Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about Other Imperial Palaces => Palaces in Moscow => Topic started by: ilias on June 24, 2004, 05:28:24 PM

Title: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: ilias on June 24, 2004, 05:28:24 PM
I know that kremlin was not used by the romanovs but does anyone know a good site with nice pictures?  i'VE SEEN SOME IN A MAGAZINE when a greek singer was in moscow for a concert and they gave her a special tour even in rooms not open to the public and they were impressive!

Thanks!
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on June 25, 2004, 11:42:47 AM
Hi ilias !

The Imperial Family lived within the Kremlin when they were in Moscow. There residence was the Grand Palace.

The President of Russia uses this palace today for ceremonial occasions.

Joanna

Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: ilias on June 27, 2004, 03:11:05 PM
Oh my God! It is in such great shape!

So I'm guessing it was never destroyed by the germans in WWII?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Greg_King on June 27, 2004, 06:07:04 PM
The Grand Kremlin Palace was featured in an issue of Architectural Digest in the early 1990s-I don' have the exact reference at hand.

Two other books with a lot of interior photos:

Markova, G.  The Great Palace of the Moscow Kremlin.  Leningrad: Aurora Art Publishers, 1981.

Rodimzeva, Irina and Nikolai Rachmanov and Alfons Raimann.  The Kremlin and Its Treasures.  New York: Rizzoli, 1987.

You can also buy a video called "Behind Kremlin Walls" that tours these rooms.

Note, though, that all of these appeared before the destruction of the Hall of Congresses and restoration of the two original parade halls-the Hall of the Order of St. Alexander Nevsky, and the Hall of the Order of St. Andrei.

Greg King
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on November 07, 2004, 10:09:46 PM
Here is a view of the Grand Palace from the side with Nicholas II riding and the various cathedrals that I have never seen before:

http://www.ipmce.su/~cyril/orthodox/tzar/images/kremlin.jpg

Joanna
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: gleb on November 09, 2004, 10:30:46 AM
if anyone is intersted in seeing a plan of the Great Palace and a section of it, can contact me at my  personal email.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Arleen on November 09, 2004, 01:04:36 PM
Does anyone know the name of the horse Nicholas is riding in the picture Joanna posted?  I am interested in the different horses that he owned after the wonderful article on the Pensioners Grave Yard in King/Wilson's Atlantis Magazine this time.
How many different horses did Nicholas have and what were their names.       Many thanks, Arleen
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on November 10, 2004, 09:10:49 PM
Quote
How many different horses did Nicholas have and what were their names.


Hi Arleen,

On Nikolai's site of the Anniversary Exhibition of Tsarskoe Selo of 1911, there are photographs of various horses one of which belonged to GD Nicholas Nicholaevich that are interesting to see. Of my translations I have not been able to identify any that belonged to Nicholas but I too would be fascinated to find out more not only of N's but of Alexandra's and the GD's. Of the Kremlin, where were the Tsar's stables located or were they kept within one of the regiments' stables? Did Nicholas transport his horses from St. Petersburg to Moscow for these revues or were familiar horse(s) maintained there for his infrequent visits?

http://geglov2.narod.ru/Foto/Raznoe/Ubileyn_vist_012.htm

http://geglov2.narod.ru/Foto/Raznoe/Ubileyn_vist_013.htm

Joanna




Title: Discoveries in the Kremlin
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on August 07, 2005, 07:15:32 AM
http://english.pravda.ru/science/19/94/377/15934_Kremlin.html

Archeologists discover secret passages and rooms in Putin's Kremlin residence

08/06/2005 17:35

There has always been a bunch of legends about secret staircases and passages in the Kremlin

The Moscow Kremlin revealed another of its mysterious. A sudden discovery was made in the place where everything seems to have been discovered. Restorers found secret corridors and staircases in the walls of the Patriarchal Kremlin.

There has always been a bunch of legends about secret staircases and passages in the Kremlin. There was a strong belief in their existence but nobody knew where exactly to look for them. Their discovery can be considered a major archeological finding of recent years. It is possible that some of them may lead to a famous library of Tsar Ivan the Terrible.  

Palace's One-Pillar Chamber was under restoration. During the Soviet period there were public lavatories here. The voids were found when builders took the tile off the walls and sank a boring.

"As a rule, during the restoration unexpected discoveries are made which surprise specialists as well as restorers and architectural historians. In this building amazing in-stairs spaces and rooms were discovered", Alexey Levykin, director of the Kremlin Museum scientific department says.

Historians think that these walled up stairs connected Patriarch Nikon's Chambers with the backyard. They made it possible to hide from the danger or to leave the palace quickly. In the time of peace they could serve practical purposes.
 
"Meals which were cooked here were then brought to gala chambers through these stairs. Two of them were found during the restoration. They had not been used for a long time", the head of the Kremlin's department of architectural monument's restoration Tatiana Krasheninnikova explains.

Tiny rooms located in the walls could be used for storage. Archeologists scrutinized every brick and sifted the dust in discovered bays.

The rooms discovered are rather small but they will definitely serve as an extra space for the Kremlin's museums. The restoration actually was started in hopes to solve the problem of space. A new exhibition hall is to be opened in One-Pillar Chamber with some new objects on display. A researcher Marina Golovanova who holds a unique collection of banners says that some of them never left the repository. A banner, which was used during the coronation of Nicholas II, is worth exposing to the public other then being tucked away. Some of the banners are kept in such places you can hardly access them. "The exhibits are not always kept as they should be. It is better to keep staffs in a horizontal position", Marina Golovanova says.

The Moscow Kremlin Museum will celebrate its 200th anniversary next year. By this time the problem of space is going to be solved as they say. All the restoration workshops and storerooms are going to be removed from the territory of Kremlin. Rooms that they occupy at the moment are to be restored and then will be used as exhibition halls for more then 100,000 objects.

Alexander Rogatkin


Read the original in Russian: (Translated by: Anastasia Pulich)
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on January 22, 2006, 07:06:39 PM
A recent article on (in?) the Spasskaya Tower in the Kremlin

http://english.pravda.ru/main/18/90/363/16730_Kremlin.html

World's most unique Kremlin tower clock celebrates 600 years
01/12/2006 14:57
Today, the Kremlin chimes are the only ancient mechanical tower clock in Russia and worldwide

In Russia, a new year begins after the old Kremlin tower chimes strike twelve on December 31. The clock is situated in the very heart of Moscow, the Red Square, that is known as the favorite place of interest among foreign and Russian guests of the capital. In 2005, the old clock turned 600.

The old clock is situated in the Spasskaya Tower of the Kremlin at the height of about 60 meters. One has to climb a cast-iron tracery staircase with cast footsteps to get to the clock. People who maintain technical support and secure the clock have to climb the long staircase several times a day.

Head of the group for the Kremlin chimes restoration, Alexander Starodubov, is an accurate Time Keeper. This is the name under which the man is known in the Kremlin. He has to examine parts of the chimes regularly and lubricate them with machine oil. The Time Keeper says that he adjusts the clock twice a day because the chimes go five-six seconds fast every 24 hours.

One who manages to climb the staircase and reach the rarity clock mechanism on the eighth circle of the Spasskaya Tower risks to remain thunderstruck when the chimes begin to sound. Everyone who wants to have an excursion about the Kremlin clock needs to have earplugs. The very heart of the Kremlin clock consists of perpetually moving pinions, levers and other clock mechanisms. Today, the Kremlin chimes are the only ancient mechanical tower clock in Russia and worldwide.

In previous centuries only emperors and their confidants were allowed to come inside the Kremlin clock. Sometimes, foreign ambassadors were permitted to come and see the wonderful clock from the inside. Today, the main clock of the country is guarded as a strategic object. It is not open for public excursions.  

Nobody knows how much exactly the mechanical wonder weighs. It is not easy to know absolutely everything about the huge construction. The Kremlin chimes are the national standard time for the whole of Russia.

The musical chime is what makes common tower clock particular. Some time ago, there were over 30 of working bells while there are just 14 bells there today. It was just once over the modern history of Russia that the bells kept silent. In 1974, the bells did not ring for 100 days, two hours and 58 minutes because of complex restoration of the clock.

The belfry is situated some circles above the heart of the clock. Some unique bells even have the brands of makers who moulded them. One bell weighing 21 poods (one old Russian pood equals 16.3 kg) has an engraving saying it was made in 1769 and mentions the name of the maker. Best bell ringers of the Moscow Patriarchy put the Kremlin bells' ringing right. These bells have small hammers instead of tongues to make the sound short and resonant. It slightly resembles the organ sound with its polyphony. People must not stay for too long under the hipped roof of the tower otherwise they may have headache. There is a legend saying that some members of the imperator family even lost conscience staying there. Probably it happened because of fear caused by another legend saying that ghosts haunted the Spasskaya Tower. Today, guards of the chimes say they from time to time feel uncomfortable staying in the tower as if someone is watching them.

In 2004, the Kremlin chimes turned 600. Monk Lazar Serbin from Afon made the first clock mechanism and mounted it in the Moscow Kremlin in December 1404. Today's chimes were made under Peter the Great. But the original sight of the chimes was transformed several times within the centuries. Parts of the clock were changed three times within the 20th century.

Igor Ganswindr from the Russian Academy of Sciences Center for Geoinformation says the tower clock made by Monk Lazar survived many fires and restorations. It was mysteriously discovered a year ago. In 1624, some merchants from Yaroslavl bought a clock that served its time on the Spasskaya Tower and restored it. It became a real scientific sensation when researchers supposed that the chimes of the Spassky monastery in Yaroslavl were probably the rarity clock made in the epoch when Monk Lazar lived. However, this fact is not yet determined for certain.

The first bells were made for the chimes in 1624. The face of the clock was divided into twelve hours under Peter the Great. Earlier, it was divided into 24 hours.

In 1917, Bolsheviks changed the czar melody of the chimes for The Internationale and a revolutionary song popular at that time. In 15 years, the chimes sounded only The Internationale. In 1938, the Kremlin clock sounded no music at all and only rang chimes to mark every hour.

In 1995, the authorities charged experts with reviving the melodious sound of the main clock of Russia and making it sound two melodies as it had been in previous years. So, experts of the clock industry research institute performed a unique job. At first, they recorded the chimes of the bells remaining on the Spasskaya Tower to determine the musical tone of each bell. Then they made the frequency analysis of the bell sound. The sound of the chimes was restored in 1996. Today, the Kremlin bells sound two melodies; Russia's national anthem composed by Alexandrov is one of the two.

During the last restoration of the clock the face and the hands were covered with special protective substance to resist the soot and gases of the megapolis.  
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: xirbis on January 31, 2006, 03:51:19 PM
TO ILIAS:
Ilias, Germans never took Moscow. This is why the Palace could not be destroyed by them. The Kremlin was protected against German air raids quite well.
Title: Burials in the Archangel Michael Cathederal
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on February 19, 2006, 10:55:32 AM
Hi - not sure if this will be of interest to others or not, but I've been looking for a long time for a list of burials (in english) in the Archangel Cathederal in the Kremlin.

Here it is...

http://www.kreml.ru/en/main/museums/archangel/burial-vault/scheme/

dca
Title: Re: Burials in the Archangel Michael Cathederal
Post by: David_Pritchard on February 19, 2006, 01:25:46 PM
Nice site Dominic!

In case anyone is interested in the historic churches that contain the burials of other early Russian rulers, I found some old research stored in my computer regarding the burial places of a few of the Rurikid grand princes:

The tombs of Yaroslav I Mudriy (the Wise), born 1017 and died 1054; Vladimir II Monomakh, born 1053 and died 19 May 1125; Izyaslav I, born 1024 and died 3 October 1078 are at the Cathedral of Saint Sophia in Kiev.

The tombs of Vsevolod III, born 1154 and died 15 April 1212; Yaroslav II Feodor, born 8 February 1191 and died 30 September 1246 are at the Uspensky (Assumption) Cathedral in Vladimir.

Svyatoslav I Igorovich, born 930 and died 972, has no grave at all as the Turkic Pechenegs killed him near the cataracts of the Dnieper River and converted his skull into a drinking vessel.

Mstislav I Vladimirovich, born 1 June 1076 and died 15 April 1132, was buried in the Church of Saint Feodor.

Rostislav II Mstislavich, born 1100 and died 14 March 1167, was buried at the Theodosiev Monastery in Kiev.

Yaropolk II Vladimirovich, born 1082 and died 18 February 1139, was buried in the Church of Saint Andrei in Kiev.

Yurii I Dolgoruky Vladimirovich, born between 1096 to 1100 and died 15 May 1157, was buried in the Church of the Holy Saviour in Berestovo, Ukraine.

Tsar Boris is buried at the Trinity-Sergiev Lavra outside of Moscow. See a picture of grave at the link below. http://www.artandarchitecture.org.uk/images/conway/4689d813.html

David
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Nadezhda Edvardovna on September 19, 2006, 09:46:00 AM
In Greg King's book The Court of the Last Tsar, I saw photographs of the Grand Kremlin Palace.  Does it have another name? I didn't find any threads on it here.  Does anyone have photographs of it  that they will share?  What is the palace used for now?  Pax, Nadezhda
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: pers on September 20, 2006, 02:56:36 PM
A number of years ago, there was a whole section on the Imperial Private Apartments in the Architectural Digest . 

It would be interesting to see whether someone actually has the plans of the apartments.  I recall that they were located on the ground floor instead of the "bel etage".  I believe that it is strictly a museum.  The rooms were decorated for Nicholas I and his wife Alexandra Feodorovna and all the subsequent Emperors left the decoration just as it was, instead of changing it according to the latest fashions.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Robert_Hall on September 20, 2006, 03:15:37 PM
The State Reception Rooms are  in this palace, but they are not generally open to the public.  I think once a month and that is through a special arrangement which has to be booked  far ahead of time.
 I was recently reading that private apartments were done for N&A, for their coronation, but were rarely used after that, as they spent very little time in Moscow. Can't say that I blame them, either.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: BobG on September 21, 2006, 05:24:44 AM
The Kremlin has a great site with a virtual tour of the palaces and churches.  I don't remember if it has a floorplan, but I think it does.

the site is: http://www.moscowkremlin.ru/IE3/english/ (http://www.moscowkremlin.ru/IE3/english/)

There is a lot to see on the site, but the virtual tour is especially rewarding.

BobG
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: jacqueline on September 27, 2006, 02:53:36 PM
FYI: Some of the links don't work. (at least for me -- I'm on a MAC)
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Venois on October 02, 2006, 09:15:21 PM
Here you can find some information & photos.

http://kremlin.ru/eng/articles/atributesEng10.shtml

There is also one great site "Opening of the Kremlin"; unfortunately, it is in Russian only.

http://www.openkremlin.ru/index.html
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: James1941 on October 03, 2006, 12:05:10 PM
This book has probably been mentioned before in other posts but I will repeat it here. I highly recommend The Kremlin and its Treasures, written by Irina Rodimzeva, Nikolai Rachmanov and Alfons Raismann. It was published by 1986 and 1987. ISBN: 0-8478-0856-4.
It contains some wonderful full color pictures of the grand halls, the state parade apartments, the private apartments, the churches, the treasures, the Terem palace, the Senate building and the general Kremlin area. It also had a very readable text.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Pippilin on October 05, 2006, 02:05:54 PM
I've come home from Russia almost brokenhearted that I wasn't able to see anything of the Terem Palace except for its small golden domes.  Photos quite a few years ago ( in National Geographic, I think ) inspired my imagination with the beauty of their subject.  Lo and behold, the average visitor is not allowed to see this wonderful palace because of some obscure reason having to do with President Putin's having his office in the Kremlin. 
Has anyone on this forum every had the good luck to tour the Terem? Does anyone know if appointments can sometimes be arranged?
Thanks for any information you all might be able to share.
Linda
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Vecchiolarry on October 06, 2006, 04:48:10 AM
Hi Linda,

Yes, one can tour the Grand Kremlin Palace, Facet Palace and Terem Palace but only with a special visa, which must be obtained months in advance sometimes.
Usually, Mondays are reserved for small groups to go through them but that can change too If there's a government reception or diplomatic function going on.
I went through in 2002 with a special guide who arranged everything - but 4 months before I even arrived in Moscow.  So, you have to plan way ahead.....

BTW, each of those palaces are out of this world gorgeous!
Hope you had a good trip there.

Larry
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Tatyana on October 07, 2006, 02:16:46 AM
PATRIARSHY DOM (http://russiatravel-pdtours.netfirms.com/) gives Excellent tours of the Kremlin Palace complex. Check their website for their tour schedule, and then tell them what tour you want & when you will be arriving in Moscow. It doesn't seem possible to book a place in one of their tours from outside Russia, but if you let them know ahead of time of your interest in a tour, and then contact them as soon as you arrive in Moscow, it works out. I've done this several times, with great success.
TATYANA
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: GDNastya on October 30, 2006, 06:06:34 AM
I've just found Grand Kremlin Palace watercolour

Hall of the Order of St. Andrew
http://http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/ef/Ukhtomsky_1849.jpg
Title: Re: Discoveries in the Kremlin
Post by: dmitri on July 07, 2007, 03:16:45 AM
This sounds fantastic. On my recent visit to the Kremlin in January 2007, I found it the most incredible place full of the most magnificent treasures. I would well recommed it. I stayed at the Metropol which is in perfect walking distance of the New Bolshoi Theatre, the Russian History Museum, Red Square and of course the Kremlin. St.Basil's Cathedral just had to be seen to be believed.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: gleb on January 06, 2008, 01:45:46 PM
http://www.gustaff.ru/post34988469/ (http://www.gustaff.ru/post34988469/)

I don't know if this link has been posted yet, in this case here it is.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Forum Admin on January 06, 2008, 04:27:24 PM
We recently obtained an original first edition 1912 Visitor's Guide to the Great Kremlin Palace.  I am about 70% through translating the french to english and scanning the original 1912 photographs.  I hope to have it up on the main APTM site this week or next at the latest.

Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Belochka on January 06, 2008, 06:04:37 PM
Hi Rob,

Thank you for your efforts in advance.

Margarita
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 06, 2008, 06:08:10 PM
Thanks also Rob. It should be a great addition! Dmitri
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on January 09, 2008, 05:45:26 PM
All I can say, is COOL....
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 16, 2008, 08:44:33 PM
I remember my guide saying a number of buildings, including cathedrals were demolished on the order of Stalin. I guess that is not surprising. Thankfully the vast majority survived. Some pre-Soviet buildings in Moscow has actually been rebuilt.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 16, 2008, 08:54:32 PM
What is very interesting is if you go to Moscow it becomes quickly apparent how small Moscow was before the revolution. Compared to St. Petersburg it was more like a country town. Driving in from the Moscow Airport into the centre of Moscow you can see decade by decade the expansion of the city. When you reach where the Soviet architecture began you realise how very small Moscow was. 
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Forum Admin on January 17, 2008, 03:19:35 PM
I have decided to create a last "new" chapter for the 1912 Great Kremlin Palace Visitor's Guide, which will show what the sections of the Palace look like today, when they have been changed or destroyed since the Revolution, so that people can make the comparisons as to what has been lost.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 17, 2008, 04:31:40 PM
That is a marvellous addition!
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 17, 2008, 04:33:10 PM
Meant to say I have a fabulous colour hardback book with matching slipcase that came out during the Soviet era entitled Great Palace of the Moscow Kremlin. It is in English and full of incredible colour photos and text. Have you seen it?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: NAAOTMA on January 17, 2008, 07:01:13 PM
I have the Architectural Digest that features the Kremlin apartments. I kept it all these years. The photos and text are interesting, and at the time it was a peek behind a curtain of mystery. One thing I do remember is that the Tsar and Tsarina's apartments were very long and narrow almost like railway cars due to the piers that held that part of the building up. Not a place one would want to spend a great deal of time.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 18, 2008, 06:56:34 AM
Well the palace was rarely used by the imperial family after Peter the Great moved the capital from Moscow to St.Petersburg. Unlike the palaces at Tsarskoe Selo, the Kremlin itself is far more easy to defend. Its insides can be totally sealed off from the rest of the city. Its walls are very thick. You would be surprised how thick if you saw them.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 18, 2008, 08:27:18 AM
When / how often did they Imperial Family stay at the Grand Kremlin Palace?  Probably during celebrations associated with coronations, but was there a regular schedule for the IF to be in Moscow each year - like the British Queen spends Easter at Windsor, July/Aug at Balmoral, December/ early Feb. at Sandringham?  Did any one Tsar spent more time at this palace than others?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on January 18, 2008, 09:26:01 PM
Further to Dmitri's post on the book "The Great Palace of the Moscow Kremlin", Aurora Art Publishers, Leningrad 1981, the color photographs of the private apartments of Nicholas II and Alexandra are similar in composition to the c1896 views on the photoarchive site, for example:
Emperor's Study:
http://photoarchive.spb.ru:9090/www/showChildObjects.do?object=2500387772
Empress' Study:
http://photoarchive.spb.ru:9090/www/showChildObjects.do?object=2500387710

Notice the placement of the bed in what looks like an alcove:
http://photoarchive.spb.ru:9090/www/showChildObjects.do?object=2500387647

Joanna
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Rostov on January 24, 2008, 11:29:19 AM
In Greg King's book The Court of the Last Tsar, I saw photographs of the Grand Kremlin Palace.  Does it have another name? I didn't find any threads on it here.  Does anyone have photographs of it  that they will share?  What is the palace used for now?  Pax, Nadezhda
Quote

I have a guide book to the Grand Kremlin Palace. It is five years old. I could try scanning the pictures and sharing them with you if you like. The interiors are stunning. I also have guide books to the Catherine palace, Winter Palace, Pavlovsk and Peterhof all recent ones.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 24, 2008, 07:07:05 PM
The photos in the Aurora Art Publishers book are fantastic. If you can pick up a copy you will be enthralled.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Robert_Hall on January 24, 2008, 07:59:46 PM
Nicholas I  had the palace rebuilt in 1857 to replace a dilapidated structure. He seems to be the only Emperor to take a real interest in the Kremlin palaces.  It is not open to the public on a regular schedule,  I was last informed only once a month. It is the official State  function rooms, where the Russian Presidents recieves State quests and delegations. Very imposing, but not all that ancient after all.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: dmitri on January 25, 2008, 05:30:40 AM
What you say is quite true Robert. The Russian President uses this space for his receptions. What is interesting though is the fact that unlike the Palaces at Tsarskoe Selo, Peterhof, Pavlovsk and Gatchina, the Kremlin Palace was not looted, bombed and burnt during the barbarian Nazi German invasion. What you see today of the Palaces around the outskirts of St. Petersburg are post world war two recreations. Therefore the Kremlin Palaces are actually more authentic from the time of the Tsars. The Terem Palace actually dates back much earlier than Nicholas I. It is quite fascinating. A visit to the Kremlin alone to see the Armoury and State Diamond Fund, the surviving cathedrals and the sheer bulk of the walls plus the the huge Tsar Cannon and Bell is quite extraordinary. The Cathedrals are magnificent and very Russian indeed. St. Petersburg is quite western even with its Russian influence whereas Moscow is pure Russian. It would be a shame to visit Russia and only see St.Petersburg and not Moscow. Moscow really was extremely small and provincial while St.Petersburg was the imperial capital. It is very interesting to see how vast Moscow has grown since the capital shifted back there. The Soviets were very clever building a fake Kremlin made of wood and disguising the real Kremlin during world war two. The fake Kremlin was bombed many times, the real Kremlin left largely untouched. 
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Pippilin on January 31, 2008, 04:53:05 PM
I was given an almost perfect hardcover edition of the huge, 355-page "The Kremlin and its Treasures" (Library of Congress #   ISBN 0-8478-0856-4), author Irina Rodimzeva, first published in U.S.A. by Rizzoli Internation Publications, 1987.
The photographs are super.  I think that my daughter lucked out and was able to buy it at Amazon for about $40.00!
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Robert_Hall on January 31, 2008, 05:09:54 PM
Congratulations! Those Rizzoli publications are usually top-quality. Photographs are beautiful.   Enjoy!
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: d.maiorino on July 13, 2008, 10:58:31 AM
Hi to all from rome!
I'll be for the first time in moscow on 25th july
I would know some notice on diamonds Fund that should be in Armoury at Kremlin and should contain diamond of 190 carati that Orlov gave to catherina.
Can you confirm that?
Do you know any info on opening hours and fee?

Thanks
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on July 13, 2008, 12:26:01 PM
Kremlin Armoury:

Opening days & hours
The Moscow Kremlinís territory and museums open daily, except Thursdays, from 10:00 to 17:00. The Armoury Chamber has seances at 10:00, 12:00 , 14:30, 16:30.

Ticket offices
If you want to visit the Kremlin and its museums on your own you can purchase tickets in the ticket offices located at the Kutafiya Tower in Aleksandrovskiy Sad (the Aleksandrov Gardens), in the Armoury Chamber and on Cathedral Square.
Ticket offices are open daily, except Thursdays, from 9:30 to 16:00.

Here is information on the layout of the museum:
http://www.kremlin.museum.ru/en/main/museums/armoury/

Joanna
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: d.maiorino on July 13, 2008, 12:36:24 PM
I appreciate your kindness, but I don't find notices on Orlov diamond, and if there is a supplementar fee for diamonds fund above fee for armour;
so I hope somebody who has been recently ther can reply to me

thanks so much
domenico
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on July 13, 2008, 12:55:18 PM
Tour groups in Moscow will usually include this museum. For those visiting on their own it requires an additional 300 ruble ticket, purchased at the same time as the 300 ruble general admission to the Kremlin. Hours generally are 10 to 4:30. The Armoury ticket will have a time of admission and tickets may sell out early in the day.

On display in the Diamond Fund is the world-famous Orlov diamond, the best known in Russia in the 18th century. This bluish-greenish crystal of the first-class clarity is cut in the shape of a rose with a great number of small facets arranged in layers. The Orlov diamond is believed to have been found in India where, according to a legend, it had served as the eye of an idol in a Brahman temple until the beginning of the 18th century, when it was stolen. In 1774, it was bought by Count Grigory Orlov who presented it to Empress Catherine the Great. Since that time the Orlov diamond has adorned the gold scepter of Russian Emperors.

The Diamond Fund exposition is housed on the ground floor of the Kremlinís Armory Chamber.

Joanna
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: d.maiorino on July 13, 2008, 01:02:39 PM
So: there is a fee for kremlin, a supplementar fee for armour but this fee admits to diamond fund: i had read that there was a third fee (kremlin -> armour -> diamond fund).

That's ok: I'll be at ticket office earlier for take tickets: do you know if armour has reducted entarnce for students?

Thanks also for notices on orlov diamonds

domenico
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on July 13, 2008, 01:13:11 PM
From what I understand, there are the two tickets but you may encounter a change. Also as prices have risen, it is more probable that is now 350 roubles each but there are student tickets which is approx 175 roubles. Most museums in St Petersburg do have student rates also. The Hermitage has a separate fee for the Treasure rooms which contain a Diamond Room.

Joanna
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Forum Admin on September 15, 2008, 04:34:27 PM
My apologies for the long delay, but I have FINALLY finished the 1912 Visitors Guide for the Great Kremlin Palace.  Much of the delay was the fact that the text is rather dense with 19th century French architectural terminology, which meant that I spent perhaps an hour or two chasing down phrases for just one paragraph!

Please enjoy and I hope you find this as interesting and informative as I have.  Put on your cyber walking shoes and set the Wayback Machine to 1912 and take the guided tour of the Great Kremlin Palace, as Nicholas II saw it himself:

http://216.30.130.50/kremlin1912/ (http://216.30.130.50/kremlin1912/)
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Condecontessa on September 16, 2008, 01:25:01 PM
I love it Forum Admin. Thank you so much.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Michael HR on September 16, 2008, 03:03:47 PM
Fab! Really enjoyed the site and now have to add Moscow to my list of places to visit when I get to russia.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: BobG on September 17, 2008, 06:08:16 AM
Great Job, Rob!  I wish the book had included a map of the Kremlin as some of the building from 1912 seem to have disappeared.  But it gives us a great look into the Kremlin when N&A were there.
BobG
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Learning on September 20, 2008, 09:52:31 AM
The Soviets were very clever building a fake Kremlin made of wood and disguising the real Kremlin during world war two. The fake Kremlin was bombed many times, the real Kremlin left largely untouched. 

Huh? I have never heard this. Where did they build the fake one? How did they disguise the real one?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Robert_Hall on September 20, 2008, 10:45:30 AM
I have not heard that story either.  Wonder where he got it from?
  I have been to Moscow only once and did not plan enough time, but intend to return, perhaps as soon as next spring. The Kremlin is fascinating, there is so much to see.  But, sadly, the Great Kremlin Palace is not open to the public, except once a month for tours by a private company.  I hope we can plan more carefully for that on the next visit.
 Moscow itself is intriguing. Vast, very busy, active, modern.  The change must be  shocking from the old, Soviet days. It sort of reminds me of NYC, or a bit like LA.  There is a lot to see and do, especially if one has a Russian friend to show one around and translate. Even the  subway is  unique; clean and beautiful. We were there  for Mat Day and RO Easter, so the  city was very festive.
 I still prefer St. Petersburg. It is on a more human scale, even with he vast palaces and museums.  It reminds me more of San Francisco, without the hills! But, I  tend to take to water cities.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: pers on October 18, 2008, 10:10:45 AM
Does anyone have the plans of the private apartments in the Grand Kremlin Palace?  Please share!
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Vassili_Vorontsoff on October 19, 2008, 06:17:54 PM
http://crcv.revues.org/document76.html

Interesting website to grasp better the issue on restoration on Moscow monuments
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Vassili_Vorontsoff on December 28, 2008, 10:37:31 AM
http://www.moscow.info/kremlin/palaces/poteshny-palace.aspx

The restoration carried in The Poteshny Palace,  Office of the Kremlin Commandant
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Vassili_Vorontsoff on December 29, 2008, 03:11:03 PM
(http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r248/vassiliv/Poteshny-Palace.jpg)
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Vassili_Vorontsoff on January 25, 2009, 08:43:46 AM
Still, the Poteshny palace in the Kremlin on which I always posted before.

On this picture, one can see the building before restoration and actually:

(http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r248/vassiliv/d.jpg)

(http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r248/vassiliv/v-1.jpg)

(http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r248/vassiliv/x.jpg)

Must probably many have always seen this pics!

Vassia
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Olga Maria on February 11, 2009, 09:23:51 AM
Wow! Kremlin is really so great!
Is that really gold on those towers (?) with crosses?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Douglas on February 11, 2009, 11:10:06 PM
Yes, Ingrid, that is real gold leaf on the domes.  It's very thin though. It is 92% pure gold.  One ounce of gold makes about 200 square feet of gold leaf.  Gold leaf is traditionally made by hand in Burma, India and other third world countries.

Another type of leaf is made of copper,  brass and other metals but it would never be considered for the domes as it does not last in the outdoor elements.

Douglas

Wow! Kremlin is really so great!
Is that really gold on those towers (?) with crosses?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Olga Maria on February 12, 2009, 01:41:14 AM
Oh, thank you, Sir Douglas.

I think Kremlin is a very expensive project (definitely, it is!)
I also read that Kremlin is haunted with ghosts of Lenin and Stalin, many to mention. That's scary a bit.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Joanna on March 31, 2009, 02:49:30 PM
Did anyone watch the BBC interview yesterday with President Medvedev? I think that the room where it took place was Nicholas II study or part of the suite, with the window, archway and woodwork:

http://photoarchive.spb.ru:9090/www/showChildObjects.do?object=2500387772
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7970525.stm

Joanna

Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: richard_1990 on October 12, 2009, 11:13:07 PM
Hello, does anyone have information/pictures of the structure that was previously on the spot where the modern Soviet building (giant grey building) stands?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Douglas on October 13, 2009, 03:33:50 PM
According to the article this interview was at a dasha outside of Moscow.  Also the interview room is much wider than the N II Kremlin study.

Douglas



Did anyone watch the BBC interview yesterday with President Medvedev? I think that the room where it took place was Nicholas II study or part of the suite, with the window, archway and woodwork:

http://photoarchive.spb.ru:9090/www/showChildObjects.do?object=2500387772
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7970525.stm

Joanna


Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Alexander1917 on November 21, 2009, 07:23:28 AM
According to the article this interview was at a dasha outside of Moscow.  Also the interview room is much wider than the N II Kremlin study.

Douglas



Did anyone watch the BBC interview yesterday with President Medvedev? I think that the room where it took place was Nicholas II study or part of the suite, with the window, archway and woodwork:

http://photoarchive.spb.ru:9090/www/showChildObjects.do?object=2500387772
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7970525.stm

Joanna





This is the presidental palace, called "castle meiendorf", a gothic style palace bulit in 1878 for general kasanov, link are here
http://www.meiendorf.ru/
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: BobG on November 22, 2009, 05:38:18 PM
Why is there always enough money for maintaining and restoring the Presidential palaces, and others that are used by the public are falling apart and in dire need of repair?
BobG
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: richard_1990 on November 23, 2009, 12:05:58 AM
Quote
Why is there always enough money for maintaining and restoring the Presidential palaces, and others that are used by the public are falling apart and in dire need of repair?
BobG
Because the palaces used by the president are where foreign guests will be received, business conferences will be held etc. which are for the benefit of the country as a whole. palaces are being restored slowly - public ones too.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Alexander1917 on November 23, 2009, 03:14:54 PM
That's true, but there is also the fact that there are so many palaces, and some are really large. A good restoration will also take some time. and if they finished one part, they could start from the beginning. I suppose its also a matter of the very high changes in temperature ( -20įC in winter + 30įC in summer), not very good for bulidings I think.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: richard_1990 on April 24, 2010, 12:02:56 AM
Not many pictures in this thread. Here's some I've found. It really is the most magnificent palace in the world.. the location is so great.

http://windhorst.web.officelive.com/images/KremlinPalace.jpg
http://www.hellojeff.com/russia/picturegallery/moscow.grandkremlinpalace.jpg
http://www.kremlin2000.ru/pict/319.jpg
http://visualrian.com/images/item/153923
http://visualrian.com/images/item/476238
http://visualrian.com/images/item/107977
http://visualrian.com/images/item/99279
http://visualrian.com/images/item/138470
http://visualrian.com/images/item/574436
http://visualrian.com/images/item/599166
http://visualrian.com/images/item/543502
http://visualrian.com/images/item/543503
http://visualrian.com/images/item/409996
http://visualrian.com/images/item/410013
http://visualrian.com/images/item/410017
http://visualrian.com/images/item/409772
http://visualrian.com/images/item/409506
http://visualrian.com/images/item/372082
http://visualrian.com/images/item/372081
http://visualrian.com/images/item/371812
http://visualrian.com/images/item/371815
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Constantinople on May 09, 2010, 10:03:09 AM
Did anyone else notice Andrew Marr's resemblance to Vladimir Putin?  Perhaps Medvedev thought he was reporting to his boss when he was answering, hence the vague answers.
the room looked very dark but no ghosts seemed to appear.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: richard_1990 on May 21, 2010, 05:38:18 AM
In most paintings the Kremlin's walls are usually white, were they painted this way? ie.

http://www.artsait.ru/art/v/vereshaginPP/img/4.jpg
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Vladimir_V. on May 25, 2010, 12:15:53 PM
First Kremlin was wooden. The next one was made from the white stone. Then it was rebuilt by Italian architects. They used white stone (for basement) and red bricks. In XVIII it was colored.
Kremlin was white before 1920-1930. Now it is red except one tower.

(http://i038.radikal.ru/1005/8e/cc41c4c12538.jpg) (http://www.radikal.ru)
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: ChgoJohn on July 24, 2010, 06:27:59 PM
I am curious as to where important guests and dignitaries stay when they are visiting the Kremlin.  Would they stay in some part of the Senate or maybe in an annex of the Grand Palace?
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: richard_1990 on July 25, 2010, 03:22:11 AM
I'm pretty sure they still in a hotel.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: hikaru on January 01, 2011, 01:11:55 PM
Welkome to Kremlin!
We have not so many tourists in January and February.

As for ghosts, I know  about only one ghost in Kremlin - ghost of Iwan the Terrible.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Inok Nikolai on August 02, 2014, 12:51:12 PM
Perhaps something will appear soon in English on this proposal.

For now, here is the Russian:
http://www.blagovest-info.ru/index.php?ss=2&s=7&id=58608

Pres. Putin has seriously suggested tearing down the Soviet office buildings inside the Kremlin in order to rebuild the Chudov and Voznesensky Monasteries and the Small Nicholas Palace -- in order to return to the Kremlin its pre-Revolutionary historical appearance.

There is even talk of opening the Spasky Gates for locals and tourists to use on foot.


Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Inok Nikolai on August 03, 2014, 12:27:29 PM
Aha!

Paul Gilbert has now posted an article on the proposed Kremlin renovations in English:
http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/blog/index.blog/1455739/putin-wants-monasteries-church-rebuilt-in-kremlin/
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: IvanVII on August 04, 2014, 02:54:28 PM
When I read the article originally posted on eng.kremlin.ru there was a statement from Putin about making sure they were museums because people were already complaining that he had turned over to many properties to the Church.
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Alexandre Mikhaelovitch on August 20, 2014, 11:30:43 AM
Fantastic news from Paul Gilbert's blog Royal Russia :

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/blog/index.blog/1456084/restore-destroyed-orthodox-monasteries-in-kremlin-says-putin/

And read this old article too :

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/blog/index.blog/1455989/archaeologists-believe-excavation-of-kremlin-monasteries-to-yield-great-discoveries/

Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Judicial Investigator on June 04, 2015, 05:42:10 PM
Церковь Константина и Елены в Московском Кремле, 1914 год
The Sts. Constantine and Helenís Church of Moscow Kremlin, 1914
ГА РФ, ф. 640 оп. 3 д. 25 л. 60 об. фото 881

(https://img-fotki.yandex.ru/get/6112/98255750.16/0_157288_749f7be0_orig)
Title: Re: The Kremlin - general information
Post by: Inok Nikolai on June 05, 2015, 11:28:13 AM
Церковь Константина и Елены в Московском Кремле, 1914 год
The Sts. Constantine and Helenís Church of Moscow Kremlin, 1914
ГА РФ, ф. 640 оп. 3 д. 25 л. 60 об. фото 881

(https://img-fotki.yandex.ru/get/6112/98255750.16/0_157288_749f7be0_orig)

Sadly, it was the first church to be pulled down within the Kremlin after the Bolsheviks came to power.

It was destroyed in 1928.