Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => The Imperial Family => Topic started by: Grand_Duke_Alexei on November 14, 2004, 03:11:04 PM

Title: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand_Duke_Alexei on November 14, 2004, 03:11:04 PM
I can never pronounce anything right, does anyone know how to pronounce the following words?

Mme

Alexandrovna

Pavlovna

Petrograd

Vyrubova

Feodorovna

Hesse

Hohenzollern

Ural Mountains (just Ural, I can pronounce mountains ::))

Dagmar

Constantine

Constantinovich

Kyril

Pavlovich

I'll probably add some more later.  ;)

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: LisaDavidson on November 14, 2004, 03:43:50 PM
Mme  - Mah - damn

Alexandrovna - Alek -san - drove - nah

Pavlovna - Pav - lov - nah

Petrograd - Pe - tro - grahd

Vyrubova - Veer - oo - bove - a

Feodorovna - Fee - oh - door - ov - nah

Hesse - Hess (rhymes with yes)

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: LisaDavidson on November 14, 2004, 03:45:58 PM
Hohenzollern - ho - hen - zoe - learn

Ural Mountains (just Ural, I can pronounce mountains ) Your - ahl

Dagmar - Dahl - mar

Constantine - con - stan - teen

Constantinovich = con - stand - tin - ovich

Kyril - keer - ill

Pavlovich - pav - lo -vich

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: grandduchessella on November 14, 2004, 03:47:41 PM
Quote
I can never pronounce anything right, does anyone know how to pronounce the following words?
Hohenzollern

Ural Mountains (just Ural, I can pronounce mountains ::))

Dagmar

Constantine

Constantinovich

Kyril

Pavlovich

I'll probably add some more later.  ;)



I'll do my best to make it clear (it's hard to spell out the phonetically):

Hohenzollern: hoe-en-zoll-urn
Dagmar: Dag-marr
Constantine: kon-stan-teen (I've also heard kon-stan-tine)
Constantinovich: kon-stan-tin-oh-vich
Kyril: keer-ill
Pavlovich: pav-low-vich



Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga on November 14, 2004, 11:19:46 PM
Alexandrovna Ah-lyek-sahn-drov-nah.

Pavlovna  Pahv-lov-nah.

Petrograd  Pyet-ro-grat.

Vyrubova  Vi (like the i in bit)-roo-bova.

Feodorovna  Fyo-dor-ov-nah.

Ural  OO-rahl.

Constantine  Kon-stahn-teen.

Constantinovich  Kon-stahn-teen-o-veech.

Kyril  Kee-reel

Pavlovich  Pahv-lo-veech.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Lisa on November 17, 2004, 12:23:28 PM
Mme= Madame
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alexa on November 17, 2004, 02:03:36 PM
Quote
Mme= Madame


I know it's been a long time since I took HS French, but I thought "Mme" was mademoiselle.

Alexa
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on November 17, 2004, 02:08:27 PM
Mlle = Mademoiselle.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alexa on November 17, 2004, 02:14:36 PM
Quote
Mlle = Mademoiselle.


See, I knew there was a reason I got booted from French Honors my Junior year.  ::) ;D

Alexa
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Annie on November 17, 2004, 04:44:58 PM
Quote

Vyrubova - Veer - oo - bove - a
 

Hesse - Hess (rhymes with yes)
 


Thanks, I always see Anna V.'s name as 'vurbova' so I got the extra syllable now!

And Hess, all these years I thought it was Hessy. There was an old woman who lived near my Grandmother and her last name was Hesse and everyone called her Mrs. Hessy, and she never said it was wrong. Silly Americans!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on November 17, 2004, 04:51:42 PM
Actually, in German, Hesse is pronounced "Hess'-uh" stress on first syllable.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 18, 2004, 01:18:51 PM
Quote
I can never pronounce anything right, does anyone know how to pronounce the following words?

Mme

Alexandrovna

Pavlovna

Petrograd

Vyrubova

Feodorovna

Hesse

Hohenzollern

Ural Mountains (just Ural, I can pronounce mountains ::))

Dagmar

Constantine

Constantinovich

Kyril

Pavlovich


OK, it seems that I have a lot of work to do here. A major part of pronouncing a name correctly is to stress the right syllable which nobody has dealt with yet.
By the way Grand_Duke, do you want the English pronunciation or the Russian pronunciation?
Anyways, let's see:
Mme=ma-DAHM

Alexandrovna=a-lyek-SAHN-druv-nuh

Pavlovna=PAHV-lov-nuh

Petrograd=pyetr-uh-GRAHD

Vyrubova=VIY-roo-buh-vuh

Feodorovna=FYO-duh-ruv-nuh

Hesse=HES-suh  like Mess sir(This is a German name)

Hohenzollern=HO-hun-tso-learn

Ural =You-rul (in English), oo-RAHL (in Russian)

Dagmar=(this one I am not 100% sure. I looked it up. Apparently in German it is pronounced dag-marr,  and in Danish dow-mer. I don't know which syllable is stressed).

Constantine=CON-stun-teen (in English), kan-stan-TEEN (in Russian)

Constantinovich=kan-stan-TEEN-uh-vich

Kyril=kee-REEL

Pavlovich=PAHV-luh-vich
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Elisabeth on November 18, 2004, 03:19:08 PM
Johnny, thanks for your list. I've always thought the stresses in Russian one of the most difficult aspects of learning that language. (Only one syllable per word is stressed in Russian - unlike in English, where you have primary, secondary, even tertiary stresses - in Russian you just have to memorize each stress, although as you go along you discover certain recurring patterns, in verbs for example.) Anyway, great list, I'm sure it will be of tremendous help to all of us who are non-native speakers.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Val289 on November 18, 2004, 10:48:47 PM
Thanks everyone for posting.  It's always good to know the proper pronunciations for places, people and things :D  - esp. for us who only speak one language that isn't Russian !
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on November 19, 2004, 11:03:40 AM
and BTW, the word is
proNUNciation
NOT proNOUNciation.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga on November 19, 2004, 08:09:30 PM
One word I always have problems with is 'Marchioness'.  ???
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on November 19, 2004, 08:16:18 PM
Marsh-on-ness
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 20, 2004, 05:37:04 PM
I checked with my German friend. He says "Dagmar" in German is pronounced as I showed above with the stress on the first syllable. So it's pronounced something like "DAHG-mar". Hopefully someday I can check it with a Dane for the Danish pronunciation.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand_Duke_Alexei on November 23, 2004, 02:51:15 PM
Thanks for posting everybody, I have found more words that I still cannot prononce.

Schleswig

Holstein

Sonderburg

Glucksburg

Copenhagen

Lili Dehn

Hellenes

Xenia

Bolshevik

Livadia

Efimovich

Militza

Montenegro

Michaelovich

Wulfert

Irina

Koulikovsky

Gilliard

Buxhoeveden (excuse me if I spelled it wrong)

Marlborough

Hvidore

Sergievich

Tanieff

Illinkskoe



Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on November 23, 2004, 03:04:01 PM
Schleswig = Shless'vig
 
Holstein = hole'stine
 
Sonderburg - Sond-ur-burg
 
Glucksburg - Glooks-burg (oo as in brook)
 
Copenhagen - Cope-n-hah-gen
 
Lili Dehn - Lilly Den (like where the TV is)
 
Hellenes - huh-leans
 
Xenia - either is ok: Ksenya or Zenya
 
Bolshevik - Bowl-sheh-vick
 
Livadia - Liv-ah-dyah
 
Efimovich  - Ye-fim-o-vich
 
Militza - Mih-leet-sah
 
Montenegro - Montah-nehgrow
 
Michaelovich - Mik-eye-low-vich

Wulfert - Vuhl-fuhrt
 
Irina - Eee-ree-nah
 
Koulikovsky - Cool-ih-kovski
 
Gilliard - Zhill -ee-yard
 
Buxhoeveden - Bucks-hoe-veh-dun
 
Marlborough - Marlboro like the cigarettes.
 
Hvidore - Vuh(as in just)-dear
 
Sergievich - Sehr-gay-vich
 
Tanieff - Tahn-ay-ev
 
Illinkskoe - Ill-in-skoyeh
 
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 23, 2004, 05:24:59 PM
Quote
Schleswig = Shless'vig
 
Holstein = hole'stine
 
Gilliard - Zhill -ee-yard
 

Of course in Germany it's pronounced Hol-shtahyn.
ForumAd, are you sure that the "d" in Gilliard is pronounced. I don't know much French but I would say it's pronounced "Zhill-ee-yahr".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on November 23, 2004, 06:27:08 PM
the 'd' is pronounced, but very softly. It should not be a 'hard d' like dog.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga on November 23, 2004, 08:58:11 PM
Xenia Zina or the proper Russian, K-syen-yah.

Bolshevik  BAL-she-veek.

Livadia  Lee-VAH-dee-yah.

Efimovich  Ye-FEEM-un-veech.

Michaelovich  Mee-HEIL-uh-veech.

Irina  Ee-REE-nah.

Koulikovsky  Koo-lee-KOV-ski.

Marlborough  Marl-bruh.

Sergievich  Ser-GHEY-veech.

Tanieff  TAHN-ye-yev.

Illinkskoe  Eel-een-skuh-yeh.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand_Duke_Alexei on November 24, 2004, 08:01:30 PM
Thanks everyone, this is one that I don't think that I have ever pronunced right.  Faberge, I have always prounced it FAB-ERR-GEIR.  Is that right?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga on November 25, 2004, 12:25:15 AM
Fab-er-zhay. Or the Russian, Fahb-yer-zhe.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on November 25, 2004, 07:46:03 PM
Copenhagen in Danish sounds a bit like "Kurb'n-hey-in."

I've seen Buxhoeveden written as Bugsgevden, which I guess is the Russian version of the name. It would be pronounced "Boogz-gev-(hard g)-den".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Michelle on November 25, 2004, 09:46:22 PM
How does one pronounce "Ai-Todor?"  Sandro and Xenia's estate in the Crimea?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on November 25, 2004, 10:33:07 PM
Aye-tah-door (as in the room divider)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Michelle on November 25, 2004, 10:35:20 PM
Thank you. :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Agneschen on November 27, 2004, 07:11:10 PM
Johnny you are right "Gilliard" is a French name and therefore the "d" in the end is not pronounced at all.  The stress falls on the last syllable ; zhi lyar
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 28, 2004, 04:34:34 PM
If by "Tanieff" you mean Taneyev (Anna Vyrubova's family name) that is pronounced "ta-NYE-yef". You can trust me on that one. He is a world famous composer.  I remember mispronouncing his name often until I was corrected by a Russian woman.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Maria_Romanov_fan on November 28, 2004, 04:48:37 PM
Sorry all, this is very sad...
I can never pronounce "Nicholaievna"
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on November 28, 2004, 04:54:48 PM
Nee- koh-la-yev-nah, or a bit faster: Nee-koh-lahv-nah.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dashkova on November 28, 2004, 09:04:27 PM
Quote
Nee- koh-la-yev-nah, or a bit faster: Nee-koh-lahv-nah.


That's interesting.  In my own studies of Ryccki yazik, and from my close Russian relatives, it is pronounced:

Nick-oh-LIVE-nah.

(that's LIVE as in: "LIVE from Radio City Music Hall..." ;) )
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand_Duke_Alexei on November 29, 2004, 07:39:41 AM
Quote

That's interesting.  In my own studies of Ryccki yazik, and from my close Russian relatives, it is pronounced:

Nick-oh-LIVE-nah.

(that's LIVE as in: "LIVE from Radio City Music Hall..." ;) )


I am pretty sure that it is pronunced like this.

Nick-oh-ly-en-ah
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga on November 29, 2004, 08:40:32 AM
Quote
I am pretty sure that it is pronunced like this.

Nick-oh-ly-en-ah


Then where does the v sound go?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 29, 2004, 09:15:18 AM
OK, let's not fight over it.
It may sound like "Live from Broadway" when it's uttered quickly, but it is actually:
nee-ka-LAh-yev-na.
It will help to keep in mind that in Russian all non-stressed "O"s sound like "Ah" or "uh" depending on their position relative to the stressed syllable. A good example is the Russian word for good or well, "khorosho". The accent is on the last "o", so the first o sounds like uh and as it gets closer to the stressed syllable it sounds like ah and the last vowel is a clear oh. It sounds something like "khuh-rah-shoh".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 29, 2004, 09:25:57 AM
Quote
I've seen Buxhoeveden written as Bugsgevden, which I guess is the Russian version of the name. It would be pronounced "Boogz-gev-(hard g)-den".

Georgiy's Russian pronunciation of Buxhoeveden sounds correct. But, since it's a German name the"oe" bit is really an o-umlaut (an o with two dotts on top) which sounds like the vowel in the second syllable of the french word mon-sieur (something like "yuo").
So in German it will sound like Books-hyov-den.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 29, 2004, 09:37:05 AM
I just checked it on a website of German and Austrian nobility last names. Buxhoeveden's German spelling is BUXHÖWDEN (notice the missing e between W and D).
W in German is pronounced like a v.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dashkova on November 29, 2004, 12:27:11 PM
Quote

I am pretty sure that it is pronunced like this.

Nick-oh-ly-en-ah


Just to be absolutely certain before I posted, I asked a Russian with the same patronymic.  "Nick-oh-LIVE-nah"
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on November 29, 2004, 02:09:32 PM
When an "ah" and an "eh" sound are run together (as when spoken quickly), it sounds close to the English letter "I".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 29, 2004, 04:21:18 PM
Georgiy,
You are absolutely right. It sounds like the long English "I". But it is important to distinguish that it is actually two different vowels "ay' and "ye". By the way, if you ask a Russian to spell a word or to pronounce a word syllabically and slowly, s/he will pronounce all the "o"s as oh. That's because that is the natural sound of the letter. But when the word is spoken normally then all the "o"s become a's and uh's.  Just like our word "pronunciation". If a foreigner asked an American to pronounce it slowly s/he will probably hear something like prow-nun-si-ey-shun. But as we all know the normal American pronunciation of "pronunciation'" is more like prr-nun-si-yey-shun, without the o in the first syllable.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dashkova on November 29, 2004, 04:29:28 PM
Quote
When an "ah" and an "eh" sound are run together (as when spoken quickly), it sounds close to the English letter "I".


Well, I can't see any reason to speak it slowly, so if it's being pronounced the way Russians *speak*, then it *sounds* like Nick-oh-LIVE-nah. And since pronunciation has to do with speech, how something is spoken is what counts in this case.

I mean, come on...look at the English word: "Worchestershire." If it were pronounced gramatically correct, based on the spelling, one would be the object of ridicule.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on November 29, 2004, 04:50:44 PM
I think it would depend on who was speaking and why. After all, in different situations we adjust the way we speak - for example, if I were to meet the Queen I would speak differently than with say my work colleagues. I think if the GDs were being formally announced their names would have been pronounced carefully, but if someone was talking about them or addressing them informally the sounds would be glided together, which is the case in any language.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand_Duke_Alexei on November 29, 2004, 05:21:32 PM
Quote

Just to be absolutely certain before I posted, I asked a Russian with the same patronymic.  "Nick-oh-LIVE-nah"


Okay Dashkova, I am sorry for contradicting you without re-checking my resources.  Your phonetics do seem like they are right.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dashkova on November 29, 2004, 05:36:27 PM
Well Alexei, here's more to confuse us both! I just asked a couple other people (Russians, that is) who BOTH pronounced it "Nick-oh-LIE-yevnah"...much to the consternation of an actual "Nickolaievna" (who says she's LIVE-nah) in their presence!
Hmph!
Who knows?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on November 29, 2004, 05:46:25 PM
That's what I'm saying - both are correct, it is just that one is said more carefully than the other. It's just a difference of ennunciation, and perhaps personal preferance as well. Some people really run sounds together - I've heard Ekaterinburg pronounced like "Ektinboorg." for example. Or the way lots of people pronounce my country New Zealand as New Znd, but if they were taking more care with their speech would say it more like new zelind. (But we never say noo ZEEEland.)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dashkova on November 29, 2004, 05:54:27 PM
I've never heard that pronunciation of E'burg.  The natives definitely say Yeck-ah-tyer-in- BOORG.

What I hate most of all is to hear it pronounced Eeeekat-a-REEN-berg....like chalk scraped on a blackboard and ignorantly inaccurate!  >:(
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand_Duke_Alexei on November 29, 2004, 08:02:52 PM
Quote
I've never heard that pronunciation of E'burg.  The natives definitely say Yeck-ah-tyer-in- BOORG.

What I hate most of all is to hear it pronounced Eeeekat-a-REEN-berg....like chalk scraped on a blackboard and ignorantly inaccurate!  >:(


Lol Dashkova, screeeeeeeeeeeeeeech.  :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga on November 30, 2004, 12:12:32 AM
Quote
Or the way lots of people pronounce my country New Zealand as New Znd, but if they were taking more care with their speech would say it more like new zelind. (But we never say noo ZEEEland.)


I'm one of those Australians who says Nyooo Zeeeeeeeeland.  ;D Feesh and cheeps as opposed to fush and chups.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dashkova on November 30, 2004, 12:32:29 AM
Quote

I'm one of those Australians who says Nyooo Zeeeeeeeeland.  ;D Feesh and cheeps as opposed to fush and chups.


LOL! I remember it well (Aussies -- PLEASE Americans it's with a Z not and S! -- and Kiwis).
I've heard many say: NZed for Noo Ziland (last word spoken rapidly) :)
Where are you guys from, anyway?  I lived in Perth in OZ (Subiaco to be exact) and in NZ in Christchurch and Hamilton.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga on November 30, 2004, 01:30:48 AM
My papa is from Christchurch. I'm in the Southern suburbs.

*Olga sits and hopes no weird stalker people lurk around here*  ;D
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on November 30, 2004, 01:25:31 PM
And I'm from Auckland.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on November 30, 2004, 05:02:09 PM
Quote
Well, I can't see any reason to speak it slowly, so if it's being pronounced the way Russians *speak*, then it *sounds* like Nick-oh-LIVE-nah. And since pronunciation has to do with speech, how something is spoken is what counts in this case.

That poor word has five syllables not four. Besides, whatever the verdict on the "LIVE" bit, the fact still remains that the second syllable is not an "oh" but an "ah", unless spoken slowly which you yourself agree is not the normal way of pronouncing things.
By the way, if you heard my aunt say Tchaikovsky or Prokofieff you would certainly not recognize either. She pronounces them like chuh-KUOF-skyee and prrah-KOH-fyif. Needless to say she is one 100% made in Russia.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kostya on November 30, 2004, 08:19:17 PM
There is a good site with names in Russian and how to pronounce it.  both in male and female pronounciations and nicknames.

http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Track/7635/names.html

i hope it has not been posted already.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alicky1872 on December 20, 2004, 07:49:29 PM
Like most Americans, I pronounce their last name as

"Romin-ov"

I've noticed that in most British documentaries, they pronounce it

"Ro mann off"

What's the correct way?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dashkova on December 20, 2004, 08:39:03 PM
In Russian, it is pronounced:  Roh-MAHN-off.  Any other way, at least in Russian, is incorrect.  It is also a *very* common surname of the nonroyal variety.

Oh, and Roh-MAHN-o-vah for the ladies ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sarushka on June 04, 2005, 04:57:38 PM
Ok, gang, this might start some sort of monsterous debate (or rampant speculation that I'm a nincompoop), but I'd like to know -- just where do Russian speakers put the emphasis in "Romanov"?

Here in the states, I hear it mostly pronounced "ROmanov" with the emphasis on the first syllable. Myself, I tend to favor "roMANov" with the emphasis in the middle. Am I correct or just affected?  ;) (My college Russian classes didn't cover this -- can you imagine? But I can ask for directions to the restroom like a pro!)
Sm

ps: come to think of it, why am I specifying the Russian pronunciation when we're discussing a bilingual family??
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Lanie on June 04, 2005, 05:06:44 PM
Roh-MAH-nov, I think.  For the female members of the family, Roh-MAH-nov-a.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Angie_H on June 04, 2005, 05:26:38 PM
I have always wonder about the pronunciation of middle names.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: nerdycool on June 04, 2005, 05:28:19 PM
That's a good question, and one I've asked myself many times ever since I watched "Russia: Land of the Tsars" on the History channel a while back, where they pronounced it ro-MAH-nov. I tend to want to pronounce it RO-manov, but the other way kind of just rolls off the tongue, so I might change the way I pronounce it. I'll be curious to see how it is in Russia.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sarushka on June 06, 2005, 08:24:28 AM
According to the handy guide in the back of THE LAST DIARY OF TSARITSA ALEXANDRA, in Russian, the stress falls in the middle of the word:
roMANov

If there's any other name you're curious about, I'm happy to look it up -- they've got answers for anybody Alix mentioned in her diary beginning in January 1918.

FYI: the cook's name is pronounced khariTONov.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Elizabeth on June 06, 2005, 02:08:22 PM
Well, then, I've pronounced it WRONG for the past 30+ years (and here I thought my Russian history professor was pronouncing it that way  - the right way! - because he was from the New England area).   ;D

Seriously, it took me until I started taking Russian history classes in college that I knew how to pronounce the majority of the names that I had been seeing/reading for years -

Pobedonostev - Poe - bed - oh - no - stev - and Witte - Vit - tah  (the "w" is pronounced as a "V") - were the trickiest.  Also, Stolypin - Stoll - ee - pin.

AND, I didn't realize I was pronouncing Rasputin's name wrong (you would think THAT wouldn't be a hard one).  until I heard Robert Massie pronounce it.  (I was pronouncing it "Ras - pew - tin")

The way I remember it now is to just think of Vladimir Putin (Poo - tin) and put the "Ras" in front of it.

E-
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tsaritsa on June 06, 2005, 03:51:22 PM
I've pronounced it wrong for nearly as many years, Elizabeth.  So don't feel bad.

Thank goodness I got Rasputin correct.   8)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Daniel Briere on June 06, 2005, 10:41:24 PM
In many cases, the stress does fall in the middle of the word, but there are a number of exceptions, such as IvaNOV, GorbaCHEV (sounds like GorbaCHOV), PoPOV, YAkovlev, STOrozhev, etc. Another name that is commonly mispronounced is Anastasia’s. Not « A-na-STAY-zhya » (which drives me nuts!) but A-na-sta-SI-a (sound like A-nas-sta-SSY-ah). It takes a while to get used to say « AnasstaSSYah NikoLAevna RoMAnova », or « AlyekSANdra FYOdorovna RoMAnova », but it definitely sounds more Russian!

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: RussiaSunbeam1918 on June 07, 2005, 08:34:53 PM
So how would Nickolaevitch be? on the "LA" also? :-/
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Michelle on June 07, 2005, 08:38:19 PM
I have to say that my ignorance will overcome me here and I think that "Ana-STAY-zha" and "RO-man-ov" sound better to me. ;D
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Lanie on June 07, 2005, 10:35:01 PM
Quote
So how would Nickolaevitch be? on the "LA" also? :-/


Nee-ko-lay-ee-vech I think, for Nikolaevich
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Elizabeth on June 08, 2005, 07:53:56 AM
Actually, I think it's Nick - oh - lie - oh - vich.  For Nicholas, it would have been Alex - and - row - vich.   :D

E-
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on June 08, 2005, 09:03:15 AM
"Neeko (soft on the long e) - lie - uh (very soft) - vich"
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: RussiaSunbeam1918 on June 08, 2005, 10:13:36 AM
Thanx! :D
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Daniel Briere on June 08, 2005, 10:21:51 PM
Yes, stress for Nikolaevich (or Nikolaevna) is on LA (Ni-ko-LA-ye-vich). I should add that, except on very formal occasions, many masculine patronimics tend to be abbreviated when spoken, with the “ev” (or “ov”) almost muted. Thus NikoLAevich usually sounds more like “NikoLA’yich”. It isn’t the case for the feminine patronimic though (Ni-ko-LA-ye-vna).
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: katja on August 13, 2005, 06:39:36 AM
Hi! :) I come from Poland ( invite all to us  :) ) and Polish language is similar to Russian, so it's rather easy for me :D  to pronounce these words. And I must say, that they sound very tunefully and softly. :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: AlexP on August 13, 2005, 07:11:45 AM
Quote
Hi! :) I come from Poland ( invite all to us  :) ) and Polish language is similar to Russian, so it's rather easy for me :D  to pronounce these words. And I must say, that they sound very tunefully and softly. :)


Dear Katja,

My very Russian grandmother always used to that the Polish language was the language of the Gods because it was so soft and pleasant.

Welcome.

With all of the best from Shanghai,


A.A.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: AlexP on August 13, 2005, 07:11:53 AM
Quote
Hi! :) I come from Poland ( invite all to us  :) ) and Polish language is similar to Russian, so it's rather easy for me :D  to pronounce these words. And I must say, that they sound very tunefully and softly. :)


Quote
Hi! :) I come from Poland ( invite all to us  :) ) and Polish language is similar to Russian, so it's rather easy for me :D  to pronounce these words. And I must say, that they sound very tunefully and softly. :)


Dear Katja,

My very Russian grandmother always used to that the Polish language was the language of the Gods because it was so soft and pleasant.

Welcome.

With all of the best from Shanghai,


A.A.


Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Leonid on August 13, 2005, 07:46:59 AM
In the pronunciation of Russian patronymics I was once taught that the general rule was that the 'ov' was omitted when spoken so that Pavlovna was pronounced Pahlna
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: AlexP on August 13, 2005, 08:12:10 AM
Quote
In the pronunciation of Russian patronymics I was once taught that the general rule was that the 'ov' was omitted when spoken so that Pavlovna was pronounced Pahlna


I for one would never pronounce Pavlovna "Pahlna".  Hirakushka, Belochka, ...p----a, vashu mneniuyiu....(your thoughts here).

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Belochka on August 13, 2005, 09:19:42 AM
Quote
In the pronunciation of Russian patronymics I was once taught that the general rule was that the 'ov' was omitted when spoken so that Pavlovna was pronounced Pahlna


Oh no this is definitely incorrect! If one pronounces the patronymic as you claim then the verbal sounds become not only awkward but unrefined. Each letter is pronounced "as is."

My own patronymic is Petrovna ...  


Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: katja on August 13, 2005, 04:04:11 PM
Quote


Dear Katja,

My very Russian grandmother always used to that the Polish language was the language of the Gods because it was so soft and pleasant.

Welcome.

With all of the best from Shanghai,


A.A.




Dear AlexP,

Your post gave me a great deal of pleasure, it was really, really nice... thank you. :)

But I believe that That Language must be the mixture of all languages and dialects from all over the world....don't you think?

Kind regards from katja :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: AlexP on August 13, 2005, 08:04:13 PM
Quote

Dear AlexP,

Your post gave me a great deal of pleasure, it was really, really nice... thank you. :)

But I believe that That Language must be the mixture of all languages and dialects from all over the world....don't you think?

Kind regards from katja :)


Indeed, Katja, you are surely correct.

Welcome again to this Board.

With all of the best from Shanghai,


A.A.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: lostfan on August 15, 2005, 04:12:58 PM
I know they're not exactly Romanovs, but I've always wondered how you pronounced the names of Ferdinand and Marie of Roumania's two youngest children, Ileana and Mircea?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Mechminx on October 26, 2005, 08:54:51 AM
what is the right pronounciations for Tatiana and Anastasia - in the Anglo world it seems to be Tat-ee-ahna and Anne-as-stay-shah - i knew a daughter of a Russian immigrant - she was Tatiana and pronounced it Tat-ee-ahna.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on October 26, 2005, 09:11:58 AM
These questions have been answered before, do a search of other threads.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sarushka on October 26, 2005, 09:19:08 AM
Hi, Mechminx -- welcome to the forum!

There's been lots of talk on this subject from time to time. Here's some threads already in progress:
Pronunciation (http://hydrogen.pallasweb.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=family;action=display;num=1100466664;start=)

The Real Pronunciation of Tatiana's Name (http://hydrogen.pallasweb.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=tatiana;action=display;num=1118100829;start=3#3)

ROmanov or roMANov? (http://hydrogen.pallasweb.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=family;action=display;num=1117922258;start=14#14)

If you use the search icon at the top of the page, it'll help you find discussions you're interested in, and prevent lots of folks from getting annoyed. It's always better to add to an old topic instead of starting a new one.  ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: julia.montague on October 26, 2005, 09:58:28 AM
Quote
Actually, in German, Hesse is pronounced "Hess'-uh" stress on first syllable.

In German it's called Hessen with an N !
It sounds like Mhh..
Hessen: the two E's like the A in land and you can hear the N
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: SuSu on October 27, 2005, 01:03:11 PM
I was wondering the correct pronounciation for:-

Serge / Sergei

Illinskoe

Also is Alexandra pronounced Al LEEkS andra?

Thanks very much
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: julia.montague on October 27, 2005, 03:21:26 PM
Where is the stressing in Alix?
I always say aLIX
But I have a name book which sys that it is AA-lix.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on October 27, 2005, 03:23:23 PM
Sergei is pronounced a bit like "Sir gay"
Illinskoe: Ee leens coy yeh
Aleksandra: Ah lek sahn dra
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Annushka on October 27, 2005, 04:55:08 PM
What about?

Ioann

This one has me puzzled.

Holly
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on October 27, 2005, 05:06:22 PM
Yo-ahn. It's Russian for John.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Caleb on October 27, 2005, 07:00:20 PM
I thought "Ivan" was Russian for John, at least that's what I've read.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on October 29, 2005, 02:00:16 AM
They both are. Ioann is more old-fashioned, Orthodox style that's all, more or less straight from the Greek pronunciation. Ivan is a bit more 'Russified' if you like. For example, St John of Kronstadt is Svyaty Ioann Kronshtadskiy.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: imperial angel on October 31, 2005, 12:13:45 PM
Is it true that the correct pronunciation of Anastasia's name isn't Anastasia, as is usual today but that it was Anastazia, like that?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sarushka on October 31, 2005, 12:36:38 PM
My understanding is that in Russian, it's pronounced ah-nah-stah-SEE-yuh.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: julia.montague on October 31, 2005, 12:51:38 PM
Quote
Is it true that the correct pronunciation of Anastasia's name isn't Anastasia, as is usual today but that it was Anastazia, like that?

It's not like Anastaisha (I hate this pronounciation of this beautiful name)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: imperial angel on October 31, 2005, 01:19:36 PM
I thought that was wrong, although I have always pronounced it this way-I will try to pronounce it right. My sister always pronounced it this way, and so she is right. ;) ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: lovy on January 19, 2006, 02:12:58 AM
I think the right pronounciations for Tatiana is: "Tat-ee-ahni." And I think Anastasia's pronounciation is: "An-a-stas-i."
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on January 19, 2006, 02:51:48 AM
No, the ending "ni" and "si" are not correct. The endings are "naa" and "siya". ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: marina on January 19, 2006, 06:34:00 AM
In russian, pronunciation changes according to the tonic accent : o can become a, e becomes i, ...  The last vowel of a name or word is a little bit different if it's not emphasized, you almost can't hear it. So the last /a/ in Tatiana and Anastasia and in every name finished by /a/ is a mix between /i/ and /a/.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on January 19, 2006, 07:23:57 AM
When I say "Tatiana" in Russian I hear "a" in the ending. When we begin declining a word, f.e name "Tatiana" of course you can hear "e", "oy", "i" and so on. I understand that our Russian language is quite difficult but when we speak "TatianA" we hear "a". :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: marina on January 19, 2006, 09:31:14 AM
Quote
I understand that our Russian language is quite difficult but when we speak "TatianA" we hear "a". :)


Definitely!!!!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Margarita Markovna on January 19, 2006, 09:31:55 AM
Quote
I think the right pronounciations for Tatiana is: "Tat-ee-ahni." And I think Anastasia's pronounciation is: "An-a-stas-i."


No, the 'i' ending puts the name in the genitive, I believe. ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on January 19, 2006, 01:51:11 PM
Ritka is correct.  Perhaps Lovy heard these pronunciations in a video where a Priest is commemorating them at a memorial service.  
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sainte-Claire1875 on January 19, 2006, 05:32:53 PM
With the 'i' or 'ie' endings, those are more of a French variant, as European royals were fleuent in French, as it was the court language. This explains why many people who knew the IF and wrote about them called Anastasia "Anastasie".

As far as the Russian pronunciation, Svetabel ought to know, so you can trust what Svetabel has to say. But perhaps, being an English-speaker who is learning Russian, and the way things are pronounced, I might be able to help you...

Tatiana in Russian is pronounced more with the 'ti' being very short, if I am correct, and it would be "TA-ty'Ana" It's hard to write the sound, but hopefully you get what I mean. I don't know really how I ought to explain it...Anastasia has a more short sound on the 'si' and it's less of a 'z' sound I think. I may not be right with Anastasia's name, but I'm pretty sure on Tatiana's name.

Olga's name, if you're interested, is pronounced in Russian more like Ol-GA. The 'L' is very short, almost not even there, kind of like you're saying fast, and the G has a more pronounced sound.

Hope I was not incorrect in anything, and that I explained it well enough.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on January 19, 2006, 06:31:42 PM
The 'l' in Olga is palatised making it soft. Think on the 'ny' in canyon and change it to an L and you'll come close to the correct sound. The 'Si' in Anastasia is stressed.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on January 20, 2006, 12:37:12 AM
Quote
But perhaps, being an English-speaker who is learning Russian, and the way things are pronounced, I might be able to help you...

Tatiana in Russian is pronounced more with the 'ti' being very short, if I am correct, and it would be "TA-ty'Ana" It's hard to write the sound, but hopefully you get what I mean. I don't know really how I ought to explain it...Anastasia has a more short sound on the 'si' and it's less of a 'z' sound I think. I may not be right with Anastasia's name, but I'm pretty sure on Tatiana's name.


Hope I was not incorrect in anything, and that I explained it well enough.


Your explaining is quite correct. :) Do you learn Russian? How long?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sainte-Claire1875 on January 23, 2006, 09:41:56 PM
Quote

Your explaining is quite correct. :) Do you learn Russian? How long?


Thank you. I tried my best ro explain the sounds, but it's not at all easy. I've only been learning Russian for the past year, and I'm not learning the easy way at all--I'm more or less teaching my self with translations and reading things online and in books. I have a couple books in Russian, and I learned most of the Russian alphabet by reading the Russian version of names, mostly the names of the IF. Basically I'm learning by my passion for the Russian language, which to me is the most beautiful language I've ever heard, though many people think that's strange that I think that, but it's true. I love languages anyway, and it's one of my passions... :D
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on January 24, 2006, 12:31:35 AM
Rebecca, you are really a tough person if you love Russian language! ;) I myself quite understand all the difficulties of my native language...that's why I love English! ;D
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sainte-Claire1875 on January 26, 2006, 09:04:48 PM
Quote
Rebecca, you are really a tough person if you love Russian language! ;) I myself quite understand all the difficulties of my native language...that's why I love English! ;D


Lol. Well, I'm strong enough in certain situations and that, but I don't consider myself tough at all...I am very petite, to say the least, and very 'lady-like' in my actions and my manner--more like a Victorian lady in that way. But there is something about your language which stirs something deep within me, every time I hear Russian...It moves so beautifully to me, and everyone thinks that's odd.

I've found it somewhat easy to learn for me, though language usually does come that way for me. But it's been especially easy for me to learn, despite the difficult way I am learning it. (I'll be getting a computer program eventually to learn it legitimately!) I think English is complicated, because the rules and all of that. Many people think English is harder to learn....Interesting you think of it as easier than Russian?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on January 27, 2006, 12:20:24 AM
I don't think English is easier! :) In fact all languages are difficult. But I find English very interesting, simpler that Russian sometimes and complicated awfully when one begin mixing up all these Past Perfect, Past Perfect Cont., and so on!! ;D I mean tenses of course as in Russian we have only 3 tenses!... :) I am going to improve my Emglsih as I quite understand that I am far from perfect  :(
And I wish you good luck in learning Russian :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sainte-Claire1875 on January 27, 2006, 07:15:15 PM
Thank you for the good luck! I know what you mean with everything with English--it can be quite confusing, although having it be my first language, naturally it's not like learning a second language...

And I think your English is very good--I wouldn't have known that you weren't a native speaker by your posts. They're very convincing!! ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on January 28, 2006, 04:29:50 AM
Quote

And I think your English is very good--I wouldn't have known that you weren't a native speaker by your posts. They're very convincing!! ;)


Thank you! :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Sainte-Claire1875 on January 30, 2006, 01:03:58 PM
You're welcome! :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on December 02, 2006, 11:38:08 PM
I know this was already answered, but I'm still confused over it. It seems I've been pronouncing "Livadia" wrong for three years! I want to say Live-uh-dee-a. Yet in a documentry I saw, it was pronounced, Liv-ahh-dia. It may have just been his accent, but I'm probably wrong. Exactly how is it pronounced? It seemed the previous answer could have gone both ways.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on December 03, 2006, 04:21:54 AM
I know this was already answered, but I'm still confused over it. It seems I've been pronouncing "Livadia" wrong for three years! I want to say Live-uh-dee-a. Yet in a documentry I saw, it was pronounced, Liv-ahh-dia. It may have just been his accent, but I'm probably wrong. Exactly how is it pronounced? It seemed the previous answer could have gone both ways.

In Russian that sounds just as your second variant "Liv-ahh-dia". :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on March 31, 2007, 11:52:48 PM
Thanks! Everyone is a great help!

Demidova...

Demi-doe-va?

Or...

Demi-dah-va?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on April 01, 2007, 01:47:58 AM
Thanks! Everyone is a great help!

Demidova...

Demi-doe-va?

Or...

Demi-dah-va?

"Deemi-dah-va" is correct.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on May 06, 2007, 07:39:15 PM
I don't think English is easier! :) In fact all languages are difficult. But I find English very interesting, simpler that Russian sometimes and complicated awfully when one begin mixing up all these Past Perfect, Past Perfect Cont., and so on!! ;D I mean tenses of course as in Russian we have only 3 tenses!... :) I am going to improve my Emglsih as I quite understand that I am far from perfect  :(
And I wish you good luck in learning Russian :)
Svetabel,

It's strange that most Russian speakers and all Russian textbooks say and believe that there are only 3 tenses in Russian. It is really not true.
Never forget the two big killers, that is the perfective and non-perfective aspects in Russian. They compensate for the relatively simple tense system of the Slavic languages. You may have only one past form for the two aspects, but the perfective put in the past becomes the English Past Perfect, and the non-perfective in the past becomes  Past Perfect Cont. The same goes for the Future tenses. Russian also expresses conditional and subjunctive by using the partical "by". It even gets more complicated in imperative and so on. There is almost no tense or aspect nuances in other Indo-European language that cannot be expressed one way or the other in Russian.
I find the so called only 3-tense-simple-Slavic-language system a lot harder to manage than the supposedly complicated tense system in English, Italian, Spanish or German and so on...
By the way, of the above mentioned languages I like the Spanish tense system the best, since it seems to be the one which has kept best the tense nuances of the original Indo-European language.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Taksa on May 29, 2007, 01:23:48 PM
Demi-dah-va?

why Demi-daH-va? why not just Demi-da-va??

anyway I have no problems because of being Russian. ;D
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: viv rosendahl on August 05, 2007, 11:13:17 AM
A little overdue perhaps, but
Dagmar is pronounced "Dowmar" in Danish, stressing the first syllable!
Dag-mar/Dach-mar is the German pronunciation.

As for Romanov: When I was in Russia, I heard it
pronounced as RoMAnov. However I'll probably
continue saying ROmanov like most non-Russians
seem to do!

Viv 
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Taksa on August 05, 2007, 03:50:05 PM
 viv rosendahl
OH! do non-russain speakers really say ROmanov?! it's sooo strange))

and thank you for the information about Dagmar. Ive been always  interested in its spelling))
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Katharine on September 20, 2007, 01:51:41 AM
I know the Russian pronunciation of Alexei, but I was wondering what the most acceptable Anglicized pronunciation would be.

Ah-lex-eh(hard 'a' sound), perhaps?

Or Ah-lex-ee-eh(hard 'a' sound)?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on September 27, 2007, 05:06:58 PM
I know the Russian pronunciation of Alexei, but I was wondering what the most acceptable Anglicized pronunciation would be.

Ah-lex-eh(hard 'a' sound), perhaps?

Or Ah-lex-ee-eh(hard 'a' sound)?
The most normal pronunciation is Alex+ay. Ah-lex-ey and Ah-lex-ee-ay sound too affected to me.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: LenelorMiksi on December 09, 2007, 10:23:31 AM
I know this isn't a Russian name, but could someone try to explain how to pronounce Paléologue? 
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: LisaDavidson on December 26, 2007, 11:56:42 PM
I know this isn't a Russian name, but could someone try to explain how to pronounce Paléologue? 

Just a stab, as I am not a French speaker, but I would pronounce it "pah-layo-logzh"
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: julia.montague on December 27, 2007, 04:33:42 PM
I think the end should be more like log (with a long o and the g like in garden)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: XJaseyRaeX on December 28, 2007, 01:07:53 AM
I know they're not exactly Romanovs, but I've always wondered how you pronounced the names of Ferdinand and Marie of Roumania's two youngest children, Ileana and Mircea?

I've seen in the movie Vlad that Mircea is pronounced like "meer-cha"
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Johnny on February 10, 2008, 05:01:16 PM
I think the end should be more like log (with a long o and the g like in garden)

That's right! The end should sound like the ending of all similar English words like Prologue, dialogue, etc., which are all borrowed from French to begin with. The only difference would be the stress that, in the case of Paleologue, like all French words falls on the last syllable.
Pa-lay-o-LOG!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: I am_Tatianochka on February 11, 2008, 09:35:17 AM
This was probably already asked before but...

How do you say ''Nikolaevna''? And what is the correct spelling, as I have seen it spelled a least five different ways?

Tatianochka. :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on February 11, 2008, 11:07:56 AM
"Nikoh-lie-ehvnah"

English spelling is not consistent.  Nicholaievna or Nikolaievna are the two main "correct" spellings.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: I am_Tatianochka on April 06, 2008, 02:00:52 PM
kokoschnik...How do you say this?

Bye and Thanks, Tatianochka.  :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on April 06, 2008, 02:04:15 PM
KO-KO-SHNYIK (at least I say it like it....it´s kindy hard to explain pronunciation of ny.....
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Labuanbajo on April 13, 2008, 10:49:54 AM
and just to make things a little more confusing, patronymics such as "Konstantinovich" are usually contracted and prounounced as" Konstantinich", eliiding the "ov".

However, if your butler is announcing a grand duke as he enters your drawing room, be careful that he enunciates all the syllables!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on April 21, 2008, 09:10:29 AM
What is the proper pronunciation for Yussupov? I know that I am not saying it correctly.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Labuanbajo on April 25, 2008, 06:26:41 PM
You Sue Poff with the stress on Sue
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on April 26, 2008, 03:00:47 PM
You Sue Poff with the stress on Sue

Thanks, I knew I was saying it wrong.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: daylily on May 27, 2008, 12:03:01 AM
this is my first post, and before i go further i would just like to say how wonderful a place this is...i'm an addict as i suppose most here are.  thanks to everyone for all the hard work and hundreds of hours that go into making something like this a success.

my comment is awkward, but here goes -- since this thread is about correctness, wouldn't it be a good idea to spell it correctly?  the word is not pronounciation but pronunciation.

sorry, it's been bugging me for months....

cpaciba
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dmitrieff on June 06, 2008, 02:46:50 PM
cpaciba

You might want to correct this one, then.   :P
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on September 06, 2008, 03:50:29 PM
How do you say Mikhail, someone told me it was like this mee-ha-EEL, is that correct.



Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Labuanbajo on September 13, 2008, 05:58:18 PM
the "ha" iis usually transliterated as "kha", an aspirant somewhere between a "h" and a "k" in English pronunciation/
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on September 14, 2008, 09:37:44 AM
the "ha" iis usually transliterated as "kha", an aspirant somewhere between a "h" and a "k" in English pronunciation/

Thank you, I didn't think that it was 'ha'.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: tom_romanov on September 14, 2008, 01:16:13 PM
when i first read about the Romanov's back when i was 10, i misread Olga as ogla and that's how i called her until i read it properly and i used to pronounce Tatiana as tat-tina !
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: LisaG on October 27, 2008, 02:46:46 PM
Is Tsarkoe Selo pronounced "Zar-ko Seelo"?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on October 27, 2008, 03:07:54 PM
This has been discussed many times before.  The proper Russian pronunciation is "Sars-kaya Syelo"  But here is a very soft "t" sound with the first S, and the "kaya" "a" sounds are not hard like "ah" but soft, almost a cross between "a" and "o", and the "ye" in Syelo is very soft when properly pronounced, and the final "o" is also very soft, like the O in Oscar..  Its kind of hard for English speakers to get right unless they have heard a Russian pronounce it for them.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: nena on October 27, 2008, 04:03:20 PM
In nominative, it is Tsarskoe Selo, which speaks as Tsar-ko-yeh ; Se-loh.  ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on January 15, 2009, 02:54:51 AM
As I was reading this, I find Russian more difficult for me! I'm a filipino and I have an inversatile tongue. But it's only I who's inversatile.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Selencia on January 28, 2009, 05:50:07 PM
I took Spanish and French and not for anything can I say Russian names. I can't even sound the things out.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on January 30, 2009, 02:43:41 PM
How do you pronounce Chelyabinsk?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: nena on January 30, 2009, 04:39:20 PM
Chelyabinsk is city. Ch-eliya-binsk. I think all letters you can read in way they pronouncate. Sorry, I didn't help.  :-[
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tina Laroche on January 30, 2009, 04:48:03 PM
Well, I can speak Russian (though I'm not perfect), so I don't find it hard to pronounce any of the names... though I'm not sure if I can write pronunciations like you write them in English...
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on January 30, 2009, 06:13:07 PM
Chelyabinsk is city. Ch-eliya-binsk. I think all letters you can read in way they pronouncate. Sorry, I didn't help.  :-[
Chel- ya- Bingsk..That's how I read it (",).
Anyway, binsk is read as bingsk in english, right?
Thanks nena! I'm cleared out.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 01, 2009, 12:51:24 AM
This troubles my tongue...

Dnepr and Dnepropetrovsk. Thanks in advance to whoever would help.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on February 01, 2009, 03:51:33 AM
Dnyepr :)  Dnyepropetrovsk.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 01, 2009, 04:20:24 AM
Dnyepr :)  Dnyepropetrovsk.

Thank you soo much, Ally!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on February 07, 2009, 11:04:55 AM
Ortino?

It seems simple words can be pronounced so many ways!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 08, 2009, 12:34:51 AM
Um um...

Does the pronunciation Ta-sha-na sound good?
I said this before on Tatiana's name thread and I was cleared-out her name is pronounced as Tat-ya-na.
I still call Tatiana Ta-sha-na. I really can't avoid it.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on February 08, 2009, 05:54:53 AM
You may call her as you wish, but it´s not the correct pronunciation. Tatyana is the most precise description of how the name would sound. Maybe you could watch Romanovy - Ventsenosnaya semya - there you can hear all the names in Russian.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: nena on February 08, 2009, 06:05:39 AM
Agreed, Ally. Or watch Russian documenatries, you'll hear 'Tatyana'.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 09, 2009, 03:02:09 AM
I even heard in one show a person pronounced Tatiana as tatyana.

Well, I must practice speaking it everyday so that I'll get accustomed.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 13, 2009, 12:15:42 AM
 How is Mathilde Kschessinska pronounced?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand Duchess Jennifer on February 13, 2009, 12:34:48 AM
Um um...

Does the pronunciation Ta-sha-na sound good?
I said this before on Tatiana's name thread and I was cleared-out her name is pronounced as Tat-ya-na.
I still call Tatiana Ta-sha-na. I really can't avoid it.

Ingrid Alexie, I pronounce it wrong too. I say Tat-e-anna. I keep forgeting that it's really Tat-yana.

As for your latest post, I need help with that too. It's hard for me to say her last name.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 13, 2009, 11:02:50 AM
I pronounce Mathilde as Mathil-de. I also think it's pronounced as ma-thild. The last name, no idea about that.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand Duchess Jennifer on February 13, 2009, 02:59:12 PM
I pronounce Mathilde as Mat-il-ide. I don't think it's the right pronounciation, though.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 20, 2009, 05:42:38 AM
Is Romanov in Russian really pronounced as Ro-manoff?
Where's the v sound? I found this here. I just need a clarification.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on February 20, 2009, 07:02:36 AM
Is Romanov in Russian really pronounced as Ro-manoff?
Where's the v sound? I found this here. I just need a clarification.

"V" is like "F" there as the sound is breath consolant.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 20, 2009, 08:14:06 AM
So, there's no "v" sound in Russian. Thanks for this, Svetabel.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on February 20, 2009, 12:20:17 PM
So, there's no "v" sound in Russian.

Strange conclusion! "V" does exist in Russian, I just said that in the "Romanov" case "V" sounds like "F".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 20, 2009, 06:25:22 PM
Ah...I haven't read pronunciations in Russian yet. Hmhm...Thanks again,Svetabel.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Grand Duchess Jennifer on February 20, 2009, 07:09:50 PM
Here Sarushka has kindly posted the sounds of the Russian alphabet: http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=4952.msg121794#msg121794

And here is Russian handwriting to go with it: http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/handwritten.jpg
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on February 21, 2009, 03:41:01 AM
Thanks for these info, Jenifer.
= D
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on February 25, 2009, 12:19:24 PM
EDIT: I´m sorry, I accidentally posted in the wrong thread....
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on February 25, 2009, 12:44:48 PM
how do we delete posts now?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on February 25, 2009, 01:06:15 PM
Only moderators can do that.... PLease :) ?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on February 25, 2009, 01:17:20 PM
Everyone used to be able to delete posts. I kept looking and looking for the way.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: I am_Tatianochka on March 03, 2009, 05:57:46 PM
How do you pronounce Tsarskoe Selo in russian? :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tina Laroche on March 05, 2009, 11:35:40 AM
Originally by Forum Admin, I'm just quoting him:

This has been discussed many times before.  The proper Russian pronunciation is "Sars-kaya Syelo"  But here is a very soft "t" sound with the first S, and the "kaya" "a" sounds are not hard like "ah" but soft, almost a cross between "a" and "o", and the "ye" in Syelo is very soft when properly pronounced, and the final "o" is also very soft, like the O in Oscar..  Its kind of hard for English speakers to get right unless they have heard a Russian pronounce it for them.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on March 06, 2009, 04:23:34 AM
Thanks for the quote Tina. Cheesy Hihihihi
Yes.It's really difficult for to pronounce it. I really have to remember how letters in Russian are sounded whether accented or not.
Title: Pronunciation of "Xenia"?
Post by: historyfan on March 20, 2009, 10:06:18 PM
Is it KSEN-ee-ya, or KSEN-ya?
Title: Re: Pronunciation of "Xenia"?
Post by: Grand Duchess Jennifer on March 21, 2009, 12:15:25 AM
There's already a thread on pronunciations. It's at the top of the page. :) Anyhow, Xenia is said as (according to the other thread)
 - Ksenya
 - Zenya
 - Zina
 - or K-syen-yah

I used to say it as X-ee-knee-a. I don't think that's right though. Gathering from what's stated above, I'd say it's something like K-syen-yah or Z-syen-yah. And that's probably closer to KSEN-ya. :) I could be wrong.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on March 21, 2009, 11:28:01 PM
I also pronounce it as KSEN-ya. The only trouble for me is that K sound before that s.
I pronounce K lightly in that case.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 22, 2009, 12:07:42 PM
To pronounce it Zenia is a pure nonsense. X in Russian and other languages is KS.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Janet Ashton on March 23, 2009, 08:21:12 AM
To pronounce it Zenia is a pure nonsense. X in Russian and other languages is KS.

The name transliterated as "Ksenia" is very hard for a non-Russian speaker to pronounce. The Russian grand Duchess and princess of this name would have been very accustomed to hear their name given as "Zennia" or "Zenie" (in the French style) throughout their lives. I have heard the former ("Zennia") from someone who knew Xenia Alexandrovna well in the later years of her life. It surprised me to hear it, but in those circumstances I would feel foolish in insisting on a more Russian inflection. To pronounce X as Z when a vowel follows is not uncommon in English and French - Xavier is another such name (also Xenon, though that one is hardly common!)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 23, 2009, 08:41:10 AM
I understand that, however it makes it a different name...
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on March 24, 2009, 04:45:43 AM
It is pronounced as KSYEN-ya. I saw it in my copy of Russian names last night.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on March 31, 2009, 07:19:28 PM
How do you pronounce

Uhlan?
Impyeratorskoye Velichestva?


Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: CorisCapnSkip on May 21, 2009, 04:41:51 AM
I know the Russian pronunciation of Alexei, but I was wondering what the most acceptable Anglicized pronunciation would be.

Ah-lex-eh(hard 'a' sound), perhaps?

Or Ah-lex-ee-eh(hard 'a' sound)?
The most normal pronunciation is Alex+ay. Ah-lex-ey and Ah-lex-ee-ay sound too affected to me.

Came on here to ask this after finishing watching World War II:  Behind Closed Doors.  Two people were saying Alexei (talking about different individuals, but same spelling.)  One said Ah-LEX-ee-ay and the other Ah-LEX-ee, both with the emphasis on the second syllable.  Is different pronunciations of the same name correct?  (For instance, Colin could be with a long or short o depending on the individual.)  Which way would Alexei Romanov's name be pronounced?  By the way, I never knew the Russian pronunciation of Anastasia until I saw the Unsolved Mysteries segment in which a Russian, a relative of one of the executioners, said it.  Did Anna Anderson pronounce Anastasia correctly?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on May 21, 2009, 06:39:38 AM
I think the best way how to figure this out is to watch some Rusian movie or documentary - Romanovy: Ventsenosnaya Semya for example - and listen to the name yourself...
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: CorisCapnSkip on May 22, 2009, 02:35:38 PM
How about Maria?  Probably only two ways to pronounce that.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: tom_romanov on May 22, 2009, 04:59:51 PM
How about Maria?  Probably only two ways to pronounce that.

Two? Is it not just Marr-e-ya ?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: CorisCapnSkip on May 23, 2009, 12:10:27 AM
How about Maria?  Probably only two ways to pronounce that.

Two? Is it not just Marr-e-ya ?

Properly, yes.  The other pronunciation should be spelled "Mariah."
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: CorisCapnSkip on May 23, 2009, 12:13:17 AM
I think the best way how to figure this out is to watch some Rusian movie or documentary - Romanovy: Ventsenosnaya Semya for example - and listen to the name yourself...

Maybe someone can send a link to a YouTube video that actually mentions names.  All those I could find in either English or Russian are just music videos, except for a British news report on the discovery of the remains which pronounces the name two different ways.  I can't get the movie to play on Frozentears.org at all, even after downloading the recommended player and using Firefox as a browser.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tina Laroche on May 23, 2009, 02:08:57 AM
How about Maria?  Probably only two ways to pronounce that.

Two? Is it not just Marr-e-ya ?

Properly, yes.  The other pronunciation should be spelled "Mariah."

You mean, like we pronounce Mariah Carey's first name? No, I don't think so - or, at least I believe nobody will pronounce it like that in Russian.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: CorisCapnSkip on May 23, 2009, 05:33:48 PM
How about Maria?  Probably only two ways to pronounce that.

Two? Is it not just Marr-e-ya ?

Properly, yes.  The other pronunciation should be spelled "Mariah."

You mean, like we pronounce Mariah Carey's first name? No, I don't think so - or, at least I believe nobody will pronounce it like that in Russian.

Good, I feel better now we've got that settled, thanks.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: CorisCapnSkip on May 24, 2009, 06:27:22 AM
Well, I haven't found a source with spoken Russian yet, but someone pointed out this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep3-COpojP8 where the names are sung, as closely as I can make out (in order in song):

Nee-co-lai

Ah-lex-Sandra

Ah-lex-Syay

Mar-ee-ya

Olga

Tatyana

Ah-na-sta-see-ya

And, it is much easier to remember something if learned in song form!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on June 03, 2009, 05:12:13 AM
I'm still not understanding how to pronounce Xenia. The "KS" is throwing me off.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olgasha on June 03, 2009, 06:16:38 AM
Try to pronounce this name as -  KZENYA. Thank God, I haven't got any problems to pronounce russian names, it's just almost the same  in polish. ;-)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Georgiy on June 03, 2009, 10:40:58 PM
Take the last sound of the word "box" (i.e. the /x/ part) then add the 'eniya' part.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Olga Maria on June 11, 2009, 01:24:58 AM
It's hard to pronounce 'x' on the beginning of a word (but not that one on the case of the word xylophone).
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tina Laroche on June 11, 2009, 03:08:42 AM
It's hard to pronounce 'x' on the beginning of a word (but not that one on the case of the word xylophone).

I still think it depends of your native tongue - I have no problems with it. : )
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on June 16, 2009, 10:10:25 AM
Or you can try pronouncing XE in the same way as you do in "AleXEi".

As a Czech, I also don´t have troubles with it.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tony de Gandarillas on July 10, 2009, 12:01:28 AM
Hello,

I was wondering if someone would be kind enough to assist me with the correct pronunciation of the name of the Russian Noble House of Chavchavdze?  I thank you in advance for your time
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tony de Gandarillas on July 10, 2009, 05:02:01 PM
Also, what is the proper pronunciation of the last name of the Prima Ballerina Assoluta, Mathilde Kschessinska?  Thank you
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on November 09, 2009, 06:18:33 AM
How do you say Sigmaringen?   As in Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, I know how to say Hohenzollern as it was explained in earlier posts but I cannot say Sigmaringen correctly or rather I know I am not saying it correctly.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on November 09, 2009, 06:32:04 AM
How do you say Sigmaringen?   As in Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, I know how to say Hohenzollern as it was explained in earlier posts but I cannot say Sigmaringen correctly or rather I know I am not saying it correctly.



In Russian Sigmaringen sounds like you rerad it, only the first sound is Z.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on November 10, 2009, 11:10:44 AM
How do you say Sigmaringen?   As in Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, I know how to say Hohenzollern as it was explained in earlier posts but I cannot say Sigmaringen correctly or rather I know I am not saying it correctly.



In Russian Sigmaringen sounds like you rerad it, only the first sound is Z.

Thank you, I wasn't saying too badly then.

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: toscany on November 10, 2009, 03:55:17 PM
Also, what is the proper pronunciation of the last name of the Prima Ballerina Assoluta, Mathilde Kschessinska?  Thank you

It was mentioned up above this post, to try and pronounce,  Ks-chess-in-ska...She was actually of Polish origin.

HB
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on January 06, 2010, 02:56:24 PM
I have been pronouncing OTMA with a short O and a short A, but recently my Grandma pronounced it "oht-ma" and i'm wondering, since Olga is not pronounced with a short O, is OTMA pronounced "oht-ma"? or, going with the first letter sounds of OTMA's names, "oht-maa"? the last one sounds horrid, but is that how it is supposed to be prounoced? Or do you just say "O-T-M-A", not saying it as a word, but spelling it out?

Also, not conected with the Romanovs as far as I know, but Russian: how do you pronounce "Marya", the Russian form of Mary?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on January 06, 2010, 03:05:00 PM
Olga IS pronounced with short O. So simple short OTMA is right.

And Maria is pronounced Mariya.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on January 08, 2010, 06:22:15 PM
I don't see how Olga could be pronounced any other way than "Ohlgah"

And I did not mean Maria like Maria Nicholeivna, but "Marya", as in the character in Gloria Whelan's "Impossible Journey", which is the sequel to "Angel on the Square", a pretty much historically accurate novel about the daughter of one of Alexandra's ladies-in-waiting who makes friends with OTMA.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Ally Kumari on January 09, 2010, 04:25:12 AM
The best advice I can give you is: go and watch Romanovy - ventsenosnaya Semya. There you can hear all the names the way they are pronounced.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on January 09, 2010, 05:30:31 AM
Uhlan is oo-lahn, with stress on the second syllable.

In Sigmaringen the final g will be hard, as  there are no soft gs in German, but I'm not sure whether it is Sig-mar-ring-en or Sig-mar-ring-ghen.

Going somewhat off-topic, I once had a Chinese student whose surname was Ng, pronounced Ung.

And yes, in Britain we really do have a Marquess of Cholmondeley, pronounced Chumley.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: RHB on January 10, 2010, 06:49:33 AM
What about Romanov is it Ro-ma-noff or Ro-man-noff (like it's said on the history channel) and if it's the 2nd one how would u pronounce the female variation with the v a (Romanova) Ro-man-noff-va? Just curious! I always say the first but on Romanov Documentaries (I've seen Russia land of the Tsars) they pronounce the 2nd way so...? thanks for the info by the way!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on January 11, 2010, 02:01:11 AM
How do you say Sigmaringen?   As in Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, I know how to say Hohenzollern as it was explained in earlier posts but I cannot say Sigmaringen correctly or rather I know I am not saying it correctly.

I was intrigued too and heard from Südwestrundfunk that it's ['zɪgmaʁɪŋən], approximately SIG-mar-ing-en.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on January 22, 2010, 11:22:24 AM
With all the imperfect explanations of the pronunciation of Tsarskoe Selo around, can we try to establish a valid one in IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPA)?

My impression is that it's: ['tsarskaj sjel'o:]

Correct, or should some of the consonants be palatalyzed and shown with a [ʲ] (tiny j) next to it? All in the know, please update this attempt at a phonetic transcription.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Jessamy on January 27, 2010, 02:53:40 PM
I was reading about Grand Duke George Mikhailovich, and it said that he was known in the family as "Gogi". Any ideas how to pronounce this? Thanks
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on January 27, 2010, 05:15:02 PM
I would pronounce it "Goh-gee", but who knows?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on January 28, 2010, 02:09:30 PM
I was reading about Grand Duke George Mikhailovich, and it said that he was known in the family as "Gogi". Any ideas how to pronounce this? Thanks
I would pronounce it "Goh-gee", but who knows?

In Danish and Norwegian, Goggen or Goggi are pet forms of Georg. With the name being the same in German, and Grand Duke George's mother being German-born, I would not be surprised if it was a German-based nickname. (Just as in English, diminutives of names often end in y/i in German, e.g. Rudi and Sisi.) If it's German-derived, the pronunciation would be /go:gi:/, with the g hard and presumably both vowels long (in Norwegian both vowels in Goggi are short).

Any help with the phonetic transcription of Tsarskoe Selo above?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: nena on January 29, 2010, 06:21:35 AM
In German, I guess it would sound something like - Zarskoh - Se loh. (In German - zar + ko and seloh). I am sorry, I hope I helped.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Beautiful_Anastasia on February 27, 2010, 09:27:19 AM
How do you pronounce 'Velikye Knyaz'?
How to pronounce OTMAA's names in my opinon:
Olga [ol-gah]
Tatiana [Tat-ee-ah-nah]
Maria [Marr-ee-yah]
Anastasia [Ann-as-taz-ee-yah]
Alexei [Alek-say]
Emily x
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Beautiful_Anastasia on February 27, 2010, 09:30:02 AM
And I have always pronounced 'Nikolaevna' as [Nick-oll-eev-nah] is this wrong?
And once again, how is 'Velikye Knyaz' pronounced?
Emily x
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on March 01, 2010, 07:43:58 PM
And once again, how is 'Velikye Knyaz' pronounced?
The pronunciation of Velikiy Knyaz, Вели́кий князь, can be rendered approximately vel-EE-kiy knyahz, in English spelling. Velikiy is three syllables, knyaz is just one.
If you have a look in the preceeding pages of the thread you can find a lot of pronunciation guides to the names you mentioned.

Though, it would be absolutely great if a poster with knowledge of Russian would write the pronunciation of these words with phonetic symbols in IPA, so that we don't have to rely on the phonetically notoriously inaccurate English language and our own dialectical interpretations of its orthography. See my post above Tsarskoe Selo ( ['tsarskaj sjel'o:] ?) above.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on April 10, 2010, 01:34:23 PM
In some places when I read about the Romanovs, for the females after their names it is spelled, Romanova, how do you say, Romanova ?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on April 10, 2010, 02:44:43 PM
In some places when I read about the Romanovs, for the females after their names it is spelled, Romanova, how do you say, Romanova ?

[rʌˈmanəfə] or [rʌˈmanəvə]? Anyways stress on the second syllable, just as in the male form Romanov, [rʌˈmanəf].
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Svetabel on April 12, 2010, 01:43:53 AM
In some places when I read about the Romanovs, for the females after their names it is spelled, Romanova, how do you say, Romanova ?

[rʌˈmanəvə]?

Yes, sound V, not F.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: RHB on April 12, 2010, 03:50:14 PM
so that would be row-ma-no-va or ro-man-off with a v-a which ro-man-off-a (only the off is like ovv)? still can't seem to grasp it perhaps
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on April 12, 2010, 09:42:47 PM
Thanks, Svetabel.

so that would be row-ma-no-va or ro-man-off with a v-a which ro-man-off-a (only the off is like ovv)? still can't seem to grasp it perhaps

I urge you and all others to use the International Phonetic Alphabet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet) in order to escape the linguistic prison which the English sound system is.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on April 17, 2010, 10:33:02 PM
Quote
Actually, in German, Hesse is pronounced "Hess'-uh" stress on first syllable.
In German it's called Hessen with an N !

But in Hessian it's Hesse, pronounced [ˈhɛsɛ] :-)
In Standard German it's of course [ˈhɛsən].

It's the same with another Grand Duchy: Bade in Alemannic and Baden in Standard German.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on April 20, 2010, 11:51:11 AM
Out of curiosity, does anyone know how Dnieper is pronounced?  Is the D silent?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on April 20, 2010, 01:54:21 PM
Out of curiosity, does anyone know how Dnieper is pronounced?  Is the D silent?
Yes, in the English pronunciation:
English Dnieper, pronounced /ˈniːpər/
Russian: Днепр, Dnepr, pronounced [dnʲɛpr]
Belarusian: Дняпро, Dniapro, pronounced [dnʲaˈpro]
Ukrainian: Днiпро, Dnipro, pronounced [dnʲiˈpro]
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on April 20, 2010, 04:23:35 PM
Thanks for the info :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on April 21, 2010, 01:42:34 PM
So I'm guessing we'd say it like "nepper" or "nipper"?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on April 21, 2010, 03:23:15 PM
So I'm guessing we'd say it like "nepper" or "nipper"?

No, /ˈniːpər/ = Neeper. A colon after a vowel ([i:]) indicates a long vowel in phonetic script.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: BarefootContessa on May 01, 2010, 02:29:17 AM
What about Gottorp?  Short o?  Long o?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 01, 2010, 05:03:53 PM
What about Gottorp?  Short o?  Long o?

It's ['gɔtɔʁp]; so yes, short o.

Note that "Gottorp" is the native Low German and Danish form (used in most foreign languages), in standard High German it's "Gottorf".
And that contrary to what many English-speakers would presume, I guess, is the fact that the location of Gottorp Castle, the town of Schleswig / Sleswig / Slesvig, is pronounced with a long /e:/ in both High German, Low German and Danish. 
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dust_of_History on May 01, 2010, 07:03:55 PM
I'm living near Schleswig and I also pronounce it "Gottorf" with a short o.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MarshallHowell on May 01, 2010, 09:02:09 PM
Coty, as in the perfumes, is it pronounced (K-ah-tt-ee) or (K-oh-tt-ee)?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dust_of_History on May 02, 2010, 10:53:32 AM
I would say it's "K-oh-tt-ee" with a short "oh".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MarshallHowell on May 02, 2010, 11:01:59 AM
Thanks.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 02, 2010, 11:34:07 AM
I'm living near Schleswig and I also pronounce it "Gottorf" with a short o.

Funny that you who live there say Gottorf, while all we foreigners say Gottorp!

In phonectic script Coty is [kɔti]. So the o is the same as in Gottorp.

In English, vowel length is very important, and syllabic stress is very distinctive in both English and Russian. French has very little of that, so both vowels and syllables are pronounced equally evenly.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 02, 2010, 01:00:12 PM
And once again, how is 'Velikiy Knyaz' pronounced?

In phonetic script: [vʲɪˈlʲikʲij knjaz]
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 02, 2010, 05:28:02 PM
Leuchtenberg (semi-royal French-Bavarian-Russian ducal dynasty) really is a name with a lot of different pronunciations!

The original German prounciation is of course ['lɔɪ̯çtənbɛrk]. The Russians write it Лейхтенберг and thus pronounce it /leixtenberg/.
How do the French pronounce it? /lœʃtenberg/?

Today I heard yet another pronunciation. In a TV interview about the restored and re-opened Oscarshall Castle in Oslo, which was built by King Oscar I and Queen Josephine of Leuchtenberg, Queen Sonja pronounced her predecessor's "last name" as /'leiktenberg/!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dust_of_History on May 03, 2010, 10:42:40 AM
I'm living near Schleswig and I also pronounce it "Gottorf" with a short o.

Funny that you who live there say Gottorf, while all we foreigners say Gottorp!

Maybe that's because in old German spelling "ph" was pronounced like "f". The official web page is also using "Gottorf": http://www.schloss-gottorf.de/ (there is a mistake: it should be "Schloss" not "Schloß").  
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 05, 2010, 10:07:49 AM
Maybe that's because in old German spelling "ph" was pronounced like "f".
No. it's because of the historic sound change known as the High German Consonant Shift, by which a Low German /p/ is /(p)f/ in High German.

Compare Low German dorp and pund (and English thorp and pound!) with High German Dorf and Pfund.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 06, 2010, 10:59:14 AM
I am curious, how do English-speakers pronounce Saxe-, as in Saxe-Coburg-Gotha? As in the original French, pluss a liaison, so that it becomes /sakse/?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on May 06, 2010, 02:43:46 PM
I think it depends whether the English speaker has learned German or not.

Having done German, I say Sakser- (I hadn't appreciated it was actually French). However, the Marquis de Saxe, as a Frenchman, is Sax to my ears.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 06, 2010, 02:49:02 PM
I think it depends whether the English speaker has learned German or not.

Having done German, I say Sakser- (I hadn't appreciated it was actually French). However, the Marquis de Saxe, as a Frenchman, is Sax to my ears.

It is French. As I am sure you know, it's Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha in German. Sachse (pronounced /'sakse/) means (a) "Saxon" in German.

Well, as long as one avoids Säxy-Cowburg-Gotcha.....:-)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dust_of_History on May 06, 2010, 03:58:32 PM
Maybe that's because in old German spelling "ph" was pronounced like "f".
No. it's because of the historic sound change known as the High German Consonant Shift, by which a Low German /p/ is /(p)f/ in High German.

Compare Low German dorp and pund (and English thorp and pound!) with High German Dorf and Pfund.

Oh I see. ^^ The funny is, although I live in Northern Germany I can't speak Low German. ^^ I only know a few words. I'm surprised that the pronunciation "Gottorp" has its origins in Low German.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MarshallHowell on May 14, 2010, 10:28:24 AM
I'm reading Anna Kerenina and can't pronounce many of the names. Could someone help me with "shcherbatskaya"?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on May 14, 2010, 10:36:22 AM
On the BBC Anna Karenina series (the best adaptation in my view), it was Sherbatskya (Sher- as in sherbet, sky as in sky).

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on May 14, 2010, 02:16:50 PM
For a good insight into the consonant cluster represented by the first letter of the name Щербацкая, see Wikipedia: Shch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shcha)

BTW this is the same consonant cluster that is problematic in the surname of French queen Maria Leszczyńska, discussed in this post. (http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=6481.msg439665#msg439665)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on June 05, 2010, 09:14:10 PM
Wikipedia has a great phonetic transcritpion of Nicholas's full name in Russian: [ nʲ ɪ k ɐ ˈl a j   ə lʲ ɪ k ˈs a n d r ə vʲ ɪ ʨ   r ɐ ˈm a n ə f ]
Too bad there aren't phonetic transcriptions of AOTMAA's names.
Am I right in assuming that OTMA's patronymic is pronounced [ nʲ ɪ k ɐ ˈl a j ə v n ə ]? Or should some part of the -evna also be palatalized?

Speaking of palatalisation, it hadn't dawned on me untill now that the last sound in "tsar", царь, is actually pronounced palatalized, as [ ts a rʲ ]. But that is of course why the soft sign, ь, is there!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: nena on June 06, 2010, 12:45:03 PM
Am I right in assuming that OTMA's patronymic is pronounced [ nʲ ɪ k ɐ ˈl a j ə v n ə ]? Or should some part of the -evna also be palatalized?
The most correct pronunciation - according to what I have heard in TV documentaries and movies on them.

Quote
Speaking of palatalisation, it hadn't dawned on me untill now that the last sound in "tsar", царь, is actually pronounced palatalized, as [ ts a rʲ ]. But that is of course why the soft sign, ь, is there!

Exactly! It is soft letter that makes word sounding soft and not so loud. It is mixed with other letter while saying the word.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on June 15, 2010, 08:10:47 AM
I am curious, how do English-speakers pronounce Saxe-, as in Saxe-Coburg-Gotha? As in the original French, pluss a liaison, so that it becomes /sakse/?
I think it depends whether the English speaker has learned German or not.

Having done German, I say Sakser- (I hadn't appreciated it was actually French). However, the Marquis de Saxe, as a Frenchman, is Sax to my ears.

It is French. As I am sure you know, it's Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha in German. Sachse (pronounced /'sakse/) means (a) "Saxon" in German.

Well, as long as one avoids Säxy-Cowburg-Gotcha.....:-)

I now have it on good authority from a native French speaker that a liaison can only link a consonant to a vowel and not the other way around, and that Saxe-Cobourg-Gotha is pronounced /saks.ko.bur.go.ta/ in French. (Only in Marseillais-accented French would one read it /sak.se.co.bur.go.ta/.) And that in (Upper) Saxon, Sachsen is Sachs'n with the final n retained. (N-dropping in final -en turns out to be a very Rhenian phenomena, from Bade_ via Hesse_ to Vlaandere_!)

So I don't understand where some of the English-speaking commentators in royalty documentaries get their pronunciatioon from? Perhaps Dutch!? :-)
Does anybody know how the royals themselves pronounce(d) it?

I'm surprised that the pronunciation "Gottorp" has its origins in Low German.
Unless they are Slavic, Danish or Frisian, all place-names in Northern Germany have their origin in Saxon / Low German! That's why your state capital is called Kiel and not Keil! :-)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: toscany on June 25, 2010, 02:27:32 PM

[/quote]

I now have it on good authority from a native French speaker that a liaison can only link a consonant to a vowel and not the other way around, and that Saxe-Cobourg-Gotha is pronounced /saks.ko.bur.go.ta/ in French. (Only in Marseillais-accented French would one read it /sak.se.co.bur.go.ta/.) And that in (Upper) Saxon, Sachsen is Sachs'n with the final n retained. (N-dropping in final -en turns out to be a very Rhenian phenomena, from Bade_ via Hesse_ to Vlaandere_!)

So I don't understand where some of the English-speaking commentators in royalty documentaries get their pronunciatioon from? Perhaps Dutch!? :-)

Does anybody know how the royals themselves pronounce(d) it?
[/quote]

It sound like you have the right pronunciation covered well, FP.  If there is a Belgian or someone that still speaks high German on here, may be they would give a bit more detail.

The English speaking commentators are going to use the appropriate English translation of the names, noting a British historian - pronouncing every vowel, etc.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Beautiful_Anastasia on June 29, 2010, 06:03:41 AM
Never mind Scherbatskaya! How do you pronounce Karenina? And is it [Obb-lonn-skee] or [Obb-lonn-skI]?
Emily x
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on June 29, 2010, 09:16:18 AM
The English speaking commentators are going to use the appropriate English translation of the names, noting a British historian - pronouncing every vowel, etc.

Your statement makes no sense, as the English translation of Sachsen is Saxony and pronouncing the final e in Saxe is faux French.

Never mind Scherbatskaya! How do you pronounce Karenina? And is it [Obb-lonn-skee] or [Obb-lonn-skI]?
Emily x

Karenina:
Russian pronunciation: [kɐˈrʲenʲɪnə]
English pronunciation: [kəˈrɛnənə]
Thus stress on the second syllable in both cases.

Oblonskiy:
I presume it's pronounced something like /abl'onskʲɪ:/

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: toscany on June 29, 2010, 09:36:08 AM
The English speaking commentators are going to use the appropriate English translation of the names, noting a British historian - pronouncing every vowel, etc.

Your statement makes no sense, as the English translation of Sachsen is Saxony and pronouncing the final e in Saxe is faux French.
[\quote]

I do not see your point, FP.  English is English, German is German, and French is French.  The vocabulary, letters of the alphabet, and pronunciation of those letters are different with respect to each language spoken.

An example of English being spoken, may be with the word "aunt".  In America, people prononce it as, "Ant".  In England, "Aunt".  Both countries speak English.  England pronounces every vowel, Americans do not.

There is only one way to pronounce "Saxony" in English, however, there are many words in the English language that have more than one pronunciation.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Jessamy on June 29, 2010, 04:01:27 PM
Could anyone please tell me the pronunciation of "lapis lazuli".  Does is sound like ... Lapees La-zoo-lie, or Lapees La-zoo-lee?  Thank you.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on June 30, 2010, 01:25:56 PM
I do not see your point, FP.  English is English, German is German, and French is French.  The vocabulary, letters of the alphabet, and pronunciation of those letters are different with respect to each language spoken
(.....)
There is only one way to pronounce "Saxony" in English

Yes, but there are two ways to say Sachsen in English: Saxony (from Latin Saxonia) and Saxe (from French, with a usage restricted the Thuringian Duchies). The pronunciation of Saxe as in Saxe-Coburg-Gotha was the issue that was debated.

Quote
An example of English being spoken, may be with the word "aunt".  In America, people prononce it as, "Ant".  In England, "Aunt".  Both countries speak English.  England pronounces every vowel, Americans do not.

The word is written with two vowels, but neither the English nor the Americans pronounce two vowels or a diphtong. In most English dialects it's [ɑ:nt], in American English it's [ænt]. In both cases it's pronounced with a single vowel, a monophtong, that has equally little to do with whatever the spelling au represented in the Anglo-Norman the word and its spelling were borrowed from.

In short, a confusing example, as the relationship between spelling and pronunciation of vowels in English is very f***ed-up, to say it bluntly, like the example underneath shows:

Could anyone please tell me the pronunciation of "lapis lazuli".  Does is sound like ... Lapees La-zoo-lie, or Lapees La-zoo-lee?  Thank you.

Both forms are current: /ˈlæpɪs ˈlæzjʉlaɪ/ or /ˈlæzjʉli/.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on July 08, 2010, 03:21:33 AM
I now have it on good authority from a native French speaker that a liaison can only link a consonant to a vowel and not the other way around, and that Saxe-Cobourg-Gotha is pronounced /saks.ko.bur.go.ta/ in French.

On the other hand French tends to try to avoid three-consonant cluster like /saks.ko.bur.go.ta/.
Title: How do you pronounce this, please?
Post by: AnastasiaNikolaevna on July 27, 2010, 04:57:21 PM
Hi everyone, just a quick question.



Ever since I've come interested in the Romanovs, I've been saying the Grand Duchesses' middle name NICK-OH-LAY-VEE-NEE-YA, but when said quickly it comes out NICK OH LAY VEE NYA

Anyway, I've recently read a post saying that it's actually pronounced "NICK OH LIE EV NAH

Is this true?
Title: Re: How do you pronounce this, please?
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on July 27, 2010, 05:02:26 PM
Yes, AN. Nick-oh-lie-ev-nah is correct, at least I've hear like that so many times. In "Romanovy: A Crowned Family", they pronounce like this, and I took it as correct :)
Title: Re: How do you pronounce this, please?
Post by: AnastasiaNikolaevna on July 27, 2010, 05:13:05 PM
Thank you! I think the "ae" from the Greek spelling confused me a bit!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on July 27, 2010, 09:20:14 PM
While we're here, how is Tsarskoe Selo pronounced?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: RHB on July 27, 2010, 09:33:47 PM
I've always pronounced it Sar-co Seal-o... I could be wrong though!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on July 27, 2010, 09:40:34 PM
I always pronounced the same way.  I wonder if that's the right way.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on July 27, 2010, 09:45:58 PM
Me too! I guess it's right...
Title: Re: How do you pronounce this, please?
Post by: Belochka on July 28, 2010, 06:34:39 AM
Yes, AN. Nick-oh-lie-ev-nah is correct, at least I've hear like that so many times. In "Romanovy: A Crowned Family", they pronounce like this, and I took it as correct :)

Nick-oh-lie-yev-nah

Soften that second "e" by using the letter "y" before it.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: AnastasiaNikolaevna on July 28, 2010, 07:18:22 AM
Thank you.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: kelly88 on August 03, 2010, 09:39:43 PM
 I've never been sure of how to pronunciate these two nicknames:
Shvibzik
Alyoshka
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: RHB on August 03, 2010, 09:44:46 PM
I've never been sure of how to pronunciate these two nicknames:
Shvibzik
Alyoshka

Not sure myself on the first though i've always said Sh-ivz-bick and i could be wrong. i think the other is Al-yo-sh-ka once again could be wrong!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Beautiful_Anastasia on August 04, 2010, 05:21:36 AM
I heard the first pronounced in a movie once. "Oh, my poor little Shvybzik!" and he said it like [Shvih-bzikk]
Emily x
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Dust_of_History on August 04, 2010, 06:37:27 AM
Maybe "Shvybzik" has its origins in the German word "beschwipst" [beshvipst] which means "jolly" or "tipsy" in English. :-) But I'm not sure.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on August 06, 2010, 09:23:03 PM
While we're here, how is Tsarskoe Selo pronounced?
I've always pronounced it Sar-co Seal-o... I could be wrong though!

It's more like ['tsarskaj sʲɪel'o:], ['tsa:rskaə sʲɪe'lo:] or ['ʦarskɐje sʲɪ'ɫɔ].
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on August 22, 2010, 03:47:53 PM
Wow, it's never so bad that there isn't something good to derive from it: In tonight's news segment about Russia's nightmarish project of building a floating nuclear power plant and towing it to the Arctic Sea off Siberia, I did learn that the stretch of water where it was launched, Невa / the Neva, is pronounced /nʲe'va/ with stress on the second syllable!  
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on August 23, 2010, 08:47:00 AM
I apologize if this has been asked before how to say Yusupova. I was in the forum, in the Yusupov topic, and reading about Princess Tatiana Alexandrovna Yusupova. I cannot say Yusupova properly. Is it just Yusupov with an 'a' sound at the end?

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on August 23, 2010, 11:23:26 AM
I apologize if this has been asked before how to say Yusupova. I was in the forum, in the Yusupov topic, and reading about Princess Tatiana Alexandrovna Yusupova. I cannot say Yusupova properly. Is it just Yusupov with an 'a' sound at the end?
I think it's [ju 'su pɐ və], so stress on the second syllable.         
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: perfecciona on August 23, 2010, 01:24:39 PM
I apologize if this has been asked before how to say Yusupova. I was in the forum, in the Yusupov topic, and reading about Princess Tatiana Alexandrovna Yusupova. I cannot say Yusupova properly. Is it just Yusupov with an 'a' sound at the end?
I think it's [ju 'su pɐ və], so stress on the second syllable.         

Thank you.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on November 01, 2010, 09:52:09 AM
In the German Duden dictionary of pronunciation I finally found the correct Russian pronunciation of Tsarskoe Selo confirmed: ['ʦarskɐjɐ sʲɪ'lɔ]. In English orthography it would be something like /TSARskuyuh seeLAW/.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Tina Laroche on November 07, 2010, 08:37:12 AM
Originally by Forum Admin, I'm just quoting him:

This has been discussed many times before.  The proper Russian pronunciation is "Sars-kaya Syelo"  But here is a very soft "t" sound with the first S, and the "kaya" "a" sounds are not hard like "ah" but soft, almost a cross between "a" and "o", and the "ye" in Syelo is very soft when properly pronounced, and the final "o" is also very soft, like the O in Oscar..  Its kind of hard for English speakers to get right unless they have heard a Russian pronounce it for them.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on November 07, 2010, 11:00:32 AM
Originally by Forum Admin, I'm just quoting him:
This has been discussed many times before.  The proper Russian pronunciation is "Sars-kaya Syelo"...[..]

Tina Pavlovna, such a roundabout explanation can perhaps elucidate the pronunciation in IPA I gave above, but it says nothing about stress (so vital in Russian) and is no real substitute for a proper rendering in IPA.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: blessOTMA on November 07, 2010, 10:47:46 PM
Sometimes I wish there were audio files saying things correctly...I know I have been mispronouncing names for 40 years plus!
As Фёдор Петрович  says, where the stress is vital etc.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on June 28, 2012, 02:47:08 PM
I realize this does not really have anything to do with the Imperial Family directly, but I am wondering how to pronounce the name of the society conversation excersise Queen Victoria did with Alix when she was a young girl and teen, the cercle. Also, something else that is not directly related: Margarethe von Fabrice, Alix's lady-in-waiting. If anyone could clear this up for me I'd appreciate it greatly!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Thomas_Hesse on June 29, 2012, 11:59:19 AM
I think the "cercle" is just pronounced like the ordinary "circle" :)

As for Princess Alix's companion:
unlike the English name Margaret (Mar-gret) in the German version you pronounce the second "a" as well. The last three letters are not pronounced like the English "the" but like the first two letters of "TExt" : Mar - ga (british "a" like in MARgret - not the american one) - re (sharp "e" like the first "e" in "Ethel") - te ("TExt").

The "v" in von is like the "f" in fall

Fa (british "a") -bree-ce ("ce" like "s" - but a sharp s like in Sam)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on June 29, 2012, 04:25:25 PM
Thank you so much! I appreciate the detailed instructions a lot!
Another German surname I was wondering how to pronouce correctly is Rademacher, and also von Blumenthal. Though of course now I do know how to say von!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on June 29, 2012, 04:32:30 PM
Cercle is French for circle.  It is pronounced "Sehr-cluh"
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Thomas_Hesse on June 30, 2012, 02:12:26 AM
Thank you so much! I appreciate the detailed instructions a lot!
Another German surname I was wondering how to pronouce correctly is Rademacher, and also von Blumenthal. Though of course now I do know how to say von!

Rademacher: well the "ch" is hard to explain -  there are two ways to pronounce "ch" in German - the smooth and the hard sound. The latter is the one u need here. sounds very much as if someone is choking :) u can listen to it via this translation program if u click on the little loudspeaker button next to "machen" http://www.dict.cc/?s=machen

Ra (british "a") de (sharp like in DEborah) ma (brit.) ch er

Blumenthal: Blu (like the English "blue") men (like "MENtal") thal (like "tall")
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on July 06, 2012, 07:41:12 PM
Many thanks to both of you... :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on July 30, 2012, 09:04:18 AM
Another pronounciation question...regarding how Irene of Hesse's husband's name, Heinrich, was pronounced by the family, and also Victoria Hesse's husband, Louis. Would it have been Louie or Louis? Thank you!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on July 30, 2012, 09:16:04 AM
"Heyenrish" (with eye like in English, long I)    and Louis, not Louie. 
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Thomas_Hesse on July 31, 2012, 11:43:08 AM
Another pronounciation question...regarding how Irene of Hesse's husband's name, Heinrich, was pronounced by the family, and also Victoria Hesse's husband, Louis. Would it have been Louie or Louis? Thank you!

The easiest way: listen to this link at 0:10

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5N_0ogbImKQ

the German "ch" cannot be explained I think...  ;)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on August 01, 2012, 03:47:50 AM
I would be surprised if Louis of Battenberg were not Louie. Remember, they were all educated people.

His son, Lord Mountbatten, was frequently called Lord Louis, pronounced Louie. I knew someone (now dead), who worked with him from the 1940s and who always referred to him as Lord Louie.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on August 01, 2012, 12:58:16 PM
Also, Prince William is William Arthur Philip Louis.

Anyone who heard the wedding ceremony heard that Louis was pronounced Louie. (I know that Louis Mountbatten was Charles's favorite uncle and I think William was named for him as well as his grandfather and there is the ubiquitous Arthur. Maybe named after one of Queen Victoria's sons.)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on August 01, 2012, 01:01:55 PM
The Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn;  her 7th child.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on August 01, 2012, 03:07:55 PM
Of course. I wonder if the name Arthur had any mystical connotations with King Arthur?

Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on August 02, 2012, 01:21:23 AM
As I understand it, the Duke of Connaught was named after the Duke of Wellington, who was his godfather.

The Prince of Wales is Charles Philip Arthur George, and George VI was Albert Frederick Arthur George.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on August 02, 2012, 03:29:26 PM
Yep, that is what I meant. The ubiqutous "Arthur". The name shows up everywhere.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on August 03, 2012, 03:45:41 AM
I wonder whether the Duke of Connaught was one of George VI's godfathers.

I imagine the Queen was thinking of her father when she included Arthur George in Charles's baptismal names. Incidentally, Charles uses Arthur George Carrick as his painting name (Earl of Carrick is one of his titles).

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Romafan96 on September 30, 2012, 02:56:02 PM
If you're looking to learn the accurate pronunciations, then  I highly recommend watching the film Romanovy It was there that I learnt that 'Romanov' was actually said 'Ro-MAN-ov' - the stress being in the middle instead of RO-man-ov. The Russian language has a lot to do with stressing the right syllables, and Ro-MAN-ov sounds a lot more Russian than RO-man-ov.

There is one place that I really struggle to say and that is Tsarskoe Selo. How is that pronounced?

Also, wouldn't Maria's name have been said as MAH-ri-a instead of MER-i-a?
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: historyfan on September 30, 2012, 09:49:31 PM
I believe "Maria" is "Mah-REE-ya".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Maria the Beautiful on September 30, 2012, 11:15:55 PM
RomaFan96- For pronunciation of Tsarskoe Selo, see FA's post #143 for detailed explanation.   It would probably be very helpful for you to read through this entire thread.  We all have trouble pronouncing a lot of the Russian words and most of them have already been discussed here.    
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 01, 2012, 01:32:12 PM
When I first learned the Romanov was pronounced Ro MAN ov. I thought it sounded Italian. I don't know why but a lot of Italian names are pronounced with the accent on the second syllable like Bal DUC ci (Bal DUT chi)

However since then I have found that most three syllable Russian surnames are accented on the second syllable. It is especially annoying during the Olympic Games to hear the announcers pronouncing the names of the Russian athletes incorrectly. It has gotten better in recent years. But the ones that defeat most announcers are the female version of the male surname.

Romanova is still Ro MAN ova not Ro man OVA. It takes a while for the English speaking brain to adjust to that kind of speech, but now I find myself doing it even to names that aren't Russian. Then I have to shake my clouded head and get it right.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: historyfan on October 01, 2012, 09:21:38 PM
I still mispronounce Maria Sharapova's name. : P
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 02, 2012, 08:25:22 AM
I have noticed that some Russian athletes have either changed the pronunciation or just stopped trying to get the announcers to get it right.

I think I have heard Sharapova pronounced Shar a POVA.  I would have gone with Shar AP ova.

When I  have trouble, I think of the male version - in this instance it would Shar AP ov and then just add the "a".

I remember one time (in that other thread) asking about Alexandrovich, the patronomic.  We usually hear it as Alex AN drovich. I remember FA saying it should be Alexan DRO vich.  Roll the "r" and it sounds very very Russian.

The other interesting one is Anastasia. It should be Anasta SI a.

But that other thread does have a lot of very good information. Someone just recently asked about Xenia. It should be Ks EN ia. (There might be an apostrophe in there somewhere). I think that English authors had trouble with transliteration in some cases. That is why her monogram features a K and not an X.

Another famous one is Anna Vyr U bova  not Vyru BOVA.

But you get the point.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: rudy3 on October 02, 2012, 08:38:33 AM
I think it should be VY rubova.
The Russian Wikipedia usually has the stress marked: А́нна Алекса́ндровна Вы́рубова
 
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 02, 2012, 10:23:17 AM
Rudy - Thanks.

The fact that it is a three syllable name made me think that it should be accented on the second syllable.  I know that you speak Russian and I don't and so I thank you.

I always thought that her husband would be Vy RU bov. Is this name an exception to the general rule?

Even Medvedev. Wasn't that Med VE dev. I know that it was always pronounced differently by just about every newscaster.

Thanks
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on October 02, 2012, 11:25:06 AM
Med vy'ed ev
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 03, 2012, 07:27:31 PM
FA - Interesting.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 07, 2012, 10:55:20 AM
The Russian language can be hard for those not born into it.   I look at some of these words and names and say "huh?" a lot.  LOL!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on October 08, 2012, 02:36:43 AM
russian names are easier than Polish ones, however. We may not get the precise nuances, but it's not like all the strings of consonants in Polish.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 08, 2012, 10:19:16 AM
I have a friend who speaks Polish from childhood. He cannot make me understand the sounds that certain combinations of letters make. They are very different from English to Polish.

For example Lech Walesa is  ,lɛk vəˈwɛnsə  in English.

I asked where the "n" came from but he told me "its too hard to explain".  I don't understand the upside down small "e" or the small curvy   ɛ.

He may have just been tired of trying.  :-)

His English is perfect (with an American accent) and yet when he started school, he spoke only Polish.



Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 08, 2012, 04:13:14 PM
There is this girl who works in a bookstore a frequent.  She's from Poland, and her name is Gosia.  She tried to teach me some Polish words.  Of course, when I tried to say them, I totally butchered them!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Maria the Beautiful on October 08, 2012, 04:20:49 PM
Many years ago I worked with a guy who had a Polish last name - lots of c's, z's, y's, w's with a slight sprinkling of vowels.  No one could pronounce his name so we affectionately called him "John Alphabet".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 08, 2012, 05:29:29 PM
Growing up in the town that I did, there were many Polish as well as many Portuguese.

One Polish name is Woczyk. It is pronounced Wojack.

One year when I was working in a tax preparation office, we had a computer problem which allowed each preparer to enter the names of the clients that they had seen. However, the names could also be entered more than once (that was the glitch) and so people were being counted as being more than one client. Some were entered as many as six times depending on who did the return, who took the payment and/or who might have updated the return if more information was needed.

I was office supervisor and on April 16 my assistant and I sat with lists and lists of names and tried to sort out who had been entered more than once and why.  She asked me at one point, how I could pronounce some of the Polish names we came across. The only explanation I had was that I had gone to school in the town and I had known many of the families. I could pronounce the names only because I had grown up saying them in school.

The other language that can be difficult is French. There are many letters that are simply silent or groups of letters that make up a single sound.

My father's aunt married a man with a French last name. It was spelled Thibault. It was pronounced Teebow.

Sort of like the football quarterback Tim Tebow.

I took French in High School and I still can't get the accent marks right.  accent aigu   accent grave   accent circonflexe  accent tréma  cédille.

It must be a lot like "ph" in English which is always "f" and "gh" which is sometimes "f" and sometimes not. (ghastly) (laugh)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on October 09, 2012, 01:16:48 AM
One of the horrors at both the grammar schools I went to was dictation in French! All those endings that sounded the same but were spelt differently!

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 09, 2012, 09:20:43 AM
I love language. I love English in both the American and British version.

"We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language." Oscar Wilde, The Canterville Ghost (1887)

I often fall into the use of British phrases like "We will meet Thursday next". I usually get odd looks from my friends and I have to say "We will met next week on Thursday."

I loved to listen to William F. Buckley, Jr.

Buckley was well known for his command of language. Buckley came late to formal instruction in the English language, not learning it until he was seven years old. He had earlier learned Spanish and French. Michelle Tsai in Slate says that he spoke English with an idiosyncratic accent: something between an old-fashioned, upper class Mid-Atlantic accent, and British Received Pronunciation, with a Southern drawl.

I also liked John Simon's Paradigms Lost: Reflections on Literacy.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Rodney_G. on October 09, 2012, 04:37:06 PM
Was it Churchill who referred to the US and Great Britain  as two countries separated by a common  language? Nice.

Speaking of Russian names, the great actor Peter Ustinov pronounced his name OO steen ahv, rather than the possibly more Russian way with the stress on the second syllable. And he was a genius himself with foreign languages, knowing about a dozen. Not so very unusual(well somewhat unusual)for a trained stage actor from a European background. And he was very clever and funny.

Alixz, you might want to read some of George Orwell's essays on language. They're brilliant and insightful. He was a real language maven.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 10, 2012, 02:08:32 AM
I can usually tell when someone British writes a Fan Fiction, because they use different terms over there than we do.  For example, I remember reading a Will & Grace fan fic and knew the author was British because they wrote "To get more pills, Karen went to the chemist".  In North America, we say "pharmacist".
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on October 10, 2012, 03:25:25 AM
I was flying to America on board an American aircraft, and got rather worried when the pilot announced that we would be taking off 'momentarily'. It took me a minute or two to realise he meant 'in a moment'. To a Brit, momentarily means 'for a moment'!

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 10, 2012, 09:21:22 AM
Rodney, Actually the quote was been attributed to George Bernard Shaw, but there is no proof in his writings.

"Sometimes the inquirer asks, 'Was it Wilde or Shaw?’ The answer appears to be: both. In The Canterville Ghost (1887), Wilde wrote: ‘We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language’.  However, the 1951 Treasury of Humorous Quotations (Esar & Bentley) quotes Shaw as saying: ‘England and America are two countries separated by the same language’, but without giving a source.  The quote had earlier been attributed to Shaw in Reader’s Digest (November 1942).

Much the same idea occurred to Bertrand Russell (Saturday Evening Post, 3 June 1944): ‘It is a misfortune for Anglo-American friendship that the two countries are supposed to have a common language’, and in a radio talk prepared by Dylan Thomas shortly before his death (and published after it in The Listener, April 1954) - European writers and scholars in America were, he said, ‘up against the barrier of a common language’.

Inevitably this sort of dubious attribution has also been seen: ‘Winston Churchill said our two countries were divided by a common language’ (The Times, 26 January 1987; The European, 22 November 1991.) "


Like a lot of quotes, this has passed into urban legend.

Also: "What a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive" is often attributed to Shakespeare, but in reality was was by Sir. Walter Scott. This one is occasionally attributed to William Blake.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 10, 2012, 12:25:00 PM
Quote
I was flying to America on board an American aircraft, and got rather worried when the pilot announced that we would be taking off 'momentarily'. It took me a minute or two to realise he meant 'in a moment'. To a Brit, momentarily means 'for a moment'

Yeah, I can see why that would worry you!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 10, 2012, 01:59:51 PM
I have always thought the British way of going on Holiday is so much more happy sounding than the American going on Vacation. Vacation sounds like "I can't wait to vacate this spot".  Holiday sounds like a lot of fun.

Tim - There is also Solicitor for Lawyer - here in America we always have signs that say "No Solicitation". Doesn't quite mean the same thing. Or of course the British Barrister. (I know a lawyer here in the US who has a cat named Barr - short for Barrister. Except in the US Barr would be bar as in Roseanne.)

A spanner is a wrench.

A lorry is a truck.

The Telly instead of TV.

Flat for apartment.

But it is true that no one can truly speak a language correctly without knowing the colloquialisms. That is why in the thread about the "new" N&A movie script, I told edubs that "pretty" as in "pretty clear" is an American modifier. I had doubts as to whether or not anyone in Nicholas's 1905 court would use that phrase.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 10, 2012, 04:56:03 PM
I got a few more.


lift=elevator

loo=bathroom

fortnight=two weeks

fag=cigarette

torch=flashlight
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Alixz on October 10, 2012, 05:31:20 PM
:-)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on October 11, 2012, 04:48:52 AM
'Closets' always make me smile. Here a 'water closet' is a rather old-fashioned term for a lavatory.

In Britain we have wardrobes.

'Trunk' also confuses me. Our cars have boots. A trunk is a type of  large box for transporting clothes in, which may go in the boot.

Of course, boots are also things you wear on your feet, which may cause confusion for foreigners.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Maria the Beautiful on October 11, 2012, 06:10:46 AM
Consider the broad difference in meaning between the English word "toilet" and the French word "toilette", the first being the receptacle for (you know) and the second meaning the act of washing oneself.   Then there's the sweet smelling "eau de toilette" which, strictly translated is "water of toilet".   Oh, thank heavens I was born into an English speaking family.   What a nightmare for those learning English as a second language.   You have my sincere admiration!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Romafan96 on October 11, 2012, 10:47:47 AM
RomaFan96- For pronunciation of Tsarskoe Selo, see FA's post #143 for detailed explanation.   It would probably be very helpful for you to read through this entire thread.  We all have trouble pronouncing a lot of the Russian words and most of them have already been discussed here.    

Thank you!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 11, 2012, 01:02:27 PM
I love the term "moving house" (instead of just move).  Makes it sound like they're taking the house with them!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on October 15, 2012, 02:50:46 AM
'Moving house' makes perfect sense to me!

'Hunting' is something that causes problems. In Britain we hunt foxes on horseback with a pack of hounds. Going out with a gun is shooting.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Janet Ashton on October 15, 2012, 12:01:55 PM
In Britain we hunt foxes on horseback with a pack of hounds.

Not legally, we don't!!! (Yes, I know what you meant; but I couldn't resist the temptation....)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 15, 2012, 12:07:17 PM
Quote
'Moving house' makes perfect sense to me

Of course it would.


Quote
Not legally, we don't!!! (Yes, I know what you meant; but I couldn't resist the temptation....)

I hear now they use human volunteers to be the "fox".  Of course, said human is not killed when the chase ends.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Rodney_G. on October 15, 2012, 05:58:43 PM
Rodney, Actually the quote was been attributed to George Bernard Shaw, but there is no proof in his writings.

"Sometimes the inquirer asks, 'Was it Wilde or Shaw?’ The answer appears to be: both. In The Canterville Ghost (1887), Wilde wrote: ‘We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language’.  However, the 1951 Treasury of Humorous Quotations (Esar & Bentley) quotes Shaw as saying: ‘England and America are two countries separated by the same language’, but without giving a source.  The quote had earlier been attributed to Shaw in Reader’s Digest (November 1942).

Much the same idea occurred to Bertrand Russell (Saturday Evening Post, 3 June 1944): ‘It is a misfortune for Anglo-American friendship that the two countries are supposed to have a common language’, and in a radio talk prepared by Dylan Thomas shortly before his death (and published after it in The Listener, April 1954) - European writers and scholars in America were, he said, ‘up against the barrier of a common language’.

Inevitably this sort of dubious attribution has also been seen: ‘Winston Churchill said our two countries were divided by a common language’ (The Times, 26 January 1987; The European, 22 November 1991.) "


Like a lot of quotes, this has passed into urban legend.


I believe I stand corrected, Alixz
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Kalafrana on October 16, 2012, 03:59:03 AM
'I hear now they use human volunteers to be the "fox".'

This is called drag hunting. A fit young man drags a blanket soaked in fox urine round a route which the hounds then follow. But if the hounds starty pursuing a genuine fox it is quite legal to hunt it.

Ann
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: historyfan on October 16, 2012, 08:46:33 AM
And people *volunteer* for that "privilege"? Hm.

Sorry...way, way off topic, but I'm curious!
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Forum Admin on October 16, 2012, 10:02:22 AM
and this has what? to do with Russian pronunciation??
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: TimM on October 16, 2012, 12:07:30 PM
Quote
And people *volunteer* for that "privilege"? Hm.

Sorry...way, way off topic, but I'm curious!

They figure its more humane.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Romafan96 on November 18, 2012, 10:01:39 AM
I only found out the proper way to announce Anastasia after watching synchronised swimming. I remember hearing that the Russian duet of Anastasia Davydova and Anastasia Ermakova always had their first names pronounced as Ana-sta-SI-a. Again, that sounds more Russian than the western pronunciation of Ana-stay-zhar or Ana-star-zyhar (the latter is more American).

Despite my British ways, I think is important to pronounce someone's name the way they themselves say it out of respect to them. It takes a while to get accustomed to the Russian stresses, but once you get it you won't forget it. It also helps when it comes to learning foreign languages. I am currently teaching myself Russian for when I go and it makes it easier to get your head around the phonetics. :D

T x
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Romafan96 on November 18, 2012, 10:04:46 AM
Once again, for anyone who still struggles with saying the names I highly recommend Romanovy, as you will learn it better if you hear a native Russian saying the words.

I always used to think Ivan Trupp was said I-van Tr-upp (as in up) but it's actually said E-van Tr-oop (like troop).

You learn something new everyday! :)
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Rodney_G. on December 01, 2012, 12:10:18 PM
What about 'godoruk' ? I have more of a question about syllable stress than actual sound.
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Romafan96 on January 05, 2013, 08:01:55 AM
This site http://www.russianforfree.com/ is great for anyone who wants to learn Russian from scratch. If you devote an hour a day by the end of the week you'll well versed in simple Russian sentences. It also teaches you how to read the Cyrillic alphabet. Once you start learning the language, Russian pronunciations become much easier to get your heard around.

Tara
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on February 12, 2013, 05:59:26 PM
I have some other pronounciations that might be usefull:
Ekaterinburg Ye-ka-tyer-in-boorg from LDR

Mar Minister V.A. Sukhomlikov Sokh-om-leen-ov
LTC E.I. Miasoedov Myas-o-yed-ov  both from "The Foe Within"

Semenovsky Semionovsky Russias Military way to the west 2nd most senior guards regiment in the Rusisia Imperial army after the Preobrazhensky
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Превед on September 12, 2013, 06:18:53 PM
Good audio source for pronunciations in multiple languages: Forvo (http://www.forvo.com/search/%D0%A6%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%B5%20%D0%A1%D0%B5%D0%BB%D0%BE/).
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on September 29, 2015, 03:34:03 PM
Flipping through the book Rasputin Satyr, Saint or Satan they have prounciations of Russian words:

Borzoi bor-zoi Russian wolfhound
djipsayn gip-si-yi female gypsey
djizan dur-oc life
durak dur-oc fool
isba eez-ba peasant hut
ivrodivye ee-oo-ro-deev-ya holy idiot
muzhik moo-zheek peasant
salazki sa-laz-kee horsedrawn sled
stranik stra-neek religious mendicant
svinya sveen-ya swine
Dvina Dveena name of a river

French
Poilu Pwahl-you French infantryman
Title: Re: Pronounciation
Post by: Превед on September 30, 2015, 04:24:39 PM
Borzoi bor-zoi Russian wolfhound
djipsayn gip-si-yi female gypsey
djizan dur-oc life
durak dur-oc fool
isba eez-ba peasant hut
ivrodivye ee-oo-ro-deev-ya holy idiot
muzhik moo-zheek peasant
salazki sa-laz-kee horsedrawn sled
stranik stra-neek religious mendicant
svinya sveen-ya swine
Dvina Dveena name of a river

These pronunciations are nearly worthless as long as they don't indicate stress, which is very irregular in Russian and influences how vowels are pronounced too. (Ref. the Rómanov vs. Ramánaff discussion.) A better method nowadays is looking the word up in Google Translate and use the audio feature to listen to the pronunciation there: E.g. https://translate.google.no/#en/ru/holy%20fool (https://translate.google.no/#en/ru/holy%20fool) E.g. юрóдивый > [jʉˈrodʲɪvɨj]

Quote
French
Poilu Pwahl-you French infantryman
"Pwahl-you" for poilu indicates Russian-style palatalisation (poillou / поаю) and is thus wong. It could be rendered "pwahl-ew" to English eyes and ears, but more accurate is the international standard phonetic transscription [pwa.ly]. Or just use Forvo: http://forvo.com/search/poilu/ (http://forvo.com/search/poilu/)