Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => Marie Feodorovna => Topic started by: Candice on June 23, 2004, 06:53:15 PM

Title: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Candice on June 23, 2004, 06:53:15 PM
According to G. Battiscombe in her book 'Queen Alexandra' there are 40 volumes of letters written between Prince Waldemar to his mother Empress Marie and sister Queen Alexandra of England.  These letters were suposed to have been translated from Danish and released to the public in 1989.  These letters were housed at the archives of the October Revolution in Moscow.  The name was changed to the State Archives of the Russian Federation in Moscow.

Does anyone know anything about these letters.  The correspondence covers 50 years from 1867 to 1917.

Thank you.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dbl-headed_eagle on September 09, 2004, 08:08:45 AM
Hi

This is my first time writing on this incredible website, and I’m still learning my way around.
I would like to start by expressing my gratitude to Bob and others who have started this FANTASTIC website and to those who maintain it.

Perhaps others have posed this question before and somewhere else on the site, but I would like to know if anyone knows if Maria Feodorovnas diaries have ever been published and if so, where one can get a hold of them. I’ve seen photographs of the covers and read somewhere that they all but one have survived.

Furthermore, does anyone know in which language she wrote - danish, russian, english or even french...??

Christian
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: elisa_1872 on September 09, 2004, 01:09:32 PM
Hello!

I read that the correspondence between Empress Marie and her son Nicholas was conducted mainly in French, and i think Danish. But the quotations in the book on Grand Duchess Xenia from the Empress Marie's diary, are translations from the Russian. I don't know of an English translation of her diaries anywhere, but i think there should be a Russian publication.

http://www.eastview.com  

This company supply many books on the Imperial Family in Russian, if you search under "Romanovs", under "Books".

At their site, i did indeed find a book called "Imperatritsa Mariia Fedorovna. 1847-1928. gg. Dnevniki. Pis'ma Vospominaniaa. My Russian's very poor, but i checked and "Dnevniki" is "Diary". The publication is by a Iu.V.Kudrina, and was published in 2002, by OLMA Press.


Hope this helps,
Best wishes :)
Elisa
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dbl-headed_eagle on September 10, 2004, 06:23:03 AM
Thanks for the info, Elisa

My native tongue is Danish, so that I can probably manage ;) but I know no Russian what so ever, so I probably have to pass – bummer!

Christian
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Forum Admin on September 10, 2004, 09:52:25 AM
Christian,
There is a book, "DAGMAR - zarina fra Danmark" by Inger-Lise Klausen in Danish, that should answer your questions. Sadly there is no English translation yet, although we have been advised that one may be coming soon.

I have asked Inger-Lise to answer your question for us all. So far, her secretary has said that Dagmar spoke and wrote in Danish with her Danish family members, including Alexandra, but was fully fluent in Russian. I hope to have her answers as to what languages the diaries and letters to Nicholas were in soon.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Antonio_P.Caballer on September 10, 2004, 10:06:59 AM
While her answer comes, i´ve find some information in Edward J. Bing´s:  Her letters to Nicholas were mostly in french, it was, he said, good  society french. Her russian, when used, is inferior. He adds that "Grammar and spelling are much at fault, although there is considerable fluency of expression"(in russian)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Forum Admin on September 11, 2004, 09:52:32 AM
Just received the answers from Inger-Lise, via her translator (Inger Lise doesn't speak English). Here are her exact words:

Maria  Feodorovna, known in the family as Minny, was fluent in: Danish; English;  French; German; and Russian.

She  would speak German with her mother, who was a German-born princess of the  House of Hesse-Cassel. But after the war between Germany and Denmark in  1864, which ended in Denmark’s defeat where Denmark lost much territory to  Germany, mother and daughter would not communicate  in Danish. Just about the only German word her Danish family would use all  the time was “bitte,” which means “please”.

Her  diaries are in Danish. However, during her stay in Crimea, her diary  entries tend to be a mixture of several languages all mixed together.

For  her son, Nicholas, and her daughter-in-law, Alexandra, she would use  English.

For  her sister, Queen Alexandra of England, known as Alix, she would use  Danish. Absolutely. Please note here that whenever Alix wanted to enquire  about, or send greetings to Tsar Alexander III, known as Sacha, Alix would  always write it in French.

When  Minny arrived in St Petersburg to marry Russia’s Crown Prince, Alexander,  she had already converted to the Russian-Orthodox faith. She took the name  of Maria Feodorovna. [One of her names was Marie. Feodorovna is  patronymic, i.e. derived from the name of the bearer’s father. Eeodor is  Russian for the Danish name of her father: Frederik]. She had already  received lessons in Russian in Copenhagen before leaving for Russia.  Whenever Minny wrote a letter to Sacha, she would begin the first  paragraph or two in Russian, which Sacha praised her for. Sacha and Minny  would speak Russian to one another on everyday affairs. On more  complicated issues such Royal protocol and etiquette, Sacha told Minny  that he would have to do so in French.

To  her sisters and brothers on the thrones of Europe, Minny would always  write in Danish. 



 


 
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: grandduchessella on September 11, 2004, 02:15:49 PM
I thought that Feodorovna was the default patronymic for those brides whose husband's didn't have a convertible name? (IE Ella--Ludwig, Victoria Melita--Alfred). Wasn't it in honor of Feodor the long ago savior of the Romanovs? Plus, MF's father's name was Christian (IX); her brother was Frederick.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Forum Admin on September 12, 2004, 04:34:58 PM
Just received this afternoon:
Dear Rob,

Inger-Lise wants me to make corrections and add some more to what I wrote yesterday. So here is a more correct version:

From  a very early age, Maria Feodorovna was  known as Minny in the family. This is also how she would sign her letters.  She was fluent in Danish; French; German; and Russian. Not so much in  English because it was not a world language on the Continent the way it is  now. Her older sister, Alexandra, known as Alix, took lessons in English  from Miss Mathilde Knudsen, known as “Miss Knudsen” immediately before her  marriage to Bertie. Maria Feodorovna, on the other hand, had a  French-speaking Belgian governess by the name of Mlle. Sidone de  L’escaille, at Det Gule Palæ in Copenhagen. Mlle L’escaille became Maria  Feodorovna’s life-long friend and confidante. Her task was to teach French  etiquette and how to be a lady in society.

Maria  Feodorovna’s parents, King Christian IX and Queen Louise, spoke a mixture  of Danish and German, which was quite the common thing in Denmark at the  time. Her mother came to Denmark at the age of three. She was of the House  of Hesse-Cassel. Maria Feodorovna would speak German to her mother but  following the Danish defeat over Germany in 1864, German was banned. So  mother and daughter did not  communicate in German after 1864. A German word that was used very  frequently in the Danish Royal Household at the time was “bitte,” which  means “please.”

Maria  Feodorovna’s diaries are in Danish. However, when she was in house arrest  in Crimea, she would write one paragraph in Russian if she had a  Russian-speaking person in mind; Danish if she had a Danish-speaking  person in mind; French when she referred to a French-speaking person, and  so forth.

At  the age of sixteen, Maria Feodorovna’s first letter to her future father-in-law,  Tsar Alexander II, was in French.

For  her son, Nicholas (Nicky), and her daughter-in-law, Alexandra (Alicky),  she would use Russian and English. Alicky, although German by birth, was  brought up by Queen Victoria, which was why she was fluent in English. On  her marriage to Nicky, Maria Feodorovna asked Alicky to call her ‘Mother  Dear,’ not ‘ Aunty Dear.’

Maria  Feodorovna’s letters to her older sister, Alexandra (Alix) were in Danish.  Absolutely. Please note here that whenever Alix wanted to enquire about,  or send greetings to, Tsar Alexander III, known as Sasha, Alix would  always write it in French.

When  Maria Feodorovna arrived in St. Petersburg to marry Sasha, she converted  to the Russian-Orthodox faith. In Denmark, her Christian names were Marie  Sophie Frederikke Dagmar. Dagmar is a Gothic name and was very popular in  the Nordic countries at the time. Because the patronymic would be  Christianovna because of her father and since Christianovna does not exist  in Russian, Tsar Alexander II decided that her Russian name was to be  Maria Feodorovna. Dagmar was so Nordic that it did not exist in Russian  either.

Maria  Feodorovna had already taken lessons in Russian in Copenhagen before  leaving for St. Petersburg in 1866. Whenever she wrote a letter to Sasha,  she would begin the first paragraph or two in Russian, which Sasha praised  her for. Sasha and Minny would speak Russian to one another on everyday  affairs. When they discussed more complicated issues, Sasha insisted on doing  so in French in order to avoid any misunderstanding.

To  her sisters and brothers on the thrones of Europe, she would always write  in Danish. It is interesting that her sister-in-law, Queen Olga of Greece,  married to her brother Vilhelm, who ascended the throne of the Hellenes as  George I, was fluent in Danish. Olga, a Russian-born Grand Duchess, was  known within the family as Oli.

From  the very day that Maria Feodorovna left Denmark in 1866 and until the  death of her father, Christian IX in 1906, father and daughter would write  in Danish.

I hope this clarifies things. The above is the version that replaces my mail dated September 11 2004.

Kind regards and best wishes,

Anna 
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on September 12, 2004, 05:30:58 PM
Did she happen to mention if Minnie's or Sasha's diaries have ever been published - in english?

thank you.

dca
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Forum Admin on September 12, 2004, 06:00:50 PM
They have not. I believe Inger Lise is working to produce an english translation of MFs diaries.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dbl-headed_eagle on September 13, 2004, 03:01:55 AM
Thank you Forum Administrator for all the trouble you’ve taken to answer my questions – I’m most grateful.

Has Inger-Lise Klausen mentioned if ‘Dagmar – zarina fra Danmark’ contains the complete diaries of Maria Feodorovna or only extracts? And if it is only extracts, does she know where I can get hold of the complete version?

Once again, thank you very much for your trouble.

Christian
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Candice on September 14, 2004, 09:14:35 AM
Months ago, I started a topic asking about these letters but no one ever answered.  I understand there are in total about 40 volumnes of letters. This is very intersting!


"On her marriage to Nicky, Maria Feodorovna asked Alicky to call her 'Mother Dear,' not 'Aunty Dear.'  My question is why would Alicky call Mimmi Aunty ?  Do the letters make that clear?

Regards
Candice

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: marymac on September 17, 2004, 05:58:09 PM
Prior to marriage, Alix's relationship w/Marie would have been similar to  "Aunt".  Marie's sister, Alexandra, being married to Edward, Alix's maternal uncle.  If I recall correctly, all of Alexandra's children called her "Mother Dear".  
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: JonC on September 18, 2004, 01:48:39 PM
Can you give a reference for that practice or is it simply what you think might be the case?

From what I've read...admitedly its not much...Empress Marie, being from Denmark was not much of a figure in English circles. Then she was married to Alexander 3rd so I haven't seen much of a 'chuminess' enough to be called 'mother' by Alexandra or her children.

Ofcourse when she married Nicholas she had every right to call Minny mother. But why had she called her 'Aunty Dear' up until then seems wrong to me.

You making a connection to Edward 7th seems a bit of a stretch to me. Maybe I'm making too much of this. Best regards. JonC.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Marlene on January 12, 2005, 02:50:30 PM
Danish publisher Gylendal has recently published a selection of Empress Marie's diaries -in Danish

Olga Romanoff found the diaries in her home, Provender, in Kent.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Marlene on January 12, 2005, 02:50:51 PM
Quote
Danish publisher Gylendal has recently published a selection of Empress Marie's diaries -in Danish

Olga Romanoff found the diaries in her home, Provender, in Kent.


oops forgot the link

http://www.gyldendal.dk/Gyldendal/gb/main.nsf/advanced
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Svetabel on January 12, 2005, 03:08:03 PM
Quote

oops forgot the link

http://www.gyldendal.dk/Gyldendal/gb/main.nsf/advanced


Thanks,Marlene! The diaries of 1917-1919 years..interesting! I hope will be English or Russian translation of that book!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Marlene on January 12, 2005, 03:08:49 PM
Quote

Thanks,Marlene! The diaries of 1917-1919 years..interesting! I hope will be English or Russian translation of that book!



Me too but such translations are rare  ...
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alicky1872 on January 12, 2005, 04:15:57 PM
Guess we had all better start learning Danish then!  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Georgiy on January 12, 2005, 04:36:16 PM
I am thinking maybe I should get this. Speaking Swedish (though not 100% fluently), I can read Danish as well to a degree. Looking at the website, the book says it is her 1917 - 1919 diaries, written while under housearrest,  day to day life under arrest, despair over the tsar's family, etc. It says it is well illustrated with previously unpublished photos.

If I get it (it is quite expensive at NZ$88 + postage on top of that...), and have time, I could post some sketchy translations from it...
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Georgiy on January 12, 2005, 04:48:01 PM
I tried to purchase it, but discovered, sadly, they will not send to people that don't have a Danish address. A pity.
I guess there is always Amazon or ebay to try instead though.... :(

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dennis on January 12, 2005, 05:33:04 PM
Georgiy:
     
Jag lasar svensk ocksa och dig forstar dansk ordar mychet bra!


Halsningar!

Dennis

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Georgiy on January 12, 2005, 05:44:23 PM
Hej Dennis!
Tack ska du ha! Men jag har inte pratat paa svenska foer maanga aar sen och daa har jag gloemt mycket. Tyvaerr...
Hej hej!

(For those with no Scandinavian language knowledge, I wrote: Hi Dennis. Thanks for that, but I haven't spoken Swedish for many years and thus I have forgotten a lot. A pity...
Bye!)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dennis on January 12, 2005, 07:29:20 PM
Var saa god!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Marlene on January 12, 2005, 08:04:49 PM
Quote
I tried to purchase it, but discovered, sadly, they will not send to people that don't have a Danish address. A pity.
I guess there is always Amazon or ebay to try instead though.... :(



Where did you try to purchase it.   I order Danish books from GAD  www.gad.dk   They have credit cards and send outside Denmark.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Georgiy on January 12, 2005, 09:23:15 PM
From the link on this thread. I haven't heard of gad.dk - I'll have to check them out. :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on January 15, 2005, 05:00:32 AM
From the "The Russian & Balkan Royal Message Board"

http://members5.boardhost.com/houseofwillis/msg/3588.html

Article:

Posted by Stig on January 12, 2005, 14:09:19
User logged in as: Stig
83.93.108.29

The diaries of Tsarina Marie Feodorovna (née Dagmar of Denmark) - covering the years 1917-1919 when she was interned in the Crimea - have been published in Danish.
See my message on the Scandinavian MB:


Link: http://members3.boardhost.com/scandinavia/msg/92187.html
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on January 15, 2005, 09:48:52 PM
Thanks for letting us know here about this book. Perhaps one can be optimistic and hope that an English translation may be a worthwhile marketing exercise.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Marlene on February 02, 2005, 03:20:55 PM
Quote
Thanks for letting us know here about this book. Perhaps one can be optimistic and hope that an English translation may be a worthwhile marketing exercise.



I got a copy last week ... excellent illustrations.  But I do not hold out hope for an English translation.   :-/
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on February 14, 2005, 09:41:44 AM
I just saw the book today. Looked great with good pictures and of course fascinating info.. Quit funny as I rescently posted a topic on the IF discussion asking for info on those years in the Crimea...And know i got it, more or less, have to find out if my budget can take it  ;D!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on February 20, 2005, 04:16:03 PM
Here is another, related article.  I sure hope that Marlene is wrong in this case and that these are translated into English...

http://en.rian.ru/rian/index.cfm?prd_id=160&msg_id=5427967&startrow=1&date=2005-02-18&do_alert=0

best,
dca
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 20, 2005, 07:08:28 PM
Quote
Here is another, related article.  I sure hope that Marlene is wrong in this case and that these are translated into English...
dca


I suspect that this is will be a Russian language publication, because Vagrius Publishers is a large Moscow based publishing house.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Georgiy on February 20, 2005, 08:24:26 PM
The article must have it a bit off - from the Crimea under house arrest they have quoted from a letter supposedly from Empress Maria to GD Georgi Alexandrovich! (I guess it must really have been to GD Mikhail).
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 21, 2005, 08:00:42 PM
Today I watched NTV (Russian news service) on satellite, and one of the last segments presented an interview with Rostropvich and scenes at the book launch. I was able to hear him introduce the brand new publication of the Diaries at the Hermitage several hours ago. :)

The book is definitely in Russian, and the cover bears Dowager Empress Marie's youthful Imperial image against numerous hand written lines on a white background.

Now it's time to hit the Russian bookstores! ;D
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Scott on February 22, 2005, 10:17:54 PM
http://www.sptimes.ru/archive/times/1046/news/n_14938.htm

http://www.sptimes.ru/archive/times/1046/news/n_0_4622.htm

St. Petersburg Times - 2/22/05

Diaries of Maria Fyodorovna Published

By Galina Stolyarova
STAFF WRITER

Cellist and philanthropist Mstislav Rostropovich launched a book of the previously unpublished diaries of Tsarina Maria Fyodorovna on Monday.

The musician purchased the original diaries, dating back to the years 1914 and 1923, which were discovered only a few years ago, and donated them to the publishing house Vagrius, which printed them.

"We [Rostropovich and his wife Galina Vishnevskaya] have left Russia, but we are closely following events in the country," Rostropovich said at the launch in the State Hermitage Museum. "We are returning as many precious memorabilia of the country's finest as we can. On my last trip here I brought 20 of [Pyotr] Tchaikovsky's letters, a [Nikolai] Gogol letter, a [Nikolai] Rimsky-Korsakov letter and four pages of [Nikolai] Karamzin's manuscripts and more."

Maria Fyodorovna, daughter of the Danish king, Christian IX, married Tsarevich Alexander, later Tsar Alexander III. Together they had six children, including Russia's last tsar, Nicholas II.

After her son abdicated in 1917, Maria Fyodorovna escaped to the Crimea with her daughter, and in 1919 they emigrated from there to England and later to Copenhagen.

The diaries were found in a house on the outskirts of London where the empress spent several years before moving to Denmark. The previous owner, who sold the diaries to Rostropovich in 2001, requested anonymity. "I was approached by the owner, who didn't want to go through the auction schemes or any public sale," Rostropovich said.

The newly published diaries reflect the most tragic, troubled and challenging part of the empress's life.

"After the [October] revolution, Russia was breaking apart but the empress didn't give up and never allowed her spirit be broken by the turbulent times and miseries she was going through," said Yulia Kudrina, the project's director and one of the book's translators.

The book offers precious - and previously unpublished - personal insights into events that shook the world.

In a letter from May 4, 1917, Maria Fyodorovna describes a humiliating scene of Bolsheviks searching her estate in Ai-Todor in Crimea. "Everything was so brutal and indecent: a marine officer broke into my room and woke me up at 5:30 a.m.," the empress wrote. "He placed a guard just by my bed and told me to get up ... I was bewildered. The officer sat at my desk and started perusing literally every single piece looking for compromising materials. And everything, even my Dutch children's gospel book, was thrown into a big sack and taken away."

It took several years to prepare the manuscript for publication.

"The diaries were written in minute handwriting, with many words smudges and many pages torn," Kudrina said. "We also had to do quite a lot of deciphering as a number of words were abbreviated."

Even in the last hours of her life, the tsarina refused to believe that the Bolsheviks had murdered her son and his family. She died in Denmark in 1928 and was buried in Copenhagen's Roskilde Cathedral, and is to be reburied next to her husband in the Peter and Paul Cathedral next year.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 22, 2005, 10:36:36 PM
Rostropovich to his credit is doing a lot of good for Russia today. :)

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Marlene on February 24, 2005, 09:42:28 AM
Quote
Rostropovich to his credit is doing a lot of good for Russia today. :)



Interesting - but according to the original reports - Olga Romanoff, daughter of Prince Andrew, found the diaries in her attic in her home at Provender in Kent.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 24, 2005, 09:15:04 PM
Quote
Interesting - but according to the original reports - Olga Romanoff, daughter of Prince Andrew, found the diaries in her attic in her home at Provender in Kent.


Hi Marlene,

Rostropovich purchased the book "for a huge sum of money". In his Russian interview he stated that the Diary was in the possession of a distant Romanoff relative." He would not disclose her name, except to say that this woman "sought him out" by telephone, because she believed that he understood the nature of the item and that he would enable its publication.

Rostrpovich went on to claim that there were other items accompanying the Diary. Inside a floral handkerchief he found a pair of manicuring scissors which belonged to the Empress.

It took two years to translate the Diary from the original Danish language. There were numerous abbreviations and close to one thousand names mentioned, which necessitated the Russian publisher to produce a separate listing.

The print run was 5000 copies.  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: hikaru on February 26, 2005, 04:43:11 AM
I have bought today the Diaries of Maria Fyodorovna in Russian. Very exiting.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 26, 2005, 05:14:27 AM
Hi Hikaru,

How exciting! If you do not mind me asking, how many rubles did you pay for your copy?

Thanks,

Belochka :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: hikaru on February 26, 2005, 06:12:27 AM
It is published in 2005 by Moscow Publishing House "Vagrius" and its price in the "Dom knigi" (Book's House) on Novy Arbat is 766 roubles -702 pages (about 30 dollars) .
(New books became very expensive)
It conclude:
Diaries from 1914 till 1923.
Diaries from 1916 was bought by Mstislav Rostropovich
Everyting is translated from Danish.
The number of printed issues are 5000 volumes
It is a simple book with some photographs and with firm cover.
Nothing special from the publishing point of view.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 26, 2005, 08:50:55 PM
Quote
It is published in 2005 by Moscow Publishing House "Vagrius" and its price in the "Dom knigi" (Book's House) on Novy Arbat is 766 roubles -702 pages (about 30 dollars) .


Thanks hikaru. I was very curious about the retail price in Russia.  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Svetabel on February 28, 2005, 07:29:59 AM
Quote
It is published in 2005 by Moscow Publishing House "Vagrius" and its price in the "Dom knigi" (Book's House) on Novy Arbat is 766 roubles -702 pages (about 30 dollars) .
(New books became very expensive)
It conclude:
Diaries from 1914 till 1923.
Diaries from 1916 was bought by Mstislav Rostropovich
Everyting is translated from Danish.
The number of printed issues are 5000 volumes
It is a simple book with some photographs and with firm cover.
Nothing special from the publishing point of view.

Well,here in St Petersburg one can find a book at 738 roubles. In fact all the photos in the book are well-known. I mean they travelled from A.Bokhanov's and Y.Kudrina's books. ::)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eurohistory on February 28, 2005, 09:20:12 AM
Apparently the Danish and Russian publications cover different years of the Dowager Empress' diaries.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 28, 2005, 07:46:03 PM
Quote
Well,here in St Petersburg one can find a book at 738 roubles. In fact all the photos in the book are well-known. I mean they travelled from A.Bokhanov's and Y.Kudrina's books. ::)


Obviously a bargain in SPb!.

It is hardly surprising that photographs would have been used from other publications since the text, being the main focus of attention, came from an intimate personal diary. The diary was never intended for global publication when it was written by the Dowager.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 28, 2005, 07:53:30 PM
Quote
Apparently the Danish and Russian publications cover different years of the Dowager Empress' diaries.
Arturo Beéche


Hi Arturo,

Do you have any idea how the two versions differ? ??? It seems that there are a number of diaries floating around, and Rostropovich must have purchased part of a set.

Perhaps the Russian based posters here can provide details of the contents of the Russian publication? :) I understand that the exile years are the main focus of attention.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: hikaru on March 01, 2005, 01:36:23 AM
Maybe Danish version is only from 1916 year.
Because diary of 1914 and one  part  of 1915 diary (it is not full) originally was in Russia.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on March 01, 2005, 12:31:34 PM
I dont have the danish book (yet), but it also has a chapter from Xenia Alexandrovnas diary on life in the Crimea..
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on March 01, 2005, 04:54:42 PM
Yet another article -

http://english.pravda.ru/main/18/90/363/15032_Princess.html

dca
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on March 01, 2005, 06:10:57 PM
Does anyone have any idea about the contents of the Danish publication? Thanks for any information. :)

We are probably looking at two completely different books here.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on March 02, 2005, 08:41:19 AM
The danish book is called, Empress Dagmars captivity in The Crimea, Diaries and letters 1917-1919.
The book is almost 600 pages.
The diaries cover the life at Aj-Todor, Djulber and Kharaks
Then there is as stated, a chapter of GD Xenias diary on Aj-Todor 1917-1918.
And finally Dagmars letters to her family, mainly Alix, but also Waldemar and Olga.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: hikaru on March 02, 2005, 08:51:44 AM
As I understood the same in the Danish and Russian
edition is only the Crimea era Diaries of Mariya Fyodorovna.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Marlene on March 02, 2005, 09:32:59 AM
Quote
As I understood the same in the Danish and Russian
edition is only the Crimea era Diaries of Mariya Fyodorovna.



I asked Coryne Hall, a longtime friend, about the diaries, and she confirmed that the two editions are separate.  The Russian diaries cover a longer time period
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eurohistory on March 02, 2005, 12:23:58 PM
Quote

Hi Arturo,

Do you have any idea how the two versions differ? ??? It seems that there are a number of diaries floating around, and Rostropovich must have purchased part of a set.

Perhaps the Russian based posters here can provide details of the contents of the Russian publication? :) I understand that the exile years are the main focus of attention.


Not really but I a looking forward to getting the Russian edition at least...since I have a marvelous book afgent n St. Petersburg who gets me great stuff all the time...'ll keepyou informed.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on March 02, 2005, 09:05:28 PM
Quote

Not really but I a looking forward to getting the Russian edition at least...since I have a marvelous book afgent n St. Petersburg who gets me great stuff all the time...'ll keepyou informed.

Arturo Beéche


Thanks, I, and I 'm sure many others look forward to hearing from you! :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: duchella on April 28, 2005, 12:32:20 PM
Alix's Uncle was Edward VII - of course she would have called his wife Aunt (or in this case Aunty Dear, a follow-up to being called Mother Dear by her own children.)  The relationship of an aunt-by marriage and her sister, might certainly be extended to "Aunty Dear" as well.  She would have been quite young when she first started calling Edwards wife Aunty Dear, and ... it makes sense if you think about  extended families.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: L. on December 14, 2005, 03:10:05 PM
  I have seen published  diary of Maria Feodorovna on Russian language in September on book fair in Belgrade this year. The publisher is Russian, but I dont know wich one :-/. :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dmitri on June 02, 2007, 11:27:17 PM
The link provided by Marlene is incorrect. It doesn't function.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dmitri on June 02, 2007, 11:36:23 PM
I would like to know about the letter of Maria to her sister Alexandra. I think they would be in the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle. I wonder whether these are in Danish or English as they would be most interesting as they would express her opinions whereas the ones in the Russian archives would be answers to questions from Maria by Alexandra her sister.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on June 02, 2007, 11:46:48 PM
 I have seen published  diary of Maria Feodorovna on Russian language in September on book fair in Belgrade this year. The publisher is Russian, but I dont know wich one :-/. :)

I have a copy. It was published in 2005 by Vagrius, Moscow.

Margarita  :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Teddy on August 25, 2007, 02:08:26 PM
What happened with the private correspondence of Maria and her siblings (Frederick, Waldemar, George, Alexandra, Thyra, and maybe even with that of their brothers- and sister in laws)???
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dmitri on August 26, 2007, 02:02:55 AM
much would be in the Danish Royal Archives
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dmitri on September 25, 2007, 12:05:37 AM
I thought this new thread might be rather fascinating as it allows Maria Feodorovna to speak to us today in her own words from entries from her letters and diaries.

This entry is to her Mother, Queen Louise of Denmark in a letter written about the death of Alexander II :

" Oh! my angelic blessed Mama! Can anyone believe that all this horror is really true? The ways of the Lordare past understanding, and we poor people cannot comprehend that he can permit this most awful of events. Oh, what sorrow and despair, that our beloved Emperor should be torn away from us and even in this dreadful way! No, anyone who has not seen the appalling sight himself can never imagine anything like it! I can still see it before me, night and day! The condition was truly heartrendering! His face and head and upper body were untouched but his legs were completely crushed and torn up to the knees, so that at first I did not understand what I was actually looking at, a bleeding mass with half a boot on the right foot: all that was left of the left was the sole of his foot! Never in my life have I seen anything like it: no it was horrible.

This is how we (Sascha and I) found him, lying on his bed with his eyes still openm and breathing, but unconscious, and less than 3/4 of an hour after our arrival, it was all over: naturally after the enormous loss of blood, all the doctors' efforts were in vain. Poor Uncle Micha (Alexander II's brother Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevuch), who had been with the Emperor at Aunt Cathy's just a few minutes before, had heard the first explosion from her house, immediately rushed out, and arrived at the corner of the street when the second explosion took place, which he clearly saw, and to his question of whether the Emperor was not hurt, he was answered: the Emperor got out of the carriage and walked home unscathed, so he was quite calm and when he cam a bit closer he saw a crowd of soldiers and Cossacks carrying something, and then he saw it was the Emperor they were carrying , half naked since his trousers had been torn off, and the poor legs in that appalling state, which I have already described to you!

You can imagine poor Uncle Mischa's horror and despair at this terrible sight, after he had seen him just 10 minutes before happy and pleased at Aunt Cathy's! Uncle Mischa asked him he he was suffering, after which the poor Emperor could still say in a weak voice: 'quickly home, home! and looked at him with an expression, said Uncle Mischa, that he will never be able to forget! They carried him to a police officer's sled and then drove him as quickly as possible to the palace, but already unconscious!

We found the entire stairs and corridor spattered with the blood that had flowed from him and the wounded Cossacks who carried the Emperor right to his bed, so you can imagine what an awful impression this sight already made on us, we who still only knew that he was wounded.

To see the unfortunate widow's despair was more than heartrendering , so that in an instant, everything that we previously felt against her was gone and only the greatest, most sincere sympathy for her boundless pain remained. I cannot tell you how much I pity her: in such moments, one forgets and forgives everything, and I am certain that if he could see our true feelings for the one he loved most on this earth, he would be pleased with it ...

But for my beloved Sascha, iot was the hardest of all blows! - Imagine to lose one's father in this way, and then the awesome yoke that Our Lord is placing upon him! I am disconsolate and say, as I heard Papa say to you when Frederik VII died: our happiest and lovely time is now past. It was indeed a difficult time for you two then, but it cannot be compared to what we are going through here! My peace and calm are gone, for now I am never again rest assured about Sascha: if I did not have firm faith in God, that he will help us when we do not renounce Him. He himself is touching, in his profound sorrow and despair over his beloved father, but he is calm, trusts firmly in our Lord, and is filled with courage and energy.

May our Lord hear my prayer and protect him and preserve him as he is, in every respect, and bless all his ways and help him to carry out everything with wisdom and crown with success all his good intentions for the country and the people's well-being, happiness and blessing!"

(Cat.No.42)

Kejserinde Dagmar Empress of Russia - Christianborg Palace Copenhagen 1997 - p.140, 142 
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: dmitri on September 25, 2007, 12:23:10 AM
Maria Feodorovna on the wedding of her son Nicholas II and his bride Alexandra Feodorovna and shortly afterwards to her Mother, Queen Louise:

"The bride was thoroughly enchanting, so lovely and beautiful and with an Imperial calm and dignity. They now live down in his rooms with two other drawing rooms, which are very charming and cozily outfitted, and I am so glad that they are living with me, as you can imagine, and that I have them with me. You say that none of us has written anything about Alicky, but I am certain that in my first long letter I said how sweet and affectionately sympathetic she has been to me the entire time, and how close she has come to my heart in all this sadness and despair, which she has shared with us so beautifully."     
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on September 26, 2007, 10:20:56 PM
Thanks for sharing that wioth us.  :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on November 12, 2007, 05:04:07 PM
November 13, 1898, addressed to his sister Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909)

My dear Mary, your good letter made me great pleasure and I thank you with all my heart for giving me writing. It was so good to you because since my departure from Bernstorff, [holiday residence of the king of Denmark], I had no news of you all and it was more than painful. It feels so alone, so isolated and the burden of terrible grief seems even more heavy and painful when one is the only one to wear. I wish these lines t'en express my gratitude and how I am affected. I also think that many of you must feel so alone in Copenhagen now without Waldemar and without our loved Mom [Queen Louise of Denmark (1878-1918)] which was the soul of everything! Since I have been here I can even believe that it really has been removed! It seems like a horrible nightmare and await constantly a letter from her, her letters ideal that m'apportaient always a ray of sunshine in my life so sad lonely now. It's such a vacuum, such a difficult to express sadness! When you wired me about the departure of loved Papa, [Christian IX, King of Denmark (1818-1906)] I was initially frightened of the idea that living at that time in Gumden could harm his health, but now I am happy because this change seems to be good. Thank you. The heart is tightened thinking about his return, what will the poor Papa to return in this big empty house. Horrible. He feels so out of step alone and without the beloved Mama! I hope that you and your dear children go well and that Aage [Aage prince of Denmark (1887-1940)] recovers completely. I think we need a long time to spare its forces and not to make too learn. Poor little I am sure he feels so deeply the irreparable loss of his beloved grandmother that he was still the big favorite. She particularly liked, and he felt should never be forgotten. I embrace all from the heart and you likewise dear Mary. Georgia [nickname of his son George Duke of Russia (1871-1889)], Micha [nickname of his son Michel de Grand Russia (1878-1918)] and Olga [his daughter Grand Duchess Olga of Russia (1882-1960)] do you say a thousand things. I am pleased to be here with Georgia [suffering from tuberculosis in many years is in convalecence to Abass-Jouman in Crimea, where he décédra] and it is good mine Thankfully, it has not only fattened since last year. We enjoy a wonderful time despite the snow. We have lunch outside and we réchauffons sun shining. We are conducting an existence of quiet and calm that is good but now we must finish. Dear Mary Thanks again for your letter. A toi de coeur.
 "Minny"

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on November 12, 2007, 05:05:51 PM
Gatchina, December 7, 1899, addressed to his sister Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909)

My dear Mary, I was so happy to receive your dear letter and worry thank with all my heart. It touches me greatly that you will say that I lack a little. We have both seen this time and if there is good understanding and I would like to thank you again for all your marks and affection of so many touches which touched me well. Very often I think of you as dear Mary, and you have to feel alone without Waldemar [Prince Waldemar of Denmark (1885-1939)] and your brother Jean [Jean Duc de Guise (1874-1940)], especially for Christmas. Fortunately, you will have the joy of having your father to you for a few weeks. We found the winter completely prepared by returning here, a lot of snow and 10 cold. The return was particularly sad and painful this year. So did I so happy to reconsider my dear Nicky [nickname of his son, Nicolas II emperor of Russia] and the three girls [Olga, Tatiana, Maria] which made me the joy of spending two weeks here with me Gatchina. Small inspired the whole house and were so nice. Xenia [Russian Grand Duchess Xenia, daughter of the Empress] has finally returned to Crimea and a very good mine thank God. They are based in Petersburg, and I was at home on the day of their arrival. The children have grown a lot especially the youngest who is enormous. It looked great event for our Christmas around. I wanted either already past, it gives me emotions atrocious. God gives all will be well. From Dad I often receive telegrams, even a letter immediately after his arrival. He feels very well thank God despite the cold and it is very pleased with Thyra [Thyra Duchess of Cumberland (1853-1933), sister of the empress]. The poor Alix [nickname of his daughter, Alexandra Feodorovna, Empress of Russia] is very much to the chagrin of the unfortunate events of the Transvaal and mass casualties. It is appalling, and wondering how it will end. It is a true slaughter! I give you the 20000 crowns and asking you to give them as required. Here it I tell you goodbye dear Mary in wishing you a happy feast and t'embrassant tenderly and your dear children. God bless. Ta old sister who love you. Minny. Can I ask you to send me mail with two or three little ducks (twins) of a mill like the one tu m'avais a gift and mets-y note I pray thee [reference to the porcelain factory in Copenhagen , for whom Princess Marie Drew animals].

Minny
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on November 12, 2007, 05:07:40 PM
Gatchina, June 17, 1909, addressed to his sister Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909),

Dear Mary, I thank you a thousand times for your dear letter and the lovely little thought which made me so happy. It is so beautiful and stands in front of me on my table. I greatly regret not having seen Anderson this time and do not understand why he did not come with me. When I asked him to come here, I was told that it was already left. Here I give you my number for the factory that you asked me, and found the idea of making this small figure in memory of Papa pretty cheap and hopes that it will succeed. By your telegram I learned the departure of Waldemar [Prince Waldemar of Denmark (1885-1939), husband of Princess Mary] with Aage [Aage prince of Denmark (1887-1940), son of Princess Mary] for France and Gmunden, will enjoy Thyra [Thyra Duchess of Cumberland (1853-1933), sister of the empress] for revision. She writes very rarely in general. I thirst for news from all of you. I feel so sad and abandoned. Here we live in a time much more seriously, and that's sad. The storm is closer and closer. There is a sense of walking on a volcano. Only God knows how it will end, it helps us out. I embrace you tenderly with the dear children. God bless dear Mary. Ta well affectionnée Minny. I will try to send you roses Socrates as soon as possible.
 Minny
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Amanda_Misha on November 12, 2007, 07:06:08 PM
Thanks for the letter, are very interesting to know something that has written Dagmar :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on November 13, 2007, 02:56:03 AM
MAria Féodorovna wrote to her sister Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909),
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 14, 2007, 02:14:31 AM
Sister-in-law I think. She was the wife of Prince Waldermar of Denmark.  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: grandduchessella on November 14, 2007, 06:51:51 PM
November 13, 1898, addressed to his sister Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909)

My dear Mary, your good letter made me great pleasure and I thank you with all my heart for giving me writing. It was so good to you because since my departure from Bernstorff, [holiday residence of the king of Denmark], I had no news of you all and it was more than painful. It feels so alone, so isolated and the burden of terrible grief seems even more heavy and painful when one is the only one to wear. I wish these lines t'en express my gratitude and how I am affected. I also think that many of you must feel so alone in Copenhagen now without Waldemar and without our loved Mom [Queen Louise of Denmark (1878-1918)] which was the soul of everything! Since I have been here I can even believe that it really has been removed! It seems like a horrible nightmare and await constantly a letter from her, her letters ideal that m'apportaient always a ray of sunshine in my life so sad lonely now. It's such a vacuum, such a difficult to express sadness!

Queen Louise died in 1898, not 1918, that's whose death she is referring to. Minny had stayed for several weeks, I believe, in Denmark helping to console her father.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: grandduchessella on November 14, 2007, 06:55:21 PM
Gatchina, June 17, 1909, addressed to his sister Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909),

I wonder if this was one of the last letters--Marie would pass away almost 6 months later (4 Dec).

Thanks so much, Alexandre, for the letters and their translations. It's much appreciated and, since you state in each translation that she was born a princess of Orleans, I'm sure that you already knew she was a sister-in-law and not a sister. The Danish princesses were very close to 2 of their 3 sisters-in-law (Olga and Marie) and considered them sisters in heart if not blood.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 14, 2007, 08:47:49 PM
They were all indeed very close. Thanks again for the translation (from French !)  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on November 15, 2007, 03:40:48 AM
These true that Maria, Alexandra and Thura was near their Sister-in-law, except for the woman of their brother, the Princess of Sweden.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 15, 2007, 08:11:34 PM
Indeed ! "Aunt Swan" as she was called in the family.  ::) Dagmar also complained that Thyra did not write enough.  :(
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Valmont on February 08, 2008, 06:15:06 PM
who was Aunt Cathy????
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 09, 2008, 10:00:12 AM
Maria Féodorovna, empress of Russia, born Princess Dagmar of Denmark (1847-1928).
Letter autograph signed: "Minny", Gatchina, June 17, 1906, addressed to his sister-in-law, Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909), p. 4 In-4, on letterhead with the figure of the Empress, with its preserved envelope.
Text in french.

"Dear Mary, thank you a thousand times for your dear letter and the delightful little thought which made me so much pleasure.
She is so pretty and stands in front of me on my desk. I greatly regret not having seen Anderson this time and do not understand why he did not come to my house.
When I asked him to come here, I was told that it was already left. Here I am sending you my number for the factory that you asked me and finds the idea of this little figure in memory of the dear Papa very pretty and hopes that it will succeed. For your telegram I learned the departure of Waldemar [Prince Waldemar of Denmark (1885-1939), husband of Princess Marie] with Aage [Aage prince of Denmark (1887-1940), son of Princess Marie] for France and Gmunden, it will be happy to Thyra [Thyra Duchess of Cumberland (1853-1933), sister of the empress] to see him again. She writes very rarely in general. I thirst for news from all of you. I feel so sad and abandoned. Here we live in a time much more seriously, and that's sad. The storm is closer and closer.

There is a sense of walking on a volcano. God only knows how this will end, it helps us out.
Je t'embrasse tenderly with the ladies and children. God bless dear Mary. Your well affectionnée Minny. I will try to send you roses Socrates as soon as possible ".

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/Lettre/12011874828133641.jpg
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 09, 2008, 10:01:06 AM
Maria Féodorovna, empress of Russia, born Princess Dagmar of Denmark (1847-1928).
Map autograph signed: "Minny", Gatchina, June 17, 1902, addressed to his sister-in-law, Princess Mary of Denmark, born Princess of Orleans (1865-1909), seen on the reverse side of Anitchkoff palace, residence of 'empress.
Text in french.

"Dear Mary, thank you a thousand times for your beautiful photographs of you and your sister-in-law that I am very happy to have, as well as your three letters. Everything is already facilitating the travel of your cousin.
What terrible nightmare that the disease so dangerous and anguish of the poor Bertie [nickname of King Edward VII of Great Britain], just on the eve of his coronation. Thank God that it's going better now and he is out of danger. Mischa [Michel Alexandrovitch, Grand Duke of Russia, the brother of Nicolas II] has already left London yesterday, which proves that everything goes normally. What happiness for Alix [Alexandra, Queen of Great Britain, sister of the Empress Maria Feodorovna] to have his brothers around her.
Je t'embrasse tenderly. Ton affectionnée sister Minny "

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/Lettre/12011874832033081.jpg
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 09, 2008, 10:01:44 AM
Maria Féodorovna, empress of Russia.
Interesting telegram sent to Dr. Boris Malama (private doctor of the Imperial Family), by Countess Zénaïde Mengden, maiden of honor of the Empress Maria Féodorovna (1847-1928), Copenhagen, February 22, 1928, some time before death the Empress.
"After my boss influenza still very low could you do not immediately come to Copenhagen for a few days. Visa will be ready in Paris at the Legation"

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/Lettre/12011874854094351.jpg
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on April 04, 2008, 07:15:30 PM
Aunt Cathy was Grand Duchess Ekaterina Mikhailovna, daughter of Grand Duke Mikhail Pavlovich, and grand daughter of Emperor Paul.  She was married to Duke George of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who was a first cousin of Maria Feodorovnas mother, Queen Louise.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: M. le Comte de Boir on May 13, 2008, 10:03:23 AM
It's so nice to hear what Minnie said about Princess Yurievskaya. I know Minnie really hated her for a while but now Minnie and Sasha's actions after the death of Alexander II make sense. (They gave her a pension and a palace and told her to go away, but they did it nicely.) Anyway, thank you so much for sharing that with us!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Svetabel on April 13, 2009, 04:25:28 AM
Has anyone ever read the Empress' diaries of the 1914-1919 years? I have a Russian copy of her diaries and now I've finished reading the 1918 year. Just want to express some feelings on this.

I got bored reading the 1914-1916 years and that's why: I read many journals/diaries of common and Royal persons and I exactly know that one should not expect something really EXCITING from such epistolary, and the MF's records are not an exception.
Certainly she was not writing her entries and thinking "Oh,someday historians will read and be fascinated", her records is an everyday routine. Though sometimes it's getting funny as she frequently uses words "wonderful" and "sweet" describing people, things and events..as if all around is sweet and  wonderful, the people are wonderful, the hospitals are wonderful and so on. It's a shining example that the Romanovs lived in a gilded cage, the aged Empress reasons as a naive girl. And this "girl" sometimes sounds sooo egoistic that one can feel sorry for her relatives and inner circle. Her relations with daughters is the best example.

Also one episode impressed me much: The Romanian Royal Family was seeking for a refuge in 1916 after the Germans invaded Romania and the Russian government asked Empress MF if she could make some rooms for the Romanians in her residence in Kiev. The Empress got furious!! She flatly refused and bluntly wrote in her diary that such request was impossible, she would have been squeezed up in her residence and probably would have been forced to leave her place. Here one must keep in mind that the Empress was living alone, only with her attendants in a comfortable big Palace....and in 1918-1919 years Queen Marie of Romania would try to save the lives of her Romanov relatives and especially the Empress'.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 13, 2009, 12:04:04 PM
Indeed. Much of the information that came out recently is in Russian only. Would love to see that information translated to English.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on August 21, 2009, 11:50:30 AM
Thank you very much for post all the information and the letter, sadly I can't understand anything that
she wrote, but thank you!!!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Teddy on August 21, 2009, 04:12:16 PM
Its a pity that there are no English versions of her diaries, only in Russian and Danish.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 01, 2009, 05:46:52 AM
I would like to know about the letter of Maria to her sister Alexandra. I think they would be in the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle. I wonder whether these are in Danish or English as they would be most interesting as they would express her opinions whereas the ones in the Russian archives would be answers to questions from Maria by Alexandra her sister.

I once had the pleasure of meeting Georgina Battiscombe, author of what is, to date, the definitive biography of Queen Alexandra.

In the course of our talk, she discussed in detail her search in the Royal Archives (Windsor) and in the Royal Danish Archives (Copenhagen) and the paucity of relevant material she found in both.

It seems that upon the death of her various relatives, the Queen asked that her letters to them be returned.  In most cases, her wishes were honored.  Shortly after Queen Alexandra's death, her friend and confidante Charlotte Knollys, following the Queen's instructions, burned all the personal letters to and from the late Queen that she could find.

One of the rare exceptions were the letters Queen Alexandra wrote to her youngest brother, Prince Waldemar.  These are housed in the Royal Danish Archives, but as Prince Waldermar did not die until 1939, they were to have been under embargo until at least 1989.  (Mrs. Battiscombe did her research in the 1960s; whether or not these letters have since been un-sealed, I do not know.)

As for the Russian archives, Mrs. Battiscombe was able to make use of the one volume of the Queen's letters to the Empress Marie which the Soviet authorities included in a display at an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum.  At that time, the Russian authorities were quite vague about when they might translate the voumes and release them for research; as Mrs. Battiscombe said, with quiet tact (and understatement), "I'm afraid the translation of volumes of letters writen in Danish in a rather unshaky hand was not high on their list of priorities."

I hope this ramble is of some help in providing some background as to the apparent dearth of letters from the Empress Marie to Queen Alexandra!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Teddy on December 01, 2009, 07:21:30 AM
What about her letters to Thyra?
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 02, 2009, 06:04:41 AM
What about her letters to Thyra?

Hi, Teddy:

Good question.  Presumably, any letters written to Princess Thyra (Duchess of Cumberland) by Queen Alexandra or the Empress Marie would be in the Hanover family archives, though just where these archives are located, how complete they are, what condition they might be in (losses and/or damages during World War II), and whether or not they are open to researchers, I do not know.

(By the same token, there may well be letters from Queen Alexandra to Queen Olga or to her children in the Greek archives --- though whether these are government or private family archives or just how complete they might be, again I don't know.)

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Teddy on December 02, 2009, 10:38:28 AM
Thank you for reply. We can just ask the current Prince of Hannover about the letters of Queen Alexandra and the same we can ask for the Greece goverment or to King Constantine of Greece. Personally I think that also these letters are probaly destroyed because was it not a custom to send the complete correspondence back when the writer itself had died? As for the letters towards Queen Olga, I think that the chance that they are still anyware is bigger because she had a lot on her mind at the end of her days and had not even the time to send the letters to her sister-in-law back.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 02, 2009, 12:24:18 PM
I think the letters from Thyra might still survive since both sisters lived to an old age. Thyra was the last sister of the trio of Danish Princeses to die.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 04, 2009, 05:48:46 AM
Thank you for reply. We can just ask the current Prince of Hannover about the letters of Queen Alexandra and the same we can ask for the Greece goverment or to King Constantine of Greece. Personally I think that also these letters are probaly destroyed because was it not a custom to send the complete correspondence back when the writer itself had died? As for the letters towards Queen Olga, I think that the chance that they are still anyware is bigger because she had a lot on her mind at the end of her days and had not even the time to send the letters to her sister-in-law back.

Hi, Teddy:

Well, the House of Hanover is still capable of generating headlines --- though more for the eccentric goings-on of its current head than for anything else.  Still, presumably he would be the one to grant permission for access to any of the family archives.

As for the question of ownership (which leads to the question of copyright), I believe that this devolve to the recipient of the letters and that under normal circumstances, they have the right to dispose of their private papers as they wish.  As one example, Queen Victoria named her youngest daughter, Princess Beatrice, as her literary executor.  Princess Beatrice, in turn, took it on herself to transcribe her mother's diaries, editing as she went along, and then destroying the originals:  not even King Edward VII  could prevent her.  It would seem that Queen Alexandra's request that her letters to various members of her family be returned to her upon their deaths was just that:  a request, not adherence to a hard-and-fast custom or policy.

Given the vicissitudes of the Greek Royal Family since 1917, their archives pose some interesting questions.  Yes, you are quite right in saying that during the last years of her life, Queen Olga had more important things on her mind than the safekeeping of private papers.  As I recall, she was in Russia at the time the revolution broke out there; by the time she was able to leave, I believe that the Greek royals had already gone into exile and that she rejoined them in Switzerland (?), not Athens.

During the years when Greece seesawed between a monarchy and a (nominal) republic, what happened to the archives?  Were they impounded intact by the new governments?  Were parts of them destroyed?  And if so, by whom?  Did members of the family have time destroy documents which might, for whatever reason, prove to be detrimental to them (much in the same way that the Empress Alexandra burned portions of her private papers in 1917)?  Or, conversely, the did the republican government destroy those papers which would show the royal family in a favorable light?

Certainly at the time of the counter-coup in 1967, I doubt that either King Constantine nor Queen Anne-Marie had much time to worry about letters and diaries.  In fact, in one documentary (perhaps the wonderful Danish-produced documentary, "A royal family"?), Queen Anne-Marie spoke quite openly and candidly, saying that they packed very little, assuming that they would only be away for a few days.  (Whether or not any such private papers were later returned to them, I have no idea.)

Bringing this back to the letters and diaries of the Empress Marie, the same questions can be asked.  We know that many of the Romanov personal papers (letter, diaries, photo albums, etc.) were impounded the by the Soviets and consigned to storage where most of them are just now beginning to surface for the first time since the revolution; still other were taken by their owners when they went into exile or were later sent out of Russia.  But what happened to the papers the Empress had in her posession at the time of her death?  Are they kept as they treasures they undoubtedly are by family members?  Were they destroyed?  (And if so, by whom?)  Or perhaps as courtesy, were they consigned to the archives of the Danish Royal Family?  (Which, among other things, contains the dossier complied at the request of Prince Waldemar into the case of Anna Anderson by Herluf Zahle, the Danish minister in Berlin in the 1920s.  It seems that when Zahle retired, he turned his files over to King Christian X where they have remained under embargo ever since.  As author Peter Kurth found out when he was researching his book on Anna Anderson/Grand Duchess Anastasia, such documents are considered by Queen Margrethe as being part of the private family archives and, as such, cannot be made available to researchers or scientists.)

With time, as the immediate family members and/or descendants of those involved die, perhaps such papers as are still extant will be released; in the meantime, we can only speculate on their contents.

FASCINATING!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 04, 2009, 08:15:47 AM
I think the letters from Thyra might still survive since both sisters lived to an old age. Thyra was the last sister of the trio of Danish Princeses to die.

Hi, Eric:

You're correct:  Princess Thyra, Duchess of Cumberland, outlived the Empress Marie by about five years.  And unless she, too, requested the return of  letters she wrote to family members (for their eventual destruction), they should have survived.  Alternately, she may have requested their return to have them placed in the Hanover family archives.  If they remained in Denmark, there is the chance that the Empress's two daughters, the Grand Duchess Xenia and the Grand Duchess Olga, may have either consigned some/all of their mother's papers to the rubbish bin while cleaning out Hvidore; kept some/all of them; or placed them in the Danish Royal Archives.

What is especially interesting is that apparently the Duchess of Cumberland was one who urged her sister to investigate the claims of Anna Anderson, reasoning that by doing so, it would help clear up the matter once and for all.  Any such letters would no doubt make for extremely interesting reading!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 04, 2009, 05:01:04 PM
I agree.

Unfortunately, the information on Prince Waldemar who did investigate the claims of Anna are under lock and key. Those close to Queen Margarete II is convinced that she will never open the information during her lifetime. When her son is king, then we will see that information, letters from both Thyra and Dagmar on the subject. I am not sure if the letters of Thyra, Duchess of Cumberland would be in the archievs in Hannover, it may still be with the family.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on December 09, 2009, 05:02:41 PM
Princess Thyras letters to Maria Feodorovna are in the Russian state archive, GARF.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 09, 2009, 06:36:47 PM
Not the ones after her exile to Hvidore...
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 10, 2009, 04:45:04 AM
Princess Thyras letters to Maria Feodorovna are in the Russian state archive, GARF.

Certainly those surviving letters written by Princess Thyra to the Empress prior to Marie Feodorovna's exile would be in the Russian State Archives. 

(As a side note here, it is interesting to speculate on those written by the Princess to the Empress after 1914.  With the declaration of war, normal channels of communication were disrupted; perhaps some were smuggled in; perhaps others were copied and forwarded on under the auspices their mutual sister-lin-law Queen Alexandrine or through the Crown Princess of Sweden.  I would think that as the situation deteriorated in Russia, communication would have become increasingly difficult, especially after the Tsar's abdication; it is possible that some letters may have simply disappeared in the general chaos.)

Please remember, too, that the Empress did spend some time in England before relocating to Denmark.  Were letters between the two sisters exchanged at that time?  And if so, did the Empress bother to keep them?  Or toss them after replying?  And as for those letters written to the Empress in Denmark - which may have contained references to the Anna Anderson/Grand Duchess Anastasia question - these could have been destroyed by the Empress herself; destroyed after her death by either the Grand Duchess Xenia or the Grand Duchess Olga (though the latter, because of her morganatic marriage, seemed to be kept pretty much out the of the decision making process); or consigned to a sealed family archive.

Finally, there is the question of the number of letters:  more than once, the Empress was known to have complained about how infrequently Princess Thyra wrote. 
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Teddy on December 10, 2009, 05:47:07 AM
Princess Thyras letters to Maria Feodorovna are in the Russian state archive, GARF.

Certainly those surviving letters written by Princess Thyra to the Empress prior to Marie Feodorovna's exile would be in the Russian State Archives. 

(As a side note here, it is interesting to speculate on those written by the Princess to the Empress after 1914.  With the declaration of war, normal channels of communication were disrupted; perhaps some were smuggled in; perhaps others were copied and forwarded on under the auspices their mutual sister-lin-law Queen Alexandrine or through the Crown Princess of Sweden.  I would think that as the situation deteriorated in Russia, communication would have become increasingly difficult, especially after the Tsar's abdication; it is possible that some letters may have simply disappeared in the general chaos.)

Please remember, too, that the Empress did spend some time in England before relocating to Denmark.  Were letters between the two sisters exchanged at that time?  And if so, did the Empress bother to keep them?  Or toss them after replying?  And as for those letters written to the Empress in Denmark - which may have contained references to the Anna Anderson/Grand Duchess Anastasia question - these could have been destroyed by the Empress herself; destroyed after her death by either the Grand Duchess Xenia or the Grand Duchess Olga (though the latter, because of her morganatic marriage, seemed to be kept pretty much out the of the decision making process); or consigned to a sealed family archive.

Finally, there is the question of the number of letters:  more than once, the Empress was known to have complained about how infrequently Princess Thyra wrote. 


Dear, where did you have the idea that in WW1 letters were copied by the Princess of Sweden? I'm also confinced that she copied letters.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexander1917 on December 10, 2009, 09:40:43 AM
That they excanged letters via Sweden is know, but that they were copied is new.. I can't belive this.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 10, 2009, 10:51:15 AM
That they excanged letters via Sweden is know, but that they were copied is new.. I can't belive this.

I thought, too, that any such letters would simply be put in a new envelope and addressed to the recipient in such a way as to look as it were originating in either Denmark or Sweden.

Apparently, though, some (if not all) were indeed re-copied and sent on in the above-mentioned manner.  (Why, I do not know; perhaps due to the contents of some of them being of a sensitive - if not confidential - nature?)  This was cited by John van der Kiste in his book "Northern crowns:  the kings of modern Scandinavia," a fascinating, concise overview of the Royal Famiilies of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden from the late nineteenth century through the accession of the current sovereigns. 

(It looks as if the then-Crown Princess Louise of Sweden carried on in World War II the efforts which her predecessor started in World War I.  By that time, due to the German occupation of Denmark, Queen Alexandrine was unable to paritipcate in these efforts.)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 10, 2009, 12:13:35 PM
I think those letters Thyra wrote to Waldemar and Dagmar on the Anna Anderson case is locked up in the Danish archievs.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 10, 2009, 01:30:45 PM
I think those letters Thyra wrote to Waldemar and Dagmar on the Anna Anderson case is locked up in the Danish archievs.

Hi, Eric:

I  have no doubt that any of the letters still extant that Princess Thyra wrote to either Prince Waldemar or the Empress Marie regarding the Anna Anderson question are sealed in the private archives of the Danish Royal Family (as are the files kept by H. Zahle, Danish minister in Berlin in the 1920s).

Princess Thyra must have known what a painful subject Mrs. Anderson was to her older sister; I'm sure she was most tactful in broaching the matter --- but how much she put on paper and how much she discussed in person with her sister, I have no way of knowing.  It is not unreasonable to imagine the Empress burning or tearing up any letter she found offensive --- and it is equally easy to imagine her giving a good tongue-lashing to anyone who would dare try and pursue any such matter further with her.

Given what I know of Princess Thyra's character, I am sure that she felt was acting on the best of motives, that of wanting to "clear the matter up once and for all."  And didn't that turn out to be a forlorn hope!

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 10, 2009, 06:58:39 PM
Indeed. Thyra was the kindest of the three sisters.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 11, 2009, 04:23:20 AM
Indeed. Thyra was the kindest of the three sisters.

Hi, Eric:

I've wished for a long time now that there was more information available on the both Princess Thyra and on Prince Waldemar:  what relatively little I know about them are bits and pieces which have been culled from numerous other sources (many of which are biographies of their more famous siblings).  With regard to the three sisters, the consensus seems to be that Queen Alexandra was the most beautiful; the Empress Marie the cleverest; and the Duchess of Cumberland having the sweetest disposition.

Perhaps these could be topics for the "Danish Royal Family" thread?
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 11, 2009, 04:42:11 AM
Princess Thyras letters to Maria Feodorovna are in the Russian state archive, GARF.

Certainly those surviving letters written by Princess Thyra to the Empress prior to Marie Feodorovna's exile would be in the Russian State Archives. 

(As a side note here, it is interesting to speculate on those written by the Princess to the Empress after 1914.  With the declaration of war, normal channels of communication were disrupted; perhaps some were smuggled in; perhaps others were copied and forwarded on under the auspices their mutual sister-lin-law Queen Alexandrine or through the Crown Princess of Sweden.  I would think that as the situation deteriorated in Russia, communication would have become increasingly difficult, especially after the Tsar's abdication; it is possible that some letters may have simply disappeared in the general chaos.)

Please remember, too, that the Empress did spend some time in England before relocating to Denmark.  Were letters between the two sisters exchanged at that time?  And if so, did the Empress bother to keep them?  Or toss them after replying?  And as for those letters written to the Empress in Denmark - which may have contained references to the Anna Anderson/Grand Duchess Anastasia question - these could have been destroyed by the Empress herself; destroyed after her death by either the Grand Duchess Xenia or the Grand Duchess Olga (though the latter, because of her morganatic marriage, seemed to be kept pretty much out the of the decision making process); or consigned to a sealed family archive.

Finally, there is the question of the number of letters:  more than once, the Empress was known to have complained about how infrequently Princess Thyra wrote. 


Dear, where did you have the idea that in WW1 letters were copied by the Princess of Sweden? I'm also confinced that she copied letters.

Hi, Teddy:

That the Crown Princess of Sweden acted as a postal "distribution center" has been widely quoted.  The most recent example I can think of is in John van der Kiste's book "Northern crowns:  the kings of modern Scandianvia."  She was, of course, particluarly well-suited to this, as she herself had first cousins fighting on both sides. 

I've often thought her position must have been an uncomfortable one more than once during the war years:  though Sweden was neutral, her mother-in-law, German-born Queen Victoria, made no pretense of neutrality, and King Gustav, though not as vehement in his feelilngs, certainly realised what would happen to the Swedish economy should relations with Germany become too strained.

(In her relations with her mother-in-law, their are distinct similarities between the Crown Princess of Sweden and Queen Ena of SPain, who's mother-in-law was born an Austrian Archduchess.)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Teddy on December 11, 2009, 11:35:57 AM
That she was a go-between, thats what I know, but i've read somewhere that she copied letters.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 11, 2009, 02:20:32 PM
How close was Dagmar with Daisy ?
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 13, 2009, 09:58:48 AM
How close was Dagmar with Daisy ?

Hi, Eric:

While I have seen nothing to indicate that there was any degree of hostility or dislike between the two women, neither have I seen anything to indicate that they shared any special bond --- though I would imagine that the Empress, with relatives on both side of the conflict, would have appreciated the Crown Princess's efforts as a "postal distribution center" during World War I.

As the Crown Princess was born Princess Margaret of Connaught, chances are that Queen Alexandra probably knew her better than the Empress did.  My guess is that the Empress and the Crown Princess were on what might be called "formally friendly" terms (perhaps exchanging holiday or birthday greetings or even gifts on special occasions). 

Putting to one side the marriage between the future King Frederick VIII and Princess Lovisa, my impression is that it wasn't until the next generation (that is, that of King Frederick VIII's children) that relations in general between the Royal Houses of Denmark and Sweden began to really warm up --- a process which seems to have increased with each following generation.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 13, 2009, 08:05:38 PM
I agree that Daisy would have been closer to her "Aunt Alix" than her sister Dagmar. Maybe Queen Alexandra asked for her help (she was never too shy to ask for assistance). I was sad that there is no bio on her. However I think her cousin Maud would have known her better since they were both Princess of Great Britian and move in similar circles.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 15, 2009, 05:30:04 AM
I agree that Daisy would have been closer to her "Aunt Alix" than her sister Dagmar. Maybe Queen Alexandra asked for her help (she was never too shy to ask for assistance). I was sad that there is no bio on her. However I think her cousin Maud would have known her better since they were both Princess of Great Britian and move in similar circles.

Hi, Eric:

I agree with you completely:  many of us would lilke to see biographies on more of the children and grandchildren of King Christian IX and those of Queen Victoria.  Sad to say, from a historical or dynastic perspective (NOT, however, from a personal one!), not all of them were important enough to merit full biographies or even whole chapters in biographies of others.  As but two examples, I would love to find more material on Prince Waldemar and Princess Thyra.  Still, if one does some digging, one can find bits and pieces of information.

John van der Kistes has written several books, two of which which you may find helpful here:

"Edward VII's children" (which does have information on Queen Maud);

"Northern crowns:  the kings of modern Scandinavia" (which does have information on Crown Princess Margaret).
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 15, 2009, 06:24:00 PM
I did read both Van Der Kiste books. They are good beginners guides, but not too many further details. I think the new Norweigen book on Haakon & Maud might have more details.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 22, 2009, 05:51:02 AM
I did read both Van Der Kiste books. They are good beginners guides, but not too many further details. I think the new Norweigen book on Haakon & Maud might have more details.

Hi, Eric:

As unfortunate as it is, no matter how interersting a royal might be on a personal level, unless they are important historically or dynastically, I think it is going to be difficult (not necessarily impossible, but difficult) to find much in-depth information on them --- and, as a rule, certainly not neatly and concisely in one source.  To illustrate my piont, take the children of King Frederick VIII:  of them, the most important from these viewpoints are Prince Christian and Prince Carl.  Is this to say that the life stories of, say, Prince Harald or of Princess Louise were not interesting?  Not at all. (And what of  Prince Gustav, come to think of it?) 

Perhaps the best source of information on some of these more obscure royals might be in newspaper or magazine archives, with special attention being paid to articles written at the time of their birth, marriage, or death. 


Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 22, 2009, 10:46:47 AM
Indeed. We can usually get a sidelight of them in bios of more major royals as cross reference.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: William-Kentucky on December 23, 2009, 05:19:21 AM
Indeed. We can usually get a sidelight of them in bios of more major royals as cross reference.

Hi, Eric:

And I find the discovery of these "sidelights" (as you so aptly call them) to be very rewarding --- rather like finding a missing piece of jigsaw puzzle.

To bring this discussion back toward the letters and diaries of the Empress Marie in general, and those to/from Princess Thyra specifically, I quote from a passage in Theo Aronson's "A family of kings":

"Never as close to her sisters Alexandra and Dagmar as they had been to each other, Thyra had drifted still further away during the last years of her life.  A barely perceptible chill had developed between them.  The marriage of Thyra's son, Ernest Augustus, to Kaiser Wilhelm II's daughter, must have seemed like a betrayal to her violently anti-Prussian sisters.  And the fact that Thyra had been on the opposite side during the war had considerably widened the estrangement between them.  ...  The end of the war had done little to bringing the three sisters closer together.  Thyra could hardly have been expected to share Alexandra's delight at the collpase of Wilhelm II's Germany.  ...  Princess Thyra lived on into a world vastly different from that of her youth ... (and) was buried in the family vault, built by her father-in-law to house the bodies of the sovereigns of Hanover."

This "sidelight," coupled with difference in ages and interests, does much, I think, to explain the relatively few extant letters between Princess Thyra and the Empress, especially in the post-war/revolution years.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 24, 2009, 10:35:15 AM
Indeed. However Queen Mary kept up correspondence with Thyra as far as I know. She seemed closer to Dagmar than to Alexandra after the war.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: katmaxoz on January 26, 2010, 06:23:58 AM
I recently bought a book called "treasures of Russia - Imperial Gifts".  Its a catalog from 2002 in Copenhagen on Faberge etc and the Danish and Russian royal families. It actually has a lot of letters from various members of the Romanov family quoted in it and I thought this one from Marie to her mother Queen Louise written before Xenia and Sandro's wedding might be of interest to people here about how she *really* thought about the wedding and Sandro in particular.

" He does not hesitate to show his impatience, that the long wait is finally over, shows me no feeling at all and is as dry as a stick, which is more than ungrateful after all the courtesy I have shown him since he became engaged. He receives everything comme si cela lui etait du [as if it was his due] but is never fully satisfied in his pretensions which are more than grand, and which I did not expect from a gentleman, let alone from a Grand Duke, and which pain me rather, for I am wholly disillusioned, but that is just between us I trust, for I find it highly distasteful!  In time, I hope this will cease, and that her good influence will help awaken more noble feelings in him - it probably comes from a bad upbringing, but he is also lacking in tact, and in delicacy, which must be inne [inborn] - that is not something you learn, it is something you are born with! Now that this has all been confined to paper, I worry about having said these things - but to you, Mama, it does not matter - you will keep it to yourself, won't you." [19/31 July 1894]

**Source - the state archives of the Russian Federation, fond 642



Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Ena on January 26, 2010, 11:01:40 AM
I recently bought a book called "treasures of Russia - Imperial Gifts".  Its a catalog from 2002 in Copenhagen on Faberge etc and the Danish and Russian royal families. It actually has a lot of letters from various members of the Romanov family quoted in it and I thought this one from Marie to her mother Queen Louise written before Xenia and Sandro's wedding might be of interest to people here about how she *really* thought about the wedding and Sandro in particular...
Do you happen to have an ISBN on that book? Where did you acquire it and would you consider it a worthy purchase? Any additional information about the book would be great.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 26, 2010, 12:14:33 PM
Yes. Lets share the information.Out-of-prints is hard to find in Denmark. I search all of Copenhagen before locating a copy of Dagmar's diary (in Danish) with lots of awesome photos.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: katmaxoz on January 26, 2010, 04:20:28 PM
I recently bought a book called "treasures of Russia - Imperial Gifts".  Its a catalog from 2002 in Copenhagen on Faberge etc and the Danish and Russian royal families. It actually has a lot of letters from various members of the Romanov family quoted in it and I thought this one from Marie to her mother Queen Louise written before Xenia and Sandro's wedding might be of interest to people here about how she *really* thought about the wedding and Sandro in particular...
Do you happen to have an ISBN on that book? Where did you acquire it and would you consider it a worthy purchase? Any additional information about the book would be great.  Thanks.

Title: Treasures of Russia - Imperial Gifts
2002 - the royal silver room, copenhagen
Author - Krog, Ole Villumsen, et al
isbn - 87-983777-5-2

the book is in English, Danish and Russian. It wasn't easy, or cheap to find online and it's a title I backtracked from another book on Marie which used a lot of quotes from the letters in this one.  It has a short biography of all the members of the imperial family and seems to have quite a bit of objects that relate to Grand Duchess Xenia.

http://www.stocklund.dk/soelvkammer/soelvkammer.gb.html



Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Ena on January 26, 2010, 11:10:17 PM
Thank you for the information.  Krog's books can be difficult to find.  Once located, they tend to be quite expensive.  Still, I'll be on the lookout for this title because these books only get more scare through the years.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 27, 2010, 07:39:20 AM
I know. Should buy them when they came out. these books are good investments as they appreciates in prices.  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: abbigail on February 14, 2010, 03:43:38 PM
I read today in "Ripley's Beleive it or Not" about how Maria Feodorovna was sending a telegram, and her mistake in comma placement saved a prisoner's life. Apparently she meant to write "Pardon impossible, send to Siberia" but accidentally wrote, "Pardon, impossible send to Siberia" isntead. Therefore the man was set free and was spared banishment to Siberia. Has anyone else read this? Is this incident true?
Thanks!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: aleksandr pavlovich on February 14, 2010, 04:16:59 PM
I have no earthly idea about the veracity of this anecdote, but things can and DO happen in haste or transcription, etc.  Please note in your posting, your spellings of "believe", "instead," and use of the small letter "i" in "It."  All unintended, of course (and with no Siberian consequences).  Thank God for "Edit," which I use frequently, especially if I have an additional thought!   Humorously,  AP
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Douglas on February 14, 2010, 06:31:38 PM
I have no earthly idea about the veracity of this anecdote, but things can and DO happen in haste or transcription, etc.  Please note in your posting, your spellings of "believe", "instead," and use of the small letter "i" in "It."  All unintended, of course (and with no Siberian consequences).  Thank God for "Edit," which I use frequently, especially if I have an additional thought!   Humorously,  AP

Pardon?  That Alex Pavlovich is such a softy.  Send Abbi to Siberiana immediately.  We can't have these misspellings on the AP.

Tsar Douglas...;=))
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: abbigail on February 14, 2010, 06:39:03 PM
Very sorry for the misspellings...I didn't notice them :D. But thank you both for your replies.
Ahh...no Siberia for me, I guess! Thank God! XD
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: nena on February 14, 2010, 07:50:31 PM
I like ''Ripley's Beleive it or Not". It is published frequently every Friday in magazine I occasionally buy (On the 1st page, after cover page). Some facts are really unbelievable. But still, I do believe in those. Most of them have humorous contain that I like. (This is topic - off partly). Thanks for sharing it,  abbigail.

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 15, 2010, 06:34:43 PM
It shows Marie's mercy to the prisoners. It must have happened before the railroad accident.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on February 15, 2010, 06:55:19 PM
I'm sorry, but I find it hard to believe that Marie had the power to pardon anyone (under either Alexander III or Nicholas II) - Maybe someone more knowledgeable then I can confirm this.

dca
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 15, 2010, 07:19:18 PM
She didn't. The story was that she changed the lettering so the original command would not be carried out. It is done without her husband's knowledge.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Svetabel on February 15, 2010, 11:42:43 PM
I'm sorry, but I find it hard to believe that Marie had the power to pardon anyone (under either Alexander III or Nicholas II) - Maybe someone more knowledgeable then I can confirm this.

dca

Of course she hadn't the power for such actions, as she wasn't the Emperor. She hadn't the power to change the lettering either.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 16, 2010, 12:20:48 PM
She hadn't but she did it. I wonder what her husband would have done had he known.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Svetabel on February 16, 2010, 10:41:48 PM
She hadn't but she did it. 

Your sources? Did she personally tell that to you?
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Belochka on February 16, 2010, 11:59:36 PM
I'm sorry, but I find it hard to believe that Marie had the power to pardon anyone (under either Alexander III or Nicholas II) - Maybe someone more knowledgeable then I can confirm this.

dca

Dominic is correct. The Imperial Criminal Code stipulated that only the Emperor had the legal capacity to grant a pardon.

As for the magazine "Ripley's Believe it or Not", it is best to read it with caution in mind and recognize that this anecdote is one that falls into the absolutely "not" category.

Margarita
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on February 17, 2010, 01:12:55 AM
Just returning for Mardi Gras, day of extravagant self-indulgence.

I too think this may be a an urban legend. The classic example is a sovereign mixing up "Wait not, execute" and "Wait, not execute". This works better in languages which don't use "to do" in such negations, like English does. Our Russian posters can perhaps shed some light on whether the MF incident is linguistically possible in Russian.

So far I've only heard this story about letters, the telegram aspect was new to me. Were commas even possible in telegrams? (Perhaps they were, as I just read that STOP was spelled out because punctuation was especially expensive.) Anyway the story fits very well relating to a telegram, as they usually were without punctuation.

And it fits very well relating to a Glücksborger! Having read quite a few excerpts from their letters in Tor Bomann-Larsen's recent, excellent, multi-volume Norwegian-language biographies of Carl/Haakon and Maud, I can say that the whole family exhibited a total disregard for proper punctuation, making the style in their frequent letters even more flowing.

Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Vecchiolarry on February 17, 2010, 10:28:21 AM
Hi,

I've heard this story too;  but have always wondered how & why the Empress got hold of this telegram in the first place....
Was she snooping through the Czar's correspondence (something I cannot visualize her doing)???  She wouldn't enter his office without him being there, surely...

And, as stated, a lot of the Royals didn't necessarily use (nor understand) punctuation, except for the exclamation mark-!!!- and the underline....

Larry
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Robert_Hall on February 17, 2010, 11:26:32 AM
I am with you, Larry,  just another hagiography or mistranslation,  IMO. The Empress Marie never  would have  interfered with either her husband or son. Well until the end perhaps, I think that was one of her criticisms of Alexandra. Marie was a very kind and generous woman [as all the Danes that I know are!] but she knew her place, It was high enough as it was !
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 17, 2010, 11:58:20 AM
This incident was recorded in several books. In the end people do not know where it came from, it most certainly merits more investigation. Marie did offer her advice to her husband and knew a lot about the inside of ruling. It is possible that her husband bounce off ideas onto her, but unlike Alexandra, she never directly ruled. At the begining of the reign of Nicholas II, she played a major role in being her son's advisor in politics. As Nicholas II wanted to continue the way his father ruled, who was more qualified than his mother. The memoirs of Count Witte did recorded this. Yet she never did cross swords with her son when she knew it was Alexandra who ruled.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Dominic_Albanese on February 17, 2010, 06:11:12 PM
Eric - there is an enormous difference between advising her son and changing an actual government order.  I suspect you would agree.  Much is written, but this one doesn't pass (my) smell test!

best regards,

dca
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: abbigail on February 17, 2010, 06:16:59 PM
Could she possibly have been writing something for her husband (if this was even allowed), and then made the grammar mistake? If I remember correctly this wasn't during the reign of her son. And it was stated as being an accidental comma error, not as something she did on purpose to save the man's life.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 18, 2010, 10:30:21 AM
I suspect it was a one off thing. Minny did NOT rule. That was very true, but it did not deter her from influencing the person (her husband & son) who did. The moral of this story is that Minny was "the angel of mercy" who saved a man's life. As Alexander III always refer his wife in such terms, it would be such a story that he would not mind retelling, but of course it would not be something he allow all the time. It would be the exception rather the usual.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on March 03, 2010, 10:40:54 PM
And, as stated, a lot of the Royals didn't necessarily use (nor understand) punctuation, except for the exclamation mark-!!!- and the underline....
Early 20th-century Danish linguist Otto Jespersen opined that while contemporary women were rather ignorant of the correct use of "proper punctuation" like commas, he characterized exactly that pair of "emotional ones" as women's preferred punctuation marks, along with ellipsis (....)! :-)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 04, 2010, 09:23:13 AM
Doesthat mean that Dagmar's action id fully understandtable.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on March 07, 2010, 07:06:25 PM
Letter from MF to Grand Duke Kyrill Vladimirovich, 1924. About his proclamation as Emperor.

Dear Kyrill
I am sending you my answer to your letter. In asking me for my blessing, you evidently didn't need, nor expect it as you never waited. You can see by my enclosed telegram, that you even gave me no time to answer.
You can imagine my feelings when I read the whole thing in the papers.
think of the false position you have put yourself in and all the others and the disquiet you have sown in so many minds and hearts.
God bless us! your affectionate and sorrowful Aunt Minny.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Margot on March 07, 2010, 07:13:17 PM
Another priceless jewel from our dear Kmerov!

Good for Marie F. I do like the way she didn't mince her words! It must have hurt her so deeply that he couldn't be bothered to even wait for her opinion when he declare himself Czar, the loathsome, repellant traitor! I am surprised Marie F. even managed the civility of an 'affectionately' actually! But then again she was a genuine Empress after all, so she had 'manners' naturally!
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on March 09, 2010, 06:02:24 PM
You are welcome!

She did handle it quite well I think.

MF's telegram to Kyrill after learning about his proclamation.
Grand Duc Kyrill Coburg
I deplore your letter arrived same day as I read your declaration in papers. My only answer is that as I am convinced that my two beloved sons are alive, I can't look upon your act as un fait accompli (the last phrase has been corrected, and originally ran: I consider your act premature).
Aunt Minny
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 09, 2010, 07:16:21 PM
She was sadly mistaken of course since her two sons did die and Kyrill was next in line. However he could have waited until her death to proclaim Emperor. It is just poor taste on his part.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on March 13, 2010, 03:19:16 PM
Yes, and GD Kyrill was disappointed, also of the fact that she turned to GD Nicholas Nicholaivich.
When she learned of Kyrill's action she immediately send a telegram to Nicholas.

"Grand Duke Nicholas. Choigny, Sautenay (France)
Have just learned with astonishment of K.W's action. Deplore great new trouble that this will cause among all the emmigrants. What do you intend doing?
Mari (signature crossed out)."
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 14, 2010, 03:39:58 PM
Yes. She trust him better since "Nicholasha" (as he was called in the family) was loyal to her son till the last (unlike Kyrill who deserted to the revolutionaries).
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: kmerov on March 14, 2010, 04:30:08 PM
Yes. She trust him better since "Nicholasha" (as he was called in the family) was loyal to her son till the last (unlike Kyrill who deserted to the revolutionaries).

Nikolasha was more loyal, but Kyrill wrote back to MF "...I cannot believe that rather than see another man, myself in this instance, take up your son's duties, you side with Nicholacha who proved himself in the past a traitor through and through to Nicky and who continues his destructive work up to the present moment..."
Kyrill was not happy about MF's decision to say the least.   
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 15, 2010, 03:13:30 PM
It was natural, even though the Vladimir family was next in line for the throne, both Alexander III and Marie did not trust their intentions nor their loyalty. Kyrill's mother Miechen was one of the least favourites of the family according to Alexander III.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexander1917 on May 27, 2010, 01:18:17 PM
In her diary MF wrote serveral times about a Karl Rothe. Does somebnody could tell me who he was?
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 27, 2010, 10:34:56 PM
I don't have her diary. My guess is that he is not related to Karl Rove...
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Svetabel on May 27, 2010, 11:49:46 PM
I don't have her diary. My guess is that he is not related to Karl Rove...

Rothe.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 28, 2010, 05:31:16 AM
It was a joke and pun on the name.  :)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexander1917 on May 28, 2010, 08:49:28 AM
I think more of a friend to the family. because MF and Alix sent a wreath at his aunt's death in the after 1920's
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 29, 2010, 08:46:38 AM
Both MF and Alicky could be very warm and kind if they chose to, but they could also be bossy. It is sad that people saw mostly the other side in the case of Alicky, MF was more diplomatic in her dealings with people.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexander1917 on May 30, 2010, 08:44:15 AM
Both MF and Alicky could be very warm and kind if they chose to, but they could also be bossy. It is sad that people saw mostly the other side in the case of Alicky, MF was more diplomatic in her dealings with people.


Alix her sister the Dowager Queen of Great Britain
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 30, 2010, 12:56:46 PM
Yes. Alix was "Aunt Alix" to Alicky. She was more big hearted than MF.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexander1917 on May 30, 2010, 04:40:02 PM
Yes. Alix was "Aunt Alix" to Alicky. She was more big hearted than MF.

Alix was always Alix , despite her children there she was "Motherdear".
But the mystery Karl is still not solved for me
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Svetabel on May 30, 2010, 11:49:09 PM
Yes. Alix was "Aunt Alix" to Alicky. She was more big hearted than MF.

Alix was always Alix , despite her children there she was "Motherdear".
But the mystery Karl is still not solved for me

I don't have MF's diaries right now at hand but I remember that Rothe seemed was an old Danish friend, at least the editors of the Russian version of the diaries described him so.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 31, 2010, 09:43:09 AM
Alix was "Aunt Alix" to her nieces, both Alicky and Ella called her by that name (not to mention Missy who has a chapter on her in her bio). Yes, both Alix and Minny use "motherdear" to their own children (Minny also extented an invitation to Alicky to call her "Motherdear" in one of her letters to her son Nicky.).

That would make sense. They were devoted to their Danish friends.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexander1917 on May 31, 2010, 10:04:37 AM
Yes. Alix was "Aunt Alix" to Alicky. She was more big hearted than MF.

Alix was always Alix , despite her children there she was "Motherdear".
But the mystery Karl is still not solved for me

I don't have MF's diaries right now at hand but I remember that Rothe seemed was an old Danish friend, at least the editors of the Russian version of the diaries described him so.

many thanks for this. as I have the translated diary but already not the editors notes :-)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 31, 2010, 10:39:20 AM
Lucky you to have the translated diary.  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 02, 2010, 09:59:21 AM
Lucky you to have the translated diary.  ;)

I bought the russian version, and a friend (which I paid) translated it for me.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 02, 2010, 10:22:50 AM
Can I pay you for a copy ?  ;)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Olga Maria on June 22, 2010, 01:20:49 AM
From the book “Dnyevniki Impyeratritsy Marii Fyedorovny” (Diaries of the Empress Maria Feodorovna); I translated these excerpts using Google translator, so, I apologize in advance for the mistakes…Excerpts found in a Russian website.

15/28 June 1914, Sunday
We all went to the Anglican Church today. While having tea, a dreadful news arrived: the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife were assassinated in Bosnia. How cruel! Thank God that in dying, they were together. At seven o’clock, we went to Komb for breakfast. Soon came Chaliapin, who sang wonderfully.

8/21 August, 1914
Paul Benckendorff visited me after having a long break. We were both in despair at the terrible message from the front and other things that happen and are being talked about. Firstly, the evil Grigori returned, and that Alexandra Feodorovna wants Nicky to take the command instead of Nicholas Nikolaevich; she must be crazy to want this!

12/25 August 1914

Yusupov came after dinner, telling all sorts of horrors which are spoken around the city. Nicky came with his four girls. He began to speak that he will assume command instead of Nikolasha. I was so horrified that I almost had a stroke…I begged him not to do so, especially now that things are bad for us, and added that if he does, everyone will see that this was ordered by Rasputin…He does not understand the danger and misery it can bring us and the whole country.
Title: Marie Feodorvna Letters to Prince Nikita, 1920-21.
Post by: Forum Admin on April 29, 2012, 12:55:25 PM
We have just acquired four handwritten letters written by Marie Feodorovna to her grandson Prince Nikita Alexandrovich from Denmark.  Nikita was one of the sons of GD Xenia and GD Alexander Michaelovich, who left on the HMS Marlborough. I have put up scans of the originals in (mostly) Russian and English translations.  Her Russian cursive is, while pretty to look at, apparently very difficult for modern Russians to read! If anyone can read them and improve the translations, please don't hesitate to email me.  The Russians who translated what we have both said they had to make some guesses about some of the words.  They are an interesting read, sweet yet sad, of a grieving Grandmother taking some joy in what family she has left.

Here is the link:

http://alexanderpalace.org/palace/MarieFedorovnalettersNikita.html (http://alexanderpalace.org/palace/MarieFedorovnalettersNikita.html)
Title: Re: Marie Feodorvna Letters to Prince Nikita, 1920-21.
Post by: Kalafrana on April 30, 2012, 07:14:48 AM
Interesting that Marie F was full of grandmotherly devotion towards Tikhon and Guri when her relations with their father were somewhat strained.

Ann
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 17, 2012, 07:27:28 AM
Not too hard to understand. She felt he wasn't good enough for her daughter.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Kalafrana on May 17, 2012, 10:36:53 AM
Yet Nikolai Koulikovsky was a decent man and good soldier. The only problem was that he wasn't royal.

Ann
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 17, 2012, 10:44:40 AM
Yes. That makes all the difference in her eyes. She wasn't too keen on Misha's widow for the same reason.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Joanna on January 11, 2018, 10:45:43 AM
Empress Marie's letters to her mother - May 1883:

Prince Valdemar of Denmark supporting his sister Empress Marie

https://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2018/01/prince-valdemar-of-denmark-supporting.html

Joanna
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Joanna on March 05, 2018, 07:11:23 PM
Empress Maria's amusing letters about food to Emperor Alexander III of Schloss Rumpenheim in Germany!

Old photographs and aerial views of Schloss Rumpenheim in Germany

http://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2018/03/empress-maria-feodorovnas-food-problems.html

Joanna
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Превед on March 06, 2018, 07:04:29 PM
Empress Maria's amusing letters about food to Emperor Alexander III of Schloss Rumpenheim in Germany!

Old photographs and aerial views of Schloss Rumpenheim in Germany

http://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2018/03/empress-maria-feodorovnas-food-problems.html

Joanna

There is something rather Atlantic about the exterior look of Rumpenheim, especially Dutch (e.g. Soestdijk Palace) or Colonial American. Rumpenheim, originally a part of the County of Hanau, was the only Hesse-Cassel possession south of the river Main, which is a kind of German Mason-Dixon line. When Prussia annexed all of Hesse-Cassel north of the Main, territorial sovereignty of Rumpenheim was ceded to Hesse-Darmstadt.
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Joanna on April 24, 2018, 06:29:23 PM
especially Dutch (e.g. Soestdijk Palace)

Soestdijk Palace was given to Prince William of Orange and when he and his wife the former Grand Duchess Anna Pavlovna moved there permanently in 1831, she copied the design of the gardens at Pavlovsk. I believe she also redesigned the palace as it looks like her beloved childhood home Pavlovsk Palace.

Joanna
Title: Re: Marie Feodorovna, her correspondence - letters, diaries etc
Post by: Превед on April 28, 2018, 07:41:16 AM
especially Dutch (e.g. Soestdijk Palace)

Soestdijk Palace was given to Prince William of Orange and when he and his wife the former Grand Duchess Anna Pavlovna moved there permanently in 1831, she copied the design of the gardens at Pavlovsk. I believe she also redesigned the palace as it looks like her beloved childhood home Pavlovsk Palace.

Apparantly it's the wings of Soestdijk that are inspired by Pavlovsk, which interestingly enough was built by an "Atlantic" (Scottish) architect (Charles Cameron) in the Neo-Classical Palladian style. But it's no doubt the dark-coloured shutters of these buitenplatsen (summer residences) contrasting with the white walls on a rather top-heavy square form that make up a distinct Atlantic / Colonial feature of these buildings. Even though shutters also are typically Mediterranean feature, they are certainly not Russian.

BTW another fine example of the style is the landed estate Vollenhoven in the village of De Bilt not far from Soestdijk. (Yes, the eponymous De Bilt whence the Vanderbilts emigrated): Landgoed Vollenhoven (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3e/Vollenhove-De_Bilt_%286%29.JPG)