Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => The Windsors => Topic started by: Eddie_uk on December 08, 2009, 01:30:40 PM

Title: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 08, 2009, 01:30:40 PM
Yesterday I attended an interesting tour of Marlborough House, does anyone have any photos of the interior during the Royal Occupations? There was still a few lovely items of furniture no doubt left from Queen Marys time, one particular beautiful table that has been insured for £2 million! There was also two beautiful marble busts of Edward & Alexandra and also two plaster busts of George and Mary. There was also a lovely oak overmantel with the date 28 April 1863 on the top, the date Edward & Alexandra moved in and on the bottom the date 4April 1903 for when George & Mary moved in - a very nice touch! We saw the state dining room, with original ceiling put in by Edward VII, where Edward VIII  dined in 1936 prior to announcing to Queen Mary, in her apartments upstairs, his intention to marry Mrs Simpson!!! Through the window I could see Queen Marys thatched revolving summer house (to keep out the sun), still there! And saw both staircases which she must have swept down in all her glory!!!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 08, 2009, 03:56:30 PM
That is new information. When is Marlborough House open to the public ? Maybe it is a one shot deal ?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 09, 2009, 01:00:19 AM
No you have to email them and ask them for the dates of the tours.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 09, 2009, 08:20:54 AM
From the Commonwealth Secretariat's website (which incidentally has a virtual tour of the house on it):
http://www.thecommonwealth.org/Internal/34467/marlborough_house/ (http://www.thecommonwealth.org/Internal/34467/marlborough_house/)


Historical tours of Marlborough House can be arranged subject to the availability of the Fine Rooms and the tour guide.

Tours usually take place every Tuesday morning subject to the availability of the rooms and the guide.The tours are normally two hours long and take in all the fine rooms, the history of the building and the gardens and the Work of The Commonwealth Secretariat. Groups should be a minimum of 10 and maximum 25.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 09, 2009, 01:36:51 PM
Thanks ! I will try to arrange it the next time I go London. It will be such a treat !
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on December 30, 2009, 05:44:50 AM
An exterior shot of staff at the Royal Mews, Buckingham Palance, 1847. Why do so many Victorians look like criminals?!

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/Richard1961/RF_51_edited.jpg)
I believe it was because in those days they had to wait so long for picture to be taken they got bored
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: TampaBay on January 03, 2010, 02:24:14 PM

I'm not suggesting a massive redecoration is in order, or even that Her Majesty hang a Warhol in place of a Gainsborough.  But for God's sake, in 150 years you'd expect at least a table to be moved from one side of a room to another, wouldn't you??? 


It my understanding that The Queen HATES change.

TampaBay
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 04, 2010, 09:50:45 AM
Quite clearly true TB  ;D   From the antique radio and light at her breakfast table, to the unaltered state of her rooms, to the running of her household.... Her Majesty is obviously no fan of change.

Which will make it all that much more interesting to see what happens after the present reign ends.  If The Queen lives to the same age as her mother, she will have reigned for some 75 odd years at her death, and over 80% of her subjects will have been born during her reign.  Given three quarters of a century of consistency, even minor changes made by Charles (or William) will seem enormous by comparison!

Example:  Let's say the next King decides to adopt the practice of the monarchs of Scandinavia, Spain and Belgium, who all live in a suburban residence, while the main capital city royal palace is used only for receptions and court functions.  Perhaps we'd then have the King living at Windsor Castle and coming to BP only for investitures, receptions and audiences? 

To most people that might seem unheard of - but then, prior to 1901 the monarch spent much of the year outside London anyway. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on January 07, 2010, 08:22:14 AM
Historically, Buckingham Palace has never been a favourite of any of the Royal Family since Queen Victoria's day. She stayed there only when she had to.

Perhaps in futute it will be used for ceremonial purposes, I would imagine that it is not a very private or quiet place to live. Prince William is a very sociable person and a bit of a party animal, so I am sure there will be a lot of renovating going on.

It does not look as if the Queen has made any real changes during her reign. Unlike Edward VII and George V, who renovated furiously, she has just maintained basically.       
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 07, 2010, 11:04:57 AM
If I'm not mistaken, the only major change to the palace during the present reign is the addition of the new Queen's Gallery.  Minor changes discussed elsewhere in the forum include a few of the state rooms being redecorated (the Throne Room and the Portrait Gallery are two in particular that have changed color and/or gotten new carpets). 

As far as I can tell, the rest of the state rooms haven't changed at all since before the present Queen's succession.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 07, 2010, 11:12:57 AM
Yes. The Royals regarded "Buck House" as more office than residence.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 08, 2010, 08:19:50 AM
I can certainly understand why - BP seems to afford them little privacy or quiet.  For one thing, the Queen's apartments are far from "private" - ministers and ambassadors arriving for audiences apparently walk down the private corridor right past the Queen's bedroom to reach her audience chamber!  And the rooms used by Andrew, Anne and Edward/Sophie are all in the East Range overlooking the Forecourt, so tourist and traffic noise must be constant - day and night.

Windsor certainly affords the Queen more quiet and private accommodations.  Does anyone know if the other royals occupy rooms in the east range (above George IV's new private apartments), or above the guest rooms in the South Range overlooking the Long Walk?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on January 08, 2010, 11:26:41 AM
As far as I know Windsor has guest suites, and these are allocated to them and other guests when they stay, unlike Buckingham Palace where they have permanent apartments, which they occupy when in London.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 08, 2010, 11:30:48 AM
I think Buckingham Palace had guests rooms too. When Princess Andrew of Greece was at her last illness, she was invited to stay there. She joked that the only reason her brother Louis, Earl Mountbatten came to see her is to get to write on Buckingham palace note paper. Her daughters Margarita & Sophie also came to keep her company then.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 08, 2010, 01:31:02 PM
From the BP floorplans I've studied, that's correct Eric.  BP has guest rooms on the State Floor of the East Range, with the Yellow Drawing Room and the Chinese Dining Room at either end, and the Center Room in the center, obviously.  The  apartments of Andrew, Anne and Edward are directly above those on the 2nd (Chamber) floor.  There are also guest rooms  on the Chamber floor in the north range, above the private apartments of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh.  An early floor plan I saw showed one of those apartments being occupied by someone other than a senior royal (I don't recall whom, perhaps a cousin or other relative).
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 09, 2010, 07:24:12 PM
Thanks for the information. According to my source, in one of the living rooms ajactioned to the guest room hung the portait of Princess Louise Margaret, Duchess of Connaught by Sargent. It was there Princess Sofie of Hannover tried to peep at the view outside before her big sister Margarita called her back.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on January 12, 2010, 04:01:12 AM
I know I should be looking at the floor plan to get this answer. What room exits onto the balcony overlooking the Mall ?
Are there any other balconies in Buckingham Palace ?.   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 12, 2010, 07:29:31 AM
The Center Room opens onto the main balcony facing the Mall.  It is a large Chinese-style saloon enhanced by Queen Mary, although the lacquer doors were brought from Brighton in 1873.  When looking at the palace's East Facade from the Mall, left to right the rooms are:  The Yellow Drawing Room (southeast corner), three guest bedroom suites, the Center Room, three more guest bedroom suites, and finally the Chinese Dining (or Chinese Luncheon) Room.

There are many balconies at Buckingham Palace - although aside from the large Main Balcony, most are Juliet-type balconies which are not very deep, but run the length of the north facade (outside the Queen's private rooms), as well as outside the large French doors opening from various rooms on the west facade (ie.  The Blue Drawing Room, the Royal Closet).
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Learning on January 12, 2010, 08:27:57 AM
There is a balcony outside the Queen's private rooms? I wonder if one can look up and see her sitting outside with the paper?

About the guest rooms, I assume they are simply a bed room with bath attached or do some guests have to share a bath?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on January 12, 2010, 09:04:59 AM
Thank you. I never realised that. Perhaps she pops out occasionally for a breath of fresh air. I would imagine that it is quite private on that side of the palace. One never really sees close up shots of the back or sides of the building.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 12, 2010, 11:29:23 AM
One of the few "private" places in the palace that some privacy can be expected. However even the Queen's bedroom was invaded once...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 12, 2010, 04:32:08 PM
Well as I mentioned, the ones in the Queen's apartments are more like "Juliet balconies" - ie.  French doors open and there's a shallow space to step outside, but not a "proper balcony".  I'm looking at the floor plans right now, and see that quite a shallow one runs the length from the Queen's Bedroom, past the Anteroom, Sitting Room, and the adjacent two rooms (which in my old plans are labeled "Audience Chamber" and something else).  Another, wider balcony runs the length of the Duke of Edinburgh's apartments further east along that range.

There are four somewhat more "proper" balconies along the west front, from the Sheraton Room (at the northwest corner), the Royal Closet, The Blue Drawing Room, and a small staircase room just south of the State Dining Room. 

As far as the guest rooms on the East range, I just looked at my plans and see that my earlier post was incorrect - I said there were 3 bedrooms in between the Yellow Drawing Room and Center Room, and another 3 rooms between the Center Room and the Chinese Dining Room.  I now notice that (at least, at the time of my Victorian era plans), there are actually more rooms than that.

Just north of the "Yellow Drawing Room" the plans show a small "Writing Room" (with an attached bathroom), then 4 connecting bedrooms without baths (two labeled just bedroom, one called "Green Bedroom" and one "Red Bedroom").  Then a small "Dressing Room" (with another attached bathroom) before you reach the Center Room.  Two water closets are also shown at either end of this section of the principal corridor (on the Quadrangle side across the corridor from the bedrooms).

North of the Center Room it shows another small "Bedroom" (with attached bath), followed by two larger "Bedrooms", then a "Sitting Room", and finally another small "Bedroom" with a attached bathroom.  Another pair of water closets are across the corridor.  Past this is a staircase, and finally the Chinese Dining Room at the northeast corner.

But I wouldn't be surprised if these rooms were reconfigured in the 20th century to add bathrooms.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on January 13, 2010, 11:02:54 AM
Thank you Chris. One can look at that facade and imagine what is behind all those windows. One automatically expects that there is one long enfilade of grand rooms.

I really must look at the floorplans before asking these questions. But now we know. Thanks
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 13, 2010, 03:13:39 PM
Yes. They were of course renovated for the 21st Century. They do seem to keep the appearance very much the same feel though.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 13, 2010, 03:28:45 PM
Thank you Chris. One can look at that facade and imagine what is behind all those windows. One automatically expects that there is one long enfilade of grand rooms. I really must look at the floorplans before asking these questions. But now we know. Thanks

I wouldn't say your image of a long enfilade of grand rooms is incorrect Pavlov!  I mean, I've never personally been inside Buckingham Palace, but from the floor plans and various photos I've seen, the rooms behind those windows certainly are grand....(at least on the State Floor).  The bedrooms / writing rooms and so forth I described in the East Range are certainly of substantial scale - and probably very finely furnished as well.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 13, 2010, 04:38:39 PM
I am not sure about the bedrooms, but the State bedrooms are definitely grand.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 15, 2010, 08:05:54 AM
If you refer to the royal families' bedrooms Eric, I'd say it's a mixed bag.  You can tell from the plans and photos posted elsewhere on this forum that basically all of the principal royal rooms are of substantial scale /size. 

But as far as how they are decorated?  That's entirely another story.  We've probably all seen various photos published (in particular those a few years back by that reporter/ fake footman who published them in the Mirror).  The Belgian Suite was extremely elegant and of excellent quality, but the colors not exactly to my taste.  The Queen's Sitting Room and Dining Room are grandly appointed and furnished (despite the Tupperware and old radio on the breakfast table).  The Private (North) Corridor and Principal (East) Corridors are also very grand.

But remember the pics of Edward / Sophie's bedroom?  Ack!  Spacious true, but cheap looking light oak veneered bookcases and headboards!?!  Andrew's sitting room was better - but not by much!  On the other side of the coin, later photos of Diana's apartment at KP (post divorce) reveal them to be spacious, elegant and grand, while still comfortable.  And Chuck's redo at Clarence House resulted in rooms far more appropriate for a senor royal than those of his younger brothers' down the street at BP.  I wonder what Anne's private quarters would look like? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 15, 2010, 11:42:20 AM
Spartan is what I expect of Anne's taste. I guess apart from Prince Charles, the rest of the family did not care a toss about interior decoration. Princess Margaret & The Queen Mum used to be the one who cared about this sort of thing. Another person would be Viscount Linley (who studied cabinet making at the Coltwords) and of course Prince & Princess Michael of Kent.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on January 16, 2010, 07:49:13 AM
Yes I would not imagine that The Princess Royal would be wildly enthusiastic about interior decorating. She does'nt care very much for clothes, so I dont think her surroundings would be very important to her.
David Hicks did her house in the 70's, and I expect that it has not been touched at all since then.

 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 16, 2010, 11:40:05 AM
I tried to find Anne's place in David Hick's recently published book but cannot find it in there.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on January 19, 2010, 04:38:25 AM
I dont think you willl find anything. Gatcombe Park was decorated in the 70's, after the Queen Bought it for her, and her then husband Mark Phillips.
 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 19, 2010, 03:54:51 PM
Spartan is what I expect of Anne's taste. I guess apart from Prince Charles, the rest of the family did not care a toss about interior decoration. Princess Margaret & The Queen Mum used to be the one who cared about this sort of thing. Another person would be Viscount Linley (who studied cabinet making at the Coltwords) and of course Prince & Princess Michael of Kent.

Somewhere earlier on this thread is a photo / discussion of Princess Michael of Kent's sitting room at Kensington Palace.  It could be kindly described as "late Victorian / early Edwardian", and bluntly described as "cram as many objects as possible into a room."
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 19, 2010, 06:19:28 PM
Very much the style of "clutter" favoured by the late Queen Alexandra.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on January 19, 2010, 07:48:30 PM
Yes, Eric & Chris, but Queen/Empress  Alexandra's "clutter"  did include lots of Faberge! Especially the Sandringham animals and loads of picture frames.  Otherwise, I find the  crammed environment  heavy & dark. It must have been quite uncomfortable, considering the  way they dressed in those days.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 20, 2010, 08:33:18 AM
 ;)  Quite true Robert, I can probably tolerate clutter a bit more when we're talking Faberge!   In PMoK's case, however, the objects in question were hundreds - if not thousands - of books stacked several layers high, overwhelming every flat surface in her sitting room.  Just looking at the picture gave me claustrophobia.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 20, 2010, 06:54:04 PM
Indeed. It was noted that QA starting to give away things in her old age from her "collection". Perfect strangers were given junk or Faberge depending on her mood...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on January 20, 2010, 08:43:19 PM
I recall pictures of Princess Michael's  loosely called "decorating skills" when the  country house went up for sale.  "jumble sale" -or garage sale [for Americans] seemed appropriate.
 And Eric, remember Prince Andrew was instrumental in saving many precious objects  from the Windsor fire.
 I am no great fan of the Windsors [except the Queen, of course] but I think they appreciate what is in their care  as the national patrimony.
 As for Princess Anne, she does seem rather frugal in her tastes. I know of no pictures of her horse farm mansion.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 21, 2010, 12:00:39 PM
Indeed. No critizism of the RF on their preserving their heritage. However indiviual taste is quite another. Prince Charles had a luxurious hand in redecorating Clarence House for himself and his family using public money, the result was not universal approval.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 21, 2010, 02:53:23 PM
Not that I am keen to defend the Prince of Wales' spending habits, but as far as who paid for what for Clarence House - according to official Parliamentary records (Hansard's Debate June 2003), £ 3.2 million of public money was spent on restoring that building.  This was met from the regular Property Services Grant, meaning that no EXTRA public funds were provided (just that any money spent on CH wasn't available for projects at other royal properties that year).

The Prince of Wales personally paid £ 1.5 million for interior decoration of the rooms occupied by himself, Camilla and his sons.  £ 373,000 of public money was spent on interior decoration, but for staff and office areas. 

Granted, Charles gets the daily benefit of that expenditure because he gets to live in a nice place, but when you look at where the public money actually went (below), some of the media reports on this topic were a bit exaggerated.  Parliamentary records show that aside from its offices and staff areas, there are 16 main rooms in Clarence House.  5 are ground floor reception rooms, which leaves 5-6 rooms on the 1st floor for Charles and Camiilla's private use, and another 5-6 on the 2nd floor for William and Harry.  That's hardly extreme.

Work carried out   Total cost (£ thousand)
General builders work   445
Mechanical services and plumbing   428
Electrical services   410
Internal decoration   373
Specialist finishes    250
Fire protection   150
Asbestos removal   110
Catering equipment   96
Scaffolding—Internal and external   85
Carpentry   80
Service lift and shaft   72
Removal of redundant services   64
External decoration   60
Window refurbishment   54
Cleaning and repairs   24
Structural steelwork   19
Replacement of roof lights   13
Total of redecoration and refurbishment works   2,733
Construction manager's fees, services and site facilities relating to this work   512
Total   3,245
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 21, 2010, 09:08:45 PM
I see...That is why I said the thing did not look good for him due to reports. Also they might have a discount for royals on the project ? I know some renovation work is needed beause since the Queen Mum lived there, there has been none.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Windsor on January 22, 2010, 02:15:49 PM
I am very curious as to the layout of the upper floors of Clarence House.  Based on the previous post, if there are only 5 or 6 principal rooms on each of the upper floors it is quite easy to imagine that perhaps the layout is similar to that of the White House in the US with a large, open central hall/living area with rooms opening off it on each floor.  Perhaps?  While Clarence House is undeniably a lovely house, it is understandable why the Queen Mother did not want to move there when leaving Buckingham Palace.  Personally, I would think that something more grand could have been managed!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 23, 2010, 03:14:18 PM
I think it was the memories that she shared with her "darling Bertie" that made the transition so difficult. Clarence House was the residence of Elisabeth & Philip before the death of the King.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 24, 2010, 08:07:39 PM
As quoted from a biography about her elsewhere on this thread, the Queen Mother supposedly once referred to Clarence House as "that horrid little house."  That says it all......

The ground floor is arranged like a capital L.  At the top of the L being the Dining Room, then the Library, then the Morning Room at the bottom left corner.  The Main Corridor or Hall runs up and down along those rooms.  Along the bottom of the L (facing the garden) is the Entrance Hall, Lancaster Room and finally Garden Room.  The Horse Corridor runs behind / above those rooms.  There are also a few smaller ancillary rooms off both corridors (overlooking the palace's interior courtyards).

I've never seen a floorplan of the house's upper levels, but from various pictures I've seen and things I've read, I can somewhat piece together how the 1st Floor (2nd floor for us Americans) is laid out.  Here's what I think:  At the top of the L (above the Dining Room and Library) is a large Drawing Room (I once saw an old photo shoot of the QM and Margaret taken in there, and it looked like a double room, with the two sections separated by columns).  At the bottom of the L  (above the Morning Room) is the private sitting room (it was Princess Elizabeth's during her occupancy, probably Charles' now).  Along the bottom of the L (above the Lancaster Room and Morning Room) must be Charles' bedroom, dressing room and bath (those spaces overlook the garden, and the principal bedroom of the house almost certainly would).  Before their marriage Charles' spokesman (somewhat surprisingly) confirmed that Camilla had been given a bedroom and bath adjoining Charles'.  I can only imagine those must lie above the ancillary rooms facing the courtyards, but that's just a guess.

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ashdean on January 25, 2010, 07:37:15 AM
Indeed. No critizism of the RF on their preserving their heritage. However indiviual taste is quite another. Prince Charles had a luxurious hand in redecorating Clarence House for himself and his family using public money, the result was not universal approval.
I have been lucky enough to visit the public rooms of Clarence House on several occasions and find them very tastefully done with a certain homage too to the late Queen Mother..
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 25, 2010, 12:20:21 PM
I think the cost from the usage of public money that was the problem as it was blow up in the British press. I did credit Prince Charles was the few members of the Royal Family who cared about taste (he has excellent taste). Anyway, I am sure you did not see Clarence House during the period when the Queen Mother was in residence. I am sure Prince Charles injected hios taste into his own home, not only as a memorial to his grandmother.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on February 04, 2010, 12:07:12 AM
To be honest with you....from what I have seen of how CH was when Cookie was in residence and now......it is IMHO, 'little' altered in any major way taste-wise! For all their foibles (acknowledged or not) Cookie and the POW seem to share very similar tastes in palette, style etc. I do not think if Cookie were to pop in today she would find CH significantly altered internally from her own time really!  
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on February 04, 2010, 12:13:14 AM
oops I duplicated---sorry!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on February 04, 2010, 06:07:06 AM
Prince Charles I think is the only member of the Royal Family with any taste. He has beautiful things, and although the Royal Family probably have warehouses of furniture and paintings, he chooses obviously chooses carefully, and tastefully.  I think Clarence House is understated and very elegant. When the Queen Mother lived there it was slightly run down, " shabby chic", I think. Prince Charles has smartened it up.
The cost of doing this is astonomical, however the building belongs to the state, and although Prince Charles has an enormous income, and a very luxurious lifestyle, he does not own the building. All redecoration and renovations are funded from government coffers, and it has always been so. The fact that he made a large contribution to the redecorating is quite something.

Redecorations to the White House are also paid by the American Government. I have not heard of an American president making a large donation to have the private quarters of the White House done up !

Please stop referring to the Queen Mother as " Cookie". Its disrespectful, and was a nickname given to her by Wallis Simpson of all people. Rich coming from her, and a sign of how much respect she had for her husbands family. Its offensive coming from a person who most people regard as having no breeding, or background, and a social climber and money grabber.

I have it on good authority that a member of the family peruses this forum from time to time, and i dont think its respectful referring to his grandmother as "Cookie".

OK ?
 
   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 04, 2010, 08:52:42 AM
Actually, the funding to redecorate the White House is somewhat similar to Clarence House.  Yes, maintenance of the grounds and upkeep of the structure are paid for by the Federal Government at hefty expense!  But the government only contributes $100,000 (US) to each new president for decorating and furnishing the Oval Office and the private quarters. 

The White House Endowment, a financial arm of the White House Historical Association, pays the bulk of the costs of White House redecoration. The group was founded in November 1961 thanks to Jacqueline Kennedy, as part of her efforts to change the mansion from a frighting mess of reproductions and poor quality furnishings into a historically accurate museum quality building.  The Endowment generally supplements the $100k whenever the First Couple need or want to redecorate, buy new White House china, etc.

President and Mrs. Obama made news when they moved in - they broke precedence and refused the $100,000 federal funds.  They will instead redecorate the Oval Office and private quarters "privately".  I don't know if that means only from Endowment funds, or supplemented by themselves personally, or also supplemented by donations from others. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on February 04, 2010, 09:43:01 AM
I agree with you Chris, as far as I know the White House has always been funded not only by endowments, the Federal Government contribution, but also by private donations as well.
Mrs Kennedy's refurbishment was made possible by contributions from the aforementioned three sources. She also published a little book which was very popular at the time, and made quite a bit of money. As a result of her efforts, many items of furniture, paintings and objects, were also donated by private individuals.
She also supplemented the existing furniture with good reproductions. This is particularly evident in the Empire Room. She also raided store rooms for old furniture.
A large part of the White House was decorated not by an American, but by a Frenchman. The famous designer Francois Boudin was responsible for much that is seen today. At the time efforts were made to keep this a secret. I dont think that in the early sixties America was able to produce a designer with the necessary knowledge and exposure to take on the White House commission.
Mrs Kennedy and her team therefore had to look elsewhere.
( I hope I am correct in saying that it was Monsieur Boudin, and not Jansen ) i may be confusing the one with the other !

Both of them worked on the Duke of Windsor's houses in the Bois De Boulogne and Gif-sur-Yvette.

The point I am trying to make is that Prince Charles looked to his own pocket to subsidise part of the renovations of Clarence House. Something not done by other individuals in a similar position.

The chandelier hanging in the new White House bedroom, was made by a disadvantaged community in a dusty little village 80 kilometres from where I am. The name of the village is Barrydale.
( Just a bit of trivia and totally off topic, so I am probably going to be rapped on the knuckles ! )


 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 04, 2010, 10:33:13 AM
Maybe because since he lived there, it would be prudent for him to foot part of the bill ? It certainly defused comments on Prince Charles being wasteful of public money.

As for the Queen Mother being called "Cookie", I don't know ? I think it might be Wallis who coined it, but it was used as a nickname within royal circles in England. I talked with a former royal servant who referred to her as "that old bat" who caused the Queen (whom he was devoted) plenty of trouble with her many demands.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 04, 2010, 02:13:43 PM
I think it perfectly appropriate that Charles paid to decorate his private rooms at Clarence House.  No doubt the fact that the rather unpopular Mrs. C-B was also moving in made that decision clearer for Charles - he needed the papers to state that no taxpayer funding was going to prepare her rooms (which they duly reported).

The only real difference between Charles and the Kennedys (for example), was that Jackie got her wealthy friends to fund her redecoration, while Charles paid for his from the Duchy of Cornwall.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on February 04, 2010, 04:06:38 PM


I have it on good authority that a member of the family peruses this forum from time to time, and i dont think its respectful referring to his grandmother as "Cookie".

OK ?
    

Really Pavlov?  That's cool. I'm not surprised. I assume you refer to one of the Queen's sons.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on February 04, 2010, 09:04:03 PM
The issue of the use of the name Cookie was brought up ages ago and I thought that it had been generally accepted that it was used in a sort of affectionate tongue in cheek way rather than nastily! I use the name because I think it suited the homely and cuddly QM and I understand she liked good food to go with her drinkie-poos! With regards to lacking respect for  QETQM and it being deemed offensive, I feel far more offensive nouns have been applied to QETQM in other quarters than the pet name of Cookie!

This is all getting horribly off-topic...sorry. I do think CH was really rather beautifully and tastefully furnished during Coo....I mean QETQM's time (Oh lord now I am using an acronym which is also a pet hate of some on this forum I see!). From what I have seen of the Prince of Wales' redecoration, he seems to have retained a distinct and palpable aspect of how his grandmother had the place! Almost a bit of an homage but without the set in aspic-like formula that permeates at Balmoral and Sandringham!

Returning briefly to the issue of 'Cookie'. I really do not see why we have to be so precious about her! If a grandchild were to really object here, than I would certainly think twice! But we mere minions are just that! It is not as though I am calling her 'the old witch' or something worse! 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on February 05, 2010, 06:03:55 AM
No I am not.
He is a fairly regular viewer I am told, as is his wife.
P   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 05, 2010, 06:17:43 PM
Yes. I think of "Cookie" as an affectionate way as the "Chocolate box" image of the Queen Mum. I think Wallis referred to her in this way to stress her matronly appeal. In a way she was right. People think of her as "their grandmother" who would pop in for tea (which is seldom going to happen), but their kind of appeal was there. Living & growing up in a Crown Colony, I tend to think the same too.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on February 08, 2010, 07:39:55 PM
Actually, the funding to redecorate the White House is somewhat similar to Clarence House.  Yes, maintenance of the grounds and upkeep of the structure are paid for by the Federal Government at hefty expense!  But the government only contributes $100,000 (US) to each new president for decorating and furnishing the Oval Office and the private quarters. 

The White House Endowment, a financial arm of the White House Historical Association, pays the bulk of the costs of White House redecoration. The group was founded in November 1961 thanks to Jacqueline Kennedy, as part of her efforts to change the mansion from a frighting mess of reproductions and poor quality furnishings into a historically accurate museum quality building.  The Endowment generally supplements the $100k whenever the First Couple need or want to redecorate, buy new White House china, etc.

President and Mrs. Obama made news when they moved in - they broke precedence and refused the $100,000 federal funds.  They will instead redecorate the Oval Office and private quarters "privately".  I don't know if that means only from Endowment funds, or supplemented by themselves personally, or also supplemented by donations from others. 

Chris, I curtsy to your knowledge. Being a US citizen, I was unaware of this and I am thankful you brought this up.  :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 09, 2010, 01:41:25 PM
Yes. I don't think they publish this really. I guess Sarah Palin won't know it either.  ;)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on February 27, 2010, 12:18:54 PM
I have some questions about state rooms of Buckingham palace:

1.

I know that chimney-piece in The Grand Hall made by Joseph Theakston, in The Green Drawing Room by Joseph Browne, in The Picture Gallery and The East Gallery by Joseph Browne, in The State Dining Room by Matthew Cotes Wyatt, in The Blue Drawing Room by Richard Westmacott Junior, in the White Drawing Room by John Flaxman.
But, does any of you have informations who made chimney-pieces in the Throne Room and Music Room?

2.


Does any of you have informations who design and made the same carpets in The Blue Drawing Room and The White Drawing Room?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 27, 2010, 06:44:18 PM
Nikola,

One correction - the two white marble chimney-pieces in the White Drawing Room were not actually made by John Flaxman, but rather by someone else "after a design by Flaxman", at least according to my BP guidebook.

The book sadly doesn't identify the mantle makers for the rooms you are seeking, but does say that Joseph Browne carved a series of mantles for throughout the palace.  Also sadly, no information on the carpets.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on March 02, 2010, 09:17:01 AM
Does anyone have any photographs of Birkhall ? Have they been posted here before. ? This is a very long thread, so I dont want to wade through pages and pages of stuff. Just wondering. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: jfkhaos on March 02, 2010, 09:54:09 AM
Here's a picture of Birkhall:
(http://i3.sinaimg.cn/lx/hunjia/p/2009/0619/U1792P8T1D879696F919DT20090619093541.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on March 02, 2010, 10:46:35 AM
Thank You very much. Its a beautiful house, more so because it stands out against the green of the trees. I particularly like the pavilion in the garden. I wonder what it is used for ?

Has this house always been part of the estate ?

Do we know who has had the benefit of living here, before the Queen Mother ?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on March 02, 2010, 12:23:44 PM
Pavlov, the Birkhall Estate was purchased by Prince Albert not long after he and Queen Victoria purchased Balmoral, so it's safe to say it has been combined with Balmoral for almost as long as the latter has been in royal ownership.  But  I too have always wondered who the occupants were prior to George VI and Queen Elizabeth, and haven't been able to find out!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on March 03, 2010, 05:38:21 AM
Hi Chris,
Thanks.
It would be interesting to know what it was used for prior to the QM. Perhaps for additional guest accommodation.
Or as an annual  holiday house for all the Royal "granny's" at Kensington Palace !!

Perhaps someone out there knows the answer !


Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on March 03, 2010, 02:37:50 PM
I have found two sources that state that Helen, Duchess of Albany and her children Alice and Charles had use of Birkhill from the 1880s onwards! Whether QV gave Birkhall to Leopold and Helen is not certain or perhaps QV gave the house to the widowed Helen!? Anyway, I do not know if Helen retained use of the house up until her death although it would work neatly on a timescale if she did, as she died in 1922 and the next known occupants Albert Duke of York and his wife Elizabeth married in the following year.

Apparently Birkhall was originally purchased as a home for Albert Edward, Prince of Wales and his family! But for some reason he seems to have preferred Abergeldie Castle which was leased from the Gordon family, and after he and Alexandra moved into Balmoral the castle leasehold passed to George and Mary to provide them with a 'pad' in the Highlands!

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on March 03, 2010, 03:23:11 PM
Having flicked through a few books it would appear Sir James Clark was a tennant of Birkhall and in September 1856 Florence Nightingale stayed there as his guest.
Empress Eugenie also stayed there in the 1890s and Lady Biddulph with her children Freda and Victor are also recorded as staying there.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on March 07, 2010, 09:03:26 AM
Sandringham House Drawing Room:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/SandringhamHouseDrawingRoom.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on March 09, 2010, 07:07:55 AM
I never realised that it was quite so grand. Edward probably wanted it to be very grand to accomodate and entertain his smart set of friends, and possibly to take revenge because he had to wait so long to become king !!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on March 24, 2010, 01:52:45 AM
Birkhall is gorgeous.
It was the QM's favourite wasn't it?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on March 24, 2010, 05:07:07 AM
Perhaps Birkahll was her favourite but I think Castle of Mey was the home upon which QEQM really was able to impress her personality! She basically took a near derelict carcass of a building and surrounding grounds that had all but reverted to wilderness and created something rather special and wonderful! The castle is really little more than a rather nice house and QEQM made it her own over time, but it is the gardens that really stand out as a testament to what can be done with tatse, a huge overdraft and a desire to create something rather beautiful for oneself when one came up from London or Birkhall to play! Castle of Mey was where QEQM really was Mistress of her own house as she owned it! I believe it was the only property she ever actually owned herself personally, privately and wholly!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on March 24, 2010, 05:10:20 AM
Thanks Margot, that's what I thought.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 01, 2010, 11:05:51 AM
I recently found floor plans of Nether Lypiatt, the former country home of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent with some great interior photos from the 1930's.  Also found floor plans and again great interior photos of Harewood House, home of the Queen's cousin - same for Alrhorp - detailed floor plan of that house dating to 1822.  If anyone is interested, I'll post.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on April 01, 2010, 11:11:52 AM
Yes, please, architect ! ! !
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 02, 2010, 04:59:10 AM
I recently found floor plans of Nether Lypiatt, the former country home of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent with some great interior photos from the 1930's.  Also found floor plans and again great interior photos of Harewood House, home of the Queen's cousin - same for Alrhorp - detailed floor plan of that house dating to 1822.  If anyone is interested, I'll post.


That would be FANTASTIC if you could?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Vecchiolarry on April 02, 2010, 05:30:32 AM
Hi,

Oh yes, of course we would be interested!!  Need you ask?
You do such a great job on this thread that anything you post is appreciated!!
Go for it!!!  And, thanks....

Larry
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 03, 2010, 06:16:35 PM
Here's Althorp's Ground Floor Plan - As I mentioned, this dates to 1822 - there have been lots of changes to the plans since.

 (http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/AlthorpFloorPlan0001.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 03, 2010, 06:27:13 PM
Here's Harewood House - The top plan is an earlier version proposed by Adam's, the bottom plan is as built and designed by Carr.
 
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/HarewoodHousePlan0001.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 03, 2010, 06:33:52 PM
Here's Nether Lypiatt - Prince & Princess Michael of Kent's former country home - will include interior photos of all later
 
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiattPlans0001.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 04, 2010, 02:46:25 AM
Had a quick look as I'm a little busy but will have to study more later.
Just wanted to say THANKS!!!!! :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 04, 2010, 04:58:49 AM
Yep, just had a better look.
Wow!
Can I ask what a box room is?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 04, 2010, 05:44:03 AM
Like a store room where they would store trunks for travelling etc
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 04, 2010, 08:37:14 AM
Yeah, I thought it was something like that. Thankyou. :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 04, 2010, 08:39:41 AM
(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y29/coeurdepierre/STJgr.jpg)


Ground floor of St. James' Palace 1890s.

Clarence House in red.

State Apartments in green.

Residence of Princess Victor von Hohenlohe (widow of Queen Victoria's nephew) in yellow.

Residence of Sir Francis Knollys in pink.

Residence of Col A. J. Bigge (later Lord Stanfordham) in charcoal grey.

York House residence of Georgie and May in aqua.

The Lord Chamberlain in dark blue.

The rooms used by Prince Charles as his home after his separation from Diana.  His offices were in part of York House.

St. James is rather a odd designed royal palace, itsn't it?  Quite broken up, no large grand suite of state rooms.  Oh, I know this is the ground floor plan, and there is a suite of larger state rooms on the first floor above the yellow and green dotted rooms.  Nevertheless, it's quite an unflattering and uncomfortable residence for what was, in the 17th and 18th century when among the world's most influential monarchs resided there. 



Can someone tell me why this one has been removed?
Any chance of getting more pics as I didn't get to see these ones of St James.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 05, 2010, 06:07:07 AM
Here's Althorp's Ground Floor Plan - As I mentioned, this dates to 1822 - there have been lots of changes to the plans since.

 (http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/AlthorpFloorPlan0001.jpg)

Thank you Architetct very much for floor plans!!!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: joye on April 06, 2010, 07:56:50 PM
Nikola, what might you know please , of The Regency Room at Buckingham Palace?

Where is it situated on the floorplan and what it is used for?

I have read several books on Royalty recently, and The Regency Room is mentioned frequently.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 07, 2010, 08:05:00 AM
May I get back to the Kents for a moment ? If they have sold their very beautiful country house, and the government has clamped down on Grace and Favour accommodation, where do they live now ? The family silver and other heirlooms have gone, so are they eking out a miserable existence somewhere else ? If so, does anyone know where ?



 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 07, 2010, 09:35:28 AM
Well I thought they were allowed to stay there as long as they back paid the rent, and to do so is why they sold their country house.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 07, 2010, 01:50:51 PM
Correct, at the moment Prince and Prince Michael of Kent continue to occupy Kensington Palace Apartment #10 (incidentally next door the the apartment of the late Diana, Princess of Wales), as they have since their marriage.  For the past 7 years the Queen has paid the rent (to the tune of £10,000 a month) in recognition of their public and charitable duties for which they receive no other public funding.  That generosity ended this year, with the couple now paying their own rent.

Their country home was sold in 2006 for £5.75 million.  A further £2.1million was raised last year selling off heirlooms, but that was likely divided among Prince Michael and his two siblings.  Combined with any inheritance or trusts they may have received, and of course the income generated from the Prince's consultancy company and the Princess' books and other commercial activities, I do not believe the couple is in dire financial straits. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 07, 2010, 02:58:41 PM
Nikola, what might you know please , of The Regency Room at Buckingham Palace?

Where is it situated on the floorplan and what it is used for?

I have read several books on Royalty recently, and The Regency Room is mentioned frequently.


Dear Joye,

The Regency Room is located on the ground floor in north-west corner of Buckingham Palace, next to the Queen’s private (garden) entrence to the palace. On Architect floor-plans this room is marked as “ Miss Knollys Bed Room”.

Earlier years (1970’s, 1980’s) The Regency room used for recording of the Queen’s Christmas Broadcasts.
Also in this room (earlier years) some members of the royal family (Duke of Edinburgh, prince Andrew, prince Edward) given some of interviews for TV.
Today Her Majesty use this room for recording The Commonwealth Day Message. Also, during State Visit of president Bush this room also used.

I don’t know any information about history and decorations of this room. But if any of other members of this forum, know something about this, it’s would be very nice to share that informations with us :-)

Later I will post some photos of this room.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 07, 2010, 03:06:20 PM
Regency Room at Buckingham Palace:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/TheRegencyRoomonthegroundfloorinthe.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Insight_april06_gallery_queencards_.jpg) (http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/CommonwealthDayMessage1.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/BozicnaporukakraljiceElizabeteII-33.jpg) (http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/9750039.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 07, 2010, 03:10:33 PM
One more photo of the Regency Room:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/r-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 07, 2010, 03:45:58 PM
Does any of you have informations about decorations (and furniture) of the Room 1844 in Buckingham Palace? About walls, ceiling, chimney, furniture...?

About this room i only know how used and this: "the 1844 Room, which was decorated in that year for the State visit of Emperor Nicholas I of Russia, and, on the other side of the Bow Room, the 1855 Room, in honour of the visit of Emperor Napoleon III of France".
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 07, 2010, 05:30:58 PM
Correct, at the moment Prince and Prince Michael of Kent continue to occupy Kensington Palace Apartment #10 (incidentally next door the the apartment of the late Diana, Princess of Wales), as they have since their marriage.  For the past 7 years the Queen has paid the rent (to the tune of £10,000 a month) in recognition of their public and charitable duties for which they receive no other public funding.  That generosity ended this year, with the couple now paying their own rent.

Their country home was sold in 2006 for £5.75 million.  A further £2.1million was raised last year selling off heirlooms, but that was likely divided among Prince Michael and his two siblings.  Combined with any inheritance or trusts they may have received, and of course the income generated from the Prince's consultancy company and the Princess' books and other commercial activities, I do not believe the couple is in dire financial straits. 

Chris, I read somewhere - don't ask me where as the brain's rattled - that the Kents' apartments at KP were/used to be stables at the back but had been renovated into apártments. Apparently she didn't like this idea as she felt she wasn't living in as grand quarters as the others residing there. So have they now moved into no.10?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: joye on April 07, 2010, 08:10:23 PM
One more photo of the Regency Room:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/r-1.jpg)

Many thanks Nikola. What great pictures. Now I know where it is and when used.

Another question please.
The Belgium Suite where State Visitors are accommodated.
Where on the floorplan is this State Apartment please?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 08, 2010, 07:21:55 AM
Correct, at the moment Prince and Prince Michael of Kent continue to occupy Kensington Palace Apartment #10 (incidentally next door the the apartment of the late Diana, Princess of Wales), as they have since their marriage.  For the past 7 years the Queen has paid the rent (to the tune of £10,000 a month) in recognition of their public and charitable duties for which they receive no other public funding.  That generosity ended this year, with the couple now paying their own rent.

Their country home was sold in 2006 for £5.75 million.  A further £2.1million was raised last year selling off heirlooms, but that was likely divided among Prince Michael and his two siblings.  Combined with any inheritance or trusts they may have received, and of course the income generated from the Prince's consultancy company and the Princess' books and other commercial activities, I do not believe the couple is in dire financial straits. 

Chris, I read somewhere - don't ask me where as the brain's rattled - that the Kents' apartments at KP were/used to be stables at the back but had been renovated into apártments. Apparently she didn't like this idea as she felt she wasn't living in as grand quarters as the others residing there. So have they now moved into no.10?

I believe perhaps you may be confusing Prince and Princess Michael with his brother and sister-in-law, The Duke and Duchess of Kent.  The Michaels of Kent have always lived at #10 since their marriage.  #10 was previously the home of Princess Margaret upon her marriage; she and Lord Snowdon lived there for a while until moving to their much larger apartment on the opposite (south) side of the palace.

If you were standing on the north side of the palace looking back toward at the palace itself, you would be standing in a circular driveway where Diana used to park her car in front of her home (per her former butler's book).  On the far left NW corner of this wing would be the Queen's Staircase (the very north end of the Queen's Apartments extending from the main block / State Rooms of the palace).  Just right of this would be the windows and door of Apartment #10, and then those of the former Wales apartment at #8 and #9.  To the right of this are other apartments occupied by royal staff.

And if you turned around and faced north, you'd be looking at the Stable Block complex (not connected to the palace but adjoining it).  Here are garages and staff quarters, plus a couple of separate cottages, one called Wren House, the home of the Duke and Duchess of Kent.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 08, 2010, 07:38:54 AM
One more photo of the Regency Room:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/r-1.jpg)

Many thanks Nikola. What great pictures. Now I know where it is and when used.

Another question please.
The Belgium Suite where State Visitors are accommodated.
Where on the floorplan is this State Apartment please?

The Belgian Suite is on the ground floor of the palace, facing west toward the gardens.  These rooms lie directly beneath the Royal Closet, Queen's Audience Chamber, etc. above.  Basically, the suite begins from the pool (in the Northwest pavilion) and continues toward the Bow Room in the center of this front.

Looking at my old floor plans, next door to the pool is The Spanish Room (I've seen photos suggesting this has been used as a private dining room for the suite), then the Orleans Room (which I believe is the present bedroom of the suite), then the 18th Century Room (larger room, maybe the private sitting room of the suite), then the Cavernon Room (a narrow room under the Royal Closet).  Behind these rooms are corridors (& bathrooms) which also form part of the suite.

But if I'm not mistaken, the number of rooms which are "combined" to form the Belgian Suite vary depending on the needs of the State Guest staying there.  If more rooms are needed, some of the adjacent Semi-Suite Apartments (such as The 1844 Room and The Bow Room) could be easily added.  Across the Marble Hall are also the Billiard Room (next to the Entrance Hall), and an adjacent room who's name I can't quite see on my plans.  I seem to recall reading that during the State Visit of President Bush, these rooms were used by his staff as offices/ meeting spaces.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 08, 2010, 07:42:16 AM
I have a question?!  At Buckingham Palace, where are the rest rooms / loos used by guests at State Banquets and other large events?  Are they on the State Floor or Ground Floor?  I can't seem to find any on the old floor plans.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 08, 2010, 02:07:02 PM
Birkhall

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/04/08/article-1264595-00803E3600000258-562_468x534.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 08, 2010, 10:15:03 PM
Correct, at the moment Prince and Prince Michael of Kent continue to occupy Kensington Palace Apartment #10 (incidentally next door the the apartment of the late Diana, Princess of Wales), as they have since their marriage.  For the past 7 years the Queen has paid the rent (to the tune of £10,000 a month) in recognition of their public and charitable duties for which they receive no other public funding.  That generosity ended this year, with the couple now paying their own rent.

Their country home was sold in 2006 for £5.75 million.  A further £2.1million was raised last year selling off heirlooms, but that was likely divided among Prince Michael and his two siblings.  Combined with any inheritance or trusts they may have received, and of course the income generated from the Prince's consultancy company and the Princess' books and other commercial activities, I do not believe the couple is in dire financial straits. 

Chris, I read somewhere - don't ask me where as the brain's rattled - that the Kents' apartments at KP were/used to be stables at the back but had been renovated into apártments. Apparently she didn't like this idea as she felt she wasn't living in as grand quarters as the others residing there. So have they now moved into no.10?

I believe perhaps you may be confusing Prince and Princess Michael with his brother and sister-in-law, The Duke and Duchess of Kent.  The Michaels of Kent have always lived at #10 since their marriage.  #10 was previously the home of Princess Margaret upon her marriage; she and Lord Snowdon lived there for a while until moving to their much larger apartment on the opposite (south) side of the palace.

If you were standing on the north side of the palace looking back toward at the palace itself, you would be standing in a circular driveway where Diana used to park her car in front of her home (per her former butler's book).  On the far left NW corner of this wing would be the Queen's Staircase (the very north end of the Queen's Apartments extending from the main block / State Rooms of the palace).  Just right of this would be the windows and door of Apartment #10, and then those of the former Wales apartment at #8 and #9.  To the right of this are other apartments occupied by royal staff.

And if you turned around and faced north, you'd be looking at the Stable Block complex (not connected to the palace but adjoining it).  Here are garages and staff quarters, plus a couple of separate cottages, one called Wren House, the home of the Duke and Duchess of Kent.


You are so right Chris. It was Wren House and I was mistaking them for the Kents. Thanks.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 09, 2010, 07:38:53 AM
Chris do you know anything about Wilderness House at Hampton Court, the home in exile of GD Xenia ? I have been hunting and cannot find anything. There are one or two pictures on this forum but nothing interesting.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 09, 2010, 08:59:39 AM
Wilderness House is adjacent to the Hampton Court Palace Maze, set in the Wilderness just north of the palace (at that time the term Wilderness didn't convey the same definition as today - it meant woods and paths affording privacy for strolls and such).

Lancelot Capability Brown was appointed Master Gardener at Hampton Court in 1764.  His annual salary was £2,000 plus accommodation in Wilderness House.  After Brown's death in 1783 there is about a century gap in my information about who occupied the house.

From 1884 to 1906 Wilderness House was occupied by Lady Emily Adam, wife of Rt. Hon William Adam, Lord of the Treasury and Governor of Madras.  Her daughter (also Emiily) occupied the house from 1906-1912 when she married her second husband.

In 1912 Amy, Lady White, daughter of the Archdeacon of Calcutta and widow of Field Marshal Sir George White, Governor of Gibraltar from 1905 to his death in 1912, moved in.

In 1937, HIH Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandra, daughter of Tsar Alexander III, moved in.  Xenia previously lived at Frogmore Cottage at Windsor while both Wilderness House and Wilderness Cottage were substantially altered to accommodate her large household.  The work demanded by the Grand Duchess was far more extensive than the palace would normally have approved and added huge costs to the Privy Purse, which her cousin King George V ordered to pay the bills.  Extra work force was brought in to meet the deadline of 16 Jan 1937.

Xenia lived at Wilderness House with her daughter, Princess Youssoupoff and her son Prince Andrew.  The house became an important pilgrimage site for exiled Russian aristocracy.  Queen Mary was also frequently a visitor.  The Grand Duchess' grandson, Prince Michael, later recalled shouting directions with his brother from an upstairs window to tourists trying to find their way out of the Maze.  His mother, Elizabeth Fabrizievna, Princess Andrew, was killed there during a bombing raid on 20 Oct. 1940.  Michael was upstairs looking out of a window and saw the bombs dropped in a line across Bushy Park when one exploded nearby and blew out all the windows and external doors.  Princess Andrew had cancer at the time so her death, while tragic, was viewed as a quick end to her suffering.  Her funeral was held in Wilderness House on 31 Oct 1940.  Xenia and her household remained at the house until her death in 1960. 

In 1961 Major General Sir Charles Offley Harvey was appointed Chief Steward of Hampton Court and moved into Wilderness House.  After his death in 1969, his widow moved into another palace apartment.

In 1985 the house was given to Charles Hector Fitzroy, Lord Maclean, chief of Clan Maclean and Lord Chamberlain from 1971 to 1984.  During his tenure as Lord Chamberlain he overall all ceremonial (but not state) occasions, including the lying-in-state and funeral of the Duke of Windsor in 1972, the funerals of Prince William of Gloucester (1972), the Duke of Gloucester (1974), Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1979) and Princess Alice, Countess of Althone (1981).  He presided over celebrations of the Silver wedding in 1972, the marriage of Princess Anne (1973), the Silver Jubilee (1977) and the wedding of Charles and Diana (1981).  He retired as Lord Chamberlain in 1984 and was appointed permanent Lord in Waiting.  He was Chief Steward of Hampton Court Palace from 1985-1988., and also wrote many children's stories.

After his death in 1990, I have no other info on what the house has been used for.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: joye on April 10, 2010, 08:15:00 PM
One more photo of the Regency Room:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/r-1.jpg)

Many thanks Nikola. What great pictures. Now I know where it is and when used.

Another question please.
The Belgium Suite where State Visitors are accommodated.
Where on the floorplan is this State Apartment please?

The Belgian Suite is on the ground floor of the palace, facing west toward the gardens.  These rooms lie directly beneath the Royal Closet, Queen's Audience Chamber, etc. above.  Basically, the suite begins from the pool (in the Northwest pavilion) and continues toward the Bow Room in the center of this front.

Looking at my old floor plans, next door to the pool is The Spanish Room (I've seen photos suggesting this has been used as a private dining room for the suite), then the Orleans Room (which I believe is the present bedroom of the suite), then the 18th Century Room (larger room, maybe the private sitting room of the suite), then the Cavernon Room (a narrow room under the Royal Closet).  Behind these rooms are corridors (& bathrooms) which also form part of the suite.

But if I'm not mistaken, the number of rooms which are "combined" to form the Belgian Suite vary depending on the needs of the State Guest staying there.  If more rooms are needed, some of the adjacent Semi-Suite Apartments (such as The 1844 Room and The Bow Room) could be easily added.  Across the Marble Hall are also the Billiard Room (next to the Entrance Hall), and an adjacent room who's name I can't quite see on my plans.  I seem to recall reading that during the State Visit of President Bush, these rooms were used by his staff as offices/ meeting spaces.

I appreciate your detailed answer. Many thanks.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 14, 2010, 08:43:29 AM
Thank you so much chris for the detailed answer.
I have always wondered about the close relationship George V had with Xenia. He really looked after her very well. Perhaps she became a scapegoat for the guilt he felt with regard to the rest of the family.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 14, 2010, 01:55:11 PM
Here's a few interior photos of Nether Lypiatt - The former country home of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent
 
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-Study.jpg)
The Study
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-DrawingRoom.jpg)
The Drawing Room
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-MainStaircase.jpg)
The Main Staircase
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-EntranceHall-Study.jpg)
The Entrance Hall and Study
 
The older photos were taken 1934
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 15, 2010, 07:57:58 AM
Wow it is beautiful, and so uncluttered ( the colored picture ) in comparison to their apartment in Kensington Palace.
It must have been very sad for them to have to sell something as beautiful as this.
Thanks for the pics.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Michael HR on April 15, 2010, 09:15:52 AM
Many thanks for the information on wilderness House, indeed interesting and pleasing to know that the GD was not shoved out of sight and was pat of royal life here.

Michael
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 18, 2010, 10:17:43 PM
Good question Chris...

I think that their sense of self preservation depends on them appaering to be the same royal family generation after generation.

Maybe they would feel insecure of they started putting Andy Warhol paintings up in place of their long gone relatives.  And is it possible that  if the public saw this, they would might feel that the royals have lost their timeless mystery.

When I see royals doing what I do, they seem so very ordinary. [Which they actually are but we like to think of them as 'special'.]

If we all thought of royals as just common people, this website would not exist.



"Common People"   - exactly what are they ?


Common people are everyday people who do not live off a civil list and travel the world.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 19, 2010, 09:44:41 AM
May I steer off course, and ask about another Royal House ? Abergeldie.  Once again I do not want to wade through all this stuff to find out if it has been discussed before. If it has, I offer my apologies.

It is an interresting house, or castle, because it is ajacent to Balmoral, and belongs to the Gordon family.
When Prince Albert bought the Balmoral Estate, he tried very hard to buy Abergeldie, but the Gordon family would not part with it. He was more sucessful with Birkhall.
Instead it has been passed down by the Royal Family to this day, via 40 year leaseholds, and therefore does not belong to them.

Does anyone have any photos, and know what the property is used for today.



   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 20, 2010, 09:53:20 PM

There is bad news though, the brand new carpet had been down only 2 days when a palace footman was wheeling a trolley across the room when a wheel came off and tea and coffee went all over it causing £60,000 in damage.


Sounds like a story straight from the Daily Mail. It can't cost that much to clean a carpet surely.


Has BB never heard of ScotchGuard?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 21, 2010, 05:56:00 AM
The issue of the use of the name Cookie was brought up ages ago and I thought that it had been generally accepted that it was used in a sort of affectionate tongue in cheek way rather than nastily! I use the name because I think it suited the homely and cuddly QM and I understand she liked good food to go with her drinkie-poos! With regards to lacking respect for  QETQM and it being deemed offensive, I feel far more offensive nouns have been applied to QETQM in other quarters than the pet name of Cookie!

This is all getting horribly off-topic...sorry. I do think CH was really rather beautifully and tastefully furnished during Coo....I mean QETQM's time (Oh lord now I am using an acronym which is also a pet hate of some on this forum I see!). From what I have seen of the Prince of Wales' redecoration, he seems to have retained a distinct and palpable aspect of how his grandmother had the place! Almost a bit of an homage but without the set in aspic-like formula that permeates at Balmoral and Sandringham!

Returning briefly to the issue of 'Cookie'. I really do not see why we have to be so precious about her! If a grandchild were to really object here, than I would certainly think twice! But we mere minions are just that! It is not as though I am calling her 'the old witch' or something worse! 


Margot, we are free to call people (wether they are royalty or not), what we wish to call them, as long as it's done nicely. And I did not read any untoward sarcasm in your post when calling her cookie. I think it's cute and if the royal family want to peruse our forum then they must join in and debate about it if they have a problem.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 21, 2010, 06:03:12 AM
I have a question?!  At Buckingham Palace, where are the rest rooms / loos used by guests at State Banquets and other large events?  Are they on the State Floor or Ground Floor?  I can't seem to find any on the old floor plans.


Chris, just an idea, maybe look for different wording like WC or Ladies/Gents?
Will that help?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 21, 2010, 06:04:06 AM
Here's a few interior photos of Nether Lypiatt - The former country home of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent
 
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-Study.jpg)
The Study
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-DrawingRoom.jpg)
The Drawing Room
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-MainStaircase.jpg)
The Main Staircase
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/NetherLypiatt-EntranceHall-Study.jpg)
The Entrance Hall and Study
 
The older photos were taken 1934


Thanks architect.
What an elegant house.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 22, 2010, 07:50:48 AM
Palace of Holyroodhouse Floor Plan:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/palace-of-holyroodhouse-map.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 22, 2010, 07:51:41 AM
Carlton House Floor Plan:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/carlton-house_plan.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 22, 2010, 07:56:34 AM
Frogmore House - Some Interior Photos:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Frogmore1.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Frogmore3.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 22, 2010, 07:57:36 AM
Frogmore House - Some Interior Photos:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Frogmore2.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 22, 2010, 08:05:02 AM
Frogmore House - Some Interior Photos:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Frogmore4.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Frogmore5.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 22, 2010, 08:06:06 AM
Does any of you have some more photos of Frogmore House Interior?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 22, 2010, 07:28:00 PM
Nikola, you are a hero!
Great pics thankyou. :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 26, 2010, 07:18:51 AM
I think the watercolours of Frogmore show us that these interiors were once beautiful. The photographs alas, do not. In my personal opinion  I think it is one of the least attractive Royal houses. Those curtains look like something out of Dracula's Castle, and the blue table cloth in the other room is scary. Both belong in Liberace's museum I think. What on earth was the person who was responsible for both, thinking at the time, one wonders. There is no accounting for bad taste. Or were they oblivious to colour and pattern ?

Something else I have noticed about Royal houses. Why do they have those limp, ill fitting, hanging, loose covers ? They look as if they have been run through the Royal washing machine and tumble drier thousand of times.( See the study photograph ). They also use them on sofas sometimes.

Very odd.   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 26, 2010, 10:24:03 AM
Yes I see what you mean.
I think they just haven't been fitted properly.

And what about the old photograph on the table - the one with the guy and a moustache!Oh how I'd love to display my family pics if I had any that old.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 26, 2010, 01:31:42 PM
Frogmore House has always intrigued me, inasmuch as it is a perfectly suitable and well-located residence which has not had a proper occupant since 1910, although Queen Mary made it into a family museum and was a regular visitor until her death in 1953.

From what I've read the house underwent a substantial restoration in the 1980s and was being considered as a possible home for the newly married Duke and Duchess of York.  Perhaps some of the present unattractive furnishings were installed at that point (God knows '80s decor was not particularly attractive).

The potential York occupancy aside, I've often wondered how the royals view the house, who uses it and how often.  Set inside Home Park, it's only open to the public for brief days each year. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Jamesffarley on April 26, 2010, 03:14:01 PM
Does anyone have floor plans of Frogmore?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 28, 2010, 11:02:25 AM
Hi Lindelle
To have old family photographs is wonderful. I have a whole wall full of them in my bedroom, going back 3 generations. But at the same time it can be quite unnerving because their eyes sometimes seem to follow you around. And they always look disapproving ! Perhaps because none of them ever smiled.
 I wonder if the Royal Family have any framed photogrphs of Queen Victoria standing around ? She always looked very dissaproving of everything.  I would hate to have her on my desk !

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 28, 2010, 01:24:14 PM
Oh Pavlov, I would have to disagree, I have 3 beautiful pictures of QV on my wall, they are a joy to behold & capture ones imagination!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on April 29, 2010, 10:32:29 AM
Poor old QV was not a very attractive old lady. She looked stern, disapproving, unfriendly and generally p......d off with everything. Maybe your pictures of her are different. I think one exists where she was caught off guard, and she actually smiled !
We have a white marble statue of her in front of our Houses of Parliament, under the palm trees, looking very out of place in a tropical environment, and boy does she look miserable in her coronation robes and little veil and crown !! She has been therr since 1887. Our present government are perhaps too intimidated by her appearance to remove the staue. Thank God !!

Please dont get  me wrong, I have nothing against her, I think she was wonderful, but I still would not like her glaring down at me from the wall !!.   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: aleksandr pavlovich on April 29, 2010, 10:52:15 AM
Indeed there IS a photograph of her in later life, smiling!  IMO, she looks, with her pouched cheeks, for all the world like a very pleased rotund little chipmunk!  I'm delighted to know that there were indeed episodes in her long life in which the humor broke through.   Regards, AP
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 29, 2010, 05:35:54 PM
Dear Pavlov and aleksandr, do you know where I could find this photo of her smiling?
I've never seen her smile, in fact I don't even recall seeing her smiling in younger photo's.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: aleksandr pavlovich on April 29, 2010, 06:09:37 PM
Re Reply # 1147:  Regretfully, I do NOT have the reference volume at hand of the Queen smiling, since she is not a particular interest of mine.  It has been long ago.  I remember that she was dressed in her usual late life "widow's weeds," and I believe that she was seated alone in a carriage, facing right, but not directly looking at the camera (the picture was a relatively close-up one, but it may have been cropped). Thus I am thinking it was taken during of her Jubilee/s' appearance/s. It IS so unusual, that once seen, one doesn't completely forget!  Thank you for your interest in asking.   AP.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 29, 2010, 09:05:28 PM
 :)I might search around for it.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: aleksandr pavlovich on April 29, 2010, 10:06:23 PM
Re  Reply 1149:  I did a brief search on Google for it, and there IS reference to it under "Smiling Queen Victoria," but it seemed very convoluted to try and get to it.  Goole also has references to a PAINTING of her in her younger years smiling, which I DID get to see.  However, we are looking for a PHOTOGRAPH, and Google seems to confirm that there is only ONE (by a "Charles Knight, ca. 1887"), but again it seemed to be very difficult to bring up.  Perhaps you will have more time and luck than I.   Regards,  AP
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Jamesffarley on April 29, 2010, 11:01:13 PM
This is the about the only one I could find of her in later life. Sorry about the Getty Images watermark!
(http://i44.tinypic.com/38zm8.jpg)
 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on April 30, 2010, 12:20:45 AM
WOW! Thanks heaps James :-*

She actually looks happy for a change.
I'm amazed at how different she looks and her eyes smile too.
Quite a lovely photo
xx
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: aleksandr pavlovich on April 30, 2010, 06:02:44 AM
Yes, this is the photograph to which I referred in Reply # 1148.  It is said to date from about 1887.  Since she ascended the throne in 1837, the occasion would have been a celebration some fifty years later, thus she had certainly earned the right to smile.  When her reign was over in 1901, many, many people in her realms had been born and died, with Queen Victoria being the only sovereign that they ever knew. Have you ever read Rudyard Kipling's poem, "Walk Wide of the Widow of Windsor, for half o' creation she owns....."  ?   Regards, and thanks to the poster for posting the elusive photo.  AP
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 30, 2010, 09:23:45 AM
There is one other photo of QV smilling, taken indoors, she is sitting with her hands on her lap I recall :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: aleksandr pavlovich on April 30, 2010, 09:39:38 AM
Now that you mention it, Eddie, something like that vaguely stirs deep within the dim recesses of my memory, esp. the "hands on her lap." Was the photo almost full-length seated, with a three-quarter turn toward the camera  and, again, in her older years?  For the life of me, I can't recall it completely, and it may be just my "weaving-together" of other impressions, so I cannot sustain it as a complete affirmation.    Kind regards,  AP
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 30, 2010, 09:49:28 AM
No Aleksandr, that sounds exactly right! Well remembered!!! :):)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Jamesffarley on April 30, 2010, 11:56:37 AM
Eddie, I believe I have that picture in a book somewhere, too bad it can't be found online!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 30, 2010, 01:12:00 PM
I'm sure I have it too James, but all my books are at home along with the scanner! I can't find it online either. I'm sure someone will post it soon!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on May 01, 2010, 08:18:44 PM
Another happy smiley QV photograph is the one of her with Beatrice, Victoria Battenburg and little Alice Battenburg! In that one QV looks like she is actually laughing! Most unusual!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on May 03, 2010, 05:11:04 AM
We are VERY off topic.  Queen Victoria smiling, wow !  I wonder when the Royal Family decided thats its Ok to smile when having their photographs taken ?  I think the Queen Mum started it. QM hardly ever smiled ( welll not very much I dont think ).

   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 05, 2010, 03:03:32 PM
Broadlands - The home of late Lord Mountbatten

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome1.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome2.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 05, 2010, 03:04:21 PM
Broadlands - The home of late Lord Mountbatten

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome3.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome4.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 05, 2010, 03:05:31 PM
Broadlands - The home of late Lord Mountbatten

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome5.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome6.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 05, 2010, 03:06:14 PM
Broadlands - The home of late Lord Mountbatten

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome7.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 05, 2010, 08:37:51 PM
Splendid Nikola, thankyou!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Patrick M on May 05, 2010, 08:59:47 PM
I agree -- thanks, Nikola. What's the source? Are they from a book?

Off topic ... but I just bought 'Highland Living' about the glorious Cawdor Castle, somewhat near Balmoral and home to the always colorful Campbell family (castle currently owned by the Dowager Countess Cawdor). The photos are spectacular and the book is well worth the price.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 05, 2010, 10:05:58 PM
Oooooh Patrick, can you scan them or is that not allowed?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 05, 2010, 10:08:21 PM
Broadlands - The home of late Lord Mountbatten

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome1.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Broadlandshome2.jpg)

Oh Nikola-the dog is lovely, reminds me of mine and her name is Lily, she's going through the terrible two's at the moment.
Mountbatten's dog looks a little older but labrador's are so faithful (and at times clumsy).
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on May 07, 2010, 05:54:37 AM
Many of the Broadlands interioirs were designed by David Hicks, who of course was married to Pamela Mountbatten.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ..dlnec1 on May 07, 2010, 11:23:05 AM
I have just bought a little book called, "Royal Lodge, Windsor" by Helen Cathcart, published in London in 1966. I shall post more when I have had a good read.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 09, 2010, 06:54:14 AM
Lovely, can't wait :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 19, 2010, 10:28:33 AM
Does any of you have informations about decorations (and furniture) of the Room 1844 in Buckingham Palace? About walls, ceiling, chimney, furniture...?

About this room i only know how used and this: "the 1844 Room, which was decorated in that year for the State visit of Emperor Nicholas I of Russia, and, on the other side of the Bow Room, the 1855 Room, in honour of the visit of Emperor Napoleon III of France".

Nikola thanks a lot for your pictures and info...I am new on this site but I have extensively looked at it and it is fantastic. Anyway is there any floor plan of the second floor of BP? I have one in Andrew Morton's book of BP but I don't think it's accurate.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 19, 2010, 04:21:29 PM

Nikola thanks a lot for your pictures and info...I am new on this site but I have extensively looked at it and it is fantastic. Anyway is there any floor plan of the second floor of BP? I have one in Andrew Morton's book of BP but I don't think it's accurate.


"Prince Andrew" Welcome to the Forum Alexander Palace Time Machine!!!
I'm very happy because you enjoyed in photos and informations which I set.

Welcome again!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 19, 2010, 04:54:29 PM
Kensington Palace
between 1870 and 1900

Presence Chamber:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/78/Kensington_Palace_Presence_Chamber.jpg)

Kings Gallery:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/Kensington_Palace_Kings_Gallery.jpg)

Cupola Room:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/Kensington_Palace_Cupola_Room.jpg)

Queens Gallery:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a2/Kensington_Palace_Queens_Gallery.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 19, 2010, 04:56:42 PM
Kings Drawing Room:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/09/Kensington_Palace_Kings_Drawing_Room.jpg)

Presence Chamber:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/66/Kensington_Palace_Presence_Chamber_2.jpg)

Kings Grand Staircase:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8e/Kensington_Palace_Kings_Grand_Staircase_low.jpg)

Queen Carolines Drawing Room:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/89/Kensington_Palace_Queen_Carolines_Drawing_Room.jpg)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 19, 2010, 05:15:52 PM


Thank you Nikola,

I enjoyed a lot the pictures as I love Royal Palaces....BP and WC in particular. That's why whenever I am in London during the summer opening I visit BP if I have time....
Happy we enjoy the same interest.....I hope we can exchange more informations, pictures and book title about this.

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: jfkhaos on May 19, 2010, 05:29:09 PM
I wouldn't have thought that such important family paintings (as I imagine they would be to Queen Victoria) would have hung in Kensington Palace where she wouldn't have seen them, i.e. the painting of her marriage, Bertie's christening, and his subsequent marriage in 1863.  I always imagined them hanging in Buckingham Palace.  Thanks for posting this pictures!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on May 20, 2010, 06:59:02 AM
Am I seeing this correctly, I radiator hanging on the wall through the arch in the photo of the King's Grand Staircase?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on May 20, 2010, 07:25:02 AM
It certainly looks like a radiator has been placed on the wall in the most incongruous position! How very odd! Well spotted eagle eyed Architect!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on May 20, 2010, 07:30:34 AM
I wouldn't have thought that such important family paintings (as I imagine they would be to Queen Victoria) would have hung in Kensington Palace where she wouldn't have seen them, i.e. the painting of her marriage, Bertie's christening, and his subsequent marriage in 1863.  I always imagined them hanging in Buckingham Palace.  Thanks for posting this pictures!

Royal art and furnishings have always been moved between royal residences from reign to reign.  Some of these pieces may very well have been inside Buckingham Palace in Victoria's time; others may have been commissioned and owned by others (not the Crown) and acquired more recently.  During and after Victoria's death, most of the State Rooms fell to disrepair and lay empty and bare (or used only as storerooms).

In the past, collections used to be broken up and split between properties, or pieces given to courtiers or retainers, or sold when it was determined there was too much excess.  In the 1920s and 1930s, Queen Mary did much to reassemble collections and display them in a more historically proper way.  Today the Royal Collection handles this duty.  

I would imagine if you went to the Historic Royal Palaces website section on Kensington Palace, it would tell you some history about the art presently in the palace.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 20, 2010, 08:41:02 AM
The Kings Grand Staircase - is that the same staircase which shows a picture of Diana standing at the top?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 20, 2010, 05:45:00 PM
I have some questions about state rooms of Buckingham palace:

1.

I know that chimney-piece in The Grand Hall made by Joseph Theakston, in The Green Drawing Room by Joseph Browne, in The Picture Gallery and The East Gallery by Joseph Browne, in The State Dining Room by Matthew Cotes Wyatt, in The Blue Drawing Room by Richard Westmacott Junior, in the White Drawing Room by John Flaxman.
But, does any of you have informations who made chimney-pieces in the Throne Room and Music Room?

2.

I looked at an old guide of BP but there are no specific information about the Chimeny-piece of the Throne Room! As for the Music Room the guide says that the entire room was designed by Nash (including the mirrors) and it was ready in 1831 and it was never altered subsequently. It seems that he designed the two chimney-pieces as well....
I'll try to check the other guides I have to see if there is something about it.....


Does any of you have informations who design and made the same carpets in The Blue Drawing Room and The White Drawing Room?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 21, 2010, 12:11:25 AM
Somewhere in the earlier posts of this thread there were some pics.
Have you looked through them?
Fascinating leisure time - if you have it to spare. :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on May 21, 2010, 04:54:01 PM
Thank you so much Nikola  for these photos of a lonely  Kensington Palace.  This appears to be a time when these rooms were not in use.  Even the steam radiators  sitting in the fireplaces look totally out of place.

 It must have been ghostly for the staff to wander through these forlorn and once magnificent rooms.




Thank you Nikola,

I enjoyed a lot the pictures as I love Royal Palaces....BP and WC in particular. That's why whenever I am in London during the summer opening I visit BP if I have time....
Happy we enjoy the same interest.....I hope we can exchange more informations, pictures and book title about this.


Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 21, 2010, 05:01:53 PM
Dear Architect,
I saw there were BP Plans but they have been removed. Could you please email them? I would really appreciate. Thanks Andrew
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 21, 2010, 05:19:52 PM
Does anyone have the book Inside Buckingham Palace by Andrew Morton?  He has in the book photos of two different bedrooms in the Belgian Suite, both very different from one another and certainly not looking like that blue one shown above.  He could have things wrong in this book as well, but there are a lot of things different about the photos in this book (cornice, chandelier, etc.) and the picture above.  Does anyone know if there is more than one bedroom in the Belgian Suite?

I have Andrew Morton's book Inside BP and I agree there are two pictures of the Belgian Suite bedrooms and they look very very different. It looks so strange that they have chosen such a different style for that room. Asap I will post the two pictures.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 21, 2010, 06:49:45 PM
I looked at an old guide of BP but there are no specific information about the Chimeny-piece of the Throne Room! As for the Music Room the guide says that the entire room was designed by Nash (including the mirrors) and it was ready in 1831 and it was never altered subsequently. It seems that he designed the two chimney-pieces as well....
I'll try to check the other guides I have to see if there is something about it.....

Andrew thank you very much for this information.
You are the brilliant new member of this Forum.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 21, 2010, 06:54:12 PM
I have Andrew Morton's book Inside BP and I agree there are two pictures of the Belgian Suite bedrooms and they look very very different. It looks so strange that they have chosen such a different style for that room. Asap I will post the two pictures.

Please Andrew, post that pictures as soon as possible.
Thank you very much.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 22, 2010, 09:26:43 AM
I have Andrew Morton's book Inside BP and I agree there are two pictures of the Belgian Suite bedrooms and they look very very different. It looks so strange that they have chosen such a different style for that room. Asap I will post the two pictures.

Please Andrew, post that pictures as soon as possible.
Thank you very much.

I'll try to scan them as soon as possible and I will post them!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 22, 2010, 09:41:45 AM
I looked at an old guide of BP but there are no specific information about the Chimeny-piece of the Throne Room! As for the Music Room the guide says that the entire room was designed by Nash (including the mirrors) and it was ready in 1831 and it was never altered subsequently. It seems that he designed the two chimney-pieces as well....
I'll try to check the other guides I have to see if there is something about it.....

Andrew thank you very much for this information.
You are the brilliant new member of this Forum.


Agreed!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 22, 2010, 03:25:18 PM
I am curious...see what you think about this.... as the Gentleman with the red scarf around his arm in armor which means it is a Van Dyck and titled
Portrait of a Man in Armor with Red Scarf !

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://hoocher.com/Anthony_Van_Dyck/William_II_Prince_of_Orange_and_Princess_Henrietta_Mary_Stuart_daughter_of_Charles_I_of_England_1641.jpg&imgrefurl=http://hoocher.com/Anthony_Van_Dyck/Anthony_Van_Dyck.htm&usg=__j86ZX6jY0_tufczWCECrV1ym2Ng=&h=590&w=431&sz=84&hl=en&start=1&um=1&tbnid=Q-Qp3edcmY4V6M:&tbnh=135&tbnw=99&prev=/images%3Fq%3DVan%2Bdyck%2Bof%2BMary%2BII%2Bof%2BEngland%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26newwindow%3D1%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official%26sa%3DG


Wow thanks very much Mari for help.
I think that this is portrait which we searched :)

But how Alixa told (thanks Alixa and you so much), this portrait located in the Gemaldegalerie in Dresden, probably portrait in the White drawing Room is a copy or maybe similar painting, but how we can see this two portraits are same.

(http://hoocher.com/Anthony_Van_Dyck/Portrait_of_a_Man_in_Armor_with_Red_Scarf_1625_27.jpg)  (http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/2pbmp.jpg)


II was looking at the older posts and I saw this post that made me curious. I think that the painting of Dresden is actually that of Anthony Van Dyke “Portrait of a Commander in Armour, with a Red Scarf”, c. 1625/27 whilst that in BP White Drawing Room is a later copy made by a follower of Van Dyke and I think this is the opinion of the Royal Collection because in the last edition I have of BP Guide (2005) but still in commerce in 2008 (my last visit to BP) they state that the painting is “from the School of Anthony Van Dyke” and they put the date ca. 1650. As Van Dyke died in 1941 I think they finally agreed that is a later copy, still worthy, but a copy
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 22, 2010, 04:23:47 PM
Actually Van Dyke died in 1641.....but I think it was clear
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 23, 2010, 08:59:03 AM

(http://hoocher.com/Anthony_Van_Dyck/Portrait_of_a_Man_in_Armor_with_Red_Scarf_1625_27.jpg) (http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/2pbmp.jpg)

II was looking at the older posts and I saw this post that made me curious. I think that the painting of Dresden is actually that of Anthony Van Dyke “Portrait of a Commander in Armour, with a Red Scarf”, c. 1625/27 whilst that in BP White Drawing Room is a later copy made by a follower of Van Dyke and I think this is the opinion of the Royal Collection because in the last edition I have of BP Guide (2005) but still in commerce in 2008 (my last visit to BP) they state that the painting is “from the School of Anthony Van Dyke” and they put the date ca. 1650. As Van Dyke died in 1941 I think they finally agreed that is a later copy, still worthy, but a copy

Yes, this painting is a copy.
Andrew thank you for informations when this copy was painted.

Mean:

"Portrait of a Man in Armor with Red Scarf" - location White Drawing Room, Buckingham palace.
from the School of Anthony Van Dyke
c. 1650
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 23, 2010, 09:16:06 AM
(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/portrait22.jpg)

"Fénélon, Archbishop of Cambrai" by Joseph Vivien

Andrew, I know that original painting located in Munich (Alte Pinakothek), but who painted and when this brilliant copy which is located in White Drawing Room at Buckingham palace? Do you know?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 23, 2010, 09:39:19 AM
(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/portrait22.jpg)

"Fénélon, Archbishop of Cambrai" by Joseph Vivien

Andrew, I know that original painting located in Munich (Alte Pinakothek), but who painted and when this brilliant copy which is located in White Drawing Room at Buckingham palace? Do you know?


My guide says:

School of Joseph Vivien (1657-1735), Francois de la Mothe-Fénelon,  Archbishop of Cambrai, ca. 1700
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 23, 2010, 10:17:51 AM

My guide says:

School of Joseph Vivien (1657-1735), Francois de la Mothe-Fénelon,  Archbishop of Cambrai, ca. 1700


Thank you very much Andrew!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 23, 2010, 04:24:14 PM
Am I seeing this correctly, I radiator hanging on the wall through the arch in the photo of the King's Grand Staircase?

Kensington Palace
Kings Grand Staircase


Earlier with radiator and today without radiator :-)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8e/Kensington_Palace_Kings_Grand_Staircase_low.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Staircase.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 23, 2010, 04:26:52 PM
Interesting photos of Ballroom at Buckingham palace during restoration:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/19-3.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/19a.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Jamesffarley on May 24, 2010, 02:11:47 AM
Are they restoring the Ball Room or changing it back to the original decor when first built by Queen Victoria?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 24, 2010, 05:06:36 AM
No I don't think so. I think the picture are related to the last refurbshment. The Ballroom is due to be open for the 2010 BP Summer Opening with the Ball Supper Room organize with an exhibition on Orders of Chivalry and honours.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 24, 2010, 06:01:28 AM
Does any of you have informations about decorations (and furniture) of the Room 1844 in Buckingham Palace? About walls, ceiling, chimney, furniture...?

About this room i only know how used and this: "the 1844 Room, which was decorated in that year for the State visit of Emperor Nicholas I of Russia, and, on the other side of the Bow Room, the 1855 Room, in honour of the visit of Emperor Napoleon III of France".

Nikola thanks a lot for your pictures and info...I am new on this site but I have extensively looked at it and it is fantastic. Anyway is there any floor plan of the second floor of BP? I have one in Andrew Morton's book of BP but I don't think it's accurate.



I've just ordered that book on ebay.
Is it good?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 24, 2010, 12:49:04 PM
Royal Lodge in Windsor Great Park

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/05/24/article-1280744-008D764E00000258-845_634x432.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Constantinople on May 24, 2010, 01:13:12 PM
if anyone finds pictures of the Royal Lodge after the rennovations, please post them.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on May 25, 2010, 02:51:29 PM
Just slightly off topic, but does anyone know which members of the Royal family still maintain country houses ? I know the immediate family do, but what about the others ? I know Andrew has left " Southfork" and is moving to Royal Lodge. Is that right ? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on May 25, 2010, 03:32:56 PM
The Queen:
Official:  St. James Palace, Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Palace of Holyroodhouse
Private:  Balmoral Castle and Sandringham Estate

Charles and Camilla:
Official:  Clarence House, London
Private:  Highgrove in Glouchester, and Llwynywormwood in Wales (both owned by the Duchy of Cornwall), Birkhall on the Balmore Estate (owned by the Queen), Delnadamph Lodge on the Balmoral Estate (also owned by the Queen and gifted to Charles and Diana as their first Scottish retreat and now being rebuilt).

William and Harry:  None of their own - share Clarence House officially, and have cottages/lodges at Balmoral (and elsewhere) but they are not owned by the princes themselves.

Andrew  Duke of York:
Official:  Apartment at Buckingham Palace
Private:  Royal Lodge, owned by the Crown Estate and leased to him.

Edward and Sophie, Earl and Countess of Wessex
Official:  Apartment at Buckingham Palace
Private:  Bagshot Park, owned by the Crown Estate and leased to them.

Anne, Princess Royal
Official:  Apartment at Buckingham Palace (or St. James Palace, depends on the source)
Private:  Aside from her parents, Anne is the only inner royal who owns her own home.  She has Gatcombe Park, bought by the Queen privately as a wedding gift to her and her first husband.

The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester
Official:  Apartment in Kensington Palace
Private:  Barnwell Manor (Duke still owns it, inherited it from his late father, but do not live there - it is rented out)

The Duke and Duchess of Kent
Official:  Wren House, Kensington Palace
Private:  None.  They occupied Anmer Hall (leased from the Queen) for 18 years, then Crocker End House for a while, but appear today to not own a country home).

Prince and Princess Michael of Kent
Official:  Apartment at Kensington Palace
Private:  None.  They sold their home at Nether Lypiatt Manor a few years back.

Princess Alexandra
Official:  Apartment at St. James Palace
Private:  Thatched House Lodge, Richmond (leased from Crown Estate)


Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 26, 2010, 06:07:36 AM
I do wonder if William marries Kate, will they have their own country estate ?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on May 26, 2010, 09:51:28 AM
Of course after he marries and begins raising a family William will need a home (not surprisingly, the royals consider their official London palaces/residences to be pied-à-terres, not homes).  Of course, if Charles has succeeded his mother by that time, William will likely have all of his father's present homes at his disposal. 

But if the Queen is still on the throne, I would expect William would have a principal country home in England (maybe at/near Windsor Park?), and use of a lodge or cottage at Balmoral for holidays (it would seem likely that Delnadamph Lodge on the Balmoral Estate, which is currently being restored, is being done so with either William or Harry in mind).
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 26, 2010, 04:10:37 PM
The Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace

"The Queen's Year"

Among the exhibition highlights are:

The centrepiece of the exhibition is The Queen’s magnificent Robe of State, on public display for the first time, and the uniforms of officials and attendants at the State Opening of Parliament.

The magnificent Great Sword of State, the Mace and the Cap of Maintenance that precede The Queen through the Palace of Westminster during the State Opening of Parliament.
A regimental tunic and tricorn hat worn by Her Majesty The Queen at Trooping the Colour and The Queen’s saddle, on display for the first time.
Ten of The Queen’s Ascot hats from the past five decades, including one worn this year.
An evening gown worn by The Queen to the 1962 Royal Film Performance of A West Side Story, displayed alongside the ‘Vladimir’ tiara, shown for the first time with its beautiful pearl drops.
A selection of unusual gifts presented to The Queen on numerous ‘away days’, including a Buckingham Palace Underground sign.

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/default.asp?action=article&ID=822
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 26, 2010, 04:16:39 PM
And....

On display are The Queen’s Garter Mantle and Hat, and her Garter Collar with the diamond Marlborough Great George, which was worn at Her Majesty’s Coronation in 1953.

The exhibition includes the sword used by The Queen to confer the accolade – the act of ‘dubbing’ a new knight.

A number of Her Majesty’s dresses are shown throughout the exhibition, including three evening dresses by the great British couturier, Norman Hartnell. The gowns were worn by The Queen on the State Visit to the Netherlands in 1958, to the 1962 Royal Film Performance of A West Side Story (with the ‘Vladimir’ tiara, shown for the first time with its beautiful pearl drops) and at the Ghillies Ball at Balmoral in 1971.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 26, 2010, 04:31:59 PM
And....

On display are The Queen’s Garter Mantle and Hat, and her Garter Collar with the diamond Marlborough Great George, which was worn at Her Majesty’s Coronation in 1953.

The exhibition includes the sword used by The Queen to confer the accolade – the act of ‘dubbing’ a new knight.

A number of Her Majesty’s dresses are shown throughout the exhibition, including three evening dresses by the great British couturier, Norman Hartnell. The gowns were worn by The Queen on the State Visit to the Netherlands in 1958, to the 1962 Royal Film Performance of A West Side Story (with the ‘Vladimir’ tiara, shown for the first time with its beautiful pearl drops) and at the Ghillies Ball at Balmoral in 1971.

I will go......

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on May 26, 2010, 07:39:23 PM
Well, I will be making my first trip to London come this September. What is the best way to go about securing tickets to Buckingham Palace? The website? Through a travel agent?

I suspect I should get my tickets well in advance as the slots may fill up, and if I don't I fear that I may be out of luck.

Can anyone help with their advice in how I should proceed? Please feel free to send me a personal message, I'd be greatly obliged.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 27, 2010, 12:34:30 AM
And....

On display are The Queen’s Garter Mantle and Hat, and her Garter Collar with the diamond Marlborough Great George, which was worn at Her Majesty’s Coronation in 1953.

The exhibition includes the sword used by The Queen to confer the accolade – the act of ‘dubbing’ a new knight.

A number of Her Majesty’s dresses are shown throughout the exhibition, including three evening dresses by the great British couturier, Norman Hartnell. The gowns were worn by The Queen on the State Visit to the Netherlands in 1958, to the 1962 Royal Film Performance of A West Side Story (with the ‘Vladimir’ tiara, shown for the first time with its beautiful pearl drops) and at the Ghillies Ball at Balmoral in 1971.

I will go......




Lucky, lucky you!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on May 27, 2010, 12:37:07 AM
Oh and lucky,lucky you as well.
I was there when I was twelve years of age. That's some time ago now and it was in the middle of Feb. We went straight from our summer to their winter.OMG - COLD!!!!
We are saving to go in the next 3/5 years and will stay for a month and do and see EVERYTHING, but in the summer ( alas, much more expensive).
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Prince Andrew on May 30, 2010, 03:29:17 PM
Well, I will be making my first trip to London come this September. What is the best way to go about securing tickets to Buckingham Palace? The website? Through a travel agent?

I suspect I should get my tickets well in advance as the slots may fill up, and if I don't I fear that I may be out of luck.

Can anyone help with their advice in how I should proceed? Please feel free to send me a personal message, I'd be greatly obliged.

It is not difficult and the system works well. When you are sure of the dates of your trip to London go to the British Monarchy Website and go to the Residences link, then Buckingham Palace or go directly to http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/default.asp?action=article&ID=322 (The Royal Collection Official Website) where you can book the tickets. There is a system of timing tickets so you can choose when to go. Print the receipt and you'll retrieve your preebooked and payed tickets in the Royal Collection Shop in Buckingham Palace Road, just off the Visitor's Summer Opening Entrance (the Ambassadors Entrance). There is no rush to book well in advance! Check also for Clarence House because it deserves a visit as well!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on May 30, 2010, 04:44:21 PM
Many thanks, Prince Andrew!!!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on June 02, 2010, 04:33:26 PM
The Queen’s Year

A special exhibition at the
Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace
27 July - 1 October 2010

Visit the exhibition microsite:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/microsites/thequeensyear/default.asp
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on June 13, 2010, 05:34:40 PM
Hi, I'm a new member from Holland. Does anyone have a picture of the Household Breakfast Room (next to the 1855 room) at Buckingham Palace?
Thanks!

Household Breakfast Room At Buckingham Palace:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/hdr.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on June 13, 2010, 05:54:29 PM
145 Piccadilly, London

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/145Piccadilly.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/DrawingRoom145.jpg)
Drawing Room

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/TheDuchessboudoir145.jpg)
The Duchess of York boudoir
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on June 14, 2010, 06:14:27 AM
Hi, I'm a new member from Holland. Does anyone have a picture of the Household Breakfast Room (next to the 1855 room) at Buckingham Palace?
Thanks!

Household Breakfast Room At Buckingham Palace:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/hdr.jpg)


If it's filled as an office, why call it Household Breakfast room?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on June 14, 2010, 07:49:06 AM
Judging from the way its furnished, and the electronic cords are taped to the floor it looks to me like this photo shows the room being used as a temporary office.  Perhaps in conjunction with a state visit, or planning for a major event?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on June 14, 2010, 10:21:20 AM
Judging from the way its furnished, and the electronic cords are taped to the floor it looks to me like this photo shows the room being used as a temporary office.  Perhaps in conjunction with a state visit, or planning for a major event?


This room was used by palace staff, assisted by military personnel as an operations centre to coordinate arrangements for the Queen Mother's funeral

Today, this room used as palace cinema, and the Duke of Edinburgh use this room for smaller receptions and presentations.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on June 14, 2010, 03:11:33 PM
I know that in the past, there were numerous separate dining rooms at BP for different ranks of household and staff.  The 19th century plans show, for example, "The Household Dining Room", "The Steward's Dining Room" and another dining room (who's name I can't quite make out on the plans).

Also, it was not that many years ago that the palace's kitchen complex was complete rebuilt (if I remember correctly around the same time that the Queen's Gallery was added).  I remember reading that in that project, a brand new staff dining facility was built. 

If the old Household Dining Room is now a Cinema and a reception room, would that mean the new (singular) dining facility may have replaced the earlier multiple dining areas for palace staff? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on June 20, 2010, 02:34:42 PM
Well, I will be making my first trip to London come this September. What is the best way to go about securing tickets to Buckingham Palace? The website? Through a travel agent?

I suspect I should get my tickets well in advance as the slots may fill up, and if I don't I fear that I may be out of luck.

Can anyone help with their advice in how I should proceed? Please feel free to send me a personal message, I'd be greatly obliged.

It is not difficult and the system works well. When you are sure of the dates of your trip to London go to the British Monarchy Website and go to the Residences link, then Buckingham Palace or go directly to http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/default.asp?action=article&ID=322 (The Royal Collection Official Website) where you can book the tickets. There is a system of timing tickets so you can choose when to go. Print the receipt and you'll retrieve your preebooked and payed tickets in the Royal Collection Shop in Buckingham Palace Road, just off the Visitor's Summer Opening Entrance (the Ambassadors Entrance). There is no rush to book well in advance! Check also for Clarence House because it deserves a visit as well!


Again, thank you very much for the information. My husband and I have booked our tickets for both Buckingham Palace (plus the Royal Mews and the Queens Gallery) and Windsor Castle. I'm beyond excited! Unfortunately, we will be unable to tour Clarence House as it will not be open upon our arrival in London. I do plan to walk past it and take a few photos though. =  )

Best Regards,

RoyalWatcher Annie
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 20, 2010, 04:12:29 PM
And remember Marlborough House is just down the Mall from Clarence House You can't see much of it but it's a beautiful building with memorials to Queen Alexandra & Queen Mary.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on July 10, 2010, 09:12:41 AM
Buckingham palace announced:

"Virtual tours, which have proved one of the most popular areas of content on the website, will be expanded in 2010."

I'm very happy about this infromation. I hope that we will see virtual tours of The Green Drawing Room, The Throne Room, The Ballroom, The State Dining Room, The Blue Drawing Room, The Music room and especially virtual tour of The Picture Gallery with new carpet :-)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on July 10, 2010, 09:16:24 AM
Buckingham palace also announced:

"The launch of a British Monarchy Flickr account is planned to coincide with the beginning of the Summer Opening in July 2010. Online Royal Archives education materials will be published on www.royal.gov.uk for the first time in July 2010 with a view to developing an online education resource in advance of the Diamond Jubilee."

I hope that we would be in oportunity to see the some HQ photos of Royal Palaces interior in this Flickr account.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on July 10, 2010, 09:55:42 AM
Exclusive photos!!!!

The new Carpet in the Picture Gallery at Buckingham Palace:


(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Carpet1.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Carpet2-1.jpg)

(Save photos to see larger view)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on July 10, 2010, 10:01:27 AM
Carpet in the Picture Gallery at Buckingham Palace deatails:

- Carpet is 40m long, and designed by Amber Khokhar.
- Carpet have three identical parts.
- Deatails: "rolling pastures covered with wild roses and stylised flowers"

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Carpet3.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on July 10, 2010, 10:17:33 AM
More details of the carpet:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Carpet5.jpg) (http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/Carpet4.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Margot on July 10, 2010, 03:10:07 PM
I must admit it is a rather lovely carpet, but I really do not see it as being the most practical colour. The base colour is rather pale and will no doubt require shampooing rather often to make sure if doesn't turn grey or dirty creamy sepia tinged from countless foot falls, and think of all those receptions where footballers and their WAGS might be allowed in just to demonstrate how inclusive and 'with it' the monarchy is! God forbid the idea of wine slops! Yikes! Anyway I do like the carpet and wonder whether they will change that pink wall paper now or whether they will get another 30 years use out of it? I thought I read somewhere that someone had noticed water staining on the flock paper recently!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on July 22, 2010, 05:39:06 PM
Good view on The Room 1844 at Buckingham palace:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/microsites/thequeensyear/event.asp?id=21

And The Ballroom:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/microsites/thequeensyear/event.asp?id=23
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on September 20, 2010, 02:26:50 PM
If you scan a selection from the Royal Insight's Gallery - which most every month includes photos of the Queen receiving various ambassador, high commissioners and other dignitaries -  you'll notice that sometimes Her Majesty faces North as the guest enters from the Principal Corridor, whilst other times she faces South as guests enter from the opposite direction.  I've no idea if the visitor's path is determined by their rank or position , or by nothing more than variety, but I have noticed it routinely.

When the queen receiving guests at Room 1844 she faces South, and when her majesty receiving guests at Audience Room she faces North. I'm sure that all guests enters in the Audience Room from north door.
[/quote]

 :-[  I admit error; I went back to some of the pictures I referenced, and now see that you are right about this Nikola.  I had never noticed before that when the Queen faces South, she is definitely in a different room than her Audience Chamber (the 1844 room you say). 

Still, I'm confused by why the palace would use this route to the Audience Chamber?  I mean, up the King's Staircase, and down the Principal Corridor past the Queen's bedroom door!  Why on earth wouldn't they instead have ambassadors and such enter via the Minister's Staircase and use the State Apartment Lobby approach?  Seems more logical, more formal, and avoids unnecessary people in the Queen's private apartments.
[/quote]

I've noticed that in recent pictures on the monarch's website, HM The Queen is now holding audiences with newly appointed ambassadors and high commissioners in the White Drawing Room.  Most earlier photos show that it has been the Queen's practice to hold such audiences in either her Audience Chamber on the State Floor, or the 1844 Room on the Ground Floor. By chance, does anyone know if the Audience Chamber or 1844 Room are perhaps being remodeled? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on October 28, 2010, 07:43:33 AM
Attached is a link to a photo at Getty Images (http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/106106042/AFP) of Qatar's Emir in a Drawing Room prior to the recent State Banquet at Windsor.  Can anyone tell me if this is the Drawing Room of main Guest Suite for visiting Dignitaries - the one directly above the King George IV Gateway and on axis with the Long Walk?  From old photos and floor plans I have it appears to be so although the interior decoration has changed greatly. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on October 28, 2010, 11:50:18 AM
I suspect you are correct Architect, I can't imagine what other room that would be.  It's clearly not one of the large, lavish state rooms in the north block, nor the equally large, lavish semi-state rooms in the east wing.  It therefore must be one of the rooms in the apartments reserved for principal guests (which as you states are those directly above the George IV Gate). 

If I'm not mistaken, my official Windsor guide book said that when foreign heads of state are staying at Windsor, they are often given use of the original Queen's Apartments for receiving official guests like the Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition, etc.).  Those rooms include the Queen's Presence Chamber, Audience Chamber, Ballroom and Drawing Room.

But in this case the audience with the Leader of the Opposition was taking place immediately before the State Banquet.  Since the State Apartments were probably still being prepared for the banquet, it makes sense for the audience to have been moved to the Guest Apartments in the south wing.

As a side note, IMO the room in the photo looks a bit too cramped and not very well-decorated to be the Drawing Room in a royal palace's principal guest apartment.  I could forgive the small size (it is after all in an ancient castle), but the decor reminds me of my own grandmother's living room.

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on October 28, 2010, 12:20:12 PM
Chris - thanks for the input.  The old photos I mentioned are in a book titled "For The King's Pleasure" by Hugh Roberts.  The book details the redecoration of George IV's private apartments at Windsor as well as the rooms used for Visitors towards the South.  There are a number of old photos that show this particular room as well as a very detailed description of the furnishings purchased or used during the redecoration.  The wainscoting and the fireplace appear to be the only surviving decoration.  Originally there were beautiful wall hangings on either side of the fireplace as well as very formal looking furniture and draperies.  I agree with your assessment of the current decoration, in particular that terrible 1970's looking coffee table. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on November 04, 2010, 04:42:58 AM
A Painting by Will Topley of The Prince of Wale's Private Sitting Room at Clarence House

(http://www.willtopley.com/Clarence/files/stacks_image_45_1.png)

A Painting by Will Topley of The Duchess of Cornwall's Private Sitting Room at Clarence House

(http://www.willtopley.com/Clarence/files/stacks_image_41_1.png)

More info about artist at http://www.willtopley.com/Clarence/Clarence.html
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on November 04, 2010, 08:04:05 AM
Fantastic pictures Ridgeway, thank you.  That's the first time I've seen images of either room, and the only other first floor rooms (2nd floor for us Americans) I've seen at Clarence House were old photographs of the big double drawing room when the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret were still both in residence.

So now we have a somewhat better idea of the first floor layout.  I knew that double drawing room is located directly above the Dining Room and Library, facing west.  Adjacent to that (in the southwest corner of the house above the Morning Room) is the Prince of Wales' private sitting room.  And now we can see that the Duchess' private sitting room (with the bay window) is above the Lancaster Room and overlooking the garden.

So now I wonder what is behind that round window between the two private sitting rooms, directly above the main doors and Portico roof?  It could either be the termination of the first floor hall running above the Main Corridor below, or it could be perhaps the Prince of Wales' Study, or a private dining room?

It still seems likely to me that the Prince of Wales' Bedroom suite would be the set of triple windows overlooking the garden (and above the Morning room), since the principal bedroom of a house like this must certainly face a garden.  I also wonder what the Duchess' sitting room would have been during the Queen Mother's residence (since her sitting room is the one in the corner now used by her grandson)? 

And finally, according to newspaper reports at the time Camilla moved into Clarence House, there were "several rooms prepared for her occupancy" which seemed to be code for "she has her own bedroom and / or dressing room."  Where would those rooms be located?  If I have the layout correct, the only space left unaccounted for on the first floor would be directly above the pair of small service rooms / offices that are across the Main Corridor from the Dining Room.  Those would face an odd-shaped courtyard on the inner side of the palace.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on November 04, 2010, 08:44:13 AM
The floor in question at CH remains a total mistery to me as well. I agree with you CHRISinUSA,that the double drawing room is above the dinning room/library. and your correct in thinking the picture i posted (the princes private sitting room) is above the morning room, The room is very similar to the morning room in size, and it has the one large window facing The Mall and three slimmer windows facing west.

Now looking at the pictures, it looks like the prince uses his private sitting room like a study as well (with the large desk playing centre stage), a bit like what The Queen does in BP so i would be surprised if he has a separate study. I thought the round window room, above the portico could be the prince's bedroom, Its a very private room as the portico hides it away and the prince often has tall flowers growing above it, but you mentioned something I’ve never thought about, which is a hallway window, which actually sounds more realistic otherwise it would be a very dark corridor without any natural light. If that’s the case, The Prince's private sitting room would be isolated as its a corner room.

an older picture of that room when the Queen Mother had it, which I’ve posted below, and when the Queen used it, shows there are two doors, one i assume leads into the corridor and another facing towards the double drawing room, so perhaps the prince's bedroom faces west and is above the library, just before you get to the double drawing room (only a suggestion).

from the picture of the Duchess's sitting room, I would have thought one of the doors (either right or more likely the left) leads into the duchess's bedroom, so that would mean it was above the Garden room. after all these rooms are the private rooms so it’s likely they directly lead off to their “masters” bedroom.

The sitting room, in the Queen Mother's day (The two door's) (http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:uApDSffMhbOIPM:http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/Richard1961/rf_9_edited.jpg&t=1)

the sitting room in Princess Elizbaeth's (The Queen) day (http://cache4.asset-cache.net/xc/2369904.jpg?v=1&c=NewsMaker&k=2&d=45B0EB3381F7834D446750C08E0E11684F3614FB3E898F2EE23FEF406871B787)

You can see from that picture that the ceiling has never changed.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 04, 2010, 01:17:06 PM
I think they are beautiful rooms.

Aren't fireplaces a lovely feature? They really make any room! :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 04, 2010, 02:39:46 PM
I think photos of the rooms were featured in a magazine.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on November 04, 2010, 03:46:20 PM
Ridgeway - I am 99.9% sure there are no bedrooms on the west facade sequence of rooms.  It goes Morning Room, Library and Dining Room on the main floor, and above are Charles' Sitting Room and the double Drawing Room.

Which leaves us with the south sequence facing the mall.  I agree with you that Charles' Sitting Room appears to double as his study (I hadn't noticed the desk until you pointed it out).  But I don't think the round window above the portico is the master bedroom.  I'm still quite sure that is above the Morning Room - actually there are probably 2 rooms above the quite-large Morning Room:  Charles' bedroom and his dressing room.

One possibility would be (left to right), Charles' Sitting Room, Camilla's Dressing Room (above portico), Camilla's Sitting Room, then the Master bedroom and Charles' Dressing Room (not sure which of those would come first). 
If Charles and Camilla share a bedroom here, that would explain all the key rooms. 

Makes me wonder though - is there a private dining room on this floor?  I can't imagine Charles and Camilla take all meals in the large Dining Room downstairs (especially when it's just the two of them).  Maybe there is a small table in that big drawing room which is used for private meals.  Or - maybe one of the ancillary rooms across the hall are used for breakfasts / lunches.

Of course - once we figure all this out, there's the matter of the Second Floor, which contains the private rooms of the two princes.  Obviously the floor plan is similar on all levels, but wonder what the sequence of rooms is up there?


Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Learning on November 05, 2010, 02:41:46 PM
Great photos. I, too, like fireplaces. Glad to see Charles has not caved in to the big screen TV craze. Now, I wonder what William and Harry's rooms are like? They have their own apartments now at St. James, right?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on November 18, 2010, 08:36:10 AM
That's a funny thought, I can't imagine Charles decorating any room around a massive flat-screen TV.  I would think that would offend his sensibilities to the very core. 

On the other hand, Camilla seems a bit more relaxed, and it wouldn't surprise me to find out that the Chinese cabinet in her sitting room hides a television!  It seems perfectly positioned to watch television from the sofas or armchairs.

Yes, after their mother's death William and Harry shared apartments on the second floor of Clarence House above the private rooms of Charles and Camilla.  I'm sure there was quite a large flatscreen TV up there!

Hard to say if the two princes still regularly use those rooms now that they are both grown - I've read that Harry has "unofficial" use of a few rooms at KP when he is in London - and William seems to already have several homes (the house he's presently renting in Wales and a lodge near Birkhall to name two). 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on November 20, 2010, 04:23:51 PM
Photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor, Clarence House, St James', London, Benjamin Stone, 1900
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52545/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/ (http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52545/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/)

Photograph of the First Floor Corridor, Clarence House, St James', London, Benjamin Stone, 1900
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52547/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/ (http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52547/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/)

Photograph of Clarence House, St James', London, Benjamin Stone, 1900
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52544/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/ (http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52544/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/)

Photograph of Stafford & Clarence Houses, London, Benjamin Stone, 1900
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52390/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/ (http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O52390/photograph-national-photographic-record-and-survey/)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ashdean on November 21, 2010, 01:05:40 PM
A Painting by Will Topley of The Prince of Wale's Private Sitting Room at Clarence House

(http://www.willtopley.com/Clarence/files/stacks_image_45_1.png)

A Painting by Will Topley of The Duchess of Cornwall's Private Sitting Room at Clarence House

(http://www.willtopley.com/Clarence/files/stacks_image_41_1.png)

More info about artist at http://www.willtopley.com/Clarence/Clarence.html
It is noticable that Charles has very much kept the essence of his adored grandmother in his sittingroom...the same wall covering....placing of the mirror,portrait etc etc this is also very much the same case in the morning room
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on November 21, 2010, 01:44:34 PM
Yuck, what a clutter!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 22, 2010, 08:24:44 AM
I think the spirirt of "Cookie" lives on...She was everybody's grandmother although she was pretty elusive herself...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on November 22, 2010, 09:03:48 AM
Those photographs of the staircase at the north end of the hall raises a question - those pics, and the old floor plans of the house posted elsewhere here, clearly show that staircase is at the end of the Main Corridor (adjacent to the Dining Room on the ground floor and the Double Drawing Room on the first floor). 

But other posters here (some of whom have actually visited Clarence House in recent years) have mentioned that there is no staircase in the Main Corridor.  Does anyone know for sure if that staircase remains intact today, or was it removed sometime during the 20th century? 

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on November 29, 2010, 06:04:48 AM
If one can believe the tabloids, the Duchess of Cornwall is reported to be a packrat, and very fond of clutter. She is also a very untidy person, and apparently drives Prince Charles around the bend, as he is a meticulously tidy and orderly person.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: LauraO on November 30, 2010, 01:37:38 AM
The Small Drawing Room at Sandringham

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/Richard1961/35225797.jpg)

on my last visit to sandringham i remember one of the national trust workers referring to alix (AF)  in connection to the room- odd snippet of information and i can't really remember the context, and i keep meaning to go back and find out but i just havn't got round to it, anyone have any idea what it could be about?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 01, 2010, 07:46:33 AM
Yuck, what a clutter!

Quite so, although it does makes me think back to an earlier discussion on the Royal Interiors thread that showed a picture of Princess Michael of Kent's Kensington Palace sitting room.  The dear Princess apparently prefers to stack books, photo frames, and associated other bric-a-brac several feet tall on every table, desk, shelf and flat surface. 

Camilla's room is virtually spartan by comparison!  And to Pavlov's comment about the Duchess being a packrat, I suppose the Prince of Wales should at least be grateful he has an army of housemaids to clean up after his wife!  <grin>
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 01, 2010, 02:17:46 PM
Oh I love clutter! You should see my rooms.  :D :D
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Teddy on December 01, 2010, 02:45:42 PM
Do I see there a photo of Diana on the table in the foreground in the room of Charles?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on December 02, 2010, 02:04:49 AM
Queen Elizabeth's breakfast table.  Buckingham Palace.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v475/Douglas606/queenstable.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on December 02, 2010, 09:46:25 AM
This is the Queen breakfast table at Windsor castle.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v475/Douglas606/queenstable.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 02, 2010, 01:21:08 PM
Do I see there a photo of Diana on the table in the foreground in the room of Charles?

Good eye Teddy, now that you've said that, my eyes see it too.  It's that well-known photo of Diana in a black top.  If so, that is quite nice to think Charles keeps a photo of Diana in his private rooms.  Of course, perhaps our eyes are playing tricks on us.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 03, 2010, 12:27:47 PM
She was after all the mother of his children and she is dead. People tend to soften about the past when time passes on.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ajwatson82 on December 04, 2010, 06:00:05 PM
As I know the Blue room (where George IV, William IV and Prince Albert died) became the Wedgwood Room. This room formed part of George IV's private suite in the central area of the east front of the castle. It originally combined the functions of both bedroom and bathroom. The arrangement of the room was not deemed a success and George IV moved his bed to the adjacent room. The bath was moved elsewhere at the same time. After the death of Prince Albert in this room in 1861, the room was preserved by Queen Victoria, its George IV hangings still intact, as a shrine to his memory. With the accession of Edward VII, the room was stripped out and all traces of its previous use were obliterated.

 
Here it is first floor plan of the east wing where HM's private apartment is situated
(http://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p33/LeRoiSoleil_2006/planWC.jpg)




I would love to see the pictures that have been removed, is there anyway that I can? Thanks :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on December 04, 2010, 06:15:09 PM
Quote

I would love to see the pictures that have been removed, is there anyway that I can? Thanks :)

1. The person that posted them might have closed their photo hosting account or removed them.

2.  You might contact the person who posted them and inquire if they still have the photos and would they share them with you.

3.  Good luck.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 08, 2010, 01:47:57 PM
It would be wonderful if a book was published showing the rooms then and now & how they have changed throughout the years & over the different reigns! The book could be similar to a jewel book but with glorious photos of the private rooms etc!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on December 09, 2010, 10:23:49 PM
Do I see there a photo of Diana on the table in the foreground in the room of Charles?

Perhaps, but it looks to be a very proactive photo. The only other person who I though it could be was Zara...only for a moment because there's no way she would send her uncle a provocative picture such as that!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on December 11, 2010, 08:18:10 AM
Palace of Holyroodhouse Floor Plans (c. 1950):

The Ground Floor:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/TheGroundFloor.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on December 11, 2010, 08:19:19 AM
Palace of Holyroodhouse Floor Plans (c. 1950):

The First Floor:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/TheFirstFloor.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on December 11, 2010, 08:22:24 AM
Palace of Holyroodhouse Floor Plans (c. 1950):

The Second Floor:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/TheSecondFloor.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 12, 2010, 04:16:24 AM
Those photographs of the staircase at the north end of the hall raises a question - those pics, and the old floor plans of the house posted elsewhere here, clearly show that staircase is at the end of the Main Corridor (adjacent to the Dining Room on the ground floor and the Double Drawing Room on the first floor). 

But other posters here (some of whom have actually visited Clarence House in recent years) have mentioned that there is no staircase in the Main Corridor.  Does anyone know for sure if that staircase remains intact today, or was it removed sometime during the 20th century? 

Hi Chris, in the very interesting "Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother At Clarence House" by John Cornforth it mentions that the Queen Mother had the original staircase by Nash removed and replaced with the staircase we see today (in the long hall off the outer hall), which does look much more attractive actually, though I am a great believer in the preservation of orginal feaures!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ajwatson82 on December 12, 2010, 04:46:56 AM
Palace of Holyroodhouse Floor Plans (c. 1950):

The Second Floor:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/TheSecondFloor.jpg)

Thanks Nikol, the plans are great :). Would have plans of any other residences, like Windsor or BP ? I really would  love to see the plans.thanks again. :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 14, 2010, 07:47:19 AM
Love the floor plans of Holyroodhouse!  Thanks so much for those, I've always wondered about that building.

I believe that today the royal family's s private apartments are on the second floor.  But I've also read that since 1646 (when Charles I appointed the Dukes of Hamilton as hereditary Keeper, one of the Great Offices in the Royal Household in Scotland), that the Keeper maintains private ducal apartments which are said to cover a larger area of the palace than the State Apartments. 

Does anyone know which floor / area is "Royal Apartments" and which are "Keeper's Apartments"?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: PAVLOV on December 20, 2010, 04:50:59 AM
Some of these photographs must have been taken by Royal servants. How could the one of the breakfast room land up on this site in any other way. By the way, it looks better than it used to, but I cannot understand why they need that lamp so low over the table.   
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 20, 2010, 06:23:23 AM
If anyone is interested in the History of Clarence House then The Story of Clarence House by Marguerite D. Peacock is a must! It is only a small booklet but crammed full of pictures!

Also Marlborough Houseand It's Occupants; Present and Past by Arthur Beavan is interesting, but a bit dry in places! Published in 1896 & re-published last year. It contains some interesting information and a break down of all the rooms. In the preface he thanks the Prince of Wales and also Empress Frederick  "for her gracious assistance"
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ashdean on December 20, 2010, 08:38:22 AM
Love the floor plans of Holyroodhouse!  Thanks so much for those, I've always wondered about that building.

I believe that today the royal family's s private apartments are on the second floor.  But I've also read that since 1646 (when Charles I appointed the Dukes of Hamilton as hereditary Keeper, one of the Great Offices in the Royal Household in Scotland), that the Keeper maintains private ducal apartments which are said to cover a larger area of the palace than the State Apartments. 

Does anyone know which floor / area is "Royal Apartments" and which are "Keeper's Apartments"?
The Dukes apartment was redecorated by the legendary John Fowler (of Colefax and Fowler).
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Royski on January 02, 2011, 02:32:37 AM
Getting back to Clarence House, you were wondering about what was above the main entrance next to Charles' Private Sitting Room.  It is the end of the Main Corridor on the first floor.  There is not a room there.  I believe that that is where you can access the roof of the portico. There is a picture of it in John Cornforth's book.

I too would like to put in a request for the floor plans of St. James Palace to be shown again, if anyone has access to those.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 02, 2011, 03:46:42 AM
Edward VII's bedroom at Sandringham. Note the picture of Princess Alice on the right!


(http://img695.imageshack.us/img695/8171/royal7.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 03, 2011, 12:27:10 PM
Alice was rumored to be his favourite sister.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ajwatson82 on January 24, 2011, 04:34:30 AM
Hey all, was just wondering does anybody have any floor plans for Balmoral and Windsor Castle, I am working on a 3D project using Sweet house 3D, I am plaining to post the completed projects here when it all done :).

Thanks for any help from anyone,
Cheers all ! :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on January 24, 2011, 11:51:37 PM
They say that St James Palace is a maze of corridors and quite clumsy. Does anyone know of the corridor that is supoosed to connect St James and Clarence House?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on January 26, 2011, 04:04:22 AM
Queen victoria in her sitting room at windsor castle with princess beatrice late 1890s

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/Mary_Steen_Victoria_Beatrice_Windsor_1895.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on January 26, 2011, 04:10:24 AM
Our current Queen Elizabeth 11 in the same sitting room at windsor (obuiously the silk on the walls has changed and it is no way near as clutterd) with john howard in 1997

(http://primeministers.naa.gov.au/Images/AUSPIC_970709-28_tcm13-21835.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 26, 2011, 11:50:22 AM
They say that St James Palace is a maze of corridors and quite clumsy. Does anyone know of the corridor that is supoosed to connect St James and Clarence House?

After the death of George IV in 1830, the Duke of Clarence acceded to the Throne as William IV.  In start contrast to his late brother, William IV was quite informal and not at all extravagent, and preferred to remain living at Clarence House as King.  When the Houses of Parliament were destroyed by fire in 1834, William IV actually offered the new Buckingham Palace as a ready-made replacement (Parliament declined).

William IV's main concession to his new role as Sovereign was the addition of a corridor at first-floor level in Clarence House to connect with the State Apartments of St. James's Palace. I'm not sure exactly where it is located - but old floor plans I have seen show a couple of small closets or anterooms at the western end of the first floor State Apartments at St. James' Palace (along with a back staircase), right where the two building meet.  I'd imagine that's where the corridor was added - which would also be right behind (north) of the Prince of Wales' bedroom suite which faces south over the palace gardens and the Mall.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Windsor on January 26, 2011, 03:03:17 PM
Forgive me if this seems a strange question, but in thinking about the Queen's apartments in both Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, does anyone know if they are similar layouts?  On this site I have seen floorplans for her rooms at Buckingham Palace, but do not recall seeing any for Windsor.  I would assume that the living arrangements are equally "grand."  Also, how many personal items (e.g. clothes, pictures, whatnot's) would the Queen have taken to Windsor when she essentially moved there on a permanent basis?  Perhaps she has duplicates of everything or so much of everything that this would not even be considered?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on January 26, 2011, 04:44:39 PM
Glamis Castle:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/GlamisCastle01.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/GlamisCastle02.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on January 26, 2011, 04:46:03 PM
Glamis Castle:

The Drawing Room
(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/GlamisCastle07DrawingRoom.jpg)

The Crypt
(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/GlamisCastle06TheCrypt.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on January 26, 2011, 04:47:54 PM
Glamis Castle:

The Dining Room
(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/GlamisCastle04DiningRoom.jpg)

The Queen's Mother Bedroom
(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/GlamisCastle09QueenMothersBedroom.jpg)

The Chapel
(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/GlamisCastle08TheChapel.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on January 26, 2011, 06:45:34 PM
Forgive me if this seems a strange question, but in thinking about the Queen's apartments in both Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, does anyone know if they are similar layouts?  On this site I have seen floorplans for her rooms at Buckingham Palace, but do not recall seeing any for Windsor.  I would assume that the living arrangements are equally "grand."  Also, how many personal items (e.g. clothes, pictures, whatnot's) would the Queen have taken to Windsor when she essentially moved there on a permanent basis?  Perhaps she has duplicates of everything or so much of everything that this would not even be considered?

The Queens apartments at Windsor are actually very different to those in Buckingham Palace.
The 3 most private rooms at Windsor are a large beautifully decorated sitting room and a good sized bedroom decorated in pink satin and a boudoir and all 3 of those room are situated in Victoria tower one would have to pass from the grand corridor through the sovereigns staircase and through a lobby to get to these rooms so they are very private.

At Buckingham Palace the Queen has a sitting room with a large bow window which can be seen clearly when you look at the palace from the north side a large bedroom a dressing room an audience room and a private dining room. Her sitting room also doubles up as a study.
I haven't seen a picture of her sitting room, bedroom and dressing room at buckingham palace in this period but there are many photographs of these rooms in this thread showing how they were during the reign of Queen Victoria and later in the reign of Queen Mary as consort to George V.
The Queens apartments at Buckingham Palace are no way near as private as the busy kings corridor used much by staff runs down there fully length and pass prince Phillips rooms.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lindelle on January 27, 2011, 04:26:58 AM
They say that St James Palace is a maze of corridors and quite clumsy. Does anyone know of the corridor that is supoosed to connect St James and Clarence House?

After the death of George IV in 1830, the Duke of Clarence acceded to the Throne as William IV.  In start contrast to his late brother, William IV was quite informal and not at all extravagent, and preferred to remain living at Clarence House as King.  When the Houses of Parliament were destroyed by fire in 1834, William IV actually offered the new Buckingham Palace as a ready-made replacement (Parliament declined).

William IV's main concession to his new role as Sovereign was the addition of a corridor at first-floor level in Clarence House to connect with the State Apartments of St. James's Palace. I'm not sure exactly where it is located - but old floor plans I have seen show a couple of small closets or anterooms at the western end of the first floor State Apartments at St. James' Palace (along with a back staircase), right where the two building meet.  I'd imagine that's where the corridor was added - which would also be right behind (north) of the Prince of Wales' bedroom suite which faces south over the palace gardens and the Mall.



Thanks Chris.
Do you happen to know where I could see those pics?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on January 27, 2011, 07:41:22 AM
A photograph of the Dinning Room at Clarence House. (Set out for a lunch engagement)

(http://s3.amazonaws.com/twitpic/photos/large/231537115.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=0ZRYP5X5F6FSMBCCSE82&Expires=1296136597&Signature=7VJi1r6Tzs34j6tsUd1odgPvGNA%3D)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 27, 2011, 08:26:14 AM
Thanks Chris.Do you happen to know where I could see those pics?

They used to be somewhere on the forum, probably even earlier this thread  - I imagine they are still there (try using the search option at the top of your screen and search for floor plans in the Windsor threads), or just click backward on the threads to view earlier pages.

On the other subject - the private rooms at BP and Windsor - I concur with  Traditionalist..... although at BP I believe there are a few additional rooms in the north wing considered part of the private apartments  In addition to the Queen's Dining Room, Sitting Room, Bedroom and Dressing Room.  There are a few (3-4) smaller rooms at the very northwest corner of the palace (I believe the Sheraton Room is the name of one of them) that we rarely ever hear or see pictures about.  Not sure what those rooms are used for on a daily basis.

Windsor seems to give the royal couple much more privacy - which is probably one reason they prefer it so much.  I've always thought the private areas of BP were inadequate because of the "Private" corridors that run along them.  They seem far from private.  For some odd reason the Prime Minister's weekly route to the Queen's Audience Chamber is up the King's Staircase and down that private corridor past the doors to the Queen's bedroom, sitting room, dining room, etc.   Why he doesn't instead enter via the Grand Entrance and go up the Minister's Staircase to reach the audience room is beyond me.  Perhaps it's one of those archaic "special rights" afforded to the prime minister long ago that the court doesn't wish to dispense with?  If I were King and had to live at BP, I'd have blocked off both ends of that corridor long ago and granted access only to family and personal staff.  Everyone else could jolly well go around the south (household) corridor, or travel from east to west on a lower floor.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Learning on January 27, 2011, 09:31:21 AM
If I were King and had to live at BP, I'd have blocked off both ends of that corridor long ago and granted access only to family and personal staff.  Everyone else could jolly well go around the south (household) corridor, or travel from east to west on a lower floor.

Me, too.

But that raises a question: how much authority do the Royals have to alter or renovate the official residences? Can the Queen rearrange the furniture in her sitting room on her own initiative? What about the furniture in a state room? Could they close a corridor as you suggest or do they have to apply to the Royal Household Property Agency? I suppose financing the changes would be an issue.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on January 27, 2011, 10:06:27 AM
Can the Queen rearrange the furniture in her sitting room on her own initiative?

Lol, is your question serious? I think even the last Merovingians wielded that much power, even with the real bosses, the Carolingians, being majordomos! Haha, that's probably how Late Merovingians France was like: The butler ruled the kingdom while the king rearranged his furniture.

Quote
What about the furniture in a state room? Could they close a corridor as you suggest or do they have to apply to the Royal Household Property Agency? I suppose financing the changes would be an issue.

I would guess that the important power that be to be consulted or at least notified is the one responsible for the cataloguing and conservation of the historical furniture. They need to keep track of what is where and make sure nothing disappears, since the palace in addition to being a home and a workplace essentially is a museum.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 27, 2011, 11:07:44 AM
Quite so.  Ahem. :~)

Naturally I imagine the Queen has the final say about how all rooms are arranged and used.  The occupied royal palaces are, after all, maintained to serve the monarch.  The prior poster is probably correct, any changes in the use of historic and priceless art and furnishings from the royal collection would probably require a consult with that department's experts.  If the Queen said "I do believe I'd like to get rid of that horrid painting on my dressing room wall and replace it with that one in the store room downstairs", I hardly think anyone who challenge her wish.  But if she said "I think I'd like to put a few of those DaVinci drawings under the glass blotter on my writing desk" I'd bet some Royal Collection Print Room expert might reply "Well Ma'am, that might not be a good idea."

As far as decisions about how the areas are used - that may also ultimately rest with the Queen, but not entirely.  Unlike one's private home, palaces are predominantly office and function buildings.  There are hundreds of people who live and work there every day, and many thousands of visitors each year.  The majority of the palace's interior is staff offices and work areas, staff living quarters, etc, not living quarters for the royals.

I don't doubt for a minute the Queen could make whatever changes she wished to her private rooms.  If she chose to hold audiences with foreign ambassadors in the State Dining Room, or the Throne Room, or the Center Room above the balcony, that could be easily accommodated.  But she's not likely to unilaterally make changes to the rest of the palace without input and agreement from a whole lot of other people.  And if changes cost money - that's even more complicated.



Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Naslednik Norvezhskiy on January 27, 2011, 11:17:05 AM
A funny consideration along the same line to ponder: Is the Queen and RF considered the top bosses of the household / palace staff or rather like VIP customers / clients?
Perhaps the slogan the customer is always right is no place more true than in "the firm", as Prince Philip called it?

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 27, 2011, 01:35:55 PM
I would think your first statement would be most accurate:  The Queen is the the boss, not a client.   Everything we are allowed to see about the inner workings of the household illustrate that the entire household works very hard to meet the standards the Queen sets and expects.

That said, carrying out the boss' directions seems to be a very nuanced process.  For example, I recall seeing videos of the Queen inspecting the State Rooms ahead of a banquet, or viewing an exhibition ahead of the summer openings of Buckingham Palace.  She's always accompanied by one or more senior staff who are no doubt highly connected to the Queen's own method of conveying pleasure or displeasure.  In those videos, I've never seen the Queen say anything pointed or direct (such as:  "Oh, that flower arrangement is too large, please have it changed around to be lower profile").  Instead, she's more likely to make an observation "I should think it may be a bit difficult for some to see across that table."  The staff would recognize this as a directive, and convey the Queen's preferences to whomever down the ladder is responsible. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on February 12, 2011, 11:04:49 AM
A link to a picture of the Duke of Edinburgh sitting at his desk in Buckingham Palace in his private study. Not to my taste! http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/microsites/princephilip/MicroObject.asp?item=3&themeid=1936&object=2506962&row=3
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: toddy on February 13, 2011, 06:38:29 PM
does anyone have any pictures or floor-plans of the upper part of Windsor castle?  just curious about all those rooms in the towers  and what they are used for.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 14, 2011, 10:21:50 AM
I've also often wondered about those Tower rooms; I've NEVER seen any pictures or plans of those, or heard about their current use. 

Since we know that on the main floor, the Queen and Duke's private rooms are in the East range (south of the Crimson & Green Drawing Rooms), and the south range of that floor contains the principal guest bedrooms, I think it likely that the upper floors of these ranges (the Towers) house additional guest and royal bedrooms and probably also bedrooms for staff.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on February 16, 2011, 07:10:40 AM
I am currently reading a book written by Stephen Barry, Prince Charles' former valet.  In it he describes Prince Charles' private apartments at Windsor being directly above those of the Queens in the Queen's Tower. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 16, 2011, 01:41:08 PM
While recently scanning the Monarchy's website, I stumbled on a page describing the agenda for the State Visit paid by the President of the Republic of South Africa last year.  I noticed the following item in that itinerary:

5 March 2010
The President of the Republic of South Africa will attend a working Breakfast with principals of British and South African Industry in the South Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace.


I don't believe I've ever heard of "the South Drawing Room" at Buckingham Palace before.  I've read that what is today called the Blue Drawing Room used to be known by this name - could that be it, or is there another "South Drawing Room" today?  If not, why would an official BP document use the old name?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on February 16, 2011, 03:03:20 PM
I wonder if they could be referring to the Yellow Drawing Room.  It is on the south side of the East Front and I believe connects to the suite of rooms used for visiting dignitaries on the East Front - any other thoughts?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 17, 2011, 07:47:19 AM
True, I suppose it could be the Yellow Drawing Room, although I've not heard that name used before.  I'd also wonder why the President (who was staying in the Belgian Suite and would have use of most of the semi-state rooms on the ground floor, west wing) would need to use a drawing room at the opposite corner of the palace to host a function.

Oh wait, I just re-read the statement carefully.  It said he was "attending a working breakfast", which may differ from "hosting an official breakfast".  Maybe that means the President's entourage hosted the meal, and he was merely a participant.  If I'm not mistaken, a foreign leader's senior staff stay in the guest bedrooms in the east wing, so the Yellow Drawing Room would probably be used as their common sitting / dining room.  (Probably answered my own question!)  :~)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Windsor on March 29, 2011, 09:11:03 AM
Does anyone know if all Queens since Victoria first occupied Buckingham Palace have used the same apartments as Queen Elizabeth II?  Same configuration?  If so, is this because this is the "best suite" in the house or just a matter of tradition?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on March 29, 2011, 01:09:25 PM
To the best of my knowledge the answer would be yes.  According to the floor plans I have, the North Range (private apartments) consists of 2 sets / suites of private apartments toward the center of the range, flanked at either end by a set of more common / reception rooms.  From the northeast corner (near the Mall) heading West (toward the Garden), the order of rooms is (or at least used to be):

3 Semi-State Rooms (which I believe are shared / common rooms used by all of the palace's royal residents)
The good-sized Chinese Luncheon Room
The Small Chinese Room
The Indian Room

Then the King's Apartments:
King's Writing Room,
King's Sitting Room
King's Bedroom
King's Dressing Room and Bath.

Then the Queen's Apartments:
Queen's Dressing Room and Bath
Queen's Bedroom
Anteroom
Queen's Sitting Room (with the famous bow window)

After that are 4 other modest sized rooms
One is the Private Dining Room
One I believe is called the Sheraton Room
One is called the Empire Room on the old plans

Queen Victoria occupied The Queen's Apartments, while her mother the Duchess of Kent occupied the King's Apartments.  But since the apartments are shown on the plans as "The King's Apartments" and "The Queen's Apartments", I assume they remained as such during the next 3 reigns (Edward VII, George V and George VI), and today, Elizabeth II occupies the Queen's Apartments while Prince Phillip occupies the King's.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Windsor on March 30, 2011, 08:47:25 AM
Thanks, CHRISinUSA.  You are always a wealth of information and I enjoy reading your posts :-)

I am sure I am not the only one fascinated with the Queen and how she lives.  I wonder if the Queen has a similar set of rooms at each of her other residences or if she lives differently?

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on March 30, 2011, 01:22:59 PM
How gracious, thank you.  I do share your interest in how the royals live (and in royal architecture), so it is something I digest as much as I can find.  In response to your inquiry about other royal residences - the answer is - it depends on the residence.

At Windsor, the Queen has a private set of rooms in the Queen's Tower (sitting room, bedroom, dressing room, bath), with an audience room adjoining the tower in the south range (usually called the Visitor Apartments).  Prince Phillip's also has his own set of rooms further down that range between the Queen's Tower and the Semi-State Rooms (White, Green and Red Drawing Rooms).  This is the same general set-up as in Victoria's time - although today I'm not entirely sure what each room is named, nor which ones belong to the Queen or Prince exclusively, and which are shared / common rooms. 

At Balmoral, the Queen and Duke's private rooms lie directly above the main reception rooms (Drawing Room, Library).  Floor plans I've seen show a series of 5-6 rooms along that range, including bedrooms, dressing rooms and sitting rooms, although not sure how they are laid-out.

I've never seen floor plans (or many photos) of the private quarters at Sandringham nor Hollyroodhouse, so I'm no help there.  I do know that at Hollyroodhouse, Victoria and Albert originally used the 1st floor (2nd floor to us Americans) private apartments which were are called the King's Apartments and today open to tour.  After Albert's death, Victoria moved to a suite above on the upper floor which might today be the present private royal apartments (but not 100% sure). 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 29, 2011, 04:02:59 PM
NEW VIRTUAL ROOMS  on The British Monarchy Web Site!!!!

The Throne Room and The Blue Drawing Room


http://www.royal.gov.uk/TheRoyalResidences/BuckinghamPalace/VirtualRooms/Overview.aspx
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 29, 2011, 04:03:59 PM
NEW VIRTUAL ROOMS  on The British Monarchy Web Site!!!!

The Throne Room and The Blue Drawing Room at Buckingham palace


http://www.royal.gov.uk/TheRoyalResidences/BuckinghamPalace/VirtualRooms/Overview.aspx
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on April 29, 2011, 04:08:00 PM
The Throne Room is briliant!!!!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 29, 2011, 06:35:25 PM
They are terrific.

Flickr has also put up a few very high resolution photos of State Apartments.  Worth a look.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on April 30, 2011, 12:15:23 AM
They are terrific.

Flickr has also put up a few very high resolution photos of State Apartments.  Worth a look.

Might you supply us with the URL at Flickr.   Thank you in advance.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 30, 2011, 08:07:51 AM
Here you are, but since they keep adding photos, the page number does change -
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishmonarchy/page8/
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on April 30, 2011, 08:09:45 AM
One last thing, you must click on the photo, then click view all sizes.  The larger format of the photos are 6.5 mb.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on May 01, 2011, 03:05:00 PM
Here you are, but since they keep adding photos, the page number does change -
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishmonarchy/page8/

Thanks for the link....yes, they are really spectacular.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on June 27, 2011, 03:32:58 PM
Here i sa drawn portait of Queen Mary at Buckingham Palace in 1926 and im strongly sure that she is sitting in her private sitting room in the north wing of the Palace.
Compared to photographs i have of the Queens sitting room from the time of Queen Victoria and from the time of Queen Mary herself the detailing above the door looks exactly the same which leads me to believe that this is definetly the Queens sitting room.
It appears in other ways very different to the way it was in Queens Victorias day though, it looks much less clutterd and cleaner with a very nice silk damask on the walls.

(http://www.williamranken.org/HM%20Queen%20Mary%20at%20Buckingham%20Palace.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 27, 2011, 05:52:37 PM
Was this based on a photo ? If not would love to see a color version if possible. Thanks !  :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on June 27, 2011, 08:05:42 PM
Unfortunatly i dont think it was erick. I found this picture on a website that was dedicated to an artist from around this time, id love it though if there was a photo version of this picture and it would be even better if it was colour, then the mystery of the Queens sitting room and the way its decorated would come to and end.
My own wild guess however after studying the photograph of this room from around 1914 is that the damask is a bluey purple, i have no idea why its just what comes into my head lol.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Windsor on June 28, 2011, 12:29:23 PM
Does anyone have details (and perhaps pictures) regarding William and Katherine's "cottage" in Kensington Palace?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on June 28, 2011, 05:04:10 PM
Does anyone have details (and perhaps pictures) regarding William and Katherine's "cottage" in Kensington Palace?

Hello Windsor,

Over on the Kensington Palace Floor Plans thread (http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=14564.0) there are some posts discussing this very topic. Refer to my post #11 & #12. I'm afraid that's all the information that is out there at the moment, but we will know soon enough which apartment/cottage was chosen. Plus, in post #13, CHRISinUSA, quite rightly points out that the apartment/cottage they initially will be housed in is a temporary home until a larger property becomes available.

Cheers,

RoyalWatcher
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on June 30, 2011, 12:10:58 PM
Hi all ive found some interesting pictures of interiors form the royal train that i thought you all might be interested in :

Prince Charles study
(http://www.hellomagazine.com/imagenes/royalty/201009074105/Prince-Charles/Royal-Train/interior/0-10-805/sitting-room--a.jpg)
Queen's Bedroom
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/10/18/article-1078707-021FA555000005DC-523_468x367.jpg)
Prince Charles's sitting room
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/10/18/article-1078707-02233BC2000005DC-559_468x312.jpg)
Queen's Bathroom
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/10/18/article-1078707-02233C8D000005DC-178_233x384.jpg)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on June 30, 2011, 02:47:15 PM
An interesting view of the Ballroom at Sandringham.

In my opinion not the nicest room ive seen in any one of the Queen's residences official or private.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_PC6LYkYH40A/TBvW0J9gZHI/AAAAAAAAACA/tzlLeqgjrBw/s1600/Ballroom+1.JPG)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on July 30, 2011, 11:16:06 AM
The Saloon, Royal Lodge

http://www.architecturaldigest.com/homes/homes/2011/05/royal_residences_slideshow#slide=2 (http://www.architecturaldigest.com/homes/homes/2011/05/royal_residences_slideshow#slide=2)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on September 13, 2011, 05:02:09 AM
The Queen Palace's

New BBC series with fiona Bruce exploring the history of
Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and the Palace of Holyrood house.

Starts with Buckingham Palace, here is the link to the first episode on BBC i player.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b014s302/The_Queens_Palaces_Buckingham_Palace/ (http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b014s302/The_Queens_Palaces_Buckingham_Palace/)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on September 13, 2011, 07:36:37 PM
Alas, apparently one must live in the UK in order to view the BBC version from its website; however, there is a version of it up on YouTube.com:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tvx3o48Rc1U

Sadly, it isn't in HD, but, it's gorgeous nonetheless!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on September 19, 2011, 12:32:32 PM
Very gorgeous indeed.  From my perspective the program is a little heavy on the history of the objects and artists from the royal collection - and a little light on the palaces themselves, but gorgeous none the less.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Martyn on September 20, 2011, 08:44:10 AM
Very gorgeous indeed.  From my perspective the program is a little heavy on the history of the objects and artists from the royal collection - and a little light on the palaces themselves, but gorgeous none the less.

I would agree with that Chris.  I was a bit disappointed with the Windsor Castle episode.  One good thing though.  This series really does illustrate what a great debt the Royal Collection owes to George IV! 

The highlight of the Windsor Castle episode was the bit about Queen Mary's dollshouse - the original and inspired creation of Pcss Marie Louise and Edwin Lutyens - amazing!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ashdean on September 20, 2011, 10:00:21 AM
The Dolls House indeed was the best part of a v interesting programme.....pity Fiona Bruce who is a excellent narrator couldnt find a good stylist though!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on September 21, 2011, 07:36:28 PM
The Queen's Palaces: Windsor Castle

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0Vi6XtB5hY

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_g8mJfrOx0
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on September 22, 2011, 07:36:33 AM
Just watched the Windsor episode and once again, I felt like it would have been more accurately named "The Royal Collection at Windsor" instead of "The Queen's Palaces".  I found myself fast-forwarding past endless history of particular objects, their artists and royal benefactors.  The castle itself seemed no more than a backdrop for the story-line. 

I so wish the program had instead followed gone room-to-room and explained the name, purpose and decor of each, along with a brief description of the most important objects contained.  A bit more past-to-present display would have also been appreciated (showing the room today and then paintings or drawings of the same room in past eras).

But I was thankful for some of the wide backdrop scenes as the host entered each room.  It truly gives an awe-inspiring perspective of the scale and opulence of the castle.  Stunning..
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on September 22, 2011, 10:12:12 AM
I couldn't agree more. It's curious as to why it was decided to approach these documentaries in that manner. The one interesting bit I really did enjoy was the secret passage that lead one out of the castle in times of battle. For me, it seemed that the first half hour of the program was rather fluffy without much substance.

Onwards to Holyrood Palace!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on September 27, 2011, 01:08:24 PM
The Queen's Palaces: Holyrood Palace

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toCl8L8B74M

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R77izown4us
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Emperor of the Dominions on September 27, 2011, 04:36:04 PM
Fiona Bruce is always a joy to watch, however I think the opportunity has been missed in this series to give a real sense of the layouts of these palaces. A walk-through by Fiona would have, in my opinion been much more interesting and one could have perhaps been given an idea of the scale and how rooms interconnect etc. Perhaps there were security concerns over such an approach? I believe the last in the series from Hollyrood House lacked focus and seemed more concerned with providing a biography of Mary Queen of Scots; interesting, but nonetheless slightly off topic.

R.I.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on September 27, 2011, 10:48:16 PM
Emperor of the Dominions, I think you are being to kind to Ms Bruce. I think she royally missed the mark on the last palace, Holyrood. You're absolutely right, it contained a mini-bio of Mary Queen of Scots and to some degree Charles II and (Bonnie) Prince Charles. Why we stayed in France for that long I do not understand. I was becoming a bit impatient actually.

I was really hoping that the series was going to be a walk through of each palace as well as see the flow of the rooms. I bet you're right about it being a security issue; however, why not focus more on the architecture, the ornate finishing of the floors, walls and ceiling as well as the meaning behind each of them. In all of the State Room ceilings in Buckingham Palace, each has a theme and it's carried throughout the room up to and including gorgeous royal badges of royal orders in several rooms. It is stunning. I have never in my life seen anything that rivals its lavishness. As for Windsor Castle, it is stunning in its own right, but it gives off a very different feel than Buckingham Palace. You can feel the history there. The rooms are incredibly grand, but older...much older. It has a warmth that Buckingham Palace does not.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Soane on November 01, 2011, 06:53:01 PM
I was really hoping that the series was going to be a walk through of each palace as well as see the flow of the rooms. I bet you're right about it being a security issue; however, why not focus more on the architecture, the ornate finishing of the floors, walls and ceiling as well as the meaning behind each of them. In all of the State Room ceilings in Buckingham Palace, each has a theme and it's carried throughout the room up to and including gorgeous royal badges of royal orders in several rooms.

Exactly. Fiona Bruce is a vacuous presence on our screens. This series was ostensibly a guide to royal palaces, not royal personalities. The indiscretions of Mary, Queen of Scots, however interesting, had no impact on the form of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. Was the date of the construction of the original palace (1501-1505/6 if anyone is interested) mentioned once during the entire programme? No. Was the viewer given any sense of the layout of the building and its architectural development over time? No. Is Fiona Bruce a trained architectural historian who has the necessary academic knowledge to both write and present an informative, instructive and interesting television series about buildings that, despite their fame, are relatively poorly understod. No.

Fiona Bruce has a degree in French and Italian (the languages, not the arts or architecture) at Hertford College, Oxford and then embarked on a career as a news presenter. Over the past year she appears to have inveigled herself onto every arts or antiques programme going, including a BBC programme about the recently discovered Salvator Mundi by Leonardo. In future I would suggest that she focus on her position in the news room.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Emperor of the Dominions on November 01, 2011, 08:54:46 PM
I was really hoping that the series was going to be a walk through of each palace as well as see the flow of the rooms. I bet you're right about it being a security issue; however, why not focus more on the architecture, the ornate finishing of the floors, walls and ceiling as well as the meaning behind each of them. In all of the State Room ceilings in Buckingham Palace, each has a theme and it's carried throughout the room up to and including gorgeous royal badges of royal orders in several rooms.

Exactly. Fiona Bruce is a vacuous presence on our screens. This series was ostensibly a guide to royal palaces, not royal personalities. The indiscretions of Mary, Queen of Scots, however interesting, had no impact on the form of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. Was the date of the construction of the original palace (1501-1505/6 if anyone is interested) mentioned once during the entire programme? No. Was the viewer given any sense of the layout of the building and its architectural development over time? No. Is Fiona Bruce a trained architectural historian who has the necessary academic knowledge to both write and present an informative, instructive and interesting television series about buildings that, despite their fame, are relatively poorly understod. No.

Fiona Bruce has a degree in French and Italian (the languages, not the arts or architecture) at Hertford College, Oxford and then embarked on a career as a news presenter. Over the past year she appears to have inveigled herself onto every arts or antiques programme going, including a BBC programme about the recently discovered Salvator Mundi by Leonardo. In future I would suggest that she focus on her position in the news room.

I think that's a little harsh on Ms Bruce. I suspect the brief she was given for the series was quite prescriptive, so the content may not be entirely her fault. Although I do agree with your observations of the content of the series - which basically mirrored my previous post on the subject.

R.I.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on November 07, 2011, 04:09:35 PM
Upon hearing today that William and Kate are to move into Princess Margaret's former home - Apartment 1a Kensington Palace, I browsed back through this thread to see what has already been posted about this particular apartment.  We know it lies on the south side of Clock Court, in the Stone Gallery wing which runs from a Vestibule at the far west of the palace to the foot of the King's Staircase in the palace's main block.

Does anyone have any photographs or inside information on this apartment's layout and rooms? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CountessKate on November 08, 2011, 03:18:35 AM
Upon hearing today that William and Kate are to move into Princess Margaret's former home - Apartment 1a Kensington Palace, I browsed back through this thread to see what has already been posted about this particular apartment.  We know it lies on the south side of Clock Court, in the Stone Gallery wing which runs from a Vestibule at the far west of the palace to the foot of the King's Staircase in the palace's main block.

Does anyone have any photographs or inside information on this apartment's layout and rooms? 

It's nothing spectacular, but the Daily Mail has an aerial picture of KP with the apartments indicated and one of Princess Margaret in her drawing room:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2058109/Kate-Middleton-Prince-William-to-Kensington-Palace.html
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 08, 2011, 01:46:27 PM
I think we would be able to see Kate's personal taste when they move in next September.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: cphiggin on November 24, 2011, 05:52:37 PM
Some staggering pictures of Sunninghill Park (former home of the Duke and Duchess of York) here on this Facebook Page:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sunninghill-Park/353245286214
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on December 19, 2011, 09:59:39 AM
Some staggering pictures of Sunninghill Park (former home of the Duke and Duchess of York) here on this Facebook Page:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sunninghill-Park/353245286214
It appears that the home is abandoned?   The home was gifted to the Prince when he married Fergie.  Both the marriage and the home are now in ruiins.   What's to be done with the property?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 19, 2011, 02:56:31 PM
Yes, the Duke sold the property in 2003 to an offshore trust which reportedly is controlled by a Russian billionaire.  The buyer never moved in  and has allowed the house to sit empty and fall into decay.

What will happen to the property?  No one is quite sure - although in recent years reports suggested the local council was considering seizing the house as derelict property.  Its quite an embarrassment to the royal family - especially given the controversy around the sale. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 20, 2011, 10:47:36 AM
Yes. It was a shame.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on December 20, 2011, 11:32:12 AM
What a waste of  money and vanity. Perhaps a homeless shelter could be in order, if not very useful.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 20, 2011, 12:39:54 PM
The site itself has a royal history - the Crown Estate purchased the property in 1945 and the main house was intended for Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh, but that house burned down in August 1947 (3 months before the royal couple married).  In the 1960s the site was considered for a new home for Princess Margaret, but that never materialized. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 20, 2011, 02:21:42 PM
That was before South York was built...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 20, 2011, 04:35:53 PM
Well, yes, since the new house was constructed specifically for Andrew and Sarah. Interesting tidbit--Sunninghill Park was the first newly-built royal home since Bagshot Park was built in 1879 for the Duke of Connaught.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 20, 2011, 04:38:49 PM
What a waste of  money and vanity. Perhaps a homeless shelter could be in order, if not very useful.

That's exactly what the Mirror reported could happen (granted this was in 2009):

"In July 2009, Bracknell Forest Borough Council were said to be considering seizing the property under the Housing Act 2004 and using it as a homeless shelter, following several reported break-ins."

More stories:

Exclusive: Prince Andrew's £15million former royal residence could be seized and used for the homeless
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2009/07/19/andy-and-fergie-s-15m-mansion-faces-seizure-115875-21530759/

From royal fairytale to crumbling eyesore: the mystery of Prince Andrew's old home
http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2009/mar/01/sunninghill-park-prince-andrew

The fall of the house of York: Why has the mansion sold by Duke in mystery £15m deal gone to ruin?
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1153465/The-fall-house-York-Why-mansion-sold-Duke-mystery-15m-deal-gone-ruin.html#ixzz1h7KUhhLA




Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 20, 2011, 10:44:57 PM
In short a fiasco. The money now used by the Duke to help his former wife Sarah, Duchess of York to live in White Lodge.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 21, 2011, 07:34:44 AM
What do you mean Eric?  Sarah does not live in White Lodge, she lives in rooms in Royal Lodge with her former husband.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on December 21, 2011, 11:40:27 AM
In any case, Sunninghill is certainly in a NIMBY neighbourhood. A homeless shelter ? Doubtful.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 21, 2011, 12:37:59 PM
Wonder what could do with it ?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on December 22, 2011, 07:38:12 AM
As Robert pointed out, that 5 acres sits in the middle of very desirable Crown Estate property at the edge of Windsor Great Park.  I would think any wealthy / aristocratic family (or Russian oligarch) would be very happy with that site as a home.

That said, the most likely scenario is that somebody will eventually buy the freehold, tear down the house and replace it with a new one.  It's a rather uninspiring house anyway, not really worth restoring to its original condition (at least IMO). 

My mind wanders to "what ifs".  I would assume that after the QMs death, Andrew would have inherited Royal Lodge anyway (even if the York marriage had lasted), meaning Sunninghill Park would have still needed to be sold, or perhaps given to another royal family member.  I wonder if it might have ended up as the Cambridge's country home, or perhaps Harry's eventually?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on December 22, 2011, 01:24:29 PM
I tend to agree with Chris. The house is unremarkable and  more LA than England. Now that it has been left derelict it is most likely not cost effective to restore it.
 I recall when the York's first moved in, there was a photo spread in one of the   Sunday magazines, most likely the Times on Sunday, as well as a  "special" on TV, a la Jackie Kenndy's White House tour. It was dreadful. The place looked so out of place, inside as well as out. If I recall correctly it was  a decorator from Texas that  was responsible for the  "creation" of the interiors- hence the "Dallas" connection.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 22, 2011, 01:38:33 PM
Don't think anybody would want it...As far as members of RF is concerneed.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on December 24, 2011, 08:31:22 AM
Sorry if I offend anyone but this house is one of the most ugly I have ever seen.   It has a cheap  no class cow barn look about it.  It looks like it was never really finished.   As Frank Lloyd Wright once said, "I can design a house that will cause a divorce." 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on December 24, 2011, 01:10:43 PM
I do not think you offended anyone here, Douglas,.  Your opinion seems to fit the general consensus on Sunninghill. The joint does look like a McMansion outside of LA or Dallas. Or, as you put it- a "cow barn". And a very costly one at that.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 24, 2011, 01:21:55 PM
Exactly. The taste of the Duke and more likely Fergie, who liked Texas and of course Texans.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: TampaBay on December 24, 2011, 01:40:59 PM
I do not think you offended anyone here, Douglas,.  Your opinion seems to fit the general consensus on Sunninghill. The joint does look like a McMansion outside of LA or Dallas. Or, as you put it- a "cow barn". And a very costly one at that.

I read somewhere that "South York" was based on a house that Fergie saw in Connecticut on one of her many trips to the USA.  

The famous decorator Sister Parish, who provided design comments for the floor plan to Fergie, once stated that it was the ugliest house, inside and out, she had ever worked on.

TampaBay
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 24, 2011, 02:39:30 PM
I only hope that the daughters did not inherited their mother's horrible taste...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Windsor on December 25, 2011, 05:44:42 AM
How far from Windsor Castle is this property?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Vecchiolarry on December 25, 2011, 08:50:22 AM
Hi,

Well Eric, judging from their dress sense, 'the girls' have inherited their mother's horrible taste - no style or propriety.....
I can only hope that Andrew didn't change too much at The Royal Lodge;  or The Queen Mother will be quite annoyed!!!

Larry
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Douglas on December 25, 2011, 04:59:55 PM
I do not think you offended anyone here, Douglas,.  Your opinion seems to fit the general consensus on Sunninghill. The joint does look like a McMansion outside of LA or Dallas. Or, as you put it- a "cow barn". And a very costly one at that.

Thanks for all of your comments.  So its not just me that abhors that McMansion as Robert aptly says it.   That blond wood nailed all throughout the interior.....my teeth are hurting.!!!  Its like fingernails on a blackboard..   The kitchen.....don't get me started on that atrocious center of inconvenience.  

I have a collection of 'secretly' taken photos of many of the royal private apartments and bedrooms in Buckingham Palace.  Some of you may have seen them.  The Princes' taste in decorating their bedrooms is so common and low brow its laughable. Its the worst of early Ikea.   Should I post them here? There are cheap hotels in London with more class and taste than you will find in that royal palace.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Lucien on December 26, 2011, 01:33:38 AM
I only hope that the daughters did not inherited their mother's horrible taste...

Where have you been over the years...They DID inherid her taste...or rather total lack of it...
they look like tarts on a outing at the pictures,horid creatures in cloth where there's always to little
off...

But on Andy's dollhouse,it's a shambles...and goes to show he too has a blatant lack of taste,so,
in the end one can't really blame the girls for lack of taste..it's in their genes...double...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: cphiggin on January 11, 2012, 04:38:17 PM
I do not think you offended anyone here, Douglas,.  Your opinion seems to fit the general consensus on Sunninghill. The joint does look like a McMansion outside of LA or Dallas. Or, as you put it- a "cow barn". And a very costly one at that.

Thanks for all of your comments.  So its not just me that abhors that McMansion as Robert aptly says it.   That blond wood nailed all throughout the interior.....my teeth are hurting.!!!  Its like fingernails on a blackboard..   The kitchen.....don't get me started on that atrocious center of inconvenience.  

I have a collection of 'secretly' taken photos of many of the royal private apartments and bedrooms in Buckingham Palace.  Some of you may have seen them.  The Princes' taste in decorating their bedrooms is so common and low brow its laughable. Its the worst of early Ikea.   Should I post them here? There are cheap hotels in London with more class and taste than you will find in that royal palace.

Oh, Douglas I'd love to see some of thos 'secretly' taken photos - where can I view them? Have you posted them here, or do you have another link to them?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on January 11, 2012, 07:00:14 PM
If I recall correctly, those "secret photos were taken by a tabloid reporter posing as a royal servant. He took the job just to get stuff like that. But I agree, early Motel 6.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 12, 2012, 10:39:45 AM
You are right Robert - it was the Mirror a few years back.  One of their reporters took a job as a palace footman, and later the Mirror published a set of photos of Buckingham Palace private rooms - most of which did not portray the palace or its decorations in a positive light. 

One photo showed the private royal dining room set for breakfast for the Queen and Duke, which infamously revealed that the Queen's breakfast is served in tupperware.  Another photo showed the Belgian suite - in particular the state bedroom and the corridor in the suite with its saucer carved ceilings.  At the time I remember thinking that suite was properly decorated, but many other forum members posted that the decor was terrible (a matter of taste I suppose).

But the least flattering photos showed the BP apartments of the Earl and Countess of Wessex and the Duke of York.  The Wessex bedroom furniture included a headboard shelving unit that looked to me to be shabby 1980s style plywood that one might buy at a secondhand discount store.  The York furniture wasn't much better.  Forum members at the time wondered why - with so much historic and valuable furnishings in the royal collections and probably much of it in storage - would the private quarters be so shabby? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on January 13, 2012, 10:18:18 AM
Perhaps with all the grandeur of the other state room's - The royals keep their private rooms rather basis. After all it must not be very nice having to be so careful all the time when around the royal collection. I dont think the private rooms are shabby, just practical.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 19, 2012, 06:35:42 AM
I understand your point Ridgeway, and agree that the royals probably wouldn't wish to fill their private rooms with priceless antiques any more than the rest of us.  One does need a comfortable sofa to curl one's feet up on when watching television or reading a book, especially in rooms used by children.  But there is a sizable difference between "practical" and "shabby".  

On another thread a while back was a lively discussion about the furnishing of Balmoral - with pictures of certain rooms today and in Victoria's time.  I was absolutely shocked to see that the rooms looked identical; example, the Queen's Dressing Room had the same tables and chairs sitting in the same exact positions 140 years later!  Only the fabric at the windows and on the floors were slightly different and obviously replaced.  But at least those Balmoral pieces were high quality items.  I call that practical.

In contrast, and from the numerous photos I've seen of the private rooms in the royal residences, I fear the taste of some of the middle royal generation (Anne, Andrew, Edward) leans more to shabby and less to practical.  Quite honestly, the Mirror photos of the Wessex bedroom at Buckingham Palace looked oddly similar to my first apartment back in my university days (which even I'm ashamed today to admit).  Furniture made of light oak veneered plywood has no place in a royal palace, IMO.  THAT I call shabby.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 19, 2012, 09:43:35 AM
I agree, simply ghastly.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on January 19, 2012, 11:10:31 AM
Found a great floor plan of Balmoral Castle showing the Ballroom and Kitchen Court. Tom thanks for the help with the jpg.

(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/Balmoral-FirstFloorPlan.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on January 19, 2012, 11:20:12 AM
Here's another great plan that I don't think has been posted before.  State Apartments at Windsor Castle circa 1819.  Sorry they had to be scanned in two separate files and for the folds in the paper.  These show the former Grand Staircase and the original Chapel between St. George's Hall and the semi State Rooms.  To see larger, including the previous Balmoral plan, right click and view full size.
 
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/WindsorCastleStateApartments1.jpg)
 
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/WindsorCastleStateApartments2.jpg)
 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on January 19, 2012, 12:52:58 PM
I would agree with you Chris. Anne especially seems to have no taste. However, she has always come off as rather plain and outdoorsy. But, we should remember the Buck House apartments are basically stop overs for London engagements. They all have  far nicer accommodations elsewhere in their own homes. I would wonder actually how much of the palace rooms were put together by the occupants themselves. They could be  arranged and furnished by the Palace housedold,  keeping things cheap for budget reasons. Does this make any sense ?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: ashdean on January 19, 2012, 01:21:56 PM
I would agree with you Chris. Anne especially seems to have no taste. However, she has always come off as rather plain and outdoorsy. But, we should remember the Buck House apartments are basically stop overs for London engagements. They all have  far nicer accommodations elsewhere in their own homes. I would wonder actually how much of the palace rooms were put together by the occupants themselves. They could be  arranged and furnished by the Palace housedold,  keeping things cheap for budget reasons. Does this make any sense ?
Anne does not only have no taste she is as tight as they come....frugal..thrifty call it what you want the woman would halve a currant!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 20, 2012, 07:41:38 AM
Thank you Architect for posting the Balmoral castle plans - I've seen the main block before, but never seen the entire structure (with the ballroom and kitchen block included).  Raised a few questions for me.  First, was the Ballroom added at a later time?  (It seems to be, given the odd angle of the corridor connecting it to the main block). 

And also thank you for the early 19th century Windsor plans - copies I've seen previously cut off the large room now labeled "Library" adjacent to the Queen's Drawing Room at the corner where the Queen's and King's apartments intersect.  I know that today that room is part of the Royal Library, housed in the entire extending wing.  But back in the days when these rooms were actually occupied by monarch and consort, was that room divided into multiple rooms - one being the Queen's Bedroom?  The King's suite shows Drawing Room, Bedroom, Dressing Room, and Closet / Writing Room (and with a couple of small closet type rooms behind which likely held his bathroom/ toilet.  But plans never show a corresponding set of rooms for a queen (bedroom, dressing room, toilet).  Where were those located?  Also - what is (and was) located in the rooms above these apartments?  Were those staff rooms, family / guest bedrooms, or something else?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on January 20, 2012, 09:00:48 AM
Chris, I agree, the connection between the Ballroom and main block is quite peculiar.  I have a Balmoral guide book which has a photo taken September 1857 that shows the Ballroom in place as well as the entire Kitchen Court.  I would assume it was all constructed at the same time.  I'm adding a plan I have of Windsor that hopefully answers your questions about the location of the Queen's private apartments.  These are very early plans.  Unfortunately, I don't have anything on the spaces above the State Apartments. 
 
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e81/jmpdesign/WindsorCastle-PartialPlan2.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on January 20, 2012, 05:20:57 PM
Wow, thanks, I was correct - that Library Room did once house the Queen's bedroom / dressing room! 

Interesting also to see the site of the original staircase, before Brick Court was roofed over and the new Grand Staircase installed there, and to see plans showing Horn Court still in place (prior to IT being roofed over and the Waterloo Chamber built there).  Now I'll have to go back and dig through my later Windsor plans to compare!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on January 25, 2012, 02:04:12 PM
Royal mews at Buckingham Palace - ground floor plan:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/283_Royal-Mews.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on January 25, 2012, 02:07:12 PM
Royal yacht Britannia interior-plan:

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/jachtmap1.jpg)

(http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p67/NikolaKg/jachtmap2.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on February 25, 2012, 02:55:40 AM
Images of Birkhall in The Queen Mother's Time.

Hall
(http://www.hola.com/imagenes/realeza/casa_inglesa/2002080717508/casasreales/inglesa/galeria/birkhall/0-47-456/2002-08-07-a.jpg)

HM's Sitting Room
(http://www.hola.com/imagenes/realeza/casa_inglesa/2002080717508/casasreales/inglesa/galeria/birkhall/0-47-457/2002-08-07-a.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on February 25, 2012, 10:25:59 AM
Lovely! & cosy! Just how a room should be! :)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on March 06, 2012, 09:43:35 AM
Can anyone identify the room in Buckingham Palace that is in the latest photos on the British Monarchy website.  They are of the Queen's recent audiences and are dated March 6th.

http://www.royal.gov.uk/LatestNewsandDiary/Gallery.aspx

Thanks.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on March 06, 2012, 11:26:17 AM
Figured it out - 18th Century Room.  Here's a link with a nice photo of the space.
 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1389576/Inside-royal-suite-Obamas-stay-visit-Buckingham-Palace.html
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on March 06, 2012, 12:30:36 PM
You beat me to it!  :)  I was just hunting online for pictures to help figure it out.  Given the yellow walls, I assumed it was the Yellow Drawing Room, but was obviously wrong.  The clue was that huge portrait of George III to the left of the mantle. 

I wonder why the Queen sometimes holds her audiences in her Audience Room upstairs, and sometimes in this room downstairs? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Robert_Hall on March 06, 2012, 12:54:35 PM
My guess, Chris, is that the palace is always undergoing work of some sort. Some rooms may be undergoing cleaning or restoration, for example. Also, time of year.  Soon,  they will be preparing it for the public  visits.
 Just  my thoughts. BTW, I reckoned it was the Belian suite, but was not positive. Second guess was also the Yellow Drawing Room.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on March 06, 2012, 04:13:00 PM
You beat me to it!  :)  I was just hunting online for pictures to help figure it out.  Given the yellow walls, I assumed it was the Yellow Drawing Room, but was obviously wrong.  The clue was that huge portrait of George III to the left of the mantle. 

I wonder why the Queen sometimes holds her audiences in her Audience Room upstairs, and sometimes in this room downstairs? 

Usually its just Prime Ministers, Visiting Heads of State's, and other notable officials who are generally received upstairs in her Private Audience Room. Whilst Ambassadors, Officers of the Armed Forces and in the case of yesterday a Poet, are received downstairs away from the private apartments in the 1844 Room.   But i'd also agree too that in some cases it is a matter of which room is available and prepared.  Its been mentioned before that it would be odd to have members of the public walking past the private apartments on the way to the audience room so the 1844 Room downstairs is used for as I say more "general/public audiences".
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on March 06, 2012, 04:19:56 PM
Thanks Robert and Ridegeway - I suspect you are both right.  Here is the Queen at another diplomatic audience - a different room that is neither the Queen's Audience Chamber nor the 1870 Room.

(http://www.royal.gov.uk/List%20Images/Latest%20News/Feb12/LN-TW-Feb12-Aud-Moldova(97x85).jpg)
http://www.royal.gov.uk/LatestNewsandDiary/Gallery.aspx (http://www.royal.gov.uk/LatestNewsandDiary/Gallery.aspx)

What room is that?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Ridgeway on March 06, 2012, 04:27:12 PM
Thanks Robert and Ridegeway - I suspect you are both right.  Here is the Queen at another diplomatic audience - a different room that is neither the Queen's Audience Chamber nor the 1870 Room.

(http://www.royal.gov.uk/List%20Images/Latest%20News/Feb12/LN-TW-Feb12-Aud-Moldova(97x85).jpg)
http://www.royal.gov.uk/LatestNewsandDiary/Gallery.aspx (http://www.royal.gov.uk/LatestNewsandDiary/Gallery.aspx)

What room is that?

Hey Chris, Its the 1844 Room. Its the room which the Queen usually uses for audiences downstairs.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on April 02, 2012, 03:00:29 AM
The King's Sitting Room, Buckingham Palace. 1910

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101859 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101859)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101860 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101860)

Indian Room, Buckingham Palace. 1910

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101863 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101863)

Small Chinese Room, Buckingham Palace. 1910

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101855 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101855)

The King's Bedroom, Buckingham Palace. 1910

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101864 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101864)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101868 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101868)

The King's Audience Room, Buckingham Palace. 1910

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101857 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101857)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on April 02, 2012, 03:06:56 AM
The King's Sitting Room, Windsor Castle. 1936

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101009 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101009)

The King's Audience Room, Windsor Castle. 1936

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101008 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2101008)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on April 02, 2012, 03:13:53 AM
the interiors of Fort Belvedere, Sunningdale

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104471 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104471)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104472 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104472)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104464 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104464)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104474 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104474)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104475 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104475)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104467 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2104467)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on April 02, 2012, 03:24:27 AM
Views of Clarence House.
Watercolours by James Roberts (1800-67), dated 1861.

The dining-room
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919729 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919729)

The Duchess of Kent's large drawing-room
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919726 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919726)

The Duchess of Kent's sitting-room
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919730 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919730)

The Duchess of Kent's bedroom
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919728 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919728)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on April 02, 2012, 03:27:04 AM
Clarence House, St James's Palace: the garden front
A watercolour by Joseph Nash, 1861
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on April 02, 2012, 03:34:56 AM
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919727 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/919727)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 02, 2012, 10:07:03 AM
Thank you for sharing Le Roi Soleil! I love the Kings sitting room & bedroom, lovely interiors!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Emperor of the Dominions on May 14, 2012, 09:53:27 AM
Is Buckingham Palace ugly?:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18056612

R.I.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Nikola on May 18, 2012, 05:08:35 AM
The Queen in bed in bedroom of Belgian Suite at Buckingham palace:

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/05/17/article-2145520-00051AB700000258-682_634x596.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 18, 2012, 01:21:04 PM
Great find. The photo was only published once as it was deemed too personal to be shown public. Maybe they do it for the Jubliee...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Brassov on May 19, 2012, 03:21:55 AM
It would appear as if "South York" is to be demolished, which is of course no loss. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on May 25, 2012, 10:44:56 AM
Love to see pictures of the Russian Chapel that Grand Duchess Marie built in Clarence House. She and her husband Duke Alfred of Edinburgh used Clarence House as their London base.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: cphiggin on June 04, 2012, 06:46:42 PM
Does anyone have any pics of the interior of Princess Anne's Gatcombe Park?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 05, 2012, 08:26:12 AM
Never seen any but arial sights
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on June 06, 2012, 09:00:13 AM
Does anyone know which room the Queen used to record her Diamond Jubilee Message?  The British Monarchy website indicated it was recorded in the Presence Room but I've never heard of this space before.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on June 07, 2012, 07:49:36 AM
I've also never seen or heard about a room by that name.  Having just gone back over my floor plans again, I came up with one possibility:  the large room located between the Queen's Audience Chamber and the Royal Closet just off the Minister's Staircase.  In old floor plans from prior reigns this room was labeled a sitting room for a senior lady of the court (Miss somebody or another - I can't recall).

The traditional sequence of rooms in a royal palace's state apartments was:  Guard Room, Presence Chamber, Audience Chamber, and finally one or more withdrawing rooms or cabinets.  So it would make sense to me that the room preceding the Queen's Audience Room would be the Presence Room.

Thoughts?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: architect on June 09, 2012, 08:58:02 AM
That could very well be the space as the photo shows a reflection of a window directly opposite the fireplace, which is the case when looking at the plans of the room between the Queen's current Audience Room and Royal Closet.  I went back to those old plans, the Queen's current Audience Room is actually labeled Tapestry Room with the room between that and the Royal Closet labeled Miss Knolly's Sitting Room.  The Audience Room in those earlier plans was actually located next to the Queen's Sitting Room.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: MarshieM on January 19, 2013, 05:49:32 PM
an interesting old photo of regency room, BP

(http://c590298.r98.cf2.rackcdn.com/XDC4_012.JPG)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Le Roi Soleil on February 06, 2013, 07:15:41 AM
The Queen's Boudoir, Buckingham Palace. 1912
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/926104/the-queens-boudoir (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/926104/the-queens-boudoir)

The King's Sitting Room, Buckingham Palace. 1912
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/926098/the-kings-sitting-room (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/926098/the-kings-sitting-room)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: MarshieM on February 11, 2013, 04:48:39 PM
Interior design for the Casson Suite at Windsor Castle

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931500/windsor-castle-suite-240246-main-bedroom (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931500/windsor-castle-suite-240246-main-bedroom)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931501/windsor-castle-suite-240246-main-bedroom (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931501/windsor-castle-suite-240246-main-bedroom)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931498/windsor-castle-suite-240-246-single-bedroom (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931498/windsor-castle-suite-240-246-single-bedroom)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931499/windsor-castle-suite-240-246-sitting-room (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931499/windsor-castle-suite-240-246-sitting-room)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931503/windsor-castle-suite-240246-dressing-room (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931503/windsor-castle-suite-240246-dressing-room)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931504/windsor-castle-suite-240246-dressing-room (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/931504/windsor-castle-suite-240246-dressing-room)

Different schemes for Oak Room, Windsor Castle:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929476/windsor-castle-oak-room-scheme-a (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929476/windsor-castle-oak-room-scheme-a)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929478/windsor-castle-oak-room-scheme-b (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929478/windsor-castle-oak-room-scheme-b)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929479/windsor-castle-oak-room-scheme-c (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929479/windsor-castle-oak-room-scheme-c)

Duke's study at BP:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929433/buckingham-palace-the-libraryante-room-to-hrhs-study-schemes (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929433/buckingham-palace-the-libraryante-room-to-hrhs-study-schemes)

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929434/buckingham-palace-libraryante-room-scheme-3 (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/929434/buckingham-palace-libraryante-room-scheme-3)



Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: gleb on February 12, 2013, 05:40:53 AM
Thanks for posting these photos! they're very interesting.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 13, 2013, 07:26:52 AM
Where in Windsor Castle is the Casson Suite?  Is that one of the principal guest apartments in the south wing overlooking the Long Walk? 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: MarshieM on February 13, 2013, 09:45:44 AM
exactly. It's better known as rooms 240-244. By the way: do you have Buckingham Palace floor plan?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 13, 2013, 04:28:55 PM
I do, but unfortunately have been informed (by more than one other forum member) that those plans are copyrighted and sharing them is technically illegal.  So while I'm happy to use them to answer any questions if I can, I cannot send them out. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: gleb on February 21, 2013, 05:20:58 AM
I don't think it is right those floor plans should be copyrighted. It's simply unfair, and I say so even if I own a copy of them, which I paid, but I would be glad to share them for free if this wasn't against any law.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 21, 2013, 07:32:12 AM
Well, it certainly is not illegal for me to point out that there is no delete button for the Internet.  Once something is posted online, it exists for all time if you can find it.  So anyone really seeking the same plans that I have could simply Google different search terms such as "Buckingham Palace floor plans" and so forth.  It likely won't come up on the first few pages, but I suspect if you're willing to dedicate 20-30 minutes on the search, you will end up happily in possession of the plans.  Good luck!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: MarshieM on February 22, 2013, 07:02:23 AM
searching over 1 hour and still no results...
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on February 22, 2013, 07:55:33 AM
This link - which redirects directly to a page on this forum, shows the ground floor plans pre Victorian (before the ballroom wing added).
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=6957.15 (http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=6957.15)

This link shows a hand-drawn plan of the State rooms (west front)
http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A0PDoX5ndCdRXQsAjXmJzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTBlMTQ4cGxyBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDaW1n?back=http%3A%2F%2Fimages.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dbuckingham%2Bpalace%2Bfloor%2Bplans%26fr%3Dyfp-t-900%26fr2%3Dpiv-web%26tab%3Dorganic%26ri%3D6&w=450&h=185&imgurl=46-236-36-161.servers.dedipower.net%2Fimages%2Faccess%2Fbp_floorplan.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2F46-236-36-161.servers.dedipower.net%2Fdefault.asp%3Faction%3Darticle%26amp%3BID%3D881&size=15.5+KB&name=The+Royal+Collection+-+The+State+Rooms%2C+%3Cb%3EBuckingham+Palace%3C%2Fb%3E&p=buckingham+palace+floor+plans&oid=4dab758c78bdbc6f2c10a131925969d9&fr2=piv-web&fr=yfp-t-900&tt=The%2BRoyal%2BCollection%2B-%2BThe%2BState%2BRooms%252C%2B%253Cb%253EBuckingham%2BPalace%253C%252Fb%253E&b=0&ni=48&no=6&ts=&tab=organic&sigr=12ghkl22e&sigb=13mtrccho&sigi=122q301pt&.crumb=QBe8rtL0zPh
 (http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A0PDoX5ndCdRXQsAjXmJzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTBlMTQ4cGxyBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDaW1n?back=http%3A%2F%2Fimages.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dbuckingham%2Bpalace%2Bfloor%2Bplans%26fr%3Dyfp-t-900%26fr2%3Dpiv-web%26tab%3Dorganic%26ri%3D6&w=450&h=185&imgurl=46-236-36-161.servers.dedipower.net%2Fimages%2Faccess%2Fbp_floorplan.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2F46-236-36-161.servers.dedipower.net%2Fdefault.asp%3Faction%3Darticle%26amp%3BID%3D881&size=15.5+KB&name=The+Royal+Collection+-+The+State+Rooms%2C+%3Cb%3EBuckingham+Palace%3C%2Fb%3E&p=buckingham+palace+floor+plans&oid=4dab758c78bdbc6f2c10a131925969d9&fr2=piv-web&fr=yfp-t-900&tt=The%2BRoyal%2BCollection%2B-%2BThe%2BState%2BRooms%252C%2B%253Cb%253EBuckingham%2BPalace%253C%252Fb%253E&b=0&ni=48&no=6&ts=&tab=organic&sigr=12ghkl22e&sigb=13mtrccho&sigi=122q301pt&.crumb=QBe8rtL0zPh)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: traditionalist on March 27, 2013, 10:56:20 AM
Here is a floor plan of Buckingham Palace (the ground floor) n the way it would of appeared before the addition of Blore the bore, i still cant find one of the state floor from this time though without the east range, there is one of the queens apartments without the east range but not the whole state floor.
I think the image below may have actually been printed after the east range was added but it does give someone a much better idea.

(http://www.ribablogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/TheBuilder1912_plan_500px.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on March 28, 2013, 07:23:02 AM
Interesting - I notice a few things that have been changed in the main block and north wing since that time.  This plan doesn't appear to have the Minister's Staircase (at the north end of the Marble Hall).  Also, the open area just beyond that spot has since been "taken up" by the Belgian Corridors. 

In the north wing, the King's Staircase (from the Prince of Wales entrance via the courtyard) also doesn't seem to be here, while the large staircase just west of this (between the Sovereign's Entrance and the Prince of Wales entrance) looks much larger and in a different spot than it is on later plans. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: toddy on April 02, 2013, 01:38:08 AM
the kings staircase is in the middle of the north wing in the middle you can see it  near the forcourt
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 02, 2013, 06:36:01 AM
But according to photos I've seen, and my later floor plans, the present King's Staircase winds up around the Prince of Wales Entrance hall from the courtyard.  This plan shows the half-flight of steps rising to the corridor, but doesn't show the staircase continuing upward in the same space.

And in my later plans, that large staircase you are referring to as the King's Staircase (further west) is no longer there - it is replaced by three small offices or bedrooms.  The newer plans show a smaller staircase and the Queen's Lift next to that space (directly in front of the Sovereign's Entrance from the north front).

It seems to me that when the East Front was added (at which time the Prince's Staircase was built into the northeast corner of the palace), that likely triggered the relocation of other staircases along the north wing for better flow.  Some stairs were added, others eliminated.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: MarshieM on July 08, 2013, 10:32:56 AM
30s interior pics of Royal Lodge, Windsor:

(http://img835.imageshack.us/img835/5416/3uoh.jpg)

(http://img526.imageshack.us/img526/7849/rciq.jpg)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 16, 2013, 12:50:17 AM
I remember that desk. Princess Margaret & Snowdon posed there.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Windsor on July 16, 2013, 10:41:44 AM
Does anyone know how William and Catherine's apartment remodel is progressing in Kensington Palace?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on July 16, 2013, 01:58:41 PM
There is little known about the construction going on within Apartment 1A. It has been reported that asbestos was found and has been removed, that the state will pay for all major repairs/construction while the royals will pay for all decoration costs privately, and that their move-in date is sometime this fall. Other than that, really not too many details have been shared. I wouldn't be surprised if the palace released a few photos once the work has been done....maybe not in the same vein as when Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary of Denmark moved into the recently remolded Frederik VIII's Palace, but perhaps a few. Fingers crossed!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 20, 2013, 11:24:27 PM
It will be their taste.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: MarshieM on September 06, 2013, 12:18:02 PM
Wonderful photos of rooms in Buckingham Palace from Royal Collection website :

XVIII Room (part of Belgian Suite):

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/sites/royalcollection.org.uk/files/styles/collection-object-download/public/col/267_365399_LPR_1.jpg?itok=jQz567K3)

1855 Room:

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/sites/royalcollection.org.uk/files/styles/collection-object-download/public/col/239_362257_LPR_1.jpg?itok=BPTkFPE1)

Yellow Drawing Room:

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/sites/royalcollection.org.uk/files/styles/collection-object-download/public/col/554_365409_LPR_0.jpg?itok=rSgt-7An)

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/sites/royalcollection.org.uk/files/styles/collection-object-download/public/col/9424_365472_LPR_0.jpg?itok=5Y0j6blh)

Glimpse of the Spanish Room (part of Belgian Suite):

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/sites/royalcollection.org.uk/files/styles/collection-object-download/public/col/150_365369_LPR_0.jpg?itok=tdrLMbfJ)

Glimpse of the Orleans Bedroom (part of Belgian Suite):

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/sites/royalcollection.org.uk/files/styles/collection-object-download/public/col/166_365373_LPR_0.jpg?itok=u4pqTvdw)

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/sites/royalcollection.org.uk/files/styles/collection-object-download/public/col/161_365371_LPR_0.jpg?itok=S35i4gxY)

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on September 07, 2013, 03:59:07 PM
It's quite shocking to read about the most recent security breach at Buckingham Palace whereby a man was able to scale the 12' perimeter, break his way through a palace door and make it up to the 1st Floor State Rooms. The police are not saying in which room the man was arrested, but it was via a motion detector that alerted the palace guards. And, get this, after questioning the man, they let him go! Apparently he has to appear in court in October, but they let him go. Unbelievable.

How does this happen with the tight security at the palace? I guess it's not tight enough. It must be hard guarding such a large building with so many possible methods of entry. Windsor Castle must be even worse. But, with all the latest technology and the number of guards on duty at any given time it's still shocking that a breach can still happen. 
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on September 08, 2013, 11:57:00 AM
More of the story is coming out. The man caught within the palace is being held in a mental health unit where he will stay for 28 days for assessment. So he wasn't let go as I had read yesterday; however, his accomplish outside the palace walls bailed himself out of jail.

Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: joye on August 01, 2015, 09:42:02 PM
Which Buckingham Palace room is this please and where is it located on the floorplan?



(http://i967.photobucket.com/albums/ae159/joye-gordon/IMG_20150802_00010_zpsihrbgwhq.jpg) (http://s967.photobucket.com/user/joye-gordon/media/IMG_20150802_00010_zpsihrbgwhq.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on March 28, 2016, 04:16:37 PM
It was quite a treat seeing for the very first time the monarch's private entrance to Buckingham Palace in "The Queen at 90." The foyer is painted the same color as her reception room where she accepts diplomate's credentials. It is rather plain with only a few pieces of furniture, but it is illuminated with many windows and is very bright. I was able to see the inside of the elevator as the Queen stepped out as well. Thrilled!!!
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: CHRISinUSA on April 07, 2016, 09:22:57 AM
The Cambridges this week hosted a reception at Kensington Palace in advance of their upcoming foreign tour.  Photos of the reception were not clear enough for me to answer answer this question:  when they host official functions at Kensington, are those held in the palace's state rooms, or in the Cambridge's private apartments?

In the past I suspect that official royal events at Kensington were always in the state apartments.  But since Historic Royal Palaces renovated it and turned the lower 2 floors of the state block into public exhibition / function rooms, I wonder if those apartments still at the disposal of the royal family for official functions?  And if so, would the Royal Household have to "rent" the rooms (as any other company / institution would do), or are they still entitled to use them free as back when the entire palace was under the control of the Royal Household?
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: IvanVII on June 03, 2016, 04:20:29 AM
From the Historic Royal Palaces website:

"The palaces that Historic Royal Palaces are responsible for are all owned by The Queen 'in right of Crown'. This means that Her Majesty holds the palaces in Trust for the next monarch and by law cannot sell, lease or otherwise dispose of any interest in the palaces."

So they are still royal palaces which would mean the royal family may use them for official purposes, as the crown still "owns" them and they are simply managed by the trust.
Title: Re: Royal Interiors, Part II
Post by: Kalafrana on June 03, 2016, 06:27:06 AM
I would imagine that the exhibition/function rooms are designed so that they can still be used for formal royal occasions, without any alteration beyond moving the odd chair.

Ann