Alexander Palace Forum

Books and Films about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia => Books about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia => Topic started by: Belochka on December 06, 2007, 01:24:54 AM

Title: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 06, 2007, 01:24:54 AM
To all Forum members interested in reading a new completely revised biography about Grigori Rasputin, from a Russian perspective, please click on the link provided below:

http://www.facesofrussia.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=17&Itemid=1

My intention in writing this appraisal was that it will help set aside the many rumors and misconceptions that have evolved over the decades about Rasputin and his association with the Russian Imperial  Court.

Hopefully readers will gain a more favorable impression as to who this mysterious person really was.

This discussion is being published in 3 parts in European Royal History J. beginning with the October 2007 edition, and shall become part of a much larger work which relates to my forensic and historic interpretation of the various circumstances surrounding Rasputin's demise. Hopefully this shall all mature to see the light of day if someone is willing to publish it. 

In closing I wish to express my immense appreciation to Rudy de Casseres for his fabulous ongoing contributions extended to me.

Please enjoy!

Margarita Nelipa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: blessOTMA on January 25, 2010, 12:08:50 PM
Looking forward to this one! In some ways Rasputin's death was start of the revolution

....Margarita Nelipa’s groundbreaking new book is based on a host of previously unknown Russian sources, including primary documents such as newspapers of the day and original police depositions, diaries and Duma documents all translated by the author. Extensive annotations and comprehensive appendices add academic strength to this popular history. .....
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on January 25, 2010, 01:44:15 PM
Margarita - Congratulations.  I got the "heads up" from Gilbert's and I can't wait to read your new book.

Alixz
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: nena on January 25, 2010, 02:26:52 PM
Oh, those news are great. I am really into Rasputin's story, and am really glad that one new Russian book is to be published. I adore Russian spirit of writing book, and I can't wait to see new details on regarding new sources. Especially some extracts from memories of his daughter.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 26, 2010, 01:51:11 AM
Thank you everyone for your generous comments!

You will find that my book is very different to what has appeared in print before. With the benefit of accessing key Russian documents, diaries, confidential communications and newspaper articles of the day, my book takes a medical and legal approach to reveal all the specific details that comprised the "Rasputin Delo". The police and procuratorial  investigations interconnect with the numerous political intrigues, which emerged during the latter years of the Imperial Russia. The various machinations not only involved numerous members of the Imperial Family and polite society, but the Duma representatives and the military generals.

Furthermore, I present the real forensic report (first time to be published in the West) and include all the police depositions in unabridged form in translation. There is also re-examination of the crime itself, presenting a common sense approach that shall reveal who initiated the conspiracy to murder Rasputin, why this deed was undertaken and the political ramifications after the deed was carried out. I must confess that the entire episode is rather a sordid matter that was hidden among the pages of Russian history but now has been told.

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Phil_tomaselli on May 22, 2010, 02:52:14 PM
Any news on when we will actually see the book - it's nearly the end of May?

Phil T
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Sarushka on May 22, 2010, 04:13:36 PM
You can check this page periodically for updates:

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/grb/grbpg30.html (http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/grb/grbpg30.html)
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on May 28, 2010, 03:11:15 PM
Its' a pity that the book is not sold anymore by Van Hoogstraten.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rudy3 on May 29, 2010, 01:28:50 AM
Van Hoogstraten mentions under "Upcoming Products":

Nelipa, Margarita - The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: A Conspiracy - Date Expected 09/28/2010

Rudy
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: matushka on May 29, 2010, 01:15:13 PM
Margarita, I am looking forward to read your book, but could you please specify if you used a lot of really new material, I mean not only new material for the west, in english, but also not yet published in russian? Did you research on the differents russian archives? Or did you based your research on already published material (Platonov, for instance)? Thank you for answer!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on May 30, 2010, 02:09:28 AM
Van Hoogstraten mentions under "Upcoming Products":

Nelipa, Margarita - The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: A Conspiracy - Date Expected 09/28/2010

Rudy

But Rudy, Van Hoogstraten doesn't sells the book anymore. Gilbert Royal Books, whose owner is a strange fellow, stopped his business relation with van Hoogstraten because of an argument.

And that date: nobody knows for sure if that's the correct date. Gilbert has promised more things, but never finished or finished correctly.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: markjhnstn on May 30, 2010, 04:39:28 AM
I'd like to read this book. Hopefully it will come out in the near future.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on June 02, 2010, 08:09:18 PM
Paul Gilbert is publishing the book - he has provided regular updates.  Anyone who has been around for awhile knows that delivery dates of books regularly slip.  If you are interested in the book see: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/grb/grbpg30.html

I have bought books from Paul several times and had no problems.

dca
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on June 03, 2010, 12:28:51 AM
I had constant problems with Paul Gilbert.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on June 03, 2010, 05:15:40 PM
reading this thread it is fairly obivious that you have some problems with Paul.  However, Margarita would not be working with Paul if she wasn't confident of the outcome as am I.  Paul has been careful to not take pre-orders until he is ready (see the web page I posted yesterday) and I have no reason to expect that he won't deliver the book when he (eventually) says he will.

dca
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on June 04, 2010, 12:18:07 AM
Out of personal respects for Margarita I don't want to discuss Gilbert anymore. I have my serious problems to get her book, because Gilbert don't accept any order from me.
But I personally thinks that her book will be great and I hope a Forum Member can help me to get this book.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on June 25, 2010, 07:07:55 PM
Paul Gilbert at Gilbert's Royal Books is now taking orders for the new Rasputin book.  Details can be found at: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/grb/grbpg30.html

I ordered mine today, I'll let you know when it arrives.

(not so) patiently waiting!!

dca
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on June 27, 2010, 06:58:06 PM
My book:  The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: A Conspiracy that Brought Down the Russian Empire is available for purchase from "Librairie Galignani" in Paris.

Paul Gilbert of Gilbert's Royal Book in Canada, is also accepting orders. Please see: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/grb/grbpg30.html

Thank you to all forum members who have expressed interest in my new book.

Best regards,

Margarita Nelipa   
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on June 27, 2010, 07:52:03 PM
I just got notice that the book was mailed to me yesterday!  Can't wait!

dca
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on June 27, 2010, 08:00:28 PM
I just got notice that the book was mailed to me yesterday!  Can't wait!

dca

Dear Dominic,

Great to hear! I know that you have been waiting very patiently for a very long time. Hope that all your expectations will be met favorably!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on June 29, 2010, 03:47:49 AM
The only problem I find with Paul Gilbert's site is that his shipping is exorbitant.  I have found the same exact books elsewhere for one third the shipping costs.  Everything that Paul sells is listed as "heavy".  I find that hard to believe and usually get the book from somewhere else where the shipping is more reasonable.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on June 29, 2010, 04:21:12 AM
The only problem I find with Paul Gilbert's site is that his shipping is exorbitant.  I have found the same exact books elsewhere for one third the shipping costs.  Everything that Paul sells is listed as "heavy".  I find that hard to believe and usually get the book from somewhere else where the shipping is more reasonable.

I totally agree with you. A few weeks ago I ordered 2 small books, and the shipping costs were EUR 50,-. Thats a very high amount of money for these books.
I cancelled the order by Van Hoogstraten and a day later I got an e-mail from Gilbert Royal Books why I had cancelled my order. I told why. He replied that it cost him time and money to get my books ready. And because I had cancelled he will refuse every order from Van Hoogstraten and "every order" from me.
I was shocked by this answer. I can't order anymore by Gilbert and friends and family don't use paypall or credit cards or don't want to do business after my story.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Laura_ on June 29, 2010, 04:58:03 AM
prices @ Gilbert Royal Books are crazy!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on June 29, 2010, 10:10:42 AM
I cancelled a book order from Paul once and he emailed me to ask why. I told him that the s/h was much too high.  I think it was $15 USD for a paperback book.  I believe that Amazon had the same book and the s/h was $3.50 USD.

He told me that shipping and time are expensive just as his told you.

However, he still takes my orders, but now will not let me cancel.  He told me that all orders are final.  So I am very careful of what I get from him and also I always check to be sure that I can't get the book somewhere else for less.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Sarushka on June 29, 2010, 10:25:48 AM
I agree. GRB's shipping rates always make me gulp. However, we're straying off-topic.

(Should this thread be moved to the Books forum?)
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on June 29, 2010, 10:48:29 AM
Yes - ala magic - it is now there!




Poof ! - :-)
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on June 29, 2010, 07:28:45 PM
This thread was created by me in good faith to announce my book. It was not created so that some posters can argue about Paul Gilbert's postal rates or discuss past private issues that have absolutely no relevance to this thread.

For the record, the $20 p/h charges to Canada or the U.S. for a book that weighs over 1 kg, in my estimation is more than reasonable. See: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/grb/grbpg30.html

Please do not forget that my book is also available "off shelf" from "Librairie Galignani" in Paris.


                                          Since the moderators have not seen fit to delete those recent innapropriate posts I must ask that those posters to kindly cease and desist.

If you decide to purchase and read what I have worked on for three solid years concerning Rasputin's murder and the underlying conspiracy that brought down Imperial Russia, and have any questions about the contents of my book, then I shall be very pleased to respond.

Thank you,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on June 30, 2010, 08:29:54 AM
Margarita,

Please accept my apologies.  It never occurred to me that you would be offended by the direction that this thread has taken.  However, because the book will be available from Paul Gilbert, then I do believe that everyone who wants to buy it should be aware that Paul does charge very high shipping rates.  Remember that Paul is in Canada and close to the US and his Canadian customers, not as far away as you are which would make shipping much higher to you and those "down under".

I don't know what you mean by off the shelf, but if it means what it does here in the US, then there are very few of us in North America who will be travelling to France to buy the book "off the shelf" from "Librairie Galignani" in Paris.

I don't see the comments as inappropriate, simply as additional information that buyers of your book might want to be aware of.

No one here has maligned your book or its contents in any way.  No one has maligned Paul Gilbert either, it is a fact that his shipping amounts are very high compared to other outlets.

I, for one, am still looking forward to reading what took you three years to research and write.  Knowing the scope of your knowledge and the access that you have to source materials, I am sure that this book will be well worth reading.

However, if the cost of receiving the book is not in keeping with cost of the book and/or the weight of the volume, then I might have to pass and so will many others who feel that high shipping and handling just makes the final cost of the book too much for us to handle.  Remember that a book with (for example) a cover price of $35 and a shipping price of $15 now becomes a book that costs $50 and that can be out of the question for students and others who are on tight budgets. I actually don't think that Paul has any book listed where he hasn't posted that "heavy" shipping charges may be added.

I can't count the number of times that I have passed on a book that Paul was selling because of the shipping costs.  Even his sale items, which look so good at first glance, can become very expensive when the shipping is added.  That is why I said that I will often look for the book elsewhere to find that while Paul is charging $15 USD for shipping another source may be charging $3.95 for the same exact volume.  I would wish that your book would be available from multiple outlets (and not just in France) so that we could all make informed purchases.

Again, Margarita, please be assured that we are not veering off topic in an attempt to "high jack" your thread.  And also, we are all very excited about your work and are looking forward to seeing and reading the results.

Please accept my apologies and know that we are truly excited about your work.  

Alixz

Note: 1kg equals about 2 1/2 pounds.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Forum Admin on June 30, 2010, 10:26:24 AM
First, there is nothing wrong with discussing the cost of shipping of ANY book, as it can and will impact the reasonable person's decision to purchase.  For example, If I want a book who's price is $20 US, and it turns out that it costs me $50 to have it shipped, the total price is $70 and I would probably decide not to order as now the price has more than tripled.

For the record. I went to the UK Royal Mail website to see for myself how much the actual mailing costs of a book from the UK to North America. A book of 1 kg sent by their Surface Mail costs 7 pounds UK or about $10.50 at today's current rate of exchange. If the book goes up to say 1.5 kg, the cost is 10.30 pounds or $15.00.  You can easily go here to determine in advance how much any particular weight book will cost you:

http://www.royalmail.com/portal/rm/content1?catId=400037&mediaId=400393

You may use this information to decide for yourselves if the shipping rates from the UK to North America any dealer charges you are reasonable or not as you may see fit.  This should render the discussion moot now.

FA
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on June 30, 2010, 10:14:13 PM
Margarita,

Please accept my apologies.  It never occurred to me that you would be offended by the direction that this thread has taken.
...  And also, we are all very excited about your work and are looking forward to seeing and reading the results.

Alixz

Alixz,

Your apology is accepted. Thank you for noting my concerns. I sincerely hope that you shall decide to purchase a copy of my book and let me know what your impressions are.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 05, 2010, 08:50:43 AM
My book: The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: A Conspiracy that Brought Down the Russian Empire is now available for purchase on Ebay.ca.

For further details please see:  http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260630740819&ssPageName=ADME:L:LCA:CA:1123

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on July 05, 2010, 10:54:10 AM
Your book will be a very big succes! I don't have read the book yet, but knowing a little bit of your personality you have written it with much love and detail. It will be a "must" to read your work, only taking in mind that you are the writer of this excellent work.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: LisaDavidson on July 05, 2010, 02:49:35 PM
I placed an order yesterday. The book itself is $39 and he is charging $20 for shipping to the US.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 05, 2010, 11:52:35 PM
Your book will be a very big succes! I don't have read the book yet, but knowing a little bit of your personality you have written it with much love and detail. It will be a "must" to read your work, only taking in mind that you are the writer of this excellent work.

I placed an order yesterday. The book itself is $39 and he is charging $20 for shipping to the US.

Thank you Teddy and Lisa! I look forward to your evaluations.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on July 06, 2010, 08:20:43 PM
My copy should be here any day...I'm really itching for it!

dca
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 06, 2010, 09:59:53 PM
My copy should be here any day...I'm really itching for it!

dca

Hi Dominic,

I am sure that your suffering will end very soon!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 07, 2010, 06:13:29 AM
Thank you to all those who have already purchased my book. Unfortunately I need to make a correction:

@ p 203 please delete "Mikhail Sukhotin" and insert "Sergei Sukhotin".

(Mikhail Sukhotin was Sergei's father).

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: LisaDavidson on July 07, 2010, 01:44:17 PM
Margarita, I am very much looking forward to reading your research as I have some unpublished primary source material for the DP biography Will Lee and I are now working on. Congratulations on publishing your book!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on July 07, 2010, 02:54:37 PM
DP biography? You mean Dimitri Pavlovitsj?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on July 07, 2010, 06:48:07 PM
yes, I believe Lisa is doing research for a biography of Grand Duke Dimitri
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 08, 2010, 01:14:53 AM
DP biography? You mean Dimitri Pavlovitsj?

More correctly it should read: Dmitri Pavlovich
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 08, 2010, 01:26:10 AM
Margarita, I am very much looking forward to reading your research as I have some unpublished primary source material for the DP biography Will Lee and I are now working on. Congratulations on publishing your book!

Thank you for your congratulations Lisa!

You will find that Dmitri Pavlovich who accepted his role in the conspiracy, will present in a very different manner to that previously described.

Best regards,

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: matushka on July 08, 2010, 06:33:34 AM
Just to say I order the book yesterday, as I am extremly curious about it. Unfortnetly I have to wait 8 to 12 weeks. A good exercise of patience...
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 08, 2010, 07:39:37 PM
Just to say I order the book yesterday, as I am extremly curious about it. Unfortnetly I have to wait 8 to 12 weeks. A good exercise of patience...

Спасибо Matushka!

I am sure that your patience will be rewarded.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Georgiy on July 08, 2010, 09:36:42 PM
I too am very much looking forward to this - have orderd via surface mail, so a wee bit of a wait, but good things are worth waiting for!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 10, 2010, 02:51:41 AM
I too am very much looking forward to this - have orderd via surface mail, so a wee bit of a wait, but good things are worth waiting for!

Many thanks for purchasing my book Georgiy!

I hope that your book arrives very soon and that you will enjoy reading it.

Best regards from across the "ditch",

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on July 12, 2010, 06:54:36 PM
I am holding Margarita's book in my hands (Thank you Paul Gilbert's Royal Books).  It is incredible.  The sourcing is extremely deep, she intermingles direct quotes from source documents with expert analysis and it has 8 different appendix's!

I've not read a ton yet (too busy skipping around - a bad habit, I know).  Everything I have seen in the last hour tells me that this is the MUST HAVE book of 2010.

Thanks Margarita, now to start  at the beginning.....

Yippie!

dca
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 12, 2010, 07:20:11 PM
Dear Dominic,

I am so happy that you finally received your copy of my book.

Thank you so much for posting your initial impressions.

Enjoy reading it!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 15, 2010, 10:46:32 PM
I would like to thank everyone who has purchased my book or is intending to do so. Copies are available from:

• Gilbert's Royal Books, see: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/grb/grbpg30.html and

• "Librairie Galignani" in Paris, France. 

Over the past two weeks, since the book's release, I have received numerous private messages regarding my work and to each and everyone of you I would like to publicly express my gratitude for your kind words.

If you have any questions about the contents of my book:  The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin, A Conspiracy that Brought Down the Russian Empire, please do not hesitate to ask me here on this Forum thread.

A Facebook page, which offers an additional venue to discuss my book, using the profile identity: "The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin" has been inaugurated today. Everyone is welcome!

Margarita Nelipa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: LisaDavidson on July 15, 2010, 11:53:57 PM
I have not finished reading it, but I can tell Forum Members that Margarita's book is scholarly, footnoted, and taken from many primary sources. Because of this, it is a must have for anyone who studies the history of Imperial Russia. It looks to be very good work, Margarita!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 18, 2010, 03:13:52 AM
I have not finished reading it, but I can tell Forum Members that Margarita's book is scholarly, footnoted, and taken from many primary sources. Because of this, it is a must have for anyone who studies the history of Imperial Russia. It looks to be very good work, Margarita!

I am so pleased that you are enjoying my book Lisa!

I tried very hard to bring together and personally translate many relatively untouched documents that cumulatively revealed a horrendous untold story about the conspiracy that involved the murder of an innocent man and brought down the Imperial Empire. It is my strong belief that is a story that needed to be told.

Best regards,

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Laura Mabee on July 20, 2010, 12:46:08 PM
I have not finished reading it, but I can tell Forum Members that Margarita's book is scholarly, footnoted, and taken from many primary sources. Because of this, it is a must have for anyone who studies the history of Imperial Russia. It looks to be very good work, Margarita!
Great to know! Thanks for posting this Lisa!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Helen_Azar on July 20, 2010, 12:47:10 PM
I have the book in my possession (thank you Margarita!) and although I have not had the chance to really start reading it yet, I have looked through it carefully. It promises to be a great academic tool as well as an interesting read on its own. I am pretty sure this is the most comprehensive and accurate account of the events that took place in 1916. I am looking forward to devouring it soon!  :)
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Helen_Azar on July 20, 2010, 12:51:08 PM
P.S. The Free Library of Philadelphia is very excited to have a copy added to our extensive Russian History collection, awaiting to be added to our catalog!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 20, 2010, 09:47:59 PM
P.S. The Free Library of Philadelphia is very excited to have a copy added to our extensive Russian History collection, awaiting to be added to our catalog!

I am delighted to hear this Helen. Thank you for the good news!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 24, 2010, 09:59:05 PM
Hi Forum members,

Any reviews of my book are welcome.

Thanks in advance,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on July 25, 2010, 06:59:25 PM
I am still digesting it.  The book is very dense, full of information and well written.  I find myself reading a section then reading it over again.  There are many new theories in the book that I am still thinking about.  It is so well sourced that anyone with questions can work through their issues and/or speak to Margarita on here.  It is much more then 'just' a book on the death or Rasputin - there is so much surrounding and background information in it that makes it a must have book and compelling read.  To summarize I am still working through it and will be for awhile.  The *BEST* news for me - at the end, in the writeup on Margarita, she announces that she is working on a new bio on Alexander III - I hope it is packed as densely as this book - I can't wait.

Thanks Margarita for a great read...

More to follow.

best,
dca
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Paola on July 26, 2010, 09:11:05 AM
Dear Margarita,

I  ordered your book  last week from Librarie Galignani and Iam very much looking forward to read it. And how wonderfull to know about a new bio on Alexander III.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 26, 2010, 11:23:57 PM
I am still digesting it.  The book is very dense, full of information and well written.  I find myself reading a section then reading it over again.  There are many new theories in the book that I am still thinking about.  It is so well sourced that anyone with questions can work through their issues and/or speak to Margarita on here.  It is much more then 'just' a book on the death or Rasputin - there is so much surrounding and background information in it that makes it a must have book and compelling read.  To summarize I am still working through it and will be for awhile.  The *BEST* news for me - at the end, in the writeup on Margarita, she announces that she is working on a new bio on Alexander III - I hope it is packed as densely as this book - I can't wait.

Thanks Margarita for a great read...

More to follow.

best,
dca

Dear Dominic,

Many thanks for your very generous initial report.  : )

I welcome further comments about the book and would be pleased to entertain any questions you may have, in the near future.

BTW, AIII is maturing nicely. One feature, which may interest you is that I intend to provide a comprehensive portrait of Sasha's upbringing and childhood influences that shaped his character.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 26, 2010, 11:42:55 PM
Dear Margarita,

I  ordered your book  last week from Librarie Galignani and Iam very much looking forward to read it. And how wonderfull to know about a new bio on Alexander III.

Many thanks for letting me know Paola!

I am enjoying my new research work that involves appraising AIII's life and the era in which he lived.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: ashanti01 on July 27, 2010, 12:44:08 PM
I ordered my copy this morning and I'm eager to read it.

Margarita do you know when your book on Alexander III will be completed and possibly published?

Thanks
Teresa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 28, 2010, 05:39:00 AM
I ordered my copy this morning and I'm eager to read it.

Margarita do you know when your book on Alexander III will be completed and possibly published?

Thanks
Teresa

Dear Teresa,

Many thanks for letting me know. I certainly hope that you will enjoy reading my book and perhaps take the time to offer your impressions about it in the near future. Of course not only Felix Jnr. but his mother, Zinaida Yusupova and her husband Felix Snr. feature in ways that may be quite unanticipated!

Following my last visit to Russia and the most recent visit to parts of Finland and Denmark (in May and June of this year) in relation to the proposed AIII biography, I am now bringing everything together and have begun to write. Hopefully this new endeavor should be completed by the end of 2011 (but there are no firm promises). Thank you for asking.

Best regards,

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: ashanti01 on July 28, 2010, 10:30:55 PM
Margarita,

Thanks for the update on the status on your book on Alexander III.

Once I receive your book I will be very eager to read it so I may provide my impressions of it. So far the teasers you have given have me rushing to my mailbox in hopes of finding a miraculous expedited shipped book.   

Teresa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on July 29, 2010, 05:31:21 AM
... So far the teasers you have given have me rushing to my mailbox in hopes of finding a miraculous expedited shipped book.   

Teresa

LOL  : ))
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: primrose on August 07, 2010, 08:45:57 PM
I've been checking this thread most days but surprisingly have found no reviews or comments on Margarita's book. However, I did happen upon griff's 'Alexandra Fights Back #6' thread a little while ago and was amazed to read what he has written there about it. Posts #91-#93 make fascinating reading, and his extraordinary descriptions of various passages of her book have convinced me to order a copy.

I am posting this in case others are awaiting reviews from those who have already purchased it... wait no longer but check out griff's thread, he is himself a great writer and his posts on her book should be posted here.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Helen on August 08, 2010, 04:46:04 AM
It took six weeks to be delivered, but hip, hip, hurray, I received my copy yesterday. :)

Margarita, congratulations on your book, and thank you for writing it and for all the time and effort you have put into it! You've done a great job.

My first impression is that the book is very dense, full of information, as Dominic said. Yet it is very readable, thanks to Margarita's style of writing and her clear and structured presentation of facts, factors and actors. Personally, I like her use of summarizing lists and I also appreciate the large number of quickly identifiable quotes in indented paragraphs.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on August 08, 2010, 11:39:45 AM
I've been checking this thread most days but surprisingly have found no reviews or comments on Margarita's book. However, I did happen upon griff's 'Alexandra Fights Back #6' thread a little while ago and was amazed to read what he has written there about it. Posts #91-#93 make fascinating reading, and his extraordinary descriptions of various passages of her book have convinced me to order a copy.

I am posting this in case others are awaiting reviews from those who have already purchased it... wait no longer but check out griff's thread, he is himself a great writer and his posts on her book should be posted here.

Thanks so much Primrose as I have wanted to wait a bit to post on this thread untill Margarita's book started to arrive in Europe.  Now that Helen has the book and has read it I am sure that there will be a lively discussion.  I feel that Margarita's work has elevated the discussion of Rasputin to a sound scientific level which reveals the absolute brutality of the murder.  I will gladly post my remarks on my thread here.  Thanks again primrose... and happy reading Helen.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Janet Ashton on August 08, 2010, 12:53:21 PM
Has anyone yet received the book from Galignani? I ordered it a while ago, and received a message thanking me for "reserving" it. There was nowhere on their system to enter credit details etc., and I wonder if they don't yet have their copies?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: newfan on August 09, 2010, 02:02:11 AM
I got my copy from Paul in less then a week(I am in nyc)

Cant wait to get to it but first finnishing other books
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 09, 2010, 06:11:39 AM
I've been checking this thread most days but surprisingly have found no reviews or comments on Margarita's book. However, I did happen upon griff's 'Alexandra Fights Back #6' thread a little while ago and was amazed to read what he has written there about it. Posts #91-#93 make fascinating reading, and his extraordinary descriptions of various passages of her book have convinced me to order a copy.

I am posting this in case others are awaiting reviews from those who have already purchased it... wait no longer but check out griff's thread, he is himself a great writer and his posts on her book should be posted here.

Thank you for your thoughtfulness primrose!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 09, 2010, 06:15:52 AM
It took six weeks to be delivered, but hip, hip, hurray, I received my copy yesterday. :)

Margarita, congratulations on your book, and thank you for writing it and for all the time and effort you have put into it! You've done a great job.

My first impression is that the book is very dense, full of information, as Dominic said. Yet it is very readable, thanks to Margarita's style of writing and her clear and structured presentation of facts, factors and actors. Personally, I like her use of summarizing lists and I also appreciate the large number of quickly identifiable quotes in indented paragraphs.

I am delighted that you have finally received your copy of my book Helen!

Many thanks for offering your considerate initial impressions. I look forward to your appraisal once you have had the opportunity to finish reading it.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 09, 2010, 06:20:40 AM
I've been checking this thread most days but surprisingly have found no reviews or comments on Margarita's book. However, I did happen upon griff's 'Alexandra Fights Back #6' thread a little while ago and was amazed to read what he has written there about it. Posts #91-#93 make fascinating reading, and his extraordinary descriptions of various passages of her book have convinced me to order a copy.

I am posting this in case others are awaiting reviews from those who have already purchased it... wait no longer but check out griff's thread, he is himself a great writer and his posts on her book should be posted here.

Thanks so much Primrose as I have wanted to wait a bit to post on this thread untill Margarita's book started to arrive in Europe.  Now that Helen has the book and has read it I am sure that there will be a lively discussion.  I feel that Margarita's work has elevated the discussion of Rasputin to a sound scientific level which reveals the absolute brutality of the murder.  I will gladly post my remarks on my thread here.  Thanks again primrose... and happy reading Helen.

Yes, please go ahead and add your remarks here Griff!

My best regards to you,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 09, 2010, 06:25:12 AM
Has anyone yet received the book from Galignani? I ordered it a while ago, and received a message thanking me for "reserving" it. There was nowhere on their system to enter credit details etc., and I wonder if they don't yet have their copies?

Thank you for placing your order for my book Janet. I hope that you will receive your copy soon.

Your impressions will be welcomed!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 09, 2010, 06:28:43 AM
I got my copy from Paul in less then a week(I am in nyc)

Cant wait to get to it but first finnishing other books

Thanks for purchasing my book newfan. I hope that you will find my book enjoyable!

Regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on August 09, 2010, 10:41:43 AM

Here are my remarks about Margarital's book from my thread, THe Empress Fights Back:

Margarita has accomplished a truly amazing feat.  I am now to the chapter where she examines all the data on the murder of Rasputin; I mean every detail for sources that have long been silenced. 

When you read Margarita's moment by moment description of each day of the unfolding events surrounding Rasputin's murder including the activities of the Empress; the conspiratorial dealings of several Russian Grand Duchesses; the actions of various members of Court Society; the terrible treasonous acts of very close relations of the Empress and Tsar; the actions behind the scenes of government Ministers; the actions of Rasputin devotee's; the actions of the Russian lawyer who had been advising Yusupov step by step prior to and after the murder; the telegrams, letters, and telephone calls of the Duma Deputy who talked a reluctant Felix into his role; the telegrams, letters, and telephone calls of the one Grand Duke who had master mined the event and who wanted to bring down the monarchy; the same Grand Duke who maintained intimate contact with an Allied Ambassador about the plans to murder Rasputin, an Ambassador that used his diplomatic immunity to help motivate the murder; the actions of the police officials, investigators, the evidence of the blood splatter analysts and forensic photographers; the doctors who performed the autopsy: all this woven by Margarita into a detailed restoration of events that not only has the effect of transporting the reader back in time to the actual event, but Margarita has literally, finished the  investigation of Rasputin's murder that the War, Revolution, Émigré memoirs, and Communist rule had clouded, interrupted and misrepresented. 

Through Margarita's narration of events, the reader feels as if they are reading a piece of current investigative reporting in the Washington Post on some governmental scandal, forgetting that the event happened 94 years ago.  Was this because Margarita and her daughter went to St. Petersburg and were given special access to the locations where these events took place: because  she and her daughter stood in the rooms, saw their size, learned where the exits actually went and where the entrances actually were; learned outside distances and dimensions; absorbed every detail of the actual environment where this evil deed took place?   

Margarita's book can't simply be read, it has to be studied.  She has organized her material in a series of layers so that if you missed an issue mentioned in one layer, don't worry, the issue will reappear in greater detail in the next layer, and again in the next layer, until every facet has been explored.  Hers is the work of a brilliant and original feminine mind. 

One of the original features of the book is that brackets are frequently used to insert a point the author is making.  Because these bracketed remarks of the author do not fall within a direct quotation, at first one wonders why they are necessary.  Then one realizes that while Margarita seldom quotes directly from her massive list of sources, she annotates every source she paraphrases.  Margarita's brackets are used by her to distinguish or emphasize her own point of view in the midst of an annotated sentence or paragraph that she is paraphrasing.
One of the most supportive aspects of Margareta's carefully researched work is that she exposes once and for all the ridiculous assumption that the planning of Rasputin's murder was the matter of only a few weeks work. 

The fact that the murder bore remarkable similarities with the Khvostov/Beletsky plots to murder Rasputin in the winter of 1915-1916 (which will be coming to the surface in the Feb. 1916 correspondence) is not just a coincidence.  The other thing that Margarita reveals is that clearly the date of the murder, which occurred the day the Duma went into recess on Nov. 16 was not any coincidence.  Choosing December 16th insured the conspirators that there could be no debate over the murder in the Duma and no chance for the government to censure those Duma members who participated in the murder.
I realize now from reading Margarita's book that the Empress Dowager's refusal to admit the death of her sons was not a clever political formula the woman invented to unify the exiled Russian community, but was really an psychological device the culpable Dowager invented to silence her conscience.  As long the Dowager Empress could delude herself into believing her sons were alive, she would not have to face her own accountability and complicity in events that lead directly to her son's death. 

There is no more damning evidence against the Dowager than her own private thoughts which make her letters to her son the work of a hypocrite.

Just read Margarita's book.     
Without giving too much away, just let me say that the Empress Dowager's actions in late 1916 went far beyond the characteristic differences typical of mother-in-law/daughter-in-law relationships.  The Empress Dowager was motivated by a blind, all-consuming hatred for her daughter-in-law. 

Let me just say I believe that had Nicholas read his mother's diary entries about Alix in 1916, during a time when Nicky was doing everything in his power to protect wife, it would have altered his relationship with his mother permanently.   

You know it is interesting, that as I was writing this, I suddenly remembered that what Mossolov wrote in his memoirs in 1935 about who Nicky loved and who he didn't love in his family.

Mossolov says, first of all, that Nicky's:

...heart was full of love, but it was a 'collective love', if the phrase may be permitted; so that his feelings were very different from those which plain men sum up in the single word 'love.'  He had a sincere and intense love for the Empress and his children. [Ref: A. A. Mossolov, At The Court of The Last Tsar, (Pavlovsk Press reprint), p. 8]   

Then Mossolov then posed the question:

Did he love his more distant relations?  [Ref: A. A. Mossolov, At The Court of The Last Tsar, (Pavlovsk Press reprint), p. 8]   

And Mossolov answers:

I doubt it...

He had more regard for his two sisters and his brother Michael.  He felt a tenderness towards his nephew Dimitri Pavlovitch...As for the rest, he knew how to show just as much feeling as the proprieties demanded, just as much as was required in the due performance of his duties as Tsar, as much as would stave off any unpleasantness.  [Ref: A. A. Mossolov, At The Court of The Last Tsar, (Pavlovsk Press reprint), p. 8]   

Why didn't Mossolov name the Empress Dowager when he listed Nicky's wife and children, brothers and sisters, nephew and the rest of his relatives? 

Did Mossolov silently lump the Empress Dowager in with "the rest" of Nicky's relations, relatives he didn't love but appeased through granting their requests?   

If not, is it likely that Mossolov was avoiding the subject altogether?

Or was it probable that Mossolov knew things that made it impossible to even approach such a question, much less answer it?

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on August 09, 2010, 10:46:15 AM

Why didn't Mossolov name the Empress Dowager when he listed Nicky's wife and children, brothers and sisters, nephew and the rest of his relatives? 

Did Mossolov silently lump the Empress Dowager in with "the rest" of Nicky's relations, relatives he didn't love but appeased through granting their requests?   

If not, is it likely that Mossolov was avoiding the subject altogether?

Or was it probable that Mossolov knew things that made it impossible to even approach such a question, much less answer it?
I hope you have a chance to read Margarita's book, The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin, as it reveals some interesting facts.   

I believe that it is worthwhile noting that, unlike Paul I's assassination, the Yusupov's participation in the murder of Rasputin's accomplished nothing except further eroding public respect for the monarchy.  No political or military victory resulted from the death of the Strannik.  The Empress continued to carry out her vast responsibilities, even returning to her hospital the afternoon of Rasputin's funeral.  We know from Dorothy Seymour's audience with the Empress which occurred only a few weeks after Rasputin's burial that Empress had not lost her mind as had been predicted because of the exaggerated tales of her dependence on Rasputin.  In fact nothing changed. 

It was only after the murder of Rasputin that the Duma, the Generals, the treasonous members of the Romanov family and certain Allied Ambassadors realized that the slaying of Rasputin was politically ineffectual. 

I believe this it was the ineffectual nature of Rasputin's murder, not to mention the brutal assault of the murder, that was behind A. V. Krivoshein's disgust with Zinaida's promotion of the murder as if it was an act of patriotism.  As Margarita is able to prove, the details of the murder were extremely vicious.  The autopsy of Rasputin found no poison in his system, nor any water in his lungs; he was not poisoned, nor did he drown.  The autopsy revealed, instead, that the Strannik died, in a state of inebriation, from three fatal gunshot wounds: two close range gunshot wounds, one entering the abdomen and causing massive hemorrhaging and damage to several internal organs and the other to entering the back and striking the spine and damaging more internal organs; and the third at point blank range to the forehead that penetrated the brain.  The autopsy also indicated massive post mortem head trauma inflicted by kicking.  Because any one of the bullet wounds alone would have caused death within 10 to 20 minutes, the autopsy revealed the murder as an act of deranged overkill that became all the more ironic when it became apparent that excessively violent prosecution of the crime yielded nothing.     

Margarita reveals that it was only after it was realized that that Rasputin's murder was nothing more than an act of impotent rage based on propaganda and misinformation, that the Duma, the Generals, several Allied Ambassadors and the treasonous members of the Romanov family; bi-passing their hatred of the Empress, turned their malignant attention to Nicholas II, identifying him as their real nemesis. 

Nelipa tells us that after Rasputin was eliminated the political dispute:

...rapidly headed against the Emperor.  Anna Rodzianko [wife of the Duma President, M. M. Rodzianko] wrote to Zinaida Yusupova that current affairs had not altered in the way they had all expected following Rasputin's murder.  Oblivious to the fact that the Empress was innocent of the treacherous accusations against her, Madame Rodzianko announced the following:

"Now it is clear that Alexandra Fyodorovna alone is not to blame for everything, but that the Russian Tsar he is more of a criminal."  [Ref: Margarita Nelipa, The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: The Conspiracy That Brought Down The Russian Empire, (2010), p. 493]

One can't help but wonder how Zinaida reacted to this letter which portrayed  Rasputin's murder as politically ineffective; even going so far as to partially vindicate the Empress who was clearly Zinaida's  arch-rival.   

While it is true that men like Guchkov had already decided to take Nicholas down prior to Rasputin's death, it is clear from Margarita's research that there is no question that removing the Tsar became the Progressive Bloc's accepted goal once Rasputin's elimination was recognized as ineffectual.   

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on August 09, 2010, 10:50:43 AM

The other aspect of Margarita's research appears to have answered a question I have long speculated about: I had always wondered why men like Miliukov, Rodzianko, Guchkov, Polivanov, Shulgin, Paléologue, Buchanan; men so concerned about the shell shortage and the great retreat in 1915, dismissed or marginalized the great improvements made by Nicholas II's by the end of 1916 which had strengthened his armed forces, vastly improving the supply of armaments. 

While Miliukov mentions these improvements in his memoires that had been made by the end of 1916 he states that these issues were no longer the Progressive Bloc's source of concern. 

Indeed they were not, as Margarita points out.  It appears that men such as Miliukov secretly feared the possibility, not that Nicholas was selling out Russia to Germany, no matter what kind of lip service the Progressive Bloc, the Generals, the Allied Ambassadors or the treasonous members of the Romanov family gave to such rumours [rumours they helped invent], but it was the fear that the Tsar was winning the War.  Was there any real possibility that Nicky was winning the war in the beginning of 1917?  According to Winston Churchill there was. 

In 1922 Winston wrote:

It is the shallow fashion of these times to dismiss the Czarist regime as a purblind, corrupt, incompetent tyranny.  But a survey of its thirty month's war with Germany and Austria should correct these loose impressions and expose the dominant facts.  We may measure the strength of the Russian Empire by the battering it had endured, by the disasters it had survived, by the inexhaustible forced it had developed, and by the recovery it had made.  In the Government of States, when great events are afoot, the leader of the nation, whoever he be, is held accountable for failure and vindicated by success.  No matter who wrought the toil, who planned the struggle, to the supreme responsible authority belongs the blame or credit for the result.   

Why should this stern test be denied to Nicholas II?  He had made many mistakes, what ruler had not?  He was neither a great captain nor a great prince.  He was only a true, simple man of average ability, of merciful disposition, upheld in his daily life by his faith in God.  But the brunt of supreme decisions centered on him.  At the summit where all problems are reduced to Yea or Nay, where events transcend the faculties of man and where all is inscrutable, he had to give answers.  His was the function of the compass needle.  War or no war?  Advance or retreat? Right or Left?  Democratise or hold firm? Quit or persevere?  These were the battlefields of Nicholas II.  Why should he reap no honor for them?  The devoted onset of the Russian armies which saved Paris in 1914; the mastered agony of the munitionless retreat; the slowly regathered forces; the victories of Brusilov; The Russian entry upon the campaign of 1917, unconquered, stronger than ever; has he no share in these?  In spite of the errors vast and terrible, the regime he personified, over which he presided, to which his personal character gave the vital spark, had at this moment won the war for Russia.

He is about to be struck down.  A dark hand, gloved at first in folly, now intervenes.  Exit Czar.  Deliver him and all he loved to wounds and death.  Belittle his efforts, asperse his conduct, insult his memory; but pause then to tell us who else was found capable.  Who or what could guide the Russian State?  Men gifted and daring; men ambitious and fierce; spirits audacious and commanding--of these there was no lack.  But none could answer the few plain questions on which the life and fame of Russia turned.  With victory in her grasp she fell upon the earth, devoured alive, like Herod of old, by worms.  [Ref: Winston Churchill, The World Crisis, 1911-1914, (1924, 3rd edition), pp. 690-691]

If we can trust Winston Churchill's characterization of the Tsar and the strength of  his armed forces in the beginning of 1917, it appears that the real fear of the liberal opposition was the fear of victory: a victory under the Tsar would have secured the popularity of his rule in a way that nothing else could have.  It is very possible that it was this fear of victory under the Tsar that forced the Progressive Bloc's hand;  their window of opportunity was narrowing rapidly as the commencement of the Spring Campaign in 1917 approached.   

Just to say that there is further proof of the strength of Nicholas army in Gregory P. Tscherbotasrioff's, Russia, My Native Land.

Again this is only a small part of what Margarita's book contains and that is why I recommend that you may want to read her work.   

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 10, 2010, 06:12:21 PM
Has anyone yet received the book from Galignani? I ordered it a while ago, and received a message thanking me for "reserving" it. There was nowhere on their system to enter credit details etc., and I wonder if they don't yet have their copies?

Janet, I understand that 'Librairie Galignani' in Paris do have copies of my on their shelf.

Perhaps you should contact them again?

Regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Janet Ashton on August 11, 2010, 03:17:18 PM
Has anyone yet received the book from Galignani? I ordered it a while ago, and received a message thanking me for "reserving" it. There was nowhere on their system to enter credit details etc., and I wonder if they don't yet have their copies?

Janet, I understand that 'Librairie Galignani' in Paris do have copies of my on their shelf.

Perhaps you should contact them again?

Regards,

Margarita

Many thanks for the news, Margarita - I'll drop them a line!

J.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 24, 2010, 06:23:58 AM
Please take note of the following ERRATA in my book: The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin, A Conspiracy that Brought Down the Russian Empire -

1. @ p 375 Police photo 15a: DELETE “exit” and INSERT “entry”

2. @ p 471 DELETE “mother-in-law” and INSERT “step-mother”

3. @ p 479 DELETE “Conclusion” and INSERT “Appendix 8”

4.  @ p 486 DELETE “stepmother” and INSERT “grandmother”.



Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rgt9w on August 24, 2010, 08:51:10 AM
Hi Margarita,

First, I'm enjoying your book immensely. I'm about 1/2 way through it (I'm taking it slow so I understand all of the details)! It may be a copyright issue, but is it possible to post the photos of the step and courtyard forensic photos. A couple of them are grainy and I would like to see the details that you refer to in the text.

Regards,

Roy
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 25, 2010, 05:38:17 AM
Hi Margarita,

First, I'm enjoying your book immensely. I'm about 1/2 way through it (I'm taking it slow so I understand all of the details)! It may be a copyright issue, but is it possible to post the photos of the step and courtyard forensic photos. A couple of them are grainy and I would like to see the details that you refer to in the text.

Regards,

Roy

Hi Roy,

Many thanks for letting me know that you are enjoying reading my book.  : )

A larger number of photographs that appear in my book, including the first one to which you refer, are unique to it.

In view of that consideration I am reluctant to post any of them here in the public sphere.

Best regards,

Margarita


Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rgt9w on August 25, 2010, 04:10:26 PM
Hi Margarita,

I understand your opinion about posting the photos.  Are we allowed to ask you questions about the content of your book in this link or should it be done elsewhere? In regard to the step outside of the basement door of the Yusupov palace, was it a flat flagstone or was it actually a raised step? The  basement door seems very close to the ground in the photos.

All the Best,

Roy
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 26, 2010, 04:47:50 AM
Hi Margarita,

... Are we allowed to ask you questions about the content of your book in this link or should it be done elsewhere? In regard to the step outside of the basement door of the Yusupov palace, was it a flat flagstone or was it actually a raised step? The  basement door seems very close to the ground in the photos.

All the Best,

Roy

Hi Roy,

All questions regarding the content of my book are most definitely encouraged here!

Police photo # 5 shows that the stone step abutted against the wall and lay slightly below the framework of the basement door.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rgt9w on August 26, 2010, 07:29:01 PM
On page 253, Fyodor Kuzmin is noted as coming on duty at Post 2 at the Petrovsky Bridge, then he is described at Post 150. Were there two posts or is it a misprint?

I am trying to reconcile Ella's condonation of Rasputin's murder with her role as an Abbess of a convent. I would have thought she could empathize with Rasputin's family since her own husband had been assassinated in a gruesome manner. She does not seem disgusted by the murder, instead she is worried about the welfare of the murderers. In fact, she celebrates Rasputin's death as a patriotic deed.

Margarita, did you opinion of Ella change with your research and was her participation in the plot more direct than you previously believed?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on August 27, 2010, 01:09:38 AM
On page 253, Fyodor Kuzmin is noted as coming on duty at Post 2 at the Petrovsky Bridge, then he is described at Post 150. Were there two posts or is it a misprint?

Please omit 'Post No. 150'. Thank you for drawing this to my attention Roy.  

I am trying to reconcile Ella's condonation of Rasputin's murder with her role as an Abbess of a convent. I would have thought she could empathize with Rasputin's family since her own husband had been assassinated in a gruesome manner. She does not seem disgusted by the murder, instead she is worried about the welfare of the murderers. In fact, she celebrates Rasputin's death as a patriotic deed.

Margarita, did you opinion of Ella change with your research and was her participation in the plot more direct than you previously believed?

Unaware of Ella's true activities in relation to the Rasputin matter, I had no firm opinion about her before I began my research.

Aside from what I said in my book, it should be added that Ella's intense hatred for Grigorii Rasputin allowed her to purposefully disregard the simple truth that the Rasputin family suffered by being deprived of a husband and a father.

Ella at first encouraged, then fell behind the perpetrators while they were committing that coldblooded murder and after that "patriotic act" was committed she, without reservation extolled their criminality.

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on September 02, 2010, 10:23:45 AM
Margarita,

In connection with Ella's lack of contrition in the murder of Rasputin and her encouragement of the deed, do you feel that the secret meeting with Dimitri in December 1914 in Moscow in her Convent church may have been about Rasputin? 

The diary entry of the celebrated Russian writer, Ivan Bunin, for December 1914 describes his desire to participate in:

…a service on Ordynka Street at the Martha and Mary Cloister, whose abbess was Grand Duchess Elizaveta Fyodorovna.   [Ref: Edvard Radzinsky, “The Rasputin File,” p. 281]

Edvard Radzinsky tells us that the nuns at the Martha and Mary Cloister:

…would not allow Bunin into the church, mysteriously explaining to him that the grand duchess was with the visiting Grand Duke Dmitry Pavlovich.  And the writer, standing outside, listened through the temple’s open doors to the mournful and emotionally charged singing of it virginal choir.  And then out of the church floated icons and banners carried by virginal hands with the tall, thin-faced grand duchess in front dressed in white with a cross sewn in gold on the brow of her headgear and a large candle in her hand, and behind her a file of singing sisters with candle flames held close to their faces.  [Ref: Edvard Radzinsky, “The Rasputin File,” p. 281]

We know that Ella financed the publication of infamous Novosyolov 1910 newspaper articles into pamphlet form in 1912 which Guchkov would use  in his Duma debate on Rasputin.

Radzinsky states that:         

...in 1910 a powerful newspaper salvo was fired from Moscow as well – from the camp of the Grand Duchess Elizaveta Fyodorovna.  A member of the grand duchess’ circle, Mikhail Novosyolov, an assistant professor at the Moscow Theological Seminary and editor of The Religious-Philosophical Library, published a whole series of sensational articles: ‘Gregory Rasputin’s Past Life’, Grigory Rasputin, the Itinerant Spiritual Artiste’, and ‘Another Thing about Grigory Rasputin.’  Published along with these articles was the confession of a certain maiden whom Rasputin had seduced, and reference was also made to the investigations of the Tobolsk Consistory, which had accused him of Khlyst involvement. 

In 1910 Rasputin’s name had begun to acquire a wicked meaning.  It was turning into a punning synonym for ‘debaucher.’  [Ref: Edvard Radzinsky, The Rasputin File, (2000), p. 132]

Is it possible that Ella was behind this press attack on Rasputin in December 1914? 

[Extract from Russian magazine, “Reactions to Life,” December 1914]

‘Grigory Rasputin is a most evil enemy of the holy church of Christ…During the struggle for liberation of the Balkan countries…only an enemy of the Orthodox Church could have advised Russian diplomacy to regard the frenzied brutality of the Turks with equanimity…It is not for Russia’s good that she has been sent such detractors of Orthodoxy, such soulless false prophets,’ the magazine Reactions to Life wrote in December 1914.  [Ref: Edvard Radzinsky, “The Rasputin File,” p. 271]

Could the press attack and secret meeting with Dimitri in December 1914 have been related to the attempt to murder Rasputin on January 6, 1915?  I believe you said that this attempt on Rasputin's life has been largely ignored by most historians. 

 Thanks again for your incredible work on Rasputin!!!! 



 
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on September 03, 2010, 01:52:26 PM
Margarita, I think that the way I posed my question does not allow for an answer.  Sorry about that.  I guess there really is so little information available on Ella's private activities or her involvement in Rasputin's murder that it would be difficult to answer my question.  Well thanks again for all you have given us in the publication of your book. 
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 04, 2010, 10:13:21 PM
Margarita, I think that the way I posed my question does not allow for an answer.  Sorry about that.  I guess there really is so little information available on Ella's private activities or her involvement in Rasputin's murder that it would be difficult to answer my question.  Well thanks again for all you have given us in the publication of your book. 

No problems Griff! I always welcome any comments that you care to make here.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 04, 2010, 10:18:25 PM
Hi everyone,

Copies of my book are now also available from 'van Hoogstraten' bookstore in Den Haag in The Netherlands.

Further details are available here: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on September 05, 2010, 06:17:10 AM
Hi everyone,

Copies of my book are now also available from 'van Hoogstraten' bookstore in Den Haag in The Netherlands.

Further details are available here: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445

Margarita  

Miracles are not out of the world. I've ordered my copy.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on September 05, 2010, 12:02:03 PM
Hi everyone,

Copies of my book are now also available from 'van Hoogstraten' bookstore in Den Haag in The Netherlands.

Further details are available here: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445

Margarita  

THANK THE LORD!!!!  ANOTHER RED LETTER DAY!!!!  This is really going to great for so many people!!!!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rgt9w on September 05, 2010, 07:10:28 PM
Dear Margarita,

I finished your excellent book! First, I would like to commend your persistance in researching the numerous conflicting accounts of Rasputin's murder and bringing together a plausible and reasonable assessment of his death. Your book is excellent, but there is a lot of information to digest. I used the appendix a lot to keep the numerous characters straight. I also found a map of St. Petersburg helpful to follow your descriptions of the paths taken by by the conspirators.

I did have a couple of questions for clarification. Please excuse me if I missed this in your book.

Question #1:

With bullet #2 hitting the right kidney and lodging in the cervical spine, was the shot most likely delivered in an upward trajectory from the staircase?  I was picturing Purishkevich shooting upwards from the lower landing of the staircase leading to the courtyard of the Yusupov Palace. The upward shot would have passed through the lower back hitting the kidney and travel upwards to the cervical spine as Rasputin was trying to exit through the door.

Question #2:

Is it possible that the boot injuries to Rasputin's face and head overlapped with injuries from the bridge?  How can a pathologist differentiate betweent the two since they are both blunt force injuries.  I agree with your explanation as to why the truncheon was excluded.

Question #3

On page 410, you mention that Grand Duke Pavel Alexandrovich was upset by the thought of Mikhail becoming regent. Why was he so upset? Did he not want the Monarchy to continue even in a constituional form or did he want another candiate (Kirill) to be tsar?

I hope I haven't asked too many questions. Again, you did a great job!

Roy
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 06, 2010, 09:05:08 PM
Hi everyone,

Copies of my book are now also available from 'van Hoogstraten' bookstore in Den Haag in The Netherlands.

Further details are available here: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445

Margarita  

Miracles are not out of the world. I've ordered my copy.

LOL, I am really glad that everything has worked out for you Teddy!  I hope you shall be pleased with your purchase when it arrives and please let me know what your impressions are.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 06, 2010, 09:11:50 PM
Hi everyone,

Copies of my book are now also available from 'van Hoogstraten' bookstore in Den Haag in The Netherlands.

Further details are available here: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445

Margarita  

THANK THE LORD!!!!  ANOTHER RED LETTER DAY!!!!  This is really going to great for so many people!!!!

LOL again. Griff a number of people have informed privately that they are delighted that my book is now readily available from various locations around the world.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 06, 2010, 09:54:45 PM
Dear Margarita,

I finished your excellent book! First, I would like to commend your persistance in researching the numerous conflicting accounts of Rasputin's murder and bringing together a plausible and reasonable assessment of his death. Your book is excellent, but there is a lot of information to digest. I used the appendix a lot to keep the numerous characters straight. I also found a map of St. Petersburg helpful to follow your descriptions of the paths taken by by the conspirators.

I did have a couple of questions for clarification. Please excuse me if I missed this in your book.

Question #1:

Question #2:

Question #3

I hope I haven't asked too many questions. Again, you did a great job!

Roy

Dear Roy,

Thank you for letting me know that you enjoyed reading my book, particularly your generous remark that you found my assessment regarding Rasputin's death as being "plausible and reasonable".

It pleases me immensely that you kept referring to the appendices and the 1914 map of St. Petersburg, which admittedly I purchased at considerable expense.

Please allow me a bit of time to mull over your questions before I respond to them.

In the mean time, I would like to ask you a question. Within the context of the book, did any of your views change after reading it?

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 07, 2010, 07:16:44 AM
Question #1:

With bullet #2 hitting the right kidney and lodging in the cervical spine, was the shot most likely delivered in an upward trajectory from the staircase?  I was picturing Purishkevich shooting upwards from the lower landing of the staircase leading to the courtyard of the Yusupov Palace. The upward shot would have passed through the lower back hitting the kidney and travel upwards to the cervical spine as Rasputin was trying to exit through the door.

It is possible that the second bullet could have been fired from a weapon that was fired in an upward trajectory. As you are aware, neither Kosorotov’s forensic report nor Grand Duke Andrei Vladimirovich's notes divulge which part of the vertebral column was affected. Kosorotov noted that the bullet that entered the back did pass through the kidney before it became lodged in one of the vertebrae. The discussion on p 534 about cervical vertebral involvement helps to explain why the victim in all likelihood was immediately immobilized by the doorway.

Question #2:

Is it possible that the boot injuries to Rasputin's face and head overlapped with injuries from the bridge?  How can a pathologist differentiate betweent the two since they are both blunt force injuries.  I agree with your explanation as to why the truncheon was excluded.

On p 318 I stated that not one police photo corroborates Purishkevich’s or Yusupov’s allegation that the victim’s temple sustained a gaping wound that was supposedly caused by a boot. None of the forensic photos of Rasputin’s head or Kosorotov’s remarks tell me that the described incident had taken place.

A pathologist can differentiate blunt force injuries to the head caused by being hit by a firm object as opposed to one sustained by a fall, by looking at the injuries produced on the brain (see p 532).

Question #3

On page 410, you mention that Grand Duke Pavel Alexandrovich was upset by the thought of Mikhail becoming regent. Why was he so upset? Did he not want the Monarchy to continue even in a constituional form or did he want another candiate (Kirill) to be tsar?

As discussed on pp 409-410, three Grand Dukes, Pavel, Kirill and Mikhail signed a Manifest dated March 1 in which they declared their desire for a new State order. They, in my opinion sought a constitutional form of government that was not to be aligned to the monarchy.
 
It stands to reason that if Mikhail did become the custodian of the Throne, there might have been a remote possibility that he might have considered introducing a constitutional monarchic form of government after the war. The only way to avoid that scenario from happening was to sever all ties with the monarchy.

Since that Manifest was also countersigned by Pavel Milyukov, the document effectively allowed the Duma representative the right to carry out his objective – to change the State order. Thus when one of the signatories, Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovich, briefly considered reneging on that Manifesto, his act appeared repugnant to Grand Duke Pavel Alexandrovich, as it did for Kirill.

Trust all these responses are useful.

Best regards,

Margarita

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rgt9w on September 07, 2010, 06:26:10 PM
Margarita,

Your book definitely changed my views in certain areas.  I think the most enlightening aspect for me was how complex the plotting against Nicholas II was by the Duma and the Romanov family.  I had been aware of the tensions between Nicholas II and the Vladimirichi family members, but I was surprised to learn how many members from the other branches were actively plotting behind his back.  I had not been aware at how closely many members of the Romanov family were aligning themselves with the Duma and then the Provisional Government.  The Tsar must have felt truly isolated, especially while trying to determine an appropriate punishment for Rasputin's murderers.

I was also surprised how infrequently Rasputin interacted with the Imperial Family.  For all of the gossip and rumors, one would think he was at the Palace all of the time. It was unfortunate that Rasputin was used as a scapegoat to bring the monarchy down.  His character was certainly sullied by the numerous untruths and allegations made against him. I was struck by the class prejudice and conceit that allowed an innocent man to be murdered just because others above him deemed it necessary. This was most apparent by the Romanovs decrying that Yusupov's and Dmitri's punishments were too harsh!  Some of the various family members written correspondence with each other are unbelievable---could you imagine some of these being introduced in a court of law today. It is apparent they took full advantage of their noble and royal statuses to remain above the law and not be punished by the Tsar. Elizabeth Feodorovna's and Marie Feodorovna's actions against the Imperial couplef were disturbing given their close blood relationships to Nicholas and Alexandra.

Thank you for answering my previous questions in your previous response:

In Regards to Question #2, I totally agree with you that there is no evidence in the photos of a gaping wound on Rasputin's head. When I wrote my question, I was thinking more about the information on page 322 during the discussion about the truncheon. You stated "Yusupov struck at Rasputin's face with the tip of his heavy military boot.  He rammed it straight into the right eye and then struck him again around the head shattering the nasal bone".  When I asked the question, I was trying to determine when the nose and cheek were most likely fractured. During the beating or during the fall from the bridge. I know Kosorotov felt a number of his injuries occurred when Rasputin's body was dumped and looking through Appendix 6 I see that based on the  blood patterns you thought the facial and nasal injuries most likely occurred at this time as well. I just thought that if Yusupov was angry enough to kick his victim, he would have caused numerous injuries to the face and head with the boots.

In regards to Question #3, you presented compelling evidence that the Grand Dukes certainly wanted to remove Nicholas II and wanted a change in the status of the government. I am perplexed by what they thought a "new" form of government that was not aligned with monarchy would do for them. Certainly they would loose their royal status and their exalted position within society.  I'm not certain what role they would fulfill in this new structure. Would they all have become wealthy landowners??? 

I apologize if I have been too long winded, but your book really made me think and brought up a lot of questions I had never thought of before.

Roy
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rgt9w on September 07, 2010, 08:51:45 PM
One other area that I found interesting was the British Intelligence Service and Ambassador Buchanan's endorsement of Rasputin's murder. I was dismayed that the Entente members secretly switched their allegiance to the Provisional Government prior to Nicholas II's formal abdication. I guess to sum it up, my view of Rasputin's murder changed in the sense that I never realized how complex the murder plan was and the extent that it rocked the Imperial government.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 08, 2010, 07:17:45 AM
... When I asked the question, I was trying to determine when the nose and cheek were most likely fractured. During the beating or during the fall from the bridge. I know Kosorotov felt a number of his injuries occurred when Rasputin's body was dumped and looking through Appendix 6 I see that based on the  blood patterns you thought the facial and nasal injuries most likely occurred at this time as well. I just thought that if Yusupov was angry enough to kick his victim, he would have caused numerous injuries to the face and head with the boots.

The facial injuries inflicted by Yusupov and those sustained around the face when the body was thrown off the bridge could indeed be considered as overlapping.  

In regards to Question #3, you presented compelling evidence that the Grand Dukes certainly wanted to remove Nicholas II and wanted a change in the status of the government. I am perplexed by what they thought a "new" form of government that was not aligned with monarchy would do for them. Certainly they would loose their royal status and their exalted position within society.  I'm not certain what role they would fulfill in this new structure. Would they all have become wealthy landowners???  

On March 7, 1917 the Provisional Government enacted Regulation No. 5 that provided for a new Oath of Loyalty to the Russian State for its military and citizens.

There were no roles on offer for any Grand Duke or Grand Duchess in the new regime (see also pp 425-426). I can provide a few additional examples that illustrate my point.

The Provisional Government enacted  Regulation 1b (I) on March 12, 1917 which stipulated that Grand Duchess Mariya Pavlovna senior was to be dismissed from her responsibilities as the president of the Academy of Artists.

While on March 14, 1917 the Provisional Government enacted Regulation No 2 (I) declared that all Court ranks and names would no longer be recognized and Regulation 2 (II) declared that Court military ranks would no longer be recognized.

On March 31, 1917 the Provisional Government enacted Regulation 5 (1) IV, which discharged 1) Grand Duke Pavel Alexandrovich and 2) Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovich from their service to the military.

Clearly just with these few examples, it can be seen that there was no intention to revive the monarchic system or permit any Romanov from holding any position of authority.  

The Grand Dukes and Duchesses who openly pledged their allegiance to the new regime found that they had become irrelevant in the newly emerging society.

I apologize if I have been too long winded, but your book really made me think and brought up a lot of questions I had never thought of before.

I am really glad to learn that this matter has peeked your interest. So please continue ...

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on September 08, 2010, 07:27:39 AM
One other area that I found interesting was the British Intelligence Service and Ambassador Buchanan's endorsement of Rasputin's murder. I was dismayed that the Entente members secretly switched their allegiance to the Provisional Government prior to Nicholas II's formal abdication. I guess to sum it up, my view of Rasputin's murder changed in the sense that I never realized how complex the murder plan was and the extent that it rocked the Imperial government.

And hence the title of my book!

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on October 17, 2010, 10:21:27 AM

I just recieved the current issue of Royalty Digest Quarterly (which is an invaluable source of historic facts often publishing private letters and facts that are not available any where else) and the issue included a three page review of Margarita Nelipa's The Murder of Rasputin, by Charlotte Zeepvat. 

Charlotte's review was as scholarly and thoughtfully written as Margarita's book. 

I loved the way Charlotte examined and explored each of the aspects of Margarita's work that makes it so invaluable to the historiography of the Late Imperial Period. 

Charlotte is as meticulous in her analysis of the book as Margarita was in her analysis of the murder of Rasputin.

I found Charlotte's closing remarks as not only honest but also inspiring:

Many readers will find its conclusions hard to take and some may not even try.  I was sceptical at first, but I have to say that Margarita Nelipa's account works for me in a way that other versions of the story never have.  History is a matter of evaluating evidence and making choices: few things are set in stone.  If you have an interest in imperial Russia and its fall you should at least read this book.  What you make of it is up to you.  [Ref: Charlotte Zeepvat, Royalty Digest Quarterly, "Book Review," (Issue No. 3, 2010), [pp. 58-60.] 

When the past changes, as it is always doing, it changes our present, which in turn, has the potential to change our future. 

I believe that this is what has been happening since the Russian Archives were opened a decade ago and clearly Margarita's work on Rasputin is part and parcel of what I like to call the early 21st century reassessment movement.   


Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on October 20, 2010, 04:39:07 AM

I just recieved the current issue of Royalty Digest Quarterly (which is an invaluable source of historic facts often publishing private letters and facts that are not available any where else) and the issue included a three page review of Margarita Nelipa's The Murder of Rasputin, by Charlotte Zeepvat. 

Charlotte's review was as scholarly and thoughtfully written as Margarita's book. 

...I found Charlotte's closing remarks as not only honest but also inspiring:

Many readers will find its conclusions hard to take and some may not even try.  I was sceptical at first, but I have to say that Margarita Nelipa's account works for me in a way that other versions of the story never have.  History is a matter of evaluating evidence and making choices: few things are set in stone.  If you have an interest in imperial Russia and its fall you should at least read this book.  What you make of it is up to you.  [Ref: Charlotte Zeepvat, Royalty Digest Quarterly, "Book Review," (Issue No. 3, 2010), [pp. 58-60.] 

...I believe that this is what has been happening since the Russian Archives were opened a decade ago and clearly Margarita's work on Rasputin is part and parcel of what I like to call the early 21st century reassessment movement.   

Griff,

Thank you very much for letting the Forum know that Charlotte Zeepvat has just reviewed my book.

I am pleased with the review and would like to thank her for her appraisal.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on October 20, 2010, 08:24:43 AM

(http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/zz18/Romanov11/Galignani.jpg)


rudi3 took this great picture of your book in Paris last week in the window of Librairie Galignani, 224, rue de Rivoli. 

What a perfectly elegant bookstore and how fitting....Best Griff
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on October 20, 2010, 08:55:41 AM
What a wonderfull picture. ;)
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rudy3 on October 20, 2010, 10:15:50 AM
P.S.
Not in the window, but inside the shop, department literature in English, History, in the middle of the shop.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: griffh on October 20, 2010, 02:39:31 PM
P.S.
Not in the window, but inside the shop, department literature in English, History, in the middle of the shop.

Oops!   Rudy3 forgive my mistake, still and all that is so great that Margarita's book is displayed and as Gerjo said, that is a wonderful photogarph!!!  The bookstore must be really an incredible place.  I was reading on their website that they have a long history of supplying Paris with books written in English.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on October 21, 2010, 04:43:34 AM
P.S.
Not in the window, but inside the shop, department literature in English, History, in the middle of the shop.

(http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/zz18/Romanov11/Galignani.jpg)

... still and all that is so great that Margarita's book is displayed and as Gerjo said, that is a wonderful photogarph!!!  The bookstore must be really an incredible place.  I was reading on their website that they have a long history of supplying Paris with books written in English.

Indeed it is a wonderful photo!  : )

Many thanks for taking the photograph Rudy!!! I intend to visit Librairie Galignani next June whilst conducting my research duties in France relating to Alexander III.

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on October 21, 2010, 05:43:01 AM
So Margarita, you are going to do a sort of European tour again next year?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on October 25, 2010, 05:38:23 PM
So Margarita, you are going to do a sort of European tour again next year?

Yes Teddy I will be visiting Europe again next year.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on October 29, 2010, 10:41:57 PM
Reminding everyone that copies of my book "The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: A conspiracy that Brought Down the Russian Empire" are still available from these locations:

• Gilbert's Royal Books: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/news/rasputin.html

• van Hoogstraten in Den Haag: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445

• Galignani Bookstore in Paris: http://www.galignani.fr/listeliv.php?AUTEUR=Nelipa+Margarita&RECHERCHE=appro


Charlotte Zeepvat kindly reviewed my book and her appraisal has been published in the October edition of "Royal Digest Quarterly".

Margarita Nelipa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Petr on October 30, 2010, 07:31:34 AM
Dear Margarita

Any chance Amazon will pick up the book?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on October 31, 2010, 06:36:15 PM
Dear Margarita

Any chance Amazon will pick up the book?

Dear Petr,

My book is available only at the 3 locations mentioned above.

I trust that this will not present you with any difficulties, should you wish to purchase a copy.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Petr on November 01, 2010, 05:32:13 AM
Dear Margarita--

Thank you. I've read so much about your book in this Forum and I'm dying to read it.

Best

Petr
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Georgiy on November 01, 2010, 09:32:05 PM
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The picture it presents is balanced and rational. Well worth getting.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 03, 2010, 07:26:48 PM
Dear Margarita--

Thank you. I've read so much about your book in this Forum and I'm dying to read it.

Best

Petr

Dear Petr,

Thank you for letting me know about your intention to purchase a copy of my book. I trust that it will provide you with many hours of enjoyable reading!

Privet,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 03, 2010, 07:32:30 PM
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The picture it presents is balanced and rational. Well worth getting.

Dear Georgiy,

Thank you very much for your generous words about my book. I hope that it will become a welcome addition to your personal collection of Russian history books.

Best regards from across the ditch,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rgt9w on November 03, 2010, 07:38:12 PM
Having read Margarita's exellent book, I wanted to share my thoughts on it. 

“The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: A Conspiracy that Brought Down the Russian Empire” by Margarita Nelipa re-examines the controversial assassination using previously unavailable primary resources located within Russia. The author refutes the popular image of Rasputin as an inebriated, debauched, staretz who single handedly brought down the Romanov Dynasty and provides evidence that he was innocent of many of the accusations made against him. She reveals Rasputin had far less contact with the Empress and her family than was widely rumored by Russian society. Her research confirms Rasputin had no significant impact on appointments of government ministers or influence over the Emperor’s political decisions. The author describes an orchestrated smear campaign against Rasputin and the Empress with an objective of destabilizing the monarchy and undermining the Emperor’s authority.

Rasputin’s murder was initially conceived by disaffected members of the Duma. The assassination was supported by various members of the aristocracy, military, and leading members of the Imperial Family. The author quotes from the personal correspondence and diaries of Imperial Family members to attest to their complicity in the crime. The author outlines the actions of representatives of foreign governments who were also aware of the plan to kill Rasputin and did nothing to prevent it.

 Ms. Nelipa analyzes each stage of the conspiracy in significant detail. The author explains that the murder was intentionally timed to correspond with the recess of the Duma. The homicide is depicted in a step by step manner. The author vividly describes the crime scene and provides photographs of the key areas for illustration. Original police depositions from key witnesses are used to corroborate the sequence of slaying.  The various memoirs of the conspirators are compared in order to identify inconsistencies and fallacies. The existing information regarding Rasputin’s autopsy is examined and his injuries are described at length. The author reconstructs how the injuries were inflicted. With her forensics and medical background, the author disproves many of the myths regarding Rasputin’s demise in the Yusupov Palace and provides a logical and physiologically probable explanation of his death.  She also recounts the secret burial, exhumation, and hurried cremation of Rasputin’s corpse.  Based on her research, the author reveals where Rasputin’s remains were destroyed for the first time.

This important work is an excellent resource and highly recommended. This book will appeal to readers with an interest in Imperial Russian history or forensics.  It provides a wealth of new information about Rasputin’s life and death, as well as the final days of the autocracy. The work is fully annotated and contains an extensive bibliography. The author provides many important appendices that supplement the narrative. Stylistically, the structure of the narrative reminds one of a prosecutor presenting evidence in a judicial proceeding.

The author’s re-examination of this decades old crime provides fresh insight into the motives, actions, and fates of those involved in the homicide.  The work also humanizes Rasputin and concludes that an innocent man was killed in order to fulfill a political agenda. In the process, the conspirators help set in motion a series of events that would ultimately lead to revolution.

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Helen_Azar on November 05, 2010, 10:39:33 AM
Finished it last night. My review is below. I want to thank Margarita for her excellent research!

In history, much like in anything else, there are at least 2 sides to the "story". In this book we see a whole different side of the familiar story we have come to know as fact, the familiar story of the last days of Russia just before the revolution broke out. This book is not an easy read by any means. It took me about 3 months to finish, because I felt like I needed to concentrate on the facts that were presented, without the usual distractions, in order to fully understand and appreciate them. And there is certainly a LOT of new information to digest, a lot of new sources that have never been presented before, some very startling. This is a very different look at the last Russian Emperor Nicholas II, specifically during the twilight of his rule. This book is not just about Rasputin and his murder, it is a comprehensive study - from completely different angle - of the familiar events we have come to accept as historical truths. It can also be viewed as a form of "rehabilitation" of the last Tsar's reputation, based on thorough examination of definitive primary sources that have never been considered before. It has been very easy for us to condemn Nicholas II in historical hindsight 20/20, but stepping back in history and into "his shoes" and seeing the events as they were happening, from the perspective of perhaps a close contemporary, explains and even justifies a lot of the decisions and actions which have always seemed inexplicable or foolish to us. The author clearly did a lot of very thorough research, going directly to primary sources - the way history should be studied. From scratch. For some strange reason, I have always intuitively felt a level of sympathy for Rasputin, no matter how reviled he had been in popular history, and sensed that painting him as "evil" and consequently the imperial couple - clueless, was too simplistic of a view of very complicated persons and a very complicated situation. This book presents us with a much more realistic idea of what actually went on during that time period in Russian history, and hence helps us balance the view of this history, as we knew it - until now.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 06, 2010, 06:59:15 PM
Dear rgt9w and Helen_A,

Many thanks for taking the time to read my book and for publicly expressing your opinions about my research and the approach taken.

I am delighted by the generosity of your words.

Best regards to you both,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 06, 2010, 07:16:58 PM
Just to let everyone know on this Forum,

Paul Gilbert of Gilbert's Royal Books, (with thanks to Ted Rosvall for giving permission) has kindly made available Charlotte Zeepvat's review of my book that she had written for "Royalty Digest Magazine", No. 3, October, 2010 and published by Ted Rosvall.

Please see: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/news/reviewrasputin.html


Margarita Nelipa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Georgiy on November 07, 2010, 09:14:54 PM
Yes, the last two posts really summed it all up well. The Rasputin portrayed by Margarita is a far more realistic person than the legendary Rasputin. Her portrait of what Rasputin was very much coincides with how I have come to understand him over the years, and thinking about him as an Orthodox believer, how the Tsar and Tsaritsa, also being Orthodox, could have had time for him, if indeed, he was as is popularly believed. Once again, well done to Margarita for what is probably the most accurate portrait so far of Rasputin.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Petr on November 07, 2010, 09:34:16 PM
P.S.
Not in the window, but inside the shop, department literature in English, History, in the middle of the shop.

Many thanks for taking the photograph Rudy!!! I intend to visit Librairie Galignani next June whilst conducting my research duties in France relating to Alexander III.

Margarita[/color]


Dear Margarita

What  are you planning vis a vis AIII? Bought your book from Gilbert am awaiting delivery.

Regards,
Petr

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 09, 2010, 04:21:56 AM
Yes, the last two posts really summed it all up well. The Rasputin portrayed by Margarita is a far more realistic person than the legendary Rasputin. Her portrait of what Rasputin was very much coincides with how I have come to understand him over the years, and thinking about him as an Orthodox believer, how the Tsar and Tsaritsa, also being Orthodox, could have had time for him, if indeed, he was as is popularly believed. Once again, well done to Margarita for what is probably the most accurate portrait so far of Rasputin.

Dear Georgiy,

Many thanks for your kind comments.

I am delighted that your long held understanding of Rasputin coincides with my portrayal of Rasputin, who was not some kind of hideous person as most writers for decades have depicted him to be.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 09, 2010, 04:48:19 AM
Dear Margarita

What  are you planning vis a vis AIII? Bought your book from Gilbert am awaiting delivery.

Regards,
Petr

Dear Petr,

Thank you for your question. AIII will follow on similar lines that I followed with my book on Rasputin. Once again, all the material I have acquired is Russian and translated by myself. Extensive use of diaries penned by the key personalities of the day, government documents and journals/newspapers written during that era will be used to present, I hope, a lively image of Alexander the young boy, the reluctant heir and finally the indomitable Emperor of Russia.

Thank you very much for purchasing my book. I hope that you shall enjoy reading it!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: koloagirl on November 11, 2010, 05:27:11 PM

Aloha all!

I'm so looking forward to reading this new book on Rasputin by one of our very own forum members - that is always an added thrill!

I love the picture from Librarie Galignani in Paris - when I visited there earlier this year I thought I was in heaven for all the royalty based books they carried - I shipped quite a few back!

I am planning a return visit next year and now I will have a book on my "must find" list - I just hope I can wait that long!   It looks like a wonderful read about a fascinating and usually stereotyped individual in Romanov history!

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: matushka on November 13, 2010, 07:28:23 AM
Margarita, I have just finished your book. It took me a lot of time to read and assimilate his extremely rich and detailed information. I want first thank you for your enormous, amazing patient work. Different things were really a discovery for me. I am thinking (without any order) about the real fate of Rasputin’s remain, about the reason why Dimitri were chosen, about the real part the “Mastermind”, GD Nikolay  Mihailovich played in all of this, the genesis of Yussupov’s choice, and so on. I read with great interest the forensic evidence of the facts that Rasputin was not poisoned and indeed died before his body sank; those things were already “in the air” but not yet proven with such bright!
Of great interest were your explanations about the exact role of the British government in this case. And it will be the first of the several questions I would like to ask. Before all, I apologize if my questions sounds too naïve, perhaps too childish, the truth is I am only a “historien amateur”. Could you, please, better explain what you think were the reasons for Buchanan the Britain to be involved in the plot, to not prevent it. It is said and heard that the British government had fear for Russia’s further participation in the war efforts and that they saw Rasputin as a possible german agent, who had to be removed. But it is really so? Am I totally wrong supposing that they were on the contrary interested in that the Russian empire, their old enemy from the so called great game, will collapse, which will allow Britain to assure her position in Persia (see the statement of Shapshal you quote on page 201) and to take a part of the big Russia? In this perspective, the murder of Rasputin was only a conscientious step in the direction of revolution, of chaos. The fact that they celebrate the revolution so openly, that, as you write (p. 505), gave their agreement to the peace treaty of the Bolsheviks, the so called “intervention” Maria Fedorovna was of very poor opinion about (see her diary) suggest a lot. And if this is right, were Nikolay Mihalylovich, Yussupov and co aware of what they were involved in? Or am I too much under the influence of the “theorie du complot”?
Another question is less politic. A new thing for me was the close relationship of Rasputin with the Jewish community. Was this fact somehow studied? Why, in your opinion? Were there some spirituals connections? Did Jewish people try to obtain a better fate using the influence of Rasputin? And what about financial connections?
Another question is about the Tsar attitude. I always wonder why, being probably perfectly aware of what the papers wrote, of what society spoke, of all those fears, malicious hypotheses and gossiping, did he not took any measure at such a dangerous time like war time, for example, “sacrificing” Rasputin, sending in with good bodyguards to Pokrovkoye until the end of the war. Did he want to have the possibility to see him? Did he want to stay loyal to his friend? Did he frighten to hurt his wife? Did he hear his ministers who told him that all was “under control”? Did he have too much too important to think of? Did he simply lose control? What is your opinion? And why, at a moment when rumors of murder were running in the capital, did he not order to better protect R., day and night? O no, no fear, I am not trying to say he was involved, which I never believed, of course, but some people suggested it, and I would like to see this matter definitively closed and explained!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: matushka on November 13, 2010, 07:28:57 AM
And last question (I think), what, in your opinion, were the hopes of all of these Grand-Dukes and relatives, renting for a more liberal regime or even a republic. Did they really think it will be better for Russia, did they really were ready to sacrifice a big part of their privileges, which could not not have happened (and happened, and in such a way!)
Then, I wanted to let you know (but you probably already correct it) that mitropolit Pitirim was not killed by the Bolsheviks, but died of typhus on the south of Russia. See more exact information in the Memories of metropolit Evlogy Georguievsky or the Memories of prince Jevahov (perhaps also Shavelsky, not sure any more). The place where bishop Feophan (page 549) died is in fact well know, it is the little place of Limeray, the french village near the river Loire where he used to live as a hermit in a grotte. A picture of his grave, which has became a place of little pilgrimage, can be seen as this page http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Th%C3%A9ophane_de_Poltava. Some friends of mine were there a few years ago. And, I thought the picture you quoted as Dimitri with Alexandra Feodorovna represented in fact Dimitri with Ella? Or am I wrong?
I wanted to express some personal opinions, but it will be another time. Once more, thank you very much for you work. Waiting for your answer and… your next book!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 13, 2010, 09:27:18 PM

Aloha all!

I'm so looking forward to reading this new book on Rasputin by one of our very own forum members - that is always an added thrill!

I love the picture from Librarie Galignani in Paris - when I visited there earlier this year I thought I was in heaven for all the royalty based books they carried - I shipped quite a few back!

I am planning a return visit next year and now I will have a book on my "must find" list - I just hope I can wait that long!   It looks like a wonderful read about a fascinating and usually stereotyped individual in Romanov history!

Hi Koloagirl

Mahalo for expressing interest in my book.

Rudy3 certainly took a marvellous image of my book in Librarie Galignani in Paris.

I too am very much looking forward to visiting that bookstore next year.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 13, 2010, 10:25:50 PM
And last question (I think), what, in your opinion, were the hopes of all of these Grand-Dukes and relatives, renting for a more liberal regime or even a republic. Did they really think it will be better for Russia, did they really were ready to sacrifice a big part of their privileges, which could not not have happened (and happened, and in such a way!)
... And, I thought the picture you quoted as Dimitri with Alexandra Feodorovna represented in fact Dimitri with Ella? Or am I wrong?
I wanted to express some personal opinions, but it will be another time. Once more, thank you very much for you work. Waiting for your answer and… your next book!

Dear matushka,

Thank you very much for your comments regarding my book. You have so many interesting and diverse questions, some of which are seeking a speculative response on my part. Firstly let me say that I have attempted to put all the relevant facts in the book.

I do not know anything about the conspiracy theory surrounding "the great game".

You may be right regarding the image, but it was forwarded to me from Russia with the words: Великий князь Дмитрий Павлович и императрицa Александра Фёдоровна.

With regard to the Grand Dukes, IMO some of them were seeking a more liberalized monarchy, preferably without Nikolai II as the Sovereign. Few of them would have welcomed or foreseen the Bolsheviks taking power.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 14, 2010, 01:45:31 AM
...Then, I wanted to let you know (but you probably already correct it) that mitropolit Pitirim was not killed by the Bolsheviks, but died of typhus on the south of Russia. See more exact information in the Memories of metropolit Evlogy Georguievsky or the Memories of prince Jevahov (perhaps also Shavelsky, not sure any more). The place where bishop Feophan (page 549) died is in fact well know, it is the little place of Limeray, the french village near the river Loire where he used to live as a hermit in a grotte.

Dear matushka,

I appreciate your kindness in posting this additional information.  

Большое спасибо! [Thank you very much]

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: ashanti01 on November 14, 2010, 07:22:39 PM
I have to say this was book I was glad to add to my collection.

I have to say that I'm glad Margarita was able to uncover how involved Princess Yusupova was in the events leading up the murder. For years all one could find noted casually was that she was 'a fierce opponent of Rasputin' but nothing else that would have implicated her in any wrong doing. While Felix Yusupov's role in the murder was always question, I feel Margarita presented a wonderful insight as to why he became involved in the plot. I can honestly say I was more than a little suprised at the facts presented which had me simply stunned at times.

This is definitely a book I hope every high school and university adds to their selection on the Romanovs. It was truly a fact filled book that brought to light many things which will no doubt change how one views not only the murder victim, but members of the Romanov family as well. I will not repeat what many others have already written in this thread, except this is really an exceptional book I would encourage everyone to read.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on November 16, 2010, 05:55:22 PM
I have to say this was book I was glad to add to my collection.

I have to say that I'm glad Margarita was able to uncover how involved Princess Yusupova was in the events leading up the murder. For years all one could find noted casually was that she was 'a fierce opponent of Rasputin' but nothing else that would have implicated her in any wrong doing. While Felix Yusupov's role in the murder was always question, I feel Margarita presented a wonderful insight as to why he became involved in the plot. I can honestly say I was more than a little suprised at the facts presented which had me simply stunned at times.

This is definitely a book I hope every high school and university adds to their selection on the Romanovs. It was truly a fact filled book that brought to light many things which will no doubt change how one views not only the murder victim, but members of the Romanov family as well. I will not repeat what many others have already written in this thread, except this is really an exceptional book I would encourage everyone to read.

Dear Teresa,

Thank you very much for your considerate remarks!

I am very happy that you enjoyed my book and that it gave you much to consider given all the new information I endeavored to present in the one tome.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 10, 2010, 11:23:03 PM
If you are considering a quality Russian Imperial history book for Christmas or for the New Year holiday season, why not consider purchasing a copy of my book:

"The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin: A Conspiracy That Brought Down the Russian Empire", copies of which are still available from these two online bookstores:

1. 'Gilbert's Books' in Toronto, Canada, see: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/news/rasputin.html or

2. 'van Hoogstraten' in Den Haag, The Netherlands, see: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445 

Many thanks for your consideration,

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on December 11, 2010, 11:05:40 PM
Very much hoping to find it under my tree.  : )  I dropped some pretty strong hints....my husband is not one for subtlety.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on December 12, 2010, 11:59:15 AM
I started reading the book about a week ago and I can see, as another poster says, that it could take months to read and digest all of it.

At first, I thought to put it away.  I found it hard going and, with all of the annotation used within the chapters, I found it to be "choppy".

I do believe that Margarita did wonderful research and has provided facts not in evidence before. If there was a wide plot, then she has carefully laid out the participants and the timeline as she has interpreted the material she has uncovered.  I know that I could not have stayed the course for three years and written so complete and well annotated volume.

I still don't see, maybe because I haven't gotten even 1/3 through it, why it is so terrible that the Imperial Family wanted a man whom they saw to be hurting the dynasty to be removed.

Numerous members of the family tried and tried to talk about this issue with Nicholas and Alexandra and were treated like dogs because of their concern.  Is it any wonder that they, with only the knowledge that they had at the time and not the benefit of hindsight and GARF, thought that the best solution was to remove Rasputin from his position of "power".  And he did have power.  Remember that no matter what anyone now says, there are letters from Alexandra to Nicholas in which Alexandra begs Nicholas to listen to and trust "Our Friend".

Perhaps Rasputin was only a man of the people, a kindly "strannic" and not an evil manipulator, but I tend to agree with those who knew him that walking and preaching were more beneficial to his work ethic than actually working.

Rasputin seems to me to be one of those whom in the 20th century we would say "fell into a pile of manure and came up covered with diamonds".

Perhaps the police reports were manipulated and the actual events twisted to show him at his worst, but I still believe that he took advantage of anything that gave him power over anyone and the fact that Alexei had hemophilia was the cherry (to Rasputin) on the cake.  If there had been no hemophilia, does anyone honestly think that Nicholas or Alexandra would have given Rasputin the time of day past the first meeting?  He would have been just one more religious wanderer who passed through St. Petersburg and they would have forgotten him by nightfall.  No better or no different than many others who sought their Imperial presence to give and receive blessings.

If the plot to murder Rasputin did exist, I can see why.  No one could rid the throne of his presence by himself.  The extended Imperial Family was concerned not only for the dynasty but, of course, for their own place in it.  Put yourselves in their place, without the benefit of hindsight, and see how you would feel if you thought you could see your way of life disappearing because of a weak willed Tsar and his needy wife.

I think that Rasputin is now being looked at as an innocent dupe.  Someone who was an easy scape goat because he was not of the imperial class.  His life was looked at as disposable and so he was murdered.  But I think that those who were actually there and who actually witnessed his actions and life style might not have seen him that way at all.  They saw him as a threat to their way of life because of the power, yes, power he appeared to have over Alexandra and how Nicholas was not doing anything about it.

I think they thought he had a great deal of strength and influence over Nicholas and Alexandra.  If even Grand Duchess Ella, Alexandra's sister, felt that Rasputin was a danger, then I think he must have been.  If our sisters and/or brothers were heading for a precipice, wouldn't we go to them and try to stop them?

Many ulterior motives have been assigned to those who wanted to see Rasputin gone from his position so close to the Imperial Throne.  Some had pure motives and some had personal motives.  Some wanted to see the dynasty cleansed of the stain caused by the Rasputin that they saw, (not the one that is being presented to us today) and some saw Rasputin as a symptom of the decline in the quality of the Imperial common sense since Nicholas II became Tsar.  Probably some - like Meichen - were just jealous and looking for a way to promote her sons.

But whatever the reason for the joining together of those who have been accused of "conspiracy" in the murder of Rasputin, each had a reason that we will probably never understand as we can not live during the time of the first total world war while conditions at home were unsettled and revolution that threatened the very fabric of life had been in the offing since 1905.

The alleged conspirators were running scared and fighting for their place in a world that was crumbling around them.  Their solution was to remove what they thought to be the most horrible influence over the Imperial Family in hopes that common sense would prevail.  They were wrong in that assumption perhaps because they waited too long to make their move and they misunderstood the one person whom they were actually aiming at.  Alexandra. 

But so many did try to reach her and to talk to her and to understand her dependence on Rasputin. 

She, after all, shut them all out.

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: LisaDavidson on December 13, 2010, 12:27:55 AM
The beauty of this book is Margarita's restraint in offering her own opinions throughout the book. She presents facts and analysis and really trusts the reader to reach their own conclusions. To me what she makes clear is that Nicholas held firm (which kind of makes him not so weak willed, no?) in standing up to his family and saying, no, murder is always wrong. Now, there are many moral relativists who would say that there are times when murder is justified, but others think that murder is never right. Nicholas believed in the latter position - even to his own political detriment.

Was the Imperial Family wrong to want to remove Rasputin? I don't think so, but their method (murder) was clearly wrong, and not only that, it was ineffectual and had many unintended consequences.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on December 13, 2010, 09:40:12 AM
Was the Imperial Family wrong to want to remove Rasputin? I don't think so, but their method (murder) was clearly wrong, and not only that, it was ineffectual and had many unintended consequences.

That is exactly what I just said.  However, by the time they took action, murder seemed to be the only solution.  They had tried and tried other ways of dealing with the problem that Rasputin posed to them, but Nicholas (whether by his own action or his inability to pursue action against Alexandra's wishes) did nothing to appease them.  Remember that psychiatrists say that inaction is in itself a form of taking action.

I think that the family and others who (from the coronation onward) saw the dynasty begin to crumble, were looking for a return to common sense and could find no relief in approaching either Nicholas or Alexandra.

As I said, by trying other means, they waited too long to take any kind of action except (in their minds) murder and perhaps then the removal of Alexandra and/or Nicholas, if that were then necessary to bring back government that was responsible to the needs of the people.  Not a government only responsible to the incidental needs of one young boy with a life threatening illness whose parents were obsessed with keeping the autocracy alive and well for him to inherit.

Nicholas made strong decisions on some issues and from what we are now reading, he may have been stronger in his convictions that formerly realized.  However, he made his stand on things that did not help the general population at all.  Like exiling his relatives for not obeying the marriage laws or holding firm that murder was not acceptable in the case of Rasputin.

I can well see how the representatives of Russia's allies would also be involved in the removal of a figure that they believed to be harmful to the continuation of the war.  Covert operations are nothing new and this has "black ops" written all over it.  That doesn't mean that I condone their actions, but I think I can understand their frustration.

But I am still working on the book and so I have to finish before I can comment on other conspirators besides the Imperial Family and the high ranking members of the Duma.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on December 13, 2010, 09:50:12 AM
One other unconnected thought.  The picture of Rasputin on the cover of the book makes him look like a friendly or mostly benign teddy bear like "uncle".  However, portrait painters are notoriously inaccurate when they portray the facial expressions of their subjects.  Just ask Henry VIII and his opinion of Anne of Cleaves.

The photograph on the interior page shows the actual face of the man and one can see there is nothing nice about his facial expression or his eyes.  That man in the photograph looks like a prowling wolf.  His expression is feral.  He is not someone I would like to meet in a dark alley and certainly not someone I would trust with my children's safety.

If the eyes are the 'windows to soul",  Rasputin's soul must have been a barren moonscape.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Sarushka on December 13, 2010, 03:22:06 PM
The photograph on the interior page shows the actual face of the man and one can see there is nothing nice about his facial expression or his eyes.  That man in the photograph looks like a prowling wolf.  His expression is feral.  He is not someone I would like to meet in a dark alley and certainly not someone I would trust with my children's safety.

Is this a previously unpublished photo?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 14, 2010, 05:38:33 AM
Thank you very much for your comments Alixz!

Your continuing thoughts will be appreciated.

Best regards,

Margarita  
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 14, 2010, 05:53:16 AM
The beauty of this book is Margarita's restraint in offering her own opinions throughout the book. She presents facts and analysis and really trusts the reader to reach their own conclusions. To me what she makes clear is that Nicholas held firm (which kind of makes him not so weak willed, no?) in standing up to his family and saying, no, murder is always wrong. ...

Dear Lisa,

You are indeed correct to identify that my book is evidence-based, and not simply my interpretation of the events as they unfolded.

Thank you for your generous appraisal.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 14, 2010, 06:03:28 AM
Is this a previously unpublished photo?

To my knowledge, the portrait that appears on the cover of my book has never been previously published in any biographic study of Rasputin in the West or in Russia.


 
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 14, 2010, 06:26:59 AM
Very much hoping to find it under my tree.  : )  I dropped some pretty strong hints....my husband is not one for subtlety.

May your Christmas wish be fulfilled!!!    ;  )
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Sarushka on December 14, 2010, 08:14:01 AM
Is this a previously unpublished photo?

To my knowledge, the portrait that appears on the cover of my book has never been previously published in any biographic study of Rasputin in the West or in Russia.

I meant the one on the interior page, that Alixz describes as "feral." I don't recall a photo of Rasputin ever striking me that intensely, so I'm wondering if it's a new photo or a matter of individual interpretation.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Alixz on December 14, 2010, 08:30:24 AM
The photograph that I referred to as feral is the one on the title page not the one on the cover.  Probably just a matter of interpretation.  Even though I still haven't finished the book and I think that I might not be able to, I can not buy into the Rasputin who was innocent victim of a conspiracy conducted by most of the Imperial Family.

I can buy the conspiracy, but not that he was so innocent.

I think that the old saying that "where there is smoke there is fire" is appropriate to Rasputin.  If he had been so innocent and so religious and such a trusting man of faith, I just can't see so many people would have seen him as otherwise.

Perhaps one or two would have thought him a danger, but there are just too many to disregard their writings and their diaries.

In other threads, I have said that Nicholas was betrayed by his own family before all others.  But I believe that he betrayed them as well.  Not just because he sided with his wife against the collective experience and wisdom of those who tried to help him, but when he did take a stand he didn't pick his battles wisely.

I am not saying that murder should be excused because the murder victim was a rogue and a user.  We never excuse the new Soviets for the murder of the entire Imperial Family because they believed that Nicholas was a tyrant.

I am glad that new information is constantly disseminated and that history is treated as fluid and is always being examined as new evidence is released.

Margarita has done a marvelous job of hunting up new information and confirming some of the old.  Just the time and effort that it took to put the whole thing together amazes me.  I am always in awe of those who have the time and the money and the energy to do the leg work so that the rest of us can a reap the benefits of their effort.

Lisa said: 
She (Margarita) presents facts and analysis and really trusts the reader to reach their own conclusions. 

That is a good thing.  Not everyone who reads this book will accept that the accrued information has been pieced together in the only way possible.  Some may say "Eureka" and some may say "No eureka moment yet, I still have questions that have not been answered."  But either way the thought processes will have been stimulated.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 16, 2010, 02:50:26 AM
I meant the one on the interior page, that Alixz describes as "feral." I don't recall a photo of Rasputin ever striking me that intensely, so I'm wondering if it's a new photo or a matter of individual interpretation.

The ovoid shaped photograph to which you refer is not unique to my book.

Like you, I do not find anything "feral" about it as has been described by Alixz.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 16, 2010, 03:29:04 AM
... Even though I still haven't finished the book and I think that I might not be able to, I can not buy into the Rasputin who was  innocent victim of a conspiracy conducted by most of the Imperial Family.


...I am glad that new information is constantly disseminated and that history is treated as fluid and is always being examined as new evidence is released.

Margarita has done a marvelous job of hunting up new information and confirming some of the old.  Just the time and effort that it took to put the whole thing together amazes me.  I am always in awe of those who have the time and the money and the energy to do the leg work so that the rest of us can a reap the benefits of their effort.

Lisa said: 
She (Margarita) presents facts and analysis and really trusts the reader to reach their own conclusions. 

That is a good thing.  Not everyone who reads this book will accept that the accrued information has been pieced together in the only way possible.  Some may say "Eureka" and some may say "No eureka moment yet, I still have questions that have not been answered."  But either way the thought processes will have been stimulated.

Hi Alixz,

To correct you on one point, only a hand full of members from the Romanov family were involved in the conspiracy to eliminate Rasputin.

Should you decide to continue reading my book, and I hope that you shall, you will find that there was also a second more decisive public faction that was involved.

That said, I do understand that my book may be difficult to read because it presents a lot of new information in every chapter and as a whole, it also challenges many long held beliefs that may be difficult to set aside.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: LisaDavidson on December 16, 2010, 10:23:45 AM
The challenging of long held beliefs has long been the point of my own Romanov scholarship, and I commend writers such as Margarita who seek to uncover the truth, and at the least expose the false opinions that are held by others. Many of us historians have little interest in regurgitating the same old sources and want to shine the light into the darkness, as it were. Write on, Margarita!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 18, 2010, 07:16:44 PM
Just to let everyone know that the bookstore in Paris, 'Librairie Galignani' has just sold all their copies of my book.

However copies are still available from these two online stores:

• Gilbert's Books: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/news/rasputin.html or

• van Hoogstraten in Den Haag: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on December 25, 2010, 10:09:22 PM
Margarita, I received your book for Christmas - sometimes my husband does pay attention.  ; )  I can't wait to be able to dig into it.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 27, 2010, 08:14:20 PM
Margarita, I received your book for Christmas - sometimes my husband does pay attention.  ; )  I can't wait to be able to dig into it.

Thanks for letting me know.  : ) I sincerely hope that you shall enjoy reading my book!

Your comments will be very welcomed.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 01, 2011, 10:44:47 PM
Margarita, I'm having trouble putting your book down.  Bear in mind I'm pretty new with the subject of Imperial Russia and I'm not nearly as well-read as some of the other esteemed members of this forum who've been at it for years - some of what I am reading is absolutely stunning.  As in, I'm stunned.  To learn who the actual likely mastermind of the murder really was...that the "Yar incident" was not exaggerated, as I'd thought, but completely fabricated...and right now I'm reading the section that outlines the involvement of British intelligence.

I'm also stunned at the seeming....eagerness...of the Romanov family to subscribe to the gossip and rumour without giving serious thought about the "evidence" presented to them.  Is this simply hindsight on my part?  I don't know.  To me the "family bond" didn't exist.

I have lost a lot of sleep due to reading late into the night, reading the same passages over and over again.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Helen on January 02, 2011, 06:17:24 AM
I'm also stunned at the seeming....eagerness...of the Romanov family to subscribe to the gossip and rumour without giving serious thought about the "evidence" presented to them.  Is this simply hindsight on my part?  I don't know.  
I've wondered about this for a long time, too. I've often thought that certain members of the Romanov family were not truly interested in the truth about Rasputin and that,  if there hadn't been a Rasputin,  they would have invented him.

I don't think it's simply hindsight: Evgeny Botkin's comment as cited on page 76 in Margarita Nelipa's book is from 1913 and says something similar about "adversaries of the imperial family and preparationists of the revolution".
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 02, 2011, 08:08:58 PM
Dr Botkin also said something very similar to what you did - that if there were no Rasputin, Botkin himself would've been targeted, or Anna Vyrubova, or someone else. 

For my part, I believe it would've been someone close to Alexandra, specifically.  She was the one they wanted gone, the one they wanted to ruin.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historylover on January 03, 2011, 01:48:33 AM
I am inclined to agree with Alixz's opinions.  I am looking forward to reading Margarita's book
and studying what it says, however.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 03, 2011, 07:35:49 PM
I am inclined to agree with Alixz's opinions.  I am looking forward to reading Margarita's book
and studying what it says, however.

May I recommend that you read my book first and then decide for yourself whether you agree with the new evidence that is presented.

Hoping that you shall enjoy reading my book.  :  )

Regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 04, 2011, 03:09:27 AM
Margarita, I'm having trouble putting your book down.  ...
... I have lost a lot of sleep due to reading late into the night, reading the same passages over and over again.

Dear historyfan,

I am delighted that you are enjoying my book so much, but alas I fear for your lack of sleep!

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 04, 2011, 08:19:31 PM
Margarita, I'm having trouble putting your book down.  ...
... I have lost a lot of sleep due to reading late into the night, reading the same passages over and over again.

Dear historyfan,

I am delighted that you are enjoying my book so much, but alas I fear for your lack of sleep!

Best regards,

Margarita

Ah well.  : )  I can't read and sleep at the same time, so....

The Nikolai Mikhailovitch you refer to, this is the brother of Sandro (married to Xenia)?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 05, 2011, 07:10:56 PM
Yes historyfan, the Nikolai Mikhailovich I wrote about, is indeed Sandro's brother.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 05, 2011, 08:07:41 PM
If my mind is boggled reading your book, I can only imagine how you felt uncovering the information for it!
Title: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Lucien on January 06, 2011, 01:23:39 AM
If my mind is boggled reading your book, I can only imagine how you felt uncovering the information for it!

Now this,is a wellwrought book,it does have the original documents,in their original language which no-one,among authors that is,
masters as Margarita does.She went trough a frenzy of information from the sources that mattered,not by hear say and a wet finger.
I recommended this book as a Christmas gift to all my friends with the ( Romanov)  history gene.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Helen on January 08, 2011, 12:24:24 PM
I agree with Lucien. I'm impressed by the large number of Russian sources Margarita Nelipa has accessed, her analysis of the complex information they provide, her careful reconstruction of the plot, actual murder and subsequent police and forensic investigations, and the many references provided.

Although Chapter I of this book does not address each and every rumour written about Rasputin - which is clearly outside the scope of this book - I thought the discussion about the alleged horse-stealing, Rasputin's alleged membership of the Khlyst sect and the incident at the Yar restaurant convincing. The man was not without fault, but this chapter disproves key accusations against him. Margarita Nelipa's portrayal of Rasputin strikes me as far more credible than the rather unrealistic, wild accounts I have read in several other books.

I buy the evidence presented of GD Nikolai Mikhailovich's role as the mastermind behind the murder. Apart from his exposure and the store of information on the people directly involved in Rasputin's murder, something else I appreciate in this book is that Margarita Nelipa does not mince matters with regard to the actions of various other members of the Romanov family. I've felt for a long time that the actions of, for instance, the Dowager Empress and Ella were such that the police would have brought them in for questioning about their prior knowledge and encouragement of the murder, if all of this had taken place in my country nowadays, and I think they might even have been considered accomplices to premeditated murder in our legal system. I understand that the authorities were not competent to bring members of the royal family in and prosecute them freely, but I appreciate that the author has re-assessed their attitudes and actions, not by what might seem desirable or acceptable or inevitable to achieve the aims of people of whatever political or religious persuasion, but by fundamental values and standards of our societies and legal systems. This book is a valuable addition to the library of anyone interested in Rasputin, the Romanovs or the last years of the Romanov dynasty.

Thank you for writing it, Margarita!

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 08, 2011, 09:43:57 PM
I agree also, Helen.  I also find the information very convincing.  I like how Margarita refutes previously-published information by pointing out how it could not have possibly been true, because (and she lists the reasons).  I've read over and over about the "Yar incident" - to find out it was completely fabricated was astonishing.  Again, Margarita stated quite clearly why it was fabricated information, as opposed to exaggerated etc.

As to the Dowager Empress and Ella, as someone who's relatively new to the study of Romanov history, their role is shocking. 

I echo Helen's sentiment: thank you, Margarita.  : ) 
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 09, 2011, 04:19:46 AM
Dear Helen, Historyfan and Lucien,

Thank you so very much for your very elegant comments about my book!

and Lucien,

Thank you for being so kind as to recommend my book to your friends who 'inherited' a liking for Romanov history!  ;  )

Best regards to you all,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 09, 2011, 09:22:23 PM
More shock - Rasputin never was poisoned?  Every single thing I have ever read has stated that he was, but it didn't work.  I think the information that no poison was used is up there with the most astounding revelations.  I've yet to get to the section on the perils of handling cyanide.  I'm sorry if I sound like some sort of hysteric, but really, this is just fascinating and I can't stop reading.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 10, 2011, 04:32:28 AM
More shock - Rasputin never was poisoned?  Every single thing I have ever read has stated that he was, but it didn't work.  I think the information that no poison was used is up there with the most astounding revelations.  I've yet to get to the section on the perils of handling cyanide.  I'm sorry if I sound like some sort of hysteric, but really, this is just fascinating and I can't stop reading.

Others who wrote about Rasputin's manner of death accepted that the poisoning had taken place. Many historians simply repeated in their words, what Purishkevich and Yusupov wrote. More recently investigators have attempted to explain why the cyanide failed to take effect.

As I pointed out Lazavert revealed many years later that no poison was used.

After putting on my medical science hat, I determined that the alleged poisoning scenario was an absurdity. My reasoning was based on my understanding of the toxic character of potassium cyanide, which I explained on p 388.

The only ingested substance found during the autopsy was alcohol, which I would like to stress here, was never quantified by Professor Kosorotov.

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Sarushka on January 10, 2011, 04:30:55 PM
Margarita,

I've just received a copy of your book on interlibrary loan and have begun browsing through it. So far I have two questions:

I'm curious about the imperial family's knowledge of the details of the murder. Would Nikolai have been made aware of the true details of the autopsy, or would he and his family have been susceptible to the same popular rumors circulating among the public (ie, the poisoning, drowning, and Rasputin's hand frozen in the sign of benediction)?

What is the source of Maria Nikolaevna's ink drawing shown on page 508? It's very pretty -- I don't recall seeing it before.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Janet Ashton on January 10, 2011, 05:05:56 PM
More shock - Rasputin never was poisoned?  Every single thing I have ever read has stated that he was, but it didn't work.  

Rasputin's daughter Maria actually claimed in one of her voluminous sets of memoirs that she did not believe he had been poisoned. Her reasoning was that he hated sweet cakes and would not have eaten any if they were offered him (see Rasputin, my father, p 111). THis makes me wonder whether she was speculating - or how much she herself actually knew of the autopsy report?

See also Greg King The man who killed Rasputin for references to Lazovert admitting that he substituted some other powder for cyanide.

I have a copy of Margarita's book but regret that I haven't yet had time to read much due to the demands of my own projects, but I will home on the politics, as I generally do!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: blessOTMA on January 10, 2011, 08:18:02 PM
I sometimes think the poison myth was cultivated over the years as a means to put forward  Rasputin  was not merely human, but a  monster deserving death... " he was given enough poison to kill many men , but it could not not kill him! " Demonizing the victim  etc. His name is now synonymous with someone or thing that will not die normally....
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 11, 2011, 04:16:27 AM
Rasputin's daughter Maria actually claimed in one of her voluminous sets of memoirs that she did not believe he had been poisoned. Her reasoning was that he hated sweet cakes and would not have eaten any if they were offered him (see Rasputin, my father, p 111). THis makes me wonder whether she was speculating - or how much she herself actually knew of the autopsy report?

Since Matrena stressed in her books that her father loathed sweet foods, this information tells me that she was not informed about the autopsy results.

See also Greg King The man who killed Rasputin for references to Lazovert admitting that he substituted some other powder for cyanide.

Mr King's book "The Murder of Rasputin" @ p 173 stated the following:

"There were also repeated rumors of a deathbed confession by Lazovert in which he alleged that he had deliberately substituted a harmless chemical at the last minute."

In my edition of the book, no references were provided as to where any of these rumors came from.

I have a copy of Margarita's book but regret that I haven't yet had time to read much due to the demands of my own projects, but I will home on the politics, as I generally do!

Thank you for acquiring a copy of my book. I hope that you shall find it informative.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 11, 2011, 04:42:46 AM
I sometimes think the poison myth was cultivated over the years as a means to put forward  Rasputin  was not merely human, but a  monster deserving death... " he was given enough poison to kill many men , but it could not not kill him! " Demonizing the victim  etc. His name is now synonymous with someone or thing that will not die normally....

It is far more interesting to invent a scenario in which the use of a potent poison proved so ineffective that the conspirators were compelled to resort to other means.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 11, 2011, 05:20:38 AM
I sometimes think the poison myth was cultivated over the years as a means to put forward  Rasputin  was not merely human, but a  monster deserving death... " he was given enough poison to kill many men , but it could not not kill him! " Demonizing the victim  etc. His name is now synonymous with someone or thing that will not die normally....

It is far more interesting to invent a scenario in which the use of a potent poison proved so ineffective that the conspirators were compelled to resort to other means.

BTW I do agree with you!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Janet Ashton on January 11, 2011, 11:53:42 AM


Mr King's book "The Murder of Rasputin" @ p 173 stated the following:

"There were also repeated rumors of a deathbed confession by Lazovert in which he alleged that he had deliberately substituted a harmless chemical at the last minute."

In my edition of the book, no references were provided as to where any of these rumors came from.

True; but anyone can contact him to ask questions. My main point to historyfan is that not all previous historians have uncritically accepted the poisoning tale.

Hopefully I will have time soon to read the rest of your book.

Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Teddy on January 11, 2011, 02:58:31 PM
I have read this wonderfull work of Mrs Nelipa. This biography about Rasputin and the fall of the Romanov dynasty is well recearched and detailed. It contains new information about the person Rasputin and the influence at the Russian court. I like the style in which this book is written: cold case style. And let us see, what the true influence was of Rasputin on the Imperial couple. I'm looking forward to read the next book of Mrs Nelipa, Alexander III.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 11, 2011, 08:11:44 PM
I'm curious about the imperial family's knowledge of the details of the murder. Would Nikolai have been made aware of the true details of the autopsy, or would he and his family have been susceptible to the same popular rumors circulating among the public (ie, the poisoning, drowning, and Rasputin's hand frozen in the sign of benediction)?

@  p 360 you will read that Nikolai II requested his Minister of Justice to arrange the autopsy. It follows that the Emperor would have been duly informed of Professor Kosorotov's findings.

What is the source of Maria Nikolaevna's ink drawing shown on page 508? It's very pretty -- I don't recall seeing it before.

The drawing on p 508 was originally published in Illustrirovannaya Rossiya ["Russia Illustrated"], Paris in 1932. Unfortunately the drawing, which I saw in this journal at the Helsinki University library, is not as clear as I would have liked.



Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 11, 2011, 09:26:45 PM


Mr King's book "The Murder of Rasputin" @ p 173 stated the following:

"There were also repeated rumors of a deathbed confession by Lazovert in which he alleged that he had deliberately substituted a harmless chemical at the last minute."

In my edition of the book, no references were provided as to where any of these rumors came from.

True; but anyone can contact him to ask questions. My main point to historyfan is that not all previous historians have uncritically accepted the poisoning tale.

Hopefully I will have time soon to read the rest of your book.



Oh no, I don't assume that they all have...just what I have read (which is by no means everyone).  : )
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 12, 2011, 03:38:47 AM
I have read this wonderfull work of Mrs Nelipa. This biography about Rasputin and the fall of the Romanov dynasty is well recearched and detailed. It contains new information about the person Rasputin and the influence at the Russian court. I like the style in which this book is written: cold case style. And let us see, what the true influence was of Rasputin on the Imperial couple. I'm looking forward to read the next book of Mrs Nelipa, Alexander III.

Hi Teddy,

I really delighted that you have enjoyed reading my book. Many thanks for your kind comments.

It is my intention to complete the AIII manuscript well before the end of this year.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 16, 2011, 08:41:10 PM
Margarita, perhaps this is slightly off-topic, but I have a question about the Russian language as I've read it in your book.  It's regarding surnames.  I understood that the surname of a Russian female is the same as that of her husband or her father, but with a suffix, like "skaya" or "ova".  Example "Matrena Rasputina".

However, many times when I have read the transliteration of a headline regarding Rasputin, his name is changed to read "Rasputina".  Example "Delo Rasputina".  Why is that?  I'm just confused about why the name suddenly appears "feminized".
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Sarushka on January 16, 2011, 08:48:31 PM
Margarita, perhaps this is slightly off-topic, but I have a question about the Russian language as I've read it in your book.  It's regarding surnames.  I understood that the surname of a Russian female is the same as that of her husband or her father, but with a suffix, like "skaya" or "ova".  Example "Matrena Rasputina".

However, many times when I have read the transliteration of a headline regarding Rasputin, his name is changed to read "Rasputina".  Example "Delo Rasputina".  Why is that?  I'm just confused about why the name suddenly appears "feminized".

It has to do with the declension of nouns in the genitive case in Russian. You can read more about it here (http://www.russianlessons.net/lessons/lesson10_main.php). I think you'll find the info under the heading "Using the genitive case - ownership" most relevant to your question.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: historyfan on January 16, 2011, 09:31:57 PM
That makes complete sense.  Thank you, Sarushka, for answering a question that was starting to drive me crazy!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 17, 2011, 03:22:21 AM
Margarita, perhaps this is slightly off-topic, but I have a question about the Russian language as I've read it in your book.  It's regarding surnames.  I understood that the surname of a Russian female is the same as that of her husband or her father, but with a suffix, like "skaya" or "ova".  Example "Matrena Rasputina".

However, many times when I have read the transliteration of a headline regarding Rasputin, his name is changed to read "Rasputina".  Example "Delo Rasputina".  Why is that?  I'm just confused about why the name suddenly appears "feminized".

A good question historyfan! Thank you.

Delo Rasputina refers to: "In the matter of Rasputin" or put another way, Rasputin's case file.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Lucien on June 01, 2011, 12:44:00 AM
And I start all over again at this whale of a book with info that needs a second reading in case you think you missed something.
Like the bit in which saint...my foot...Ella commits treason to her own sister in her haute couture nuns wear.And that is just one
reason for reading it again as there hasn't been a book on the subject that had the info this one has,from original papers in the
original language,unspoiled by what I refer to as just "disney people" and their blinded ignorant fans....Really,what a laugh and
embarresment for anyone seriously into history.But this,this piece of work,is of a quality undeniably far above anything written,
or mostly invented,before on Rasputin as well as a mischevous IF.They were no saints.They betrayed Nicky and his family,over
and over,they deserved what came to them as they inflicted most of it themselves,MF,Marie,Ella to name but three former foreign
country girls,but it went beyond their controle,they couldn't have known what wind of change would blow over Russia and stopped
Russia from anything Russian but the brutal rule of communism  and the loss of more lives then under any Tsar before,and a country
still not coming to terms with the change again the last 20 years.A country still largely backward,if not kept that way by the Kremlin,
then Kyrill and his ROC do their bit.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: blessOTMA on June 01, 2011, 02:33:41 AM
 
I certainly agree this book is a land mark....just an amazing achievement ....Not only did the Imperial Family betray their Tsar...they did such a botch up of it ... you don't visibly kill the Tsar's close advisor without over throwing the Tsar as well ....you go all the way. They were hopeless  dilatants and Salon revolutionaries playing with TNT and many, many  millions died . If one looks from Nicholas I..thought to Nicholas II ,it seems the family worked less and less....and stayed more in St Petersburg living it up. What I mean is back in Nicholas 1 and Alexander II days , Grand Dukes ran areas of the country for their brother Tsar...the family worked! ...by the time of Rasputin's killing....they had forgotten even how...and expected someone less to do the work....well they did. Just hopeless..it was a collapse of a whole family that open the door and by killing Rasputin all they did was tell  the whole  world their sorry state
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on June 19, 2011, 01:15:57 AM

Following my visit to the van Hoogstraten bookstore in Den Haag, signed copies of my book are now available for purchase.

Special thanks are extended to the proprietor Annet Bakker, who welcomed me most graciously.

Margarita Nelipa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on June 19, 2011, 07:44:34 PM

Following my visit to the van Hoogstraten bookstore in Den Haag, signed copies of my book are now available for purchase.

Special thanks are extended to the proprietor Annet Bakker, who welcomed me most graciously.

Margarita Nelipa

Suffering jet lag ... I failed to add the appropriate link:

Please refer to the folllowing link: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445


Title: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Lucien on June 23, 2011, 12:06:43 AM

Following my visit to the van Hoogstraten bookstore in Den Haag, signed copies of my book are now available for purchase.

Special thanks are extended to the proprietor Annet Bakker, who welcomed me most graciously.

Margarita Nelipa

Suffering jet lag ... I failed to add the appropriate link:

Please refer to the folllowing link: http://www.hoogstraten.nl/theshop/product_info.php?products_id=445

And Hoogstraten happily twitters your recent visit around with a very nice pic of the signing session!!
They Loved to have you there,and so did all of us...grin....:))

Click on;" Follow us at Twitter" in the link you provided.

http://yfrog.com/keu59cj

 :)



Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on December 23, 2011, 11:31:07 PM
I am delighted that my book: "The Murder of Grigorii RASPUTIN, a Conspiracy That Brought Down the Russian Empire" is now available through Amazon.com and has already received excellent reviews.

See:  http://www.amazon.com/Grigorii-Rasputin-Conspiracy-Brought-Russian/dp/0986531014/ref=pd_rhf_gw_p_t_3

Hope that some of you will consider it as a worthwhile last minute gift for someone special during the forthcoming Holidays.

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Talya on January 15, 2012, 07:42:35 PM
I actually bought it through Amazon and, even though I wasn't on the best of terms with the price, I don't regret it. After reading through the first chapter, (it may have been speed reading :D) I had take a minute. I learned quite a bit from it, and I sure am I happy. Great job Margarita!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on January 16, 2012, 06:52:13 PM
I actually bought it through Amazon and, even though I wasn't on the best of terms with the price, I don't regret it. After reading through the first chapter, (it may have been speed reading :D) I had take a minute. I learned quite a bit from it, and I sure am I happy. Great job Margarita!

Many thanks for purchasing my book  and your kind comments,Talya!

I hope that you shall continue enjoy reading it and perhaps provide further feedback.

Best regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Tsarfan on January 20, 2012, 09:35:59 PM

....Margarita Nelipa’s groundbreaking new book is based on a host of previously unknown Russian sources, including primary documents such as newspapers of the day and original police depositions, diaries and Duma documents all translated by the author. Extensive annotations and comprehensive appendices add academic strength to this popular history. .....


I have just started this very lengthy thread, so please excuse me if these questions have already been asked and answered . . .

But since when is a newspaper article a primary document and an unknown source?
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Zella on April 27, 2012, 10:03:33 AM
(sorry, I am a little late to the discussion)

will be ordering this book when I return home for the summer

until then my mind is blown.  MF was in on a plot to overthrow Nicholas???  I just can't believe this.  her diary gives no indication. 
Marie, Yussopovs, even Ella I can understand.  but the Tsar's own mother!!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on April 30, 2012, 07:20:36 PM
(sorry, I am a little late to the discussion)

will be ordering this book when I return home for the summer

until then my mind is blown.  MF was in on a plot to overthrow Nicholas???  I just can't believe this.  her diary gives no indication. 
Marie, Yussopovs, even Ella I can understand.  but the Tsar's own mother!!

Thank you for expressing interest in purchasing a copy of my book.

Regards,

Margarita
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Zella on May 13, 2012, 03:26:30 PM
ordered!!  from Amazon.com!  can't wait to read it!!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: rachel5a on May 06, 2014, 05:22:43 AM
Margarita, I am very much looking forward to reading your research as I have some unpublished primary source material for the DP biography Will Lee and I are now working on. Congratulations on publishing your book!

Thank you for your congratulations Lisa!

You will find that Dmitri Pavlovich who accepted his role in the conspiracy, will present in a very different manner to that previously described.

Best regards,

Margarita  
As I haven't read this book yet could someone inform me what was GD Dmitri's role in this murder. I would be very grateful!
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: Belochka on February 13, 2015, 06:13:44 PM
By popular demand, this book will be reprinted (with a few corrections) in the Spring of 2015.

Thank you for your continuing interest in my work,

Regards,

Margarita Nelipa
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on February 18, 2015, 06:07:46 PM
Margarita
I have some comments and errata for this book:
You have Countess Cantacuzene and Paley when they were both princesses
You have General Kolchak when he was an Admiral
P317 You call purishkevich a bad marksman All I can say was he was shooting at Rasputin in a low light condition with a pocket pistol that didn't have very good sights on it.
See my comments on the handguns used to kill Rasputin on the post I made on the Rasputin section of this site
I must also point out Purishkevich shot Rasputin in the early morning hours. Sound does tend to travel in the dark when it is quite. One should also point out shooting in a urban area sometimes causes the sound of the gunshot to echo.

Pages 400, 405,431 you mention the air defenses at TS. I recently made a posting on the Nicholas section of this site which deals with the Tsars air defenses

P410 You have kyrill V with the naval regiment this should be the Guards Equipage (Battalion)

P411 You have general Ruzsky at Stavka when he was at the Northern Front headquarters at Pskov

P473 on the Russian army in the Caucususes and Persia the book "Caucasian Battlefields" is a first rate book on this subject.  it seems Dmitri  P Welcomed there.  In April 1916 a Sotnia rode across Persia and linked up with the british forces in Mespotamia and road back. In 1917 there was another link up of Russian cavalry/Cossacks with the British in "Mespot" . Arhchive.org has more on it it the book "In the Clouds Above Baghdad" also see the A,J. Barker book The negelected War/The Bastard War/The First Iraq War.

I hope this is of some interest or use. I will be reading the revised edition of your book one day.
Title: Re: A New Rasputin Biography by Margarita Nelipa
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on March 04, 2015, 11:35:50 AM
Some of you may be intersted in this entry from the book "Diary of the Commander of the Russian Imperial Guard"
22 February/7 March 1917 ( In his last meeting with Alexandra)....."Then the Empress said that the Soveriegn knows about the intrigue against me and that we are all living through difficult times. In 1905 a revolution was attempted from below and that at the present it was coming from above. This was a hint at the activity of some Grand Dukes and she added; "Do they not realize that if the dethroning of the Dynasty would be questioned, they would suffer also."

A accurate comment.