Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => The Greek Royal Family => Topic started by: Marc on January 18, 2005, 07:04:28 AM

Title: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 18, 2005, 07:04:28 AM
I would like to know much more about Aspasia Manos,wife of King Alexander I of Greece and mother of future Queen Alexandra of Yugoslavia?Any pictures of her?Her daughter,sinse her dauhter Alexandra was also cousin of Prince Consort Phillip of Great Britain,and also wrote some books about him...Anyone knows anything about this facts?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: jfkhaos on January 18, 2005, 08:19:38 AM
I think that Aspasia was made a princess and given the title of Princess Alexander, but I am sure that are multiple members who can expand on this topic.  Apparently Queen Sophie even warmed to the girl.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marlene on January 18, 2005, 01:00:41 PM
Quote
I think that Aspasia was made a princess and given the title of Princess Alexander, but I am sure that are multiple members who can expand on this topic.  Apparently Queen Sophie even warmed to the girl.


Apasia Manos was married to King Alexander of the Hellenes.  It was a secret marriage at first as she was a Greek commoner.  She was not queen.  She was pregnant when Alexander died, and gave birth to Alexandra several months later.  The restored King Constantine I recognized Alexandra as a princess of Greece and Aspasia was created Princess Alexander.

Alexandra was a childhood playmate of Philip - and her name is on several books, including a bio of Philip (although she never actually wrote the books - ghost written.)

Alexandra and Aspasia were based in Italy, and Alexandra married King Peter II of Yugoslavia. Not a happy marriage.  Financial problems and Alexandra's mental instability were issues  .. she tried suicide several times.  They had an apartment in NYC - and their little son Alexander lived in an apartment across the hall with his nanny.  Both parents went back to Europe, separately, and Aspasia came to young Alexander's rescue and raised him.  Peter returned to the USA where he died following a liver transplant .. and Alexandra was largely institutionalized for the rest of her life.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 18, 2005, 05:42:22 PM
Thanks to you both.I know she was a commoner,but she was interseting to me sinse I found that she was connected with some Moldavian,Romanian and I think Italian Famous families.Her ancestors were,(forgive me if I don't spell the names of the families good):-Ioann Callimachi Prince of Moldavia,-Princess Sevastia Callimachi born 1736,-Prince Grigorius Suco 1771-1836,-Countess Sevastia Dudescu,-Prince Constantin Suzo who died in1873,-Princess Roksana Rakovitza(dont know the spelling),-Princess Euphrosina Suco 1830-1878,also Princess Euphrosina Ghica,Princess Marioara Caradga( ???),Princess Radu Caradga,also don't know the spelling,Princess Aglae Rosetti who died in 1871.......and so on.Please forgive me if I didn't spell this like I schould,but I am also puzzled with these names I found.I was also reading,I don't remember where,that Queen alexandra of Yugoslavia said in some of her books that her mother is a descedant of some Bysantine Emperor through some of these families.I know that if someone knows anything about this,it's Marlene.It would be interesting to know something about this.Thanks
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 21, 2005, 11:02:29 AM
It seems that this Princess is a mistery to everyone...I found out about her ancestors while looking at Crown Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia(Princess Aspaias only grandson) ancestors,so I found hers also.It was quite interesting to me to see that she had a really good fimily background-Princes of Roumania,Princes of Moldavia,rulers of Wallachia(don't know about Rosetti Princely family-obviously of Italian origin) and also found out that many of her ancestors were diplomats,one of them was even Foreign Minister of Greece!Also,one of her cousins Ileana Manos(much younger) married Prince de Orleans of France
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Svetabel on January 21, 2005, 03:47:33 PM
This not a very good photo of Aspasia was listed on e-bay

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/feomarie/royals/PrincessAspasia.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on January 22, 2005, 09:19:12 AM
Queen Sophie of Greece did indeed warm up to both Aspasia and Alexandra.  In fact, I read this in the private diaries of Princess Olga of Greece which her son Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia has given to me for research and eventual publication.

My hope is to get these wonderful diaries to book form, along with a sizable number of Princess Olga and Prince Paul of Yugoslavia's photos.  I chose about 150 photos from their private collection this past week and now have all these materials here at home with me.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 22, 2005, 10:02:43 AM
Great work Arturo,I met his youngest son Prince Dushan(for those who don't know son of Prince Alexander and his 2nd wife Princess Barbara von und zu Liechtenstein) a year ago at some party(very nice and polite guy),and sinse my friends know my passiomn for everything witch is royal I was seated next to him and then had a chanse to talk to him.I was talking with him about European Royals and he was very stunned how much I know so much about them(I am still 22)...Arturo,when you complete your work please inform me about it.I would be very glad...GDElla,thaks for a beautiful picture.Thanks everyone!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on January 22, 2005, 12:22:58 PM
Dushan Yugoslavia is a nice young man indeed...he reminds me so much of his father, more and more every time I see him.

I spent Monday and Tuesday in Paris with Princess Barbara, Dushan joining us for drinks and a good chat.  He is, unfortunately, not very interested in royal matters and finds it fascinating that people like us know more about his family than he does.

Dushan is dating a girl from Mexico, where he is visiting at the moment.  We discussed the possibility of doing a trip to Costa Rica together, which he is very interested in visiting and where I have a house.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 23, 2005, 06:50:30 AM
Great Arturo,I was in Paris two weeks ago and saw(just saw  :() where are they living.Please update me with your work!!!What else could you tell me about Prince Alexander and Princess Barbara,I am very interested!!!How they met,her background,with whom are they in good terms,is she going to Marisch-Sternberg Castle where she was born?Thanks in advance
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on January 27, 2005, 09:45:03 AM
Princess Barbara and Prince Alexander are extremely nice people. They were my guests here in San francisco for the VIIth Eurohistory Conference last October, and of all the royal guests we have had there, they were the absolute, hands-down, best!

Princess Barbara's family castle in Moravia was destroyed by fire.  her mother visited before this and came back devastated by the reminiscences.  Princess Barbara has not been to the family estate since departing in 1945 as the soviets were pouring in.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on January 27, 2005, 09:47:07 AM
Oh and before I forget, the last issue of The European Royal History Journal # XLII-December 2004 has a biography of Princess Barbara's father, illustrated with photos she donated to the Eurohistory archive.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 29, 2005, 06:02:56 PM
Of course,I would like to see that.How can I get in to possesion of this magazine?Still,do you have any iformations about ancestors of even families that I have posted as Princess Aspaias ancestors...Were these families prominent ones in this region?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: NessimK. on February 06, 2005, 10:06:47 AM
The princess Aspasia lived in Venice for a long time, about 30 years till 1972, when she died there. The Venicians still remember her very well, and talk about the "byzantine princess".
Aspasia lived a diffult but  exciting life. Her myth is still alive in Venice. She lived in Giardino Eden, in Judecca. She buried in "San Michele"  (Venice's cemetery) close to Stravinsky's tomb,  and in her tomb you can see even today, roses left (her favorite flowers).
She was the last in Venice that had private gondola, she was eating very often in Gritti Palace Hotel or in Harry's Bar.

Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 06, 2005, 10:12:45 AM
Aspasia Manos:

(http://img222.exs.cx/img222/1885/aspasia7vq.png)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 08, 2005, 07:45:30 AM
Thanks for your info and for picture!She was claiming she descended from Bysantine Emperors through some of the families I posted but don't know how...Also don't know much about these families either!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: grandduchessella on February 08, 2005, 01:32:21 PM
During the Aspasia Manos 'crisis' (about Alexander wanting to marry her), the Duke of Connaught was sent to Greece in the hope that he could influence the young King in the right direction (ie not abdicating over it and thus sending the country into total chaos). This caused an impression to be made that the British hoped that Princess Patricia would marry the King; another rumor was that perhaps the way was going to be cleared for young Arthur to take over the throne. None of this was true, however, and when the Duke himself interviewed Aspasia Manos, he found her 'very nice, simple and well-educated'. Though Lord Granville thought he was disappointed by her looks, others felt that he was very charmed be her and supported the marriage.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: jfkhaos on February 08, 2005, 01:43:36 PM
I had read that the "intended" was not Princess Patricia, but Princess Mary, Princess Royal, and that Alexander was afraid that, if this was the case, it would cause damage between the Greek and British courts as to his answer.  Apparently the Duke of Connaught thought that Aspasia was highly attractive.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Danjel on February 11, 2005, 05:49:06 AM
A nice picture of Aspasia when she gained her flying-certificate in 1931

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v666/daan73/GRIEAspasiaManos.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 11, 2005, 12:45:06 PM
Quote
Wau,what a picture!Does anyone have a picture of her unfortunate daughter Alexandra?


Marc, I don't know Alexandra's story, why was she unfortunate? Thanks.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Danjel on February 11, 2005, 12:49:36 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v666/daan73/KingandQueenofSerbia.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Danjel on February 11, 2005, 12:51:11 PM
Am going to a birthday party, so very quick, I have an article about Alexandra I can translate, but I know she tried to commit suicide..
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Danjel on February 11, 2005, 12:52:07 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v666/daan73/Alexandra.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: NessimK. on February 12, 2005, 05:11:02 AM
The Alexandra's book is FOR THE KING'S LOVE(1952),  an autobiography about her life until 1952, full of fotos and memories....
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 12, 2005, 12:48:29 PM
She loved her husband more than he loved her...Fair enough to be unfortunate...Danjel,I can't see your two pictures  :( Averyone,thanks for posting them!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: lostfan on February 13, 2005, 01:10:48 PM
Does anyone know anything about him? Are there photos? I know he died early from an accident, but what exactly killed him and why did his father abdicate in his favor instead of his older brother?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: bluetoria on February 13, 2005, 01:42:25 PM
During the WWI, King Constantine, against the wishes of his Prime Minister, refused to side with the Allies. He was eventually forced to flee the country. The Allies then refused to accept his son, George, as king because of his background in the German military. That's why Alexander was chosen.
He was bitten by a monkey & died of septicaemia.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 19, 2005, 09:38:48 PM
Yes,quite so!!!  :) Strange thing,isn't it?Most of the Protestant-Lutheran(Great Britain,Belgium,Netherlands,Denmark,Norway...) and even Ortodox reigning families were Germans(Russia,Bulgaria,Greece)...or have been married to the Germans(Sweden-Leuchtenberg,Baden,Nassau,Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha,Battenberg,even Sommerlath  ::) )...and the most interesting-everybody tried to hide their German origines with changing their family names(Battenberg to Mountbatten,Teck to Cambridge,Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha to Windsor,Holstein-Gottorp to Romanov,Schhleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg's even droped their German titles,but didn't change surname  :D )!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: LisaDavidson on February 19, 2005, 11:02:36 PM
A great deal of the distancing oneself from German origins has been as a result of perceived German aggresion during WWI and WWII. I might add, that royals are not the only ones who  have practiced this. Ordinary people also have done this, especially after WWII and the Holocaust.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: NessimK. on February 20, 2005, 05:02:27 AM
Yes Grand-Duke you have right. Aspasia and Alexandra are the only  princess with trueborn Greece blood . Also Alexandros of Yougoslavia ( in a half). Pehaps that reason made  lot of problems  for them with a many members of Greek royal family.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on February 20, 2005, 11:17:51 AM
Blood poisoning is highly deadly, more so back in those years and in a country like Greece where sanitation was not as commonplace it was only worst.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 20, 2005, 01:05:13 PM
Does anyone have any other picture or even a portrait of Princess Alexandra?I find her very beautiful!She tried to kill herself 4 times because of her husband!  :(
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Mandie, the Gothic Empress on February 21, 2005, 08:45:11 PM
Quote
king Alexander died on 25 October 1920. He was 27 years-old. He left his wife Princess Aspasia pregnant. She gave birth to their child, Alexandra on 25 March 1921 (5 months after Alexander's death).




Princess Alexandra was the only greek royal member to have greek blood.......
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on February 22, 2005, 01:38:50 AM
And Queen Anne of Great Britain was the last English monarch with English blood, at least until Elizabeth II, who is the daughters of a Scotswoman with English ancestry...so your point is?

George V (1865-1936) was accused by disgusting politicians of not being English...he was insulted by this statement...for had his family not live din Briatin for more than two centuries already...doesn't that make you English?

I wa snot born in the USA...I chose to come to the USA to study and later to build a life for myself here, giving up the comforts I was raised with...it was my choice...and indeed as an American by choice I would be terribly insulted if someone says to me that I am not one...now imagine how my great-great-grandchildren would feel if in the year 2065, for example, someone told them they were not American because their great-great-grandfather was not born in the USA?  Birth is an accident that can provide nationality...I made a conscious choice to adopt my new country's nationality.

The fact that the Greek royal family finds its roots in Schleswig-Holstein and not Mount Athos or Thessaly...does it make them less Greek than any other Greek today...given that the family lived in and led the country for more than a century...I believe His Majesty feels as Greek as Niarchos or Onassis, if not more so.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 22, 2005, 06:15:35 AM
Of course he does and it's very good,but the people don't feel him Greek and that's why they don't like him in Greece...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 22, 2005, 09:33:45 AM
Quote
Of course he does and it's very good,but the people don't feel him Greek and that's why they don't like him in Greece...


I wouldn't make such a sweeping statement. Obviously there are a large number of people who don't want a monarchy there--but there are also many many people in Greece (as well as Greeks living abroad) devoted to the Royal Family. In the channel 5 interview with King Constantine earlier this year, he showed his icon collection, all of which were sent to him by loyal Greeks.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on February 22, 2005, 09:40:18 AM
His Majesty made a political blunder in 1967, a mistake that put an end to a reign that started among much promise.  He was young and inexperienced, at a time when the country needed the steady hand of someone like his late father...alas destiny...

However, in Greece the royal family always provided a degree of constancy that the political class was never able to provide for the people.

The plebiscite was not an excercise in democracy within the cradle of democracy...it was nothing but a disgusting fraud in which the monarchy anf its supporters were obstructed from partitipating openly and allowing them to rally in defense of the institution.  It was yet another shameful act from a brankrupt political class responsible for always getting Greece into muddles, and then when things did not go as planned turning around and laying all the blame on the monarchical institution.

King Constantine is as Greek as any Greek will ever be...and yes he receives thousands and thousands of letters, packages and presents from his supporters in Greece, a sham democracy that up to very recently still had political exile in force...a democracy having political exiles?  Really...

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Robert_Hall on February 22, 2005, 10:53:35 AM
Despite what King Constantine considers himself, the fact is, most Greeks-inside Greece- have no fondness for him or his family. Arturo, you are aware that this goes way back to the begining of the Greelk monarchy and has, for the most part been political propaganda by the opposition with no pretence of being "loyal" There are, indeed supporters in the country, but they are a distinct minority. I know it is ridiculous, but some even blame him for the rule of the generals! My own family [grand parents] were ferevent supporters but their best friends were equally anti.  I think the king has much more support from ex-pats than at home. Some of the trashy things I have heard said about them are not worth repeating.  Personally, I kind of like the guy, but I see not hope for any sort of restoration.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on February 23, 2005, 09:51:28 AM
I do not see any hope of restoration either...although there are those who faifthfully see it as possible...I guess in topsy-turvy Greek politics anything can happen...but I just don't see it though.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on February 23, 2005, 11:14:18 AM
Not just her husband...Alexandra suffered from depression and that is a genetic condition, not solely blamed on her husband.

She also did not enjoy a good relationship with her only son and Alexander and Alexandra seemed to be quite at loggerheads for any years.  I have read dreadful things said between them.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 23, 2005, 05:16:27 PM
I have also heard that he persuaded her to come to London and that he would take care of her...When she came,he sold her villa in Venice and put her into some kind of sanatorium!That's just what I have heard!Doesn't mean it has to be true!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on February 23, 2005, 06:23:27 PM
I think Alexander was incredibly attractive. I also find his short, troubled reign and tragic death to be quite interesting. The death of course being very sad as well.

This is my favorite photo of him. This one I found on the net but a lovely copy, sans the writing, appears in a recent issue of Majesty magazine.
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v465/PrinceEddy1864/Album%20Two/alex.jpg)

A quick question~
Does anyone know what Alexander was called as a child and young man by his family, esp. Sophie? I mean did he have a nick name or Greek diminutive? I have also never heard of any being used but I have never read any private correspondance mentioning him either.
I know that private letters can often be the best and most legitimate place to find out about family or pet names and such. Just curious.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on February 23, 2005, 07:48:38 PM
Majesty used this photo from Elleniki Dinasteia (Hellenic Dynasty) the book co-authored by Prince Michael of Greece last year, when they did a promo for it last year...a marvelous volume by the way...even though it is only available in Greek.  As far as I know the only bookstore selling it in the USA is Eurohistory.  I fetched a large number of copies in Greece last June and we are almost sold out.

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on February 23, 2005, 09:45:01 PM
Yes I could not remember the name of the book. It does look interesting.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 26, 2005, 05:30:32 AM
Is there anywhere picture of his daughter Alexandra wearing a tiara?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on February 26, 2005, 08:42:26 AM
Quote
Alexander's death

On 27 September 1920, king Alexander, after repairing the engine of his car at Tatoi, was involved in a bizarre accident.

His dog, Fritz, was involved in a fight with 2 pet monkeys, owned by the manager of the estate. The king tried to separate them and was bitten on the leg by one of the monkeys.

The wound turned septic and 4 weeks and 7 operations later, king Alexander died on 25 October 1920. He was 27 years-old. He left his wife Princess Aspasia pregnant. She gave birth to their child, Alexandra on 25 March 1921 (5 months after Alexander's death).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v488/Sebastiao/alexandrosa.jpg)



I know this will sound strange but in this picture Alexander I of Greece resembles King Carol II of Roumania.  I sumize it is the russian coming out.  

Alexander II was certainly a good looking man.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 27, 2005, 12:52:07 PM
Since Russian,Greek(Danish) and Romanian royal families were Germans who married Germans he could only look like German  :) Funny,but it's true!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on March 02, 2005, 11:39:43 AM
Quote
His Majesty made a political blunder in 1967, a mistake that put an end to a reign that started among much promise.  He was young and inexperienced, at a time when the country needed the steady hand of someone like his late father...alas destiny...


Arturo Beéche



Arturo,

What was this political blunder?

How do the people of Greece feel towards Marie Chantal Miller, the commoner who married Crown Prince Paul?

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marlene on March 02, 2005, 11:56:07 AM
Quote


Arturo,

What was this political blunder?

How do the people of Greece feel towards Marie Chantal Miller, the commoner who married Crown Prince Paul?

TampaBay



Marie Chantal and family are often featured in color photo series and articles in Greek magazines, including one called Life & Style ... there is a modicum of interest in the family, but nothing leaning toward a restoration.  I doubt the average Greek person is interested in Marie Chantal at all ..
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on March 02, 2005, 05:30:43 PM
Quote


I know this will sound strange but in this picture Alexander I of Greece resembles King Carol II of Roumania.  I sumize it is the russian coming out.  

Alexander II was certainly a good looking man.


Oh you are right he does look like Carol there. Very much so.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Paul on March 03, 2005, 01:40:58 AM
Quote
I know this will sound strange but in this picture Alexander I of Greece resembles King Carol II of Roumania.  I sumize it is the russian coming out.  


Both men had Romanov grandmothers. Their mothers were 1st cousins. Queen Marie of Romania & Sophia of Greece were granddaughters of Queen Victoria.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on March 03, 2005, 01:25:29 PM
Also Alexander I of Greece paternal grandmother Queen Olga of Greece (ne GD of Russia) and Carol II of Roumania maternal grandmother GD Marie of Russia were 1st cousins.  Their grandfather was Nicholas I of Russia.   Theorefore same great-great father-Nicholas I of Russia?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on March 03, 2005, 01:49:42 PM
Quote

Both men had Romanov grandmothers. Their mothers were 1st cousins. Queen Marie of Romania & Sophia of Greece were granddaughters of Queen Victoria.


While I think Alexander certainly took after Sophie, I dont think Carol looked much like Missy at all. Alexander and Helen both looked very much like their mother I think. While George and Irene looked just like Tino.

For some reason I love to look at how people resembled their parents and grandparents and siblings.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Paul on March 04, 2005, 01:27:24 AM
Quote
For some reason I love to look at how people resembled their parents and grandparents and siblings.


Yes- it's fun to watch the variations on the theme down thru generations. With such well documented families it's easier to do, indeed.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on March 04, 2005, 09:25:45 AM
That is indeed great fun to do because it allows you to see physial similarities carried through generations...

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on March 04, 2005, 11:07:37 AM
Quote

While I think Alexander certainly took after Sophie, I dont think Carol looked much like Missy at all. Alexander and Helen both looked very much like their mother I think. While George and Irene looked just like Tino.

For some reason I love to look at how people resembled their parents and grandparents and siblings.


I have the opposite view!  I think Alexander and Irene (and to a point Paul) looked more like Tino, with Helen, George taking after Sophie.
Ha-ha!  All in the mind/eye I suppose!
Regards
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on March 04, 2005, 03:16:42 PM
Quote

I have the opposite view!  I think Alexander and Irene (and to a point Paul) looked more like Tino, with Helen, George taking after Sophie.
Ha-ha!  All in the mind/eye I suppose!
Regards


Welcome Iskenderbey  :D
Interesting. Yes I had left Paul out. I think as a child he was the spitting image of Sophie but as he grew began to look more like his father and brother George. All were quite attractive I think.  

I notice your avatar, I guess you have a special affection for Tino?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on March 07, 2005, 12:30:02 PM
[
I notice your avatar, I guess you have a special affection for Tino? [/quote]

Thank you for the welcome.  I have a special affection for the whole Greek Royal Family, past and present.  Especially for King Tino, our great "Stratilati", or General, who more or less set Greece's present boundaries.  Also b/c since King Tino's picture I thought suited this board.

Regards once more.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on March 07, 2005, 05:05:56 PM
It is a nice picture of him, very "Kingly" looking. I think you will find alot of us are quite interested in the Greeks as well and Tino in particular.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on March 07, 2005, 06:58:34 PM
Quote
[
I notice your avatar, I guess you have a special affection for Tino? Thank you for the welcome.  I have a special affection for the whole Greek Royal Family, past and present.  Especially for King Tino, our great "Stratilati", or General, who more or less set Greece's present boundaries.  Also b/c since King Tino's picture I thought suited this board.

Regards once more.



Weclome to the Alexander Palace Forum.

I assume you are Greek.  Therfore, I ask a real Greek-Why did the Greeks vote to get rid of the King in 1967?

I follow the Royals but have not studied Greek history after WWII.

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Mandie, the Gothic Empress on March 07, 2005, 09:49:27 PM
Quote
And Queen Anne of Great Britain was the last English monarch with English blood, at least until Elizabeth II, who is the daughters of a Scotswoman with English ancestry...so your point is?


Arturo Beéche



I was JUST saying that Princess Alexandra of Greece was the only member in the Greek royal family to have greek blood......... >:( :)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on March 08, 2005, 11:33:45 AM
Quote


Weclome to the Alexander Palace Forum.

I assume you are Greek.  Therfore, I ask a real Greek-Why did the Greeks vote to get rid of the King in 1967?

I follow the Royals but have not studied Greek history after WWII.

TampaBay


The Monarchy was not officially abolished until 1974.  
The King went into exile 1967, but remained Head of State until 1974.  
The issue of why the monarchy was abolished in a long and twisted issue, one would need endless hours to fully appreciate.  Furthermore, it depends on whose view one subscribes to.
For myself, the King was blamed by the politicians for the rise of the Junta in 1967, and while he did play a part, the part played by other players, such as the politicians, contributed just as much to the destabilization of the nation and the rise of the Junta.  One can also not neglect the part played by the U.S. in supporting the Junta.  The referendum in my opinion, is not without blemishes either.  The fact that Karamanlis swore his oath as Prime Minister to the Junta President and not the true Head of State.  The fact that the King or his supporters had no time and could not organize themselves to campaign for the monarchy, and such other factors such as harrassment of farmers and traditional monarchist areas to vote against the King to have their debts written off, etc. etc.
Long story, quite sad at the end of the day.
Regards
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on March 08, 2005, 08:50:38 PM
Quote

The Monarchy was not officially abolished until 1974.  
The King went into exile 1967, but remained Head of State until 1974.  
The issue of why the monarchy was abolished in a long and twisted issue, one would need endless hours to fully appreciate.  Furthermore, it depends on whose view one subscribes to.
For myself, the King was blamed by the politicians for the rise of the Junta in 1967, and while he did play a part, the part played by other players, such as the politicians, contributed just as much to the destabilization of the nation and the rise of the Junta.  One can also not neglect the part played by the U.S. in supporting the Junta.  The referendum in my opinion, is not without blemishes either.  The fact that Karamanlis swore his oath as Prime Minister to the Junta President and not the true Head of State.  The fact that the King or his supporters had no time and could not organize themselves to campaign for the monarchy, and such other factors such as harrassment of farmers and traditional monarchist areas to vote against the King to have their debts written off, etc. etc.
Long story, quite sad at the end of the day.
Regards


Correct me if I am wrong.  Athens is more European than "Greek" and the people of Athens wanted or "thought they wanted " a republic.  

The rest of the country considered themelves Greek first then "maybe European"  sand highly supported  the Monarchy and King.  

After the King left and went into exile some greek dude who had become an American naturalized citizen came back to Greece and became the Prime Minister.  This Greek Naturalized American Greek Prime Minister was either married to or having an affair with some Greek blonde bomb shell who stared in a Hollywood movie called "Never on Sunday" and later went to jail for embezzlement of money from the Greek governemnt or was it Roumania?

In between Onassis married Jackie Kennedy and Maria Callas sold 1,000,000.00 records.

Do I know my post WWII Greek history or what!

It is amazing what knowledge a $100,000 American University education will get you.

Best Wishes,

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Robert_Hall on March 08, 2005, 09:12:28 PM
Ah-hem....Melina Mercouri was not a blonde bombshell. She WAS Cultural Minister. I do not think she married the man you are referring to.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on March 09, 2005, 08:14:01 AM
Quote
Ah-hem....Melina Mercouri was not a blonde bombshell. She WAS Cultural Minister. I do not think she married the man you are referring to.



I am sure you are right.  I was just demonstrating my indepth (LOL -very Loud!!!!) knowledge of Post WWII Greek History.

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on March 09, 2005, 09:22:44 AM
Melina had deep black hair if I recall...that woman could sing!

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Robert_Hall on March 09, 2005, 09:35:31 AM
Melina [?] or Maria  [!]
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on March 09, 2005, 11:33:05 AM
Quote
Melina had deep black hair if I recall...that woman could sing!

Arturo Beéche


Arturo, Melina's hair was towards blonde.  
Maria Callas had the jet black hair!
Regards!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eurohistory on March 09, 2005, 02:48:10 PM
You must be right.  I saw her in concert years ago and to me her hair looked black, then again the light was not very good and I tend t be as blind as a vat.   :'(

Arturo Beéche
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 08, 2005, 02:38:44 AM
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/auersperg23/PAwedding.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 08, 2005, 02:40:37 AM
This is the wedding picture of King Alexander I's daughter Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark to King Peter II of Yugoslavia!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 08, 2005, 03:07:37 AM
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/auersperg23/QA.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 08, 2005, 03:09:23 AM
And one more of Alexandra with her son Alexander!She was really beautifull as all the Greek Princesses are/were...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 11, 2005, 12:23:19 PM
Don't know how she is related but in Queen Alexandra's book "For a King's love" she said that her mother has descended from Bysantine emperors through some of the noble families she's related!As I didn't know witch families were in question I started to research and found some Princely and Countly family Aspasia has descended from!She really has a lot,maybe not royal,but noble ancestors...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on April 12, 2005, 04:36:07 AM
Quote
Don't know how she is related but in Queen Alexandra's book "For a King's love" she said that her mother has descended from Bysantine emperors through some of the noble families she's related!As I didn't know witch families were in question I started to research and found some Princely and Countly family Aspasia has descended from!She really has a lot,maybe not royal,but noble ancestors...



Did not her father hold a position at the Greek Court?  If so, doe anyone know what position he held.

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 12, 2005, 05:26:52 AM
Yes,her father was a Marshal of the Court,General-Colonel Petros Manos!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on April 12, 2005, 09:56:35 AM
Quote


Did not her father hold a position at the Greek Court?  If so, doe anyone know what position he held.

TampaBay


In fact, there is a story that Princess Aspasia's father was so devoted to the royal family, that he swam the corinthian isthmus to get to Athens in time to leave with King Constantine to their first exile in 1917. (At least from what I remember)
Regards
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 12, 2005, 06:24:13 PM
How interesting...What was his position after royal family found out abot the affair between King Alexander I and Aspasia?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on April 13, 2005, 08:59:51 AM
Quote
How interesting...What was his position after royal family found out abot the affair between King Alexander I and Aspasia?


His position remained the same, as far as I can tell, especially when he went through all that trouble to stay loyal to them, even in exile.
Regards
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 13, 2005, 12:10:41 PM
What kind of relation Aspasia had with the rest of the Royal family after the death of her husband King Alexander I?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on April 13, 2005, 05:39:29 PM
Quote
What kind of relation Aspasia had with the rest of the Royal family after the death of her husband King Alexander I?


Very good from I understand, especially with Queen Olga.

TampaBay


Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 13, 2005, 06:00:12 PM
I read that she later lived in her Villa in Venetia(can't remember Villa's name) and was one of the most famous Venetian ''citizens'' of the time...remembered by a lot of people still!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on April 14, 2005, 01:59:49 PM
Her Villa in Venice  named "Garden of  Eden", and was one of the most beautiful houses  in  the city.
Are you sure for her good releations  with the Greek royalty house? ???
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 14, 2005, 07:43:28 PM
Thanks for the name!Have something more informations about the Villa?Photos?It would be also nice to hear something more about Aspasia's relations with the rest of the royal family!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on April 15, 2005, 05:48:37 AM
Quote
Her Villa in Venice  named "Garden of  Eden", and was one of the most beautiful houses  in  the city.
Are you sure for her good releations  with the Greek royalty house? ???


After the death of Alexander I, she was given the title of Princess Alexander.  The daughter Alelander was recognized as a Royal Highness after the death of her father.  Queen Olga became rather close to this grandaughter. Most important-she had Greek blood.

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 15, 2005, 07:48:16 AM
And what about the rest of the family?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 15, 2005, 07:48:58 AM
Except Queen Olga?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on April 15, 2005, 03:41:57 PM
There was a tragic story about a Byzantin ancestor of princess Aspasia Manos,  named "princess Maria Argryropoulos" in 11o century. (Argyropoulos is the  surname of Aspasias mother).She married the son of Venecian Doge but she has an unlucky deth in Venice.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 18, 2005, 06:36:20 PM
Didn't know Argyropulos family was that old...I new about her Princely ancestors but just did not know how she descended from Byzantine Emperors as she claimed!I thought maybe through some Roumanian(Wallachian),Moldavian or even Italian(Rosetti) Princes!Thanks for this kind of informations!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 18, 2005, 06:38:44 PM
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/auersperg23/Argyropulos2.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 18, 2005, 06:39:36 PM
Coat of arms of Argyropulos family!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 18, 2005, 06:40:36 PM
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/auersperg23/Manos.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 18, 2005, 06:42:26 PM
Coat of arms of Manos family!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Danjel on May 10, 2005, 09:52:48 AM
with thanks to AlexM.! Must be this one...

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v666/daan73/11.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on May 10, 2005, 01:58:50 PM
I want to send to the forum's friends some  pictures of Aspasias Villas in Venice but i dont know the way to do that ....
Could you help me? Tell me please
The fotos are  from my private folder...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on May 10, 2005, 05:36:21 PM
Copy the picture from your private folder to the same folder from witch you posted the previous picture...and then post it!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: grandduchessella on May 10, 2005, 06:32:28 PM
I thought I read that Queen Sophie was close to her granddaugher Alexandra as the only link to her late son.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on May 11, 2005, 02:54:52 PM
Quote
I thought I read that Queen Sophie was close to her granddaugher Alexandra as the only link to her late son.


Both Queen Alexander and Queen Olga were very close to Alexandra.  The were both the driving force behind her mother receiving the Title "Princess Alexander".

Both Queens were smart enough to realize the benefit of having a member of the Royal family with true Greek Blood.  Politics aside, they really loved Alexandra as a person and as the only link to there son & grandson.

More detailed information in Van der Krists' "Kings of the Hellenes".

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: grandduchessella on May 11, 2005, 03:43:19 PM
Sent to me by ALEXM for posting:

Aspasia's villa
The Villa called "Jardino Eden" and had a great and mysterius story (there were a lot of books of this house).

(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y86/daisyconnaught/-fpnnDSC00390.jpg)
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y86/daisyconnaught/-fpnnKipos-FEden.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on May 12, 2005, 05:18:08 AM
GDElla and ALEXM,thanks so much!Does anyone know who owns it now?Why is ''Jardino Eden'' so ruined?What was this villa famous for except Aspasia?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on July 06, 2005, 07:30:50 AM
I will post one more of her daughter Alexandra...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on July 06, 2005, 07:31:13 AM
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/auersperg23/AlxandraYug.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on July 06, 2005, 07:32:20 AM
Although,can't tell if this is black and white photo or black and white portrait!?I am puzzled...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on July 17, 2005, 12:30:17 PM
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/auersperg23/AlexandraGr.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on July 17, 2005, 12:31:26 PM
And one more of Alexandra,here already as a Queen in exile...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on September 28, 2005, 08:23:56 AM
Please, anyone know more details about relations between crown prince Alexander and his mother queen Alexandra or his grandmother princess Aspasia Manos?
specialy for the years 1960-1970......
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: LisaDavidson on September 28, 2005, 07:22:51 PM
Quote
Please, anyone know more details about relations between crown prince Alexander and his mother queen Alexandra or his grandmother princess Aspasia Manos?
specialy for the years 1960-1970......


What kind of information are you seeking? If you have some specific questions, Crown Prince Alexander is reachable. However, I wouldn't want to ask him such a general question. He would have been 15 years old in 1960 and 25 in 1970 - and was mostly in the UK during this period.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on September 29, 2005, 10:15:18 AM
Lisa,

Was CP Alexander estranged from his mother or just seperated due to her illness?

YampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on September 29, 2005, 11:18:16 AM
From the book
FOR THE KING’S LOVE
The intimate Recollections of Queen Alexandra of Yugoslavia

A short part from the Chapter 1 (Mougey and Pougey):


Nannie Jackson, a comfortable jolly Yorkshire woman who had come to Italy to look after me, gave my curly brown hair a final brushing. “The princess can go in to see Her Royal Highness now” she told the maid waiting to take me to my mother.
It was a lovely, pearl-tinted morning in Florence, and the new day’s sunshine was streaming blithely into bedrooms of our small villa. I scampered off, calling “Mougey! Mougey!” my pet name for my mother – and hearing her answering call “Pougey! Pougey!”- her pet name for me- as I rushed towards her room.
As always, a funny delicious little feeling squiggled through me, the feeling of pure happiness that a small girl of five can get from knowing she is loved and secure, that in a moment she is going to be kissed and cuddled by her mummie who is, surely, the most wonderful person in the world.
I rushed into charming bedroom. My mother was sitting at her dressing table before open windows. Her back hair, falling to her waist, gleamed sometimes dark gold and sometimes raven blue as the sun glanced on its silkiness, while she brushed it with a gold and silver brush. I flung myself at her and she gathered me up. I thought she was the most beautiful lady I had never seen, and I wanted to be with her for always.
Presently she set me down in order to continue her toilette. One of the earliest lessons I had to learn was that I could not be with Mougey and sit on her lap all day. I was an over emotional and highly strung little girl, an I had  to realize  that I must be  a good child and  stay with Nannie, because Mougey was often very busy. But this morning I had a  big question to ask. “Why have I got a new Nannie?” “Because Nannie Foster  became homesick for Greece and wanted  to go back there” said Mougey.
I sensed the longing in her voice. “But she’s English and that’s our home” I cried. “Why don’t we go back with her?” “ Because Pougey, we  are exiles” said my mother slowly. I pondered the word “exile”. What did that mean? That was English  word too? I should have understood  it, for  all the five years of my life I had  spoken in English  to my Nannie, to Mougey, and Amama  my German grandmother, Queen Sophia of Greece, who was a sister of Kaiser.
“What’s an exile Mougey?” I persisted. “And why are we exiles?” I hesitated over this new, strange word. My mother put down her hair brush, and turned to look at me. She had big shining brown eyes which could flash anger, even fury when her tempestuous nature was roused, but now, this lovely morning, they were soft and nearly tear-misted.
“Exile Pougey, is a very difficult word for a little girl to understand” she told me gently. “It means we can’t go back to Greece for a little while because they would rather not have a King there now, and while  the King is away from home, so is the family”.
“Well, I’ m going  to tell Amama that I want Uncle Georgie (King George II of the Hellenes) to go back so that we can all  go with him” I said  triumphantly. “ Amama always makes everything  right”.
Me mother, who  had a great affection  for her mother-in-low Queen Sophie, smiled then. “Yes, Pougey,  you tell Amama” she agreed. “Amama will explain.” But neither  my grandmother  nor my mother  attempted  to explain, then,  the intricacies and tragic  uncertainties which governed both their exile and their loved homeland.
Only in fragments  gleaned from listening to the grown-ups’ conversation, and later, when I had to study the history of my country, did I begin  to know, and to realize in part, why we could not  go home and why I had always  been regarded, and accepted  with much  understanding, as a “highly-strung” little girl.  It was  because my father’s  tragic death, which shocked the world,  occurred when  my mother  was only in  the beginning of her  pregnancy. Alone, she  did not care to live, or to see the child  she had borne.
“ I wanted us both to die, Pougey” she told me once  “for without  your father it seemed the world  held no home for either of us”.
So my birth, which should  have marked the start of the “living happily-ever-after” to my mother and father’s story, instead began  for my mother a lonely and unceasing struggle to bring up the daughter of a dead King. The romance of my parents is, to me,  a profoundly moving love story. And because  it has  made mother a woman of infinite wisdom and  understanding towards me, in all my sorrows  and all my happiness, I would like  to tell it to you now .........…………………".

For the members of Alexander's Palace
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on September 29, 2005, 06:32:59 PM
Thank you very much for this!Could you tell me more about her book ''For a King's love''?I can't find it anywhere...P.S.Alex,where are you from?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on September 30, 2005, 11:23:54 AM
I don't know if I've mentioned this before, but about two years ago, a Mr. Alexandros Zaoussis wrote an excellent book, published in Greece, on the love affair and subsequent marriage between King Alexander and Aspasia Manos, from their courtship, marriage, to the death of the King, all within the context of the political situation in Greece at the time.
It was fairly done and not biased at all, and was very historically accurate (at least in my opinion).

Regards
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on September 30, 2005, 02:23:22 PM
Can you tell us also the name of the book?And how can we purshase it?Thanks
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on September 30, 2005, 02:24:06 PM
Correctin:purchase it?Thanks
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marlene on October 05, 2005, 02:13:47 PM
Quote
Thank you very much for this!Could you tell me more about her book ''For a King's love''?I can't find it anywhere...P.S.Alex,where are you from?



You might try out of print book sites such as www.addall.com as the book was published in the 50s -- rather embellished - and ghost written.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marlene on October 06, 2005, 09:19:51 AM
Quote
Lisa,

Was CP Alexander estranged from his mother or just seperated due to her illness?

YampaBay


The Crown Prince was largely raised by his maternal grandmother ...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on October 06, 2005, 01:52:20 PM
What impresions he has about his grandmother Aspasia?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on October 07, 2005, 01:30:39 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/PandA.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on October 07, 2005, 01:32:26 PM
Princess Alexandra with her husban King Peter II and son Crown Prince Alexander...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on October 16, 2005, 05:19:12 PM
From the book FOR THE KING’S LOVE
The intimate Recollections of Queen Alexandra of Yugoslavia
A short part from the Chapter 1 (Mougey and Pougey):

…… I suppose one could say it really began in the early nineteenth century, in the great war of Greek Independence, a famous and powerful family, the Phanariotes, settled in Athens. They could trace their direct descent from the Greek Byzantine Emperors, and were linked with the noblest family of Venetia and Greece. Those were my mother ancestors, always tremendous and true patriots of Greece, and staunch supporters of the monarchy wish was established in 1863, when Prince William George of Schleswing-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksburg-Beck, the younger son of King Christian of Denmark, became King George I of the Hellenes. His sister was Queen Alexandra of England.  Half a century later, in 1913, on the eve of the First World War, this King George I was assassinated at Salonika and was succeeded by his son, King Constantine, whose wife, Queen Sophie, was the sister of the German Kaiser.
A favourite equerry to King Constantine was Colonel Manos, my mother’s father. He had sent my mother Aspasia, to France and Switzerland to be educated. Now, with all Europe seething towards war, he brought her home to Athens. The attractive fifteen- years old Aspasia Manos, already showing signs of the lovely, vivid beauty and vital character which was to win her the heart of a King soon became a favourite at the Greek Court.
The two younger sons of the King, Prince Alexander, nineteen, and Prince Paul, fifteen, were her constant companions. Two years later Alexander and Aspasia knew themselves to be in love. Joyfully they sought King Constantine’s permission for their marriage. He and Queen Sophie were not opposed to it. My mother, thought a commoner, came from one of the noblest of the Greek aristocratic families, and King Constantine approved his second son’s engagement to her. But he would not fix a date
For their wedding, for in 1915, he was a sorely troubled man.
With Britain and Germany at war Greece was in a position of great strategic importance. The Western Allies, knowing Constantine was married to the Kaiser’s sister, held that both he, and his eldest son Crown Prince George, would incline to German, rather than French and British sympathies. So, in June, 1917, they demanded his abdication, and that of the Crown Prince.
My mother has so often told me of that ill-fated June morning. At dawn she had been out riding in the forests with her fiancé and his sister, Princess Helen of Greece, who later married King Carol of Rumania. Gaily the three young people cantered back to the Palace and ran indoors, ready for their breakfast. They had been out since 6 a.m. and now it was nine.
In the square hall of Palace they met King Constantine. Prince Alexander made his father a slight bow, and smiling asked: “How are the things to-day, Papa?” Constantine looked gravely at his son. “They are as bad as they can be” he answered. “YOU are King”
The Western Allies had demanded that Alexander, the second son, should succeed his father, who, with the Crown Prince, was banished. My mother now was engaged to the King: and she, Princess Helen, and the new King all ran upstairs to Helen’s sitting room and wept. They were young for such responsibility, young and a little afraid.
That day all Alexander’s family left. Before they went exiled king Constantine summoned him and Aspasia. “Alexander is King only in my place” he told them. “the war cannot last long and I shall return. Until that day I wish both to give me your word that you will not marry. Any issue of such marriage would complicate and endanger the line of succession in these distressing circumstances” Solemnly the young people pledged themselves to wait until the King’s return.
Then the new king Alexander was left alone. His entire family went to Switzerland. He was bereft of friends, family and counsellors; left to occupy a throne which seemed already to be tottering, and to “rule” beside the all-powerful Prime Minister, Eleftherios Venizelos, whose dominant personality and great experience would have dwarfed, if not extinguished a man much older and more tried than he.
My mother too was almost alone; with the exception of her mother all her family left with the exiled King. Together the young engaged couple turned to each other for solace, and for each other guidance. And often it was my mother who had to be stronger and more resolute of the two.
How their love, their faith and their loyalty captured the true friendship of that turbulent statesman, Venizelos, is now part of my country history: but the ordeal of that love and loyalty was only completely known to two people, my mother ad father. So much in love, so far from everyone they knew, isolated in their own land, they clung to each other, and longed to marry.
Now that Alexander was the lawful King, there was nothing, except their promise to the exiled King Constantine, to prevent marriage. Yet through all the weary months of war they kept that promise. “Perhaps it is a good thing that we cannot know the future, Sandra” my mother said to me wistfully. We always believed we would have a good and full life together for so many years after the war, your father and I. He used to tell me again and again, “I shall spend all my life looking after you, but it will take longer than life can give me to thank you for all you mean to me. I could not have managed this alone, and I could not live without you.’ Life did not give him very long, and I have had to try to live without him”
At last came the Armistice. But still King Constantine did not return. Greece was now in a state of unrest. Some wanted the exiled King to return, some wanted his son Alexander, the new King, to remain on throne, while others wanted no monarchy, but a republic. In 1919, Prime Minister Venizelos announced that the nation would go to the poll. The people would now decide in any event, which King, and which form of government they would have, and his released King Alexander and Aspasia Manos from their promise. After three and a half years engagement, they married, on 4 November, 1919.
It was a very simple ceremony, purposely quiet so that the marriage could not be said to influence the forthcoming elections.
But my Father still was King. Now he and Aspasia saw even less of each other, for, as the King’s wife, she must go to various parts of her husband’s land, visiting the hospitals still full of war-wounded men, the rest shelters and the voluntary organizations; and meanwhile my Father toured the stricken areas of his country.
In the summer of 1920, happier than they had ever been, they went together to their summer Palace of Tatoi, my Father trying practically to wrap my mother in cotton-wool. She was going to have a baby……
Continue

For the members of Alexander’s Palace

Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Grand Duke on October 23, 2005, 06:06:45 PM

King Alexander I

(http://www.ahistoryofgreece.com/photos/kingalexander.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Maki on October 23, 2005, 09:29:03 PM
Quote
And Queen Anne of Great Britain was the last English monarch with English blood, at least until Elizabeth II, who is the daughters of a Scotswoman with English ancestry...so your point is?

George V (1865-1936) was accused by disgusting politicians of not being English...he was insulted by this statement...for had his family not live din Briatin for more than two centuries already...doesn't that make you English?

I wa snot born in the USA...I chose to come to the USA to study and later to build a life for myself here, giving up the comforts I was raised with...it was my choice...and indeed as an American by choice I would be terribly insulted if someone says to me that I am not one...now imagine how my great-great-grandchildren would feel if in the year 2065, for example, someone told them they were not American because their great-great-grandfather was not born in the USA?  Birth is an accident that can provide nationality...I made a conscious choice to adopt my new country's nationality.

The fact that the Greek royal family finds its roots in Schleswig-Holstein and not Mount Athos or Thessaly...does it make them less Greek than any other Greek today...given that the family lived in and led the country for more than a century...I believe His Majesty feels as Greek as Niarchos or Onassis, if not more so.

Arturo Beéche


The question of the ethnicity of blood seems to come up again and again in this forum.  All of us come from somewhere else.  The official definition of a Native American is “one who is known as a Native American”.  Saint Paul, who was rolled down the Acropolis in a barrel and stoned in Karpanisi, said that the Poet of Earth, (Poetis tis Gis, in the Greek creed) “hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth.”
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Maki on October 23, 2005, 09:34:18 PM
Quote
Ah-hem....Melina Mercouri was not a blonde bombshell. She WAS Cultural Minister. I do not think she married the man you are referring to.


Melina married that French film director, Jules Dassin, I think his name was.
Maki
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Maki on October 24, 2005, 09:44:59 AM
Quote

The Monarchy was not officially abolished until 1974.  
The King went into exile 1967, but remained Head of State until 1974.  
The issue of why the monarchy was abolished in a long and twisted issue, one would need endless hours to fully appreciate.  Furthermore, it depends on whose view one subscribes to.
For myself, the King was blamed by the politicians for the rise of the Junta in 1967, and while he did play a part, the part played by other players, such as the politicians, contributed just as much to the destabilization of the nation and the rise of the Junta.  One can also not neglect the part played by the U.S. in supporting the Junta.  The referendum in my opinion, is not without blemishes either.  The fact that Karamanlis swore his oath as Prime Minister to the Junta President and not the true Head of State.  The fact that the King or his supporters had no time and could not organize themselves to campaign for the monarchy, and such other factors such as harrassment of farmers and traditional monarchist areas to vote against the King to have their debts written off, etc. etc.
Long story, quite sad at the end of the day.
Regards


Iskanderbey, once again you summarize a complex period of history with compassion and wisdom.  I am becoming quite a fan of yours.  Have you written a book?  Would you consider it?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on October 24, 2005, 10:32:18 AM
Quote

Iskanderbey, once again you summarize a complex period of history with compassion and wisdom.  I am becoming quite a fan of yours.  Have you written a book?  Would you consider it?

While I thank you, Please, no need for the praise.
I am just another student of history thorougly interested in modern Greek history and the very important role that the Greek monarchy played in shaping modern Greece, not to mention that I am very interested in the members of the Greek Royal Family as individuals, outside the realm of their duties.

I have considered writing, but unfortunately I don't have the resources or the time to do so at present...I don't even know how to start!  But who knows what the future holds!
Xaipetismata!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Modena on November 06, 2005, 11:48:55 AM
Quote
Thank you very much for this!Could you tell me more about her book ''For a King's love''?I can't find it anywhere...P.S.Alex,where are you from?


A good place to find rare royal books:

www.abebooks.com

I've found many an out of print book from the many booksellers on this site.  :D
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:33:49 PM
I will post some pictures of Jardino Eden that AlexM. send to me;
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:34:32 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia31.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:35:39 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia21.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:36:21 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia61.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:37:20 PM
Two photos of the garden...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:37:49 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia51.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:38:27 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia41.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:39:52 PM
Two photos of the pool...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:40:19 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia11.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 08, 2005, 06:41:37 PM
And one photo of the owner:Princess Aspasia with her daughter Alexandra!One more time-thanks AlexM.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 10, 2005, 01:13:33 PM
......Two years before mummie had gone to Venice and bought a most beautiful garden, nine acres of it, bounded by a canal on one side and a lagoon on the other. It had belonged to an elderly aunt of the Rt. Hon. Sir Anthony Eden (now Prime Minister of Great Britain), and so we called it the Giardino Eden Eden Garden. One sight of it makes everyone call it the Garden of Eden, for it is a riotous wealth of all the loveliest flowers which bloom in that lush and sunny climate. This was the first step towards a promise mummie had been making to me ever since I went to school: “One day, Sandra, we'll have a real home of our own.”
Every Christmas, and for every birthday present I always asked first for a "home of our own ". All the girls at school had one, but, as with everything else, I was different. I had no home, I was always “staying” with somebody, or “staying” with mummie in a hotel.
Now mummie had built a real home for us in the beautiful garden in Venice, a little villa, just as I wanted. This was home, a small, a lovely and a real home, and it was all ours, mummie's and mine. Apart from my very own bedroom, the balcony of which gave onto the gardens, I had my own rowing boat too. I could sail it in the lagoon and the swimming pool, which was filled with water from an artesian well in the garden.
Mummie decided I must learn to speak Italian fluently now that we were living in Italy, so in the holidays a governess was engaged to look after me. She was called Signorina Carnesecchi (in English “Miss Dried Meat”) and on the first day she met me she was, without doubt “Miss Very Wet Meat”, and it was all my fault.
The black haired Signorina was nervous and very much in awe of my mother, La Principessa, as she called her. She was in mourning for her mother when she arrived, dressed entirely in black, her long hair pinned in a mournful black bun in the nape of her neck, and her hands encased in black cotton gloves. 1 was to have my lessons out of doors, and the Signorina looked strangely out of place in the colourful care free garden, muffled in her precise black garments. After an hour I grew fidgety, and took her to see my rowing boat. It was floating upside down on the swimming pool, as it had a leak, and it was just beyond my reach.
“Please give it a push for me, Signorina”, I asked, wanting to show it to her properly. But her English and my Italian were not good enough. She thought I meant her to get in it, and with a gargantuan effort she tried to upend the boat. She over balanced and fell on top of it. She and the boat went straight to tile bottom. I shrieked, signorina bubbled, and then emerged looking like a funereal mermaid, with her long black hair bedraggling over her white face, and her black clothes clinging to her. Poor thing, she was distraught, not at her own plight, but that my mother, La Principessa, should see her like that, on her first morning with us. “She think I 'ave no dignity, your highness," she explained to me tragically, and she begged me to hide her from mummie. We found a hiding place behind some tall flowers where it was very hot. There I helped to cook the signorina in the bright sunshine till she gently steamed out. When mummie came to look for us, some time later, I had a dry governess and a firm friend, for mummie never knew of her baptism, and I never told her.

We had a gondolier in Venice, too, and fie took us in the gondola along the canal outside our " front door " and into the city when we went out.

Unhappy schooldays
A part for Alexandras book
FOR A KING LOVE

MARC thanks a lot for your help
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 10, 2005, 03:24:16 PM
No,please-thank you for those lovely parts of Alexandra's book...I am wondering are there any parts witchdescribe her(and her mother's) relations with other royal(or unroyal,but mostly noble-from her mothers side) cousins and also is there any part witch desribes her marriage to Peter and Alexandra's relations with in law family,since her mother in law Mignon did not want this marriage...?Thanks
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 11, 2005, 08:45:04 AM
WAR CHANGES EVERYTHING
Chapter 4

"....PRINCESS IRENE of Greece, Aunty Tim, was marrying the Duke of Spoletto (who later became the Duke of Aosta) in the surnmer of I938, so mummie and I left the Paris season early to go to the wedding in Florence before going on to Venice. This was my first “grown up” holiday. School was behind me I had made my debut and everyone kept telling me of the wonderful years they hoped would lie ahead for “a sweet princess, so sweetly seventeen”.

But already their words were touched with wistfulness. I moved in international society, mixing with people of many nationalities and races who, already, saw the shadow of Hitler slanting across Europe. I, myself, was not really aware of this. I was too busy enjoying myself.

The Melchetts came to Venice, with a yacht in which they took us sailing along the Dalmatian coast of Yugoslavia. I remember scrambling ashore there one day, only to be halted by a most fearsome looking guard who shouted at me ferociously. I muttered hasty apologies, and scrambled down the cliff again. Neither he nor I had the slightest notion that in six years' time I was to marry his King.

We spent some time on the lovely island of Brione, where no motor car was allowed, and we passed the blue and golden Mediterranean days in idle luxury with Auntie Sitta (Queen Helen of Rumania) and Michael.

Back we went to Venice, because Philip was coming to spend part of his holidays with us, and to this I was looking forward, very conscious of the fact that I was now " out " and could join in the party making and high spirited fun for which my dashing young cousin already had a reputation. Uncle Andrea had sent him to mummie with the strict injunction that he was “to behave himself”....

Continue.....
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 11, 2005, 08:48:30 AM
From chapter 4


......But unfortunately Philip treated me with the same cousinly candour that he had always used, reserving his more romantic moments for other girls more sophisticated than I  girls whom he took out in my speedboat for hours at a time while I was left, a wallflower, on the shore! After this irritating behaviour on his part we had a thoroughly cousinly scrap. We had riot grown up so much after all.

When Gwen Melchett decided to return to England I went with her for a while, and while I was with her she contracted typhoid. She was very seriously ill, and doctors advised another recuperative holiday for her. That was how it came about that we all went to St. Moritz together for Christmas. My other cousin, David Milford Haven, joined us there and also Phillip's father, Uncle Andrea, and my great friend, Lorna Harmsworth.

I had always been crazy about ski ing, and, to my delight, it was a sport in which I excelled. Now mummie and I ski ed all day. We entered for every race we could, and great was my pride when I beat mummie, to win the Captain Beddington Behrens Challenge Cup.

It was such a lovely winter and spring that I commenced to keep a scrap book, treasuring the pictures and accounts of my ski ing achievements, the odd snap shots taken of me at the various dances I went to in the evenings, and of the gay young people who were my friends ... but the scrap book came to an abrupt halt. War was only six months away. There were no wonderful years ahead after all for a seven teen years old princess.

At first, though Britain and France were at war with Germany, we could not really believe it was war. There was no fighting, and in Paris, not even a hint of the grimness and terror that were to follow so rapidly.

Mummie and I went to Mme Cotnareanu's great newspaper organization, Le Figaro, to pack parcels for the troops. Then, at Christmas, we went to London for a brief stay, first at Claridges, then at Buckhurst Park, Ascot, where Lady Deterding then lived.

Back to Paris, then on to Rome, mummie distractedly trying to plan how we could assemble our two homes, the one in Paris, the other in Venice. As it was still too cold to open our home in Venice she decided we would await tile warmer weather in Rome. How changed was that sunny, once friendly city.

Its broad streets were filled with hateful placards shouting   “Down with the British”

Mummie and I enjoyed being defiant in our small way, and always speaking to each other in English. This was forbidden in the streets, restaurants and shops, and always we were rudely reprimanded so we talked English all the more loudly.

In diplomatic circles relations were strained to a grotesque degree. At a neutral Embassy reception we noticed that the German and British diplomats coldly and deliberately ignored each other. Arid, after a reception given for me by the British Ambassador, Sir Percy Loraine, and his wife, we left to find that all the British cars outside the Embassy had had their tyres slit, and their petrol tanks filled with sand. The atmosphere was menacing and sullen with hate. It was my First experience of the antagonism and bitterness which the ordinary people of one nation can brew and foster against those of another. It chilled me with apprehension. If people could be so vicious only with gestures and words, how would they behave with bayonets and dive bombers?
It was not long, before I knew.
We had moved into Venice and were living each day fretfully. It seemed wrong to be doing nothing, yet where and when did one move to start doing something?
Mummie was obsessed with the need to return to nursing. She wished that I too should be trained as a nurse. Nursing, packing parcels, interpreting . . . I didn't mind what I did as long as I was occupied. I did not pretend to myself that this was either patriotism or philanthropy. It was merely that, at nineteen, I was beginning to understand some of my problems, and, in a purely personal way, the war was helping me to do this. My mind was slowly emerging from its chrysalis stage: it did not want to emerge as a butterfly. Yet it was neither trained nor equipped for anything else. There lay the cause of my troubles.
I had been born a Royal princess into a world which, even then, scarcely existed for such creatures. Within months of my birth there were no palaces, no wealth, and no purpose left in my own Royal House for a princess such as I.
Yet, with the laboured and deeply instilled belief in the “Divine Right of Kings”, my mother and my family had wholly disregarded this. I was brought up, educated and instructed as befitting the member of a Royal family. To have done otherwise with me simply would not have occurred to them. They had not arranged my life thus purposely; they had done it instinctively. How else, they would have asked in uncomprehending astonishment, would one rear a princess? A question that, even now, I would find difficult to answer logically.
In Royal families one does not question one's heritage. But what was my heritage?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 11, 2005, 08:51:28 AM
Chapter 4

......From childhood the milestones in my life had been clearly marked and unanimously accepted. Nannies, governesses, boarding school, finishing school, debut and then the unspoken, but nevertheless most firmly accepted course of all marriage, preferably with a member of another Royal House. This would set the seal on the completion, success and fulfilment of all my upbringing.
Useless then to turn to any member of my family, least of all my mother, and ask, simply, why?
To them it would have been more absurd than to ask why the sun rose and set, or why I had been born. If I received any answer at all, it would have been a long and involved treatise on the mystic, symbolic and spiritual duties of kings and their heirs, all of which I knew, and all of which I could have accepted also, had I been a King, or even a Queen. I was neither.
Marriage then  eligible marriage  had been the career for which I had been trained. That and the “talent” of meeting, mixing with, and understanding my fellow men and women. But, I thought, how could I fully understand them when I was forced always to be a little “set apart” when my fellow men and women were carefully selected to form part of the social and blue blooded cocoon of the Royal world; when even a young man who wanted to " date " me had to call me Ma'am, unless he was one of my Royal cousins.
This was revolutionary thinking, and I dared not discuss it with anyone. With what argument could I defend myself? I could think of none. Had I possessed a “vocation” there had been ample opportunity for me to demonstrate this at school, but I was no scholar.
Nor, I found, did I dislike the idea of “marriage as a career ". On the contrary, I welcomed it. Had I not always longed for a home of my own, and were not aII my day dreams centred on what I would do once I had my own home and my own babies? But I wondered, with all the romantic wistfulness of nineteen, whether my destiny might only bring its happiness if I could fall in love, and gain permission to marry some " ordinary " middle class man who would not want a social life, but who would forever be glad to be at home, just with me and the babies. That, I am afraid, was all that such a marriage meant to me then. I never took into account that there would be no maid, no cook, no nanny, no car if I married my ordinary home loving, working man. Money never entered my scheme of things. I had absolutely no knowledge of money. I had never handled it, never carried a purse, and did not know the actual cost or any single thing. When I wanted to buy something I requested mummie's permission, signed for it, and all the bills were always sent to her. One shadow, which had darkened the lives of several of my aunts and cousins, never, never troubled me. I knew that never would I be persuaded to marry any man with whom I was not completely in love. Mummie, who had known brief but total happiness in her own marriage, and, in contrast, seen the distress which loveless, arranged marriages had brought to others, would never entertain such a union for me. This I knew. “In Royal families there is no such thing as divorce”, was one of her edicts, “therefore there should be no marriage without love”. So firm were both these convictions of hers that she supremely disregarded the unalterable facts that there were divorces in Royal families, especially in our own, since the marriage of her brother in law, King George II of Greece, to Elizabeth of Rumania was dissolved, as also had been that of her sister in law Helen, to King Carol of Rumania. That my uncle Georgic had never re married, and that Aunty Sitta was still the Queen of Rumania made it possible for my mother simply to ignore the facts. She neither mentioned nor acknowledged these divorces. But in the uncertainty of that summer such thoughts and prospects were remote. I was going, to be able to think about working, and as I have said, we were living fretfully in the false peace. On the morning of I0 June, I940, I had been swimming at the Lido, not far from our house, when I noticed everyone crowding to the terrace of the Excelsior Hotel. I sensed urgency and anxiety in this crowd, and in my wet swimming suit I joined it. The Italian radio announcer was warning everyone to stand by for an important announcement. In a few minutes Mussolini was going to speak. His heavy, bull like voice shuddered through the Hotel. He was declaring a state of war between Italy and Britain and France. I noticed two English nannies, oblivious of their charges, weeping bitterly. I went back to the villa to see if mummie had heard the news. I felt shocked, yet curiously relieved, almost exhilarated. Now at last one knew where one was. Now we should be able to do something. But the first evidence of war came in a manner we had not expected. Poor Mac Doodle was arrested by Italian security police and interned. She was now a British “enemy”. Mummie had been planning to return to Paris to collect and store our furniture and most of our personal belongings which we had left there. But now, with poor Mac interned, and news of the German and Italian advance into France, we knew this would be impossible. We could not leave Venice.......

Are you bowring?
All these post are from book FROM A KING'S LOVE
By queen Alexandra of Yugoslavia
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 11, 2005, 12:59:36 PM
WAR CHANGES EVERYTHING
     Continue from foregoing post

……Sensing impending disaster mummie determined she would try to save at least one of our possessions, our car. She went on a breakneck drive to Switzerland iii order to garage the vehicle there for the duration, and I set about finding some way to make poor Mac Doodle's internment more comfortable. She was detained in a place called Abano, not far from Venice. Knowing the haphazard methods of the Italians, I soon discovered it was fairly easy to smuggle her out and bring her to Venice for the day.

This soon stopped.

The phone rang at the villa on the afternoon of 28 October. I saw mummie's hand gripping the receiver tightly as she listened to the caller. It was the Greek Ambassador. Italy had invaded Greece. We too now were “enemies”, and we were instructed to pack a few essential things immediately and be prepared to join the diplomatic train which would take us to Athens. Mac Doodle was to be allowed to come with us.

The next hours were one incredible rush. No time to sort out clothes, or to pack in any kind of order; no time to attend to the thousand things that scream for attention when one knows one is leaving one's home for years if not for good. Scarcely time in which to say a sad farewell and God speed to our faithful gondolier and his wife, Emilio and Italia, and their daughter Ilia. Should we ever meet again? We did not know.

Just before leaving I ran back tip tile stairs for one more look at my little bedroom. Mummie's voice, shrill with anxiety, called to me to hurry, but I went, for what was possibly the last time, on to my balcony and gazed into my lovely garden. The sun shone brightly, the sky was blue, everything seemed unchanged in the gentle scene. Impossible to believe that all this, my own home, would not exist for me any more. I would return. “Good bye, my little room, I'll come back” I whispered the promise and ran down to join mummie.

We started on the first of our many nightmare journeys to freedom.
Arrangements had been made between Greece and Italy each to run a train into Yugoslavia, repatriating Italian and Greek nationals. The trains would meet at Belgrade, whereupon we would disembark and change into the Greek train which would return to Athens. The Italians from Greece would take our places in their own train and first the journey was bathos after the panic and speed of our warning and departure. On board with us were members of the Greek Embassy and a very elderly aunt of mine, Aunt Minnie, who insisted I play backgammon with her all the way to Belgrade. We were in the station there for one hour, and Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia, a first cousin of King Peter, was there to greet us. I might have met my future husband then, if he had not been so averse to meeting his relatives. Years later he confessed to me that his Uncle Paul had suggested greeting us at tile station, but he had refused, saying he didn't want to meet "a lot of silly relations". When Alexander told him that I was very pretty, and he had liked me very much Peter scoffed:  “She's bound to be terrible then, if you like her”

The change of trains did us no good at all. The Italians had put on de luxe coaches to cover their part of the journey. Tile Greeks had had to send a frightful wreck in which we were to travel home, as all their trains had been commandeered for their few valiant troops in their supreme war effort.

During the whole of that four days' Journey we were without food, and water to drink, let alone water to wash in. We already looked like refugees when the family met us at Athens. Never had I taken a bath with so much pleasure as I did that first night there, in the George I Hotel......
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 11, 2005, 01:01:36 PM
......For a brief moment the world seemed to right itself. It seemed unlikely that Athens would be in the direct war zone, and mummie rented a house there. Our days fell into their almost normal routine. Mummie was nursing at the hospital each morning, and Freddie (Crown Princess Frederika) and I visited the wards, wrote letters for the wounded, helped at the Red Cross units and generally tried to do what we could. . Each day we lunched at the golf club, and then, because mummie insisted that I spend at least three hours a day in the open air because of my earlier inclination to T.B., we always played golf until dusk.

Each evening the family gathered together, either at the Palace with the King (Uncle George) or at one of our homes. Many of them were in Athens again now since war had driven them from most parts of Europe except Britain.

Even Philip, now a midshipman in the British Royal Navy, and on active service in the battleship Valiant, was with us for a few days. I never met a boy more itching for a scrap. “We'll finish this war in twelve months,” he jubilantly informed our elders. They seemed to think this optimistic. I thought twelve months sounded like eternity.

Freddie and my uncle Palo now had two babies, Princess Sophia, just two, and five months old Prince Constantine. My Aunt Katherine, my father's youngest sister, was there, and also another of my great-uncles, Prince George (called Old Uncle George to distinguish him from Uncle George, the King), and his French wife, Aunt Marie.

Old Uncle George was an enormous man, at least six feet four inches tall, with a vast memory which he was fond of airing in an immense voice. He shouted all the time, in Greek, English and often in French because his wife, Aunt Marie, insisted that he should speak her language. Old Uncle George lived on memories of past battles, revolutions and naval service.

Aunt Marie, a devoted friend and disciple of Freud she had helped him to escape from Vienna was immersed in her own versions of psychology and psychiatry. She also had a mania for photography.

This, then, was the family group in Athens in the spring of I94I. Mummie and I had been there nearly four months and we had been warned that soon we should all have to leave. The warning came two weeks before our evacuation so that this time we were a little more prepared for flight.

All possessions and clothes we had packed in trunks and sent them away, together with the faithful MacDoodle, on board a Greek destroyer bound for Crete.

Air raids had begun, and each night we packed an emergency suitcase, and placed it beside our beds, sleeping with one car open for either the air raid siren, or the telephone call which would tell us to leave at once. Even with all these precautions the Germans were upon us before we expected.

Mummie and I had gone to bed that April night when the siren went. We called to each other from our bedrooms, deciding we could not get up until we heard the planes more distinctly.

The drone of enemy aircraft increased rapidly, and, as the crunch of the first bombs made our little house tremble, the telephone rang. This was it.

“A car will fetch you in ten minutes”, a man's voice barked over the line. “The German armies are twenty four hours away”.

Mummie and I dressed quickly, our fingers fumbling with buttons and hooks, awkward in our haste and tension. We grabbed our tiny suitcases and stumbled through the dark house to the front door.

The car was already there, and the starry night was ripped by the whine of tracer bullets and the fingers of searchlights.

We scrambled into the car, grateful for its shelter from the crackling shrapnel, and the driver raced grimly through the familiar streets of my native city to the harbour, where a British Sunderland flying boat awaited us....


Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 11, 2005, 03:32:53 PM
WAR CHANGES EVERYTHING
     Continue


....All around was a sea of fire and an inferno of explosions. A convoy had just been bombed.

In the sultry awful blaze we saw Uncle George (the King), Freddie, and Uncle Palo, Freddie and her Scots Nannie trying to hush the babies who were crying loudly. Aunt Katherine was counting people and suitcases, the pilot was urging us to board the plane, and then there was a bellow and a roar  old Uncle George and Aunt Marie had arrived. He, as usual, was shouting his head off. And she ... !!

Mummie's mouth fell half open in amazement. I took one look, and, forgetting the shrapnel, bombs and all else, laughed. Aunt Marie had started the flight for freedom (via the bomb rack of a bomber) dressed impeccably for Ascot, complete with huge cartwheel floppy hat, an ermine wrap, and carrying a cine camera.

An impatient hand dragged me into the plane. We called frantic good byes to Uncle Georgic and Uncle Palo as we were herded into the bomb bays. The door slammed, the 'plane taxied lurching along the sea. As it paused to rev. Its engines I would swear I could hear, above the racket, the united thudding of all our hearts. Then the engines roared and we were airborne, flying to Crete, and beyond, into the unknown.

No one slept through the long, uncomfortable, and bitterly cold flight. Huddled in the bomb bays we whispered odd comfort to each other, took it in turns to nurse the babies.

Spring, undeterred, had dressed the morning of our escape with all the loveliness of a Mediterranean dawn....


Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 11, 2005, 03:35:59 PM
......It was about 5 a.m. when we stumbled, half dazed, half numbed, onto the jetty at Souda Bay, and smelled the fresh, sweet air. Again the babies were crying. Freddie was anxiously seeking some shelter where she could feed and change them.

Aunt Marie was handing me her absurd beige hat, and winding her cine camera. “Hold the hat, Sandra, this time I must take a picture. This is history”, she was saying. Then we saw, heard, felt, the blackness of approaching 'planes.

Falling bombs whined. Punishing clouds of torn earth and cement flayed us. Through the terrifying noise we heard the shouts and screams of those wounded, and those trying to lead us to the nearest slit trench. There we lay, in between the explosions, singing “Three Blind Mice” to quieten Freddie's babies.

At last the bombers went. Grey and filthy with dust and rubble, half deafened by the noise, we were rushed to an assembled line of ramshackle cars. In these we started an eight hours' drive over cart tracks and farm lands that I am forever unable to forget. A picture of them remains in my mind as though I am looking at confused sequences of a film in vivid Technicolor.

One moment I was dazzled by the sapphire sea, dancing and shining under the sun, almost lapping the edges of the deep golden wheat fields. Then all is the orange reddish colour of egg yolk, as, with the eyes screwed shut, I grovel tinder that wheat, sweating and almost beyond terror, while German planes roar and screech down on me.

Their machine guns bat out hideous noise, while bullets shriek and whistle like a thousand mad demons. I do not recall how often our convoy was stopped thus, or how often we had to dive to the shelter of hedges and wheat fields. It seemed to happen every half hour. I hear the babies, grimy with dust, red eyed with exhaustion, crying and whimpering. I see Aunt Marie, her long flowing gown of dark blue silk patterned with white flowers now torn and filthy beyond description, imperiously handing me her unmanageable hat to hold, while she doggedly persists in trying to film some of these scenes. I hear old Uncle George roaring.

Curiously I remember the small discomforts more than the great ones . . . a piece of grit in my eye, a painful scratching from thorns as I crawled frantically for shelter, a grazed knee.

Once we cowered from a flight of bombers, only to be told afterwards that they were the remnants of the escaping Yugoslav Royal Air Force. A ragged little group, we emerged from the thicket and cheered them.

All, it seemed, was total, grimacing, horrible madness. There was no sane world left any more.

At some stage of that terrible day we halted for a meal. While we were eating I saw two young men, unshaven, bedraggled and dressed in a ludicrous assortment of garments, coming towards us. Now, I thought, Fiv gone off my head, for each carried a walking stick over his shoulder on the ends of which were slung bundles tied up in gaudy pieces of cloth. They both looked exactly like Dick Whittington.

I knew instinctively that no one but an Englishman could look so nonchalant and so poised in such a get up. English they were, very much so and great friends of ours, Ronald Fleming and John Beith, members of His Britannic Majesty's Embassy. They told us they had been escaping n a yacht, and the…Jerries had dropped a bomb right down the . . . funnel.

They were charming, sweet, and hilariously funny over their escape from death. The only things they had salvaged from the wreck were their lives and their walking sticks. At that moment they did more for our morale than a dozen British and New Zealand divisions on the spot could have done.

By evening we reached our haven, a small rickety hotel which stood on the edge of a minute hill village. Here there was water and beds. We staggered to them, doubling tip together in the small rooms. Tonight we would sleep in temporary safety and in peace.

But after the first few hours of exhausted unconsciousness I awoke. I was hot, uncomfortable and scratching violently. The whole of my body was itching ferociously. I lit a candle, and muffled a scream. My bed was alive ... The next battle started, to be waged unceasingly during the whole of the next eight weird and fantastic days we were to five in this mountain hide out the Battle of the Bed Bugs.



Of the  book FOR A KINGS LOVE
BY Queen Alexandra of Yugoslavia

Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Modena on November 11, 2005, 09:11:36 PM
Quote
During the WWI, King Constantine, against the wishes of his Prime Minister, refused to side with the Allies. He was eventually forced to flee the country. The Allies then refused to accept his son, George, as king because of his background in the German military. That's why Alexander was chosen.
He was bitten by a monkey & died of septicaemia.


Didn't Constantine want to remain neutral? It couldn't have been easy either being the brother-in-law of the Kaiser.  :-[
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Modena on November 11, 2005, 09:18:15 PM
Quote


I know this will sound strange but in this picture Alexander I of Greece resembles King Carol II of Roumania.  I sumize it is the russian coming out.  

Alexander II was certainly a good looking man.


For some reason, I see his maternal grandfather, Kaiser Frederick III   :) A subtle resemblance perhaps. :)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Janet on November 12, 2005, 12:55:35 PM
Who was/were the person(s) who ghost-wrote Alexandra's books for her?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: isabel on November 14, 2005, 05:44:13 AM
Princess Alexandra of Greece, in needed of money, relsolved with a british publishing, to published her memorys.

The writer was a woman, JOAN REEDER.

Later, in 1959, Alexandra resolved again a biography of her cousin, Philiph, The Duke of Edinburgh, also writen by Mrs. Reeder. In despite of Alexandra´s good terms with the English Royal Family, the book was not well welcomed in Buckingham.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 14, 2005, 12:39:35 PM
Why?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: isabel on November 14, 2005, 12:56:00 PM
It seems that the book was very poor, without interest, and not very well writed.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Janet on November 14, 2005, 01:31:06 PM
Quote
Why?


In his 2004 biography "Philip and Elizabeth", Gyles Brandreth has a footnote as follows: "In 1959, she published Prince Philip: A Family Portrait, regarded at Buckingham Palace, as 'a somewhat unreliable memoir' ".  He doesn't give the BP source of that quote, but I myself suspect it came from Prince Philip.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 14, 2005, 02:48:41 PM
Anyway, the book of Alexandra's memoires FOR A KING'S  LOVE , i think that is very interesting.  Its a  dependable source  for the lives of princess Aspasia and  queen Alexandra - for two tragic figures in Greece Royal Family.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marlene on November 15, 2005, 09:42:16 AM
Quote
Anyway, the book of Alexandra's memoires FOR A KING'S  LOVE , i think that is very interesting.  Its a  dependable source  for the lives of princess Aspasia and  queen Alexandra - for two tragic figures in Greece Royal Family.



Actually, For a King's Love is rather one-sided, and ghost written.  Moreover, Alexandra was considered emotionally unstable, and had already tried to kill herself several times  -- all of her books should be taken with a grain of salt.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 15, 2005, 09:23:55 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia181.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 15, 2005, 09:24:30 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia91.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 15, 2005, 09:25:02 PM
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b375/auersperg22/Aspasia111.gif)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 15, 2005, 09:27:23 PM
Photos of Alexandra(thank Alex M.)...if you have some more of Alexandra or Aspasia I'll be very glad to post them!Thank you so much!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: AlexM. on November 16, 2005, 03:09:35 PM
Anyone knows how are the realations between crown prince Alexander and Greece Royal Family, now?
Because Konstantinos was not present in 60th celebration of Alexander in Belgrad...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 16, 2005, 04:55:07 PM
There were some informations that Crown Prince and his wife came for birthday celebrations just for one day,but I haven't seen them in any pictures,so I assume they are in good relations!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on December 30, 2005, 10:36:13 AM
Quote
Has been she Queen or just a sort of a "Princess Consort"?
Has anyone some photos about Aspasia Manos?


In short, Aspasia became a Princess of Greece only after the death of King Alexander and the birth of her daughter Princess Alexandra.

What would have happened if Alexander never died is up to anyone to guess.  Another historical "what if".
Regards
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 03, 2006, 11:27:57 AM
Don't think she will be queen though... >:(
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Iskenderbey on January 04, 2006, 10:42:05 AM
Quote
Don't think she will be queen though... >:(


I would disagree.  
If King Alexander had lived, the Prime Minister, Venizelos, would not have wanted King Constantine to return to Greece, and thus, would have probably sought to allow Aspasia to become Queen, or at the very least, a "Princess Consort", and thus allow that King Alexander's child would become successor to the throne.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 04, 2006, 11:04:43 AM
No...I don't think so. At least not at that time.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: roimat on February 24, 2006, 09:04:55 AM
Both the Greek Royal family and Prime Minister Venizelos where against Alexander to marry a commoner. So Alexander did married Aspasia in one of his friends house, secretly. When Aspasia got pregnant, the royalist part and exiled king Constantine was afraid of a boy child,which Venizelos may claim that he-the boy-is the legal succesor of his dead father. After the girl was born, King Constantine, who already been back to Greece, named Aspasia and her newborn child, Alexandra, both as ´´princess of Greece´´. He was reliefed :-))
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: roimat on February 24, 2006, 09:06:09 AM
By the way...sorry for my english...i have to do a lot of practice yet:-)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: KarlandZita on March 25, 2009, 04:15:56 PM
Alexander Ier :

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i221/pastroyals/Greeck%20royalty/alexandre.jpg)

His wife Aspasia Manos :

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i221/pastroyals/Greeck%20royalty/aspasie.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: TampaBay on March 26, 2009, 09:23:11 AM
Great pictures on this thread.

TampaBay
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 05, 2010, 10:48:38 AM
I have done a little research about Aspasia Manos and her ancestry and she was right when she claimed that she is the descendant of Byzantine Emperors...here is one of her lines:


IOANNES VI Kantakouzenos,Emperor of Byzantium,lived from 1295-1383
I
MATIAS Asen Kantakouzenos,Co-Emperor of Byzantium,lived from 1325-1391
I
Demetrios I Kantakouzenos,sebastokrator and Despot of Morea,lived from 1343-1420
I
Eirene Kantakouzene,basilissa of Morea,lived from 1400-1457
I
Stefan Brankovic ''the blind" of Serbia,Despot of Raska,lived from 1425-1476
I
Jovan Brankovic,Despot of Raska,lived from 1465-1502
I
Princess Jelena Brankovc of Raska,strangled in 1546
I
Princess Ruxandra of Moldavia,Regent of Moldavia,lived from 1537-1570
I
Ilias,Ruler of Wallachia
I
Alexandru Ilias,Duke of Wallachia
I
Ilias Alexandru,Duke o Wallachia from 1666-1668
I
Princess Sultane Chrysokula of Wallachia,died in 1694
I
Princess Helene Mavrocordato,lived from 1682-1722
I
Princess Marioara Rosetti
I
Michael Soutzo,Prince of Wallachia and Moldavia,lived from 1729-1803
I
Prince Georgi Soutzo,lived fom 1771-1836
I
Prince Constantin Soutzo,died in 1873
I
Princess Euphrosine Soutzo,lived from 1830-1878
I
Roxane Mavromichalis,lived from 1848-1905
I
Colonel Petros Manos,lived from 1871-1918
I
ASPASIA MANOS,Princess of Greece,lived from 1896-1972



It is also interesting to know that she is also related to the George VI,King of Britain,who was one of the witnesses at the wedding of her daughter Princess Alexandra and a godfather of her grandson Prince Alexander of Serbia...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 05, 2010, 01:48:05 PM
What about the Soutzo family ? Are they Princes in Greece ?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 05, 2010, 04:24:06 PM
They were Greek phanariote family whose origins are from Constantinople and who reigned in several of the Danubian Principalities...so they were Wallachian and Moldavian reigning Princes of Greek origin...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 05, 2010, 04:26:41 PM
Very interesting. Maybe Aspasia wasn't that much of a commoner as we long suspected. At least she seem to have more royal blood that Kate Middleton. Or Prince Nicholas of Greece's future bride.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 05, 2010, 05:24:36 PM
Well,in royal terms she was a commoner but in terms of blood she has a lot of noble blood...as we see she has descended from Romanian,Moldavian,Wallachian ruling Princes and through them from Kantakuzenos and Paleolog dynasties who were Emperors of Byzantium...she is also a direct descendant of Vlad II Dracul of Wallachia or "Vlad the Dragon" and through him related to Queen Elisabeth II...in fact,she shares same ancestry with every royal family of Europe!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 05, 2010, 05:49:13 PM
You mean Aspasia Manos ?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 05, 2010, 06:00:58 PM
Yes,I mean Aspasia Manos...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 05, 2010, 06:38:37 PM
No wonder she was greeted with respect in public, unlike some Hapsburg commoner wife who hasto take the back stairs. For me Royal blood is more important than titles, which could be bought with money.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 05, 2010, 06:51:45 PM
Aspasia Manos-her line from Vlad II Dracul:


Vlad II Dracul,"Vlad the Dragon",Duke of Wallachia,ruled from 1430-1446
I
Radu III,Duke of Wallachia,lived from 1430-1475
I
Princess Maria of Wallachia,died in 1511
I
Bogdan III,Duke of Moldavia,lived from 1479-1517
I
Alexandru IV Lapusneanu,Duke of Moldavia,lived from 1520-1567
I
Ilias,Ruler of Wallachia
I
Alexandru Ilias,Duke of Wallachia and Moldavia
I
Ilias,Duke of Wallachia,ruled from 1666-1668
I
Princess Sultane Chrysokula of wallachia,died in 1694
I
Princess Helene Mavrocordato,lived from 1682-1722
I
Princess Marioara Rosetti
I
Michael Soutzo,Prince of Wallachia and Moldavia,lived from 1729-1803
I
Prince Georgi Soutzo,lived fom 1771-1836
I
Prince Constantin Soutzo,died in 1873
I
Princess Euphrosine Soutzo,lived from 1830-1878
I
Roxane Mavromichalis,lived from 1848-1905
I
Colonel Petros Manos,lived from 1871-1918
I
ASPASIA MANOS,Princess of Greece,lived from 1896-1972




And here is a line of the same Vlad II Dracul to Queen Elisabeth II:



Vlad II Dracul,"Vlad the Dragon",Duke of Wallachia,ruled from 1430-1446
I
Vlad IV ''the Monk",Duke of Wallachia,lived from 1435-1495
I
Radu IV "the Great",Duke of Wallachia,lived from 1467-1508
I
Mircea III "the Shepherd",Duke of Wallachia,died in 1559
I
Princess Stanca Basarab of Wallachia
I
Semphira Logofat de Szaszebes,died in 1602
I
Adam Racz de Galgo
I
Peter Racz de Galgo
I
Christina Racz de Galgo
I
Katalin Kuun de Osdola
I
Agnes Kendeffy de Malomviz,born in 1727
I
Baron Gregor Inczédy de Nagy-Varad,died in 1816
I
Baroness Agnes Inczedy de Nagy Varad,lived from 1788-1856
I
Countess Claudine Rhedey de Kis-Rhede,lived from 1812-1841
I
Duke Franz von Teck,lived from 1837-1900
I
Princess Victoria Mary of Teck,lived from 1867-1953
I
King George VI of Great Britain,lived from 1895-1952
I
ELISABETH II,Queen of Great Britain,born in 1926
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on January 05, 2010, 06:52:16 PM
No wonder she was greeted with respect in public, unlike some Hapsburg commoner wife who hasto take the back stairs. For me Royal blood is more important than titles, which could be bought with money.

What Habsburg wife?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 05, 2010, 07:53:47 PM
Those Archdukes that married morganetically. I think they date from the time of the early reign of Franz Josef.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Rani on January 13, 2010, 10:36:19 AM
(http://i387.photobucket.com/albums/oo319/DonaIsabella/IMAGE0025.jpg) (http://i387.photobucket.com/albums/oo319/DonaIsabella/IMAGE0024.jpg)

Aspasia and Alexander

(http://i387.photobucket.com/albums/oo319/DonaIsabella/IMAGE0026.jpg)

Peter and Alexandra

(http://i387.photobucket.com/albums/oo319/DonaIsabella/IMAGE0027.jpg)

Aspasia, Lord Donegall, Lorna Harmsworth and Alexandra
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: allanraymond on January 13, 2010, 11:19:10 AM
I have done a little research about Aspasia Manos and her ancestry and she was right when she claimed that she is the descendant of Byzantine Emperors...here is one of her lines:

Colonel Petros Manos,lived from 1871-1918
I
ASPASIA MANOS,Princess of Greece,lived from 1896-1972

It is also interesting to know that she is also related to the George VI,King of Britain,who was one of the witnesses at the wedding of her daughter Princess Alexandra and a godfather of her grandson Prince Alexander of Serbia...

Another slight connection to the "French Royal Family" is that Aspasia's father Petros Manos had a brother Konstantinos Manos, born 1869. Konstantinos's great granddaughter Iléana Manos born 1970 is maried to Prince Charles-Louis Henri of Orleans (Duke of Chartres) born 1972.




Allan Raymond
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 13, 2010, 03:09:16 PM
Interesting French connection here !

The photo with King Peter showed Alexandra wearing Queen Elizabeth (The Queen Mum)'s wedding present of a pair of long diamond earrings.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: djordjes on February 25, 2010, 05:31:27 PM
I have done a little research about Aspasia Manos and her ancestry and she was right when she claimed that she is the descendant of Byzantine Emperors...here is one of her lines:


IOANNES VI Kantakouzenos,Emperor of Byzantium,lived from 1295-1383
I
MATIAS Asen Kantakouzenos,Co-Emperor of Byzantium,lived from 1325-1391
I
Demetrios I Kantakouzenos,sebastokrator and Despot of Morea,lived from 1343-1420
I
Eirene Kantakouzene,basilissa of Morea,lived from 1400-1457
I
Stefan Brankovic ''the blind" of Serbia,Despot of Raska,lived from 1425-1476
I
Jovan Brankovic,Despot of Raska,lived from 1465-1502
I
Princess Jelena Brankovc of Raska,strangled in 1546
I
Princess Ruxandra of Moldavia,Regent of Moldavia,lived from 1537-1570
I
Ilias,Ruler of Wallachia
I
Alexandru Ilias,Duke of Wallachia
I
Ilias Alexandru,Duke o Wallachia from 1666-1668
I
Princess Sultane Chrysokula of Wallachia,died in 1694
I
Princess Helene Mavrocordato,lived from 1682-1722
I
Princess Marioara Rosetti
I
Michael Soutzo,Prince of Wallachia and Moldavia,lived from 1729-1803
I
Prince Georgi Soutzo,lived fom 1771-1836
I
Prince Constantin Soutzo,died in 1873
I
Princess Euphrosine Soutzo,lived from 1830-1878
I
Roxane Mavromichalis,lived from 1848-1905
I
Colonel Petros Manos,lived from 1871-1918
I
ASPASIA MANOS,Princess of Greece,lived from 1896-1972



It is also interesting to know that she is also related to the George VI,King of Britain,who was one of the witnesses at the wedding of her daughter Princess Alexandra and a godfather of her grandson Prince Alexander of Serbia...
Very interesting line. Where did you find this sources?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on February 26, 2010, 09:19:32 AM
I combined genealogy sites and put the puzzle...you can go to genealogics.org and follow the ancestry until one point and then went to Mr.Marek genealogy site and followed from there the rest...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 26, 2010, 09:29:28 AM
Aspasia Manos did have an interesting ancestry. It would be nice to have more information on her. Her story is usually interwinded with that of her more famous husband and daughter.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: greekroyalist on April 15, 2010, 04:21:02 AM
So, according to Marc's genealogic tree, Aspasia Manos was the granddaughter of Efrosini Soutsos.. Efrosini was  king George's girlfriend, before he married Olga! And her granddaughter had a relationship with George's grandson.. Sooo interesting how this family was always involved with the greek royal family of Glucksburgs.. Both Efrosini and Aspasia weren't lucky with their love..
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 15, 2010, 07:00:06 AM
Well,she is a great-granddaughter of Euphrosine according to genealogy site,not me  :-)

Didn't know that her great-grandmother had an affair with Alexander's grandfather...very interesting!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 15, 2010, 10:31:22 AM
Yes. The Glucksborg men are always lady killers (both George I and his brother Frederick VIII). There is a story of Bertie (Edward VII) exchanging contacts with his brother-in-law Frederick VII of a "Miss Ida here and another girl from the flower shop there...".  ;)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: greekroyalist on April 15, 2010, 02:27:36 PM
George I, was indeed a ladies' man. Emmanuel Rhoides, a greek author (1836-1904) had said about the king that ''he is the father of the half greek babies ''. George had fell in love for Efrosini Soutsou by the time he came to Greece. The couple would go horse-riding toghether every day, and the greek people wanted Efrosini to marry him, it was like a fairy-tale romance to them.. But George's father learned about their relationship and got angry, he threated George that he would take him back to Denmark! So George, had to end the romance in order to keep his crown. After marrying Olga, he never stopped flirting the beautiful Greek ladies.. There happened a big scandal, when someday, in his fiftys George flirted openly, the greek prime minister's, Charilaos Trikoupis siste,r Sophia, in front of queen Olga!

Anyway, for some reason i don't think that Alexander was as playboy, as his grand father, or his father Constantine I, were.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 15, 2010, 03:17:30 PM
Queen Olga was indeed a saint to put up with that.  :(
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 15, 2010, 05:50:25 PM
It is interesting to note that Euphrosine was also a Princess and that her family was once a ruling one in Moldavia and Wallachia...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Clemence on July 04, 2010, 04:42:00 PM
. There happened a big scandal, when someday, in his fiftys George flirted openly, the greek prime minister's, Charilaos Trikoupis siste,r Sophia, in front of queen Olga!


I think Sophia Trikoupi should have a thread of her own somewhere in this forum. I recall she was among the few admitted to play with Queen Vivtoria's children when they where very young, and the Queen seemed to like her a great deal. She was very mature for her own age, very talented, very beautiful and also very unlucky, smashed between the two most important greek politicians of that era: the man she loved the most, her brother, and the man she wanted to marry, her brothers no1 political adversary. What a waste!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 04, 2010, 04:49:52 PM
Yes. Why not ? She sounds fasinating.  :)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Carolath Habsburg on November 13, 2010, 06:12:05 PM
Alexander & Aspasia

(http://img713.imageshack.us/img713/284/10406113a.jpg) (http://img713.imageshack.us/i/10406113a.jpg/)

 
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: KarlandZita on December 03, 2011, 07:08:31 AM
Aspasia and her daughter Alexandra in 1936 :

(http://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/847355aspasiaalexandra.jpg) (http://www.hostingpics.net/viewer.php?id=847355aspasiaalexandra.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 11, 2012, 08:34:13 AM
I also found some interesting notes about Aspasia's Russian ancestry...

Her ancestor Katerina Obreshkova, who married Prince Ioannis Soutzo ( Greek Minister Plenipotentiary to St. Peterburg ) , son of Michail Soutzo, reigning Prince of Molavia ( 1818-1821 ), was daughter of Dmitri Obreshkov ( 1790-1864 ) and Countess Natalia Sheremeteva ( 1795-1868 )...

Countess Natalia Sheremeteva is in turn descendant of most prominent families such as Galitzine, Obolensky, Apraksin...Through her Princess Aspasia is descendant of Roman the "Great", Grand Duke of Kiev ( 1160-1205 ) who is descendant of Emperor Constantine IX of Byzantium, King Harold II of England, King Inge Stenkilsson of Sweden, many Holy Roman Emperors such as Konrad II , Heinrich III, Heinrich IV, Counts of Savoy and so on...

Hope this was not tiring too much,but it came as a surprise to me as I didn't know that she had Russian ancestry...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Svetabel on November 11, 2012, 01:05:15 PM
I also found some interesting notes about Aspasia's Russian ancestry...

Her ancestor Katerina Obreshkova, who married Prince Ioannis Soutzo ( Greek Minister Plenipotentiary to St. Peterburg ) , son of Michail Soutzo, reigning Prince of Molavia ( 1818-1821 ), was daughter of Dmitri Obreshkov ( 1790-1864 ) and Countess Natalia Sheremeteva ( 1795-1868 )...

Countess Natalia Sheremeteva is in turn descendant of most prominent families such as Galitzine, Obolensky, Apraksin...Through her Princess Aspasia is descendant of Roman the "Great", Grand Duke of Kiev ( 1160-1205 ) who is descendant of Emperor Constantine IX of Byzantium, King Harold II of England, King Inge Stenkilsson of Sweden, many Holy Roman Emperors such as Konrad II , Heinrich III, Heinrich IV, Counts of Savoy and so on...

Hope this was not tiring too much,but it came as a surprise to me as I didn't know that she had Russian ancestry...

A little correction. Natalia Sheremeteva was not a Countess, she was from untitled branch of the family. I beleive somewhere in the Russian Noble Families subforum I discussed her genealogy with Forum Admin.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 11, 2012, 05:20:57 PM
Was she related to Misha's wife ?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 11, 2012, 09:12:03 PM
A little correction. Natalia Sheremeteva was not a Countess, she was from untitled branch of the family. I beleive somewhere in the Russian Noble Families subforum I discussed her genealogy with Forum Admin.

Thank you for this correction...I will now search there to read it!
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 11, 2012, 09:18:09 PM
Was she related to Misha's wife ?

As far as I know,she was Sheremetevsky and not Sheremetev...I am not sure if the families are somehow connected,but Brasova's father was described as a man who belonged to untitled minor nobility...

Guess other posters might know more about it...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 11, 2012, 10:31:55 PM
A little correction. Natalia Sheremeteva was not a Countess, she was from untitled branch of the family. I beleive somewhere in the Russian Noble Families subforum I discussed her genealogy with Forum Admin.

Here is that thread,in case someone is interested:

http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=16034.0
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Svetabel on November 11, 2012, 10:34:15 PM
Was she related to Misha's wife ?

No.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 11, 2012, 11:28:12 PM
Thanks. I think I got it mixed up.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 12, 2012, 06:04:57 AM
Thanks to Svetabel and her links on other thread I googled a portrait of Aspasia's ancestress, Princess Ekaterina Soutzo (1822-1874), born Obreshkova,daughter of Natalia Sheremeteva,Chopin's friend whose ancestry we have discussed earlier...

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ekaterina_Dmitrievna_Obreskova.jpg
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: grandduchessella on November 12, 2012, 02:27:33 PM
Aspasia is also distantly related to Ileana Manos, the current Duchess of Chartres. They are both descended from Konstantinos Manos Sr--Aspasia's father (Petr) and Ileana's great-grandfather (Konstantinos) were brothers.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 12, 2012, 11:38:18 PM
Didn't know that. Does she knows how to use the Greek evil eye too ? Aspasia was known to have used it.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on November 14, 2012, 08:45:15 AM
Aspasia is also distantly related to Ileana Manos, the current Duchess of Chartres. They are both descended from Konstantinos Manos Sr--Aspasia's father (Petr) and Ileana's great-grandfather (Konstantinos) were brothers.

Well,at the time of Ileana's birth Aspasia was alive and they were in fact first cousins twice removed...

Ileana's ancestors also include ancient families such Soutzo, Callimachi, Rosetti, Mavrocordato, Cantacuzene which ruled in Moldavia and Wallachia...Through them she is a descendant of many Byzantine Emperors such as Isaac II, Alexios I, Ioannes VI, Andronicos II along with Friedrich Barbarossa,Holy Roman Emperor, King Henry II of England, King Afonso I of Portugal and Dukes of Burgogne which means that she has also descended from the House of Capet to which he has been married into ;)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: KarlandZita on December 15, 2012, 07:12:05 AM
Aspasia Manos :

(http://img4.hostingpics.net/pics/829392aspasiagreece.jpg) (http://www.hostingpics.net/viewer.php?id=829392aspasiagreece.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: KarlandZita on February 23, 2013, 07:21:16 AM
(http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/841133aspiegreece.jpg) (http://www.hostingpics.net/viewer.php?id=841133aspiegreece.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 23, 2013, 01:11:31 PM
I think these photos were sold on Ebay. Did you bought them ?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on March 08, 2013, 03:45:51 AM
One more of Aspasia:

(http://i87.photobucket.com/albums/k126/auersperg21/Album%201/Aspasia_zps3963ae0f.jpg)
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Kalafrana on March 08, 2013, 06:53:11 AM
Any idea who the recipient 'Mr Louis Wily' was?

Ann
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on March 08, 2013, 12:32:58 PM
Any idea who the recipient 'Mr Louis Wily' was?

Ann

Unfortunately,no idea :(
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 10, 2013, 01:17:43 AM
She was a very energetic woman who pops up a lot in her daughter's biography.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: KarlandZita on April 13, 2013, 07:12:49 AM
One more of Aspasia:

(http://i87.photobucket.com/albums/k126/auersperg21/Album%201/Aspasia_zps3963ae0f.jpg)

Magnificent portrait makes by Bertram Park who, as Marcus Adams or Cecil Beaton, photographed many of royal of his time.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 13, 2013, 07:58:39 AM
Not Cecil I think.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: grandduchessella on April 13, 2013, 08:34:07 PM
Not Cecil I think.

No, she said it was Bertram Park. He was a contemporary of Marcus Adams and Cecil Beaton.

From the NPG: "Having started in the family firm, manufacturers of artist's materials, Park developed an interest in photography and became a professional portraitist. He was a founder member of the London Salon of Photography in 1910. Park set up studios on Dover Street, London with Marcus Adams and his wife Yvonne Gregory in 1919. He was successful, being obliged to have up to five sittings a day to satisfy the demand. He photographed the British Royal Family, and his reputation was such that various European crowned heads would come annually to his studio to be photographed. His stylish and beautifully composed portrait studies more often relied on dramatic lighting than on elaborate backgrounds."

He took many well-known royal portraits, including that of the 4 sons of GV, Wallis in her court presentation dress, the well-known shot of of Marina, Olga and Elizabeth and others:

http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person.php?LinkID=mp05646&role=art&wPage=0
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 14, 2013, 12:08:41 AM
Thanks for the info on the photographer. Not to mention Mary Evans too.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: grandduchessella on April 14, 2013, 05:50:19 PM
Mary Evans (of the Mary Evans Picture Library) wasn't a photographer. She was a collector who founded her own picture library to lend images out for publication. She only died in 2010.   
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 14, 2013, 11:56:48 PM
I see. Marina and her cousins also used a photographer in Paris for their bridal shots. Not sure of the studio and name. I only know that both Sophie & Wooley had their wedding shots there...
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on April 16, 2013, 02:17:38 AM
I see. Marina and her cousins also used a photographer in Paris for their bridal shots. Not sure of the studio and name. I only know that both Sophie & Wooley had their wedding shots there...

Which Sophie?
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 16, 2013, 04:03:23 AM
Sophie of Hesse and later of Hanover. I am talking about her first wedding.
Title: Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
Post by: Marc on March 24, 2014, 06:45:45 PM
Very interesting. Maybe Aspasia wasn't that much of a commoner as we long suspected. At least she seem to have more royal blood that Kate Middleton. Or Prince Nicholas of Greece's future bride.

Very interesting thing is that the vast number of European nobility is related to Aspasia,being descendants of the Manos family...

For example, Prince Felix Yusupov descended from Manos family, Present Crown Prince Alois von und zu Liechtenstein, as well as Johannes, Present Prince von Orsini und Rosenberg, Prince Alfred von Auersperg-husband of the famous Sunny von Bülow, Obrenovic royal family of Serbia, Karadjordjevic royal family of Serbia, actress Melina Mercouri, Count Georg Larish von Moennich-husband of the famous Marie Larish, Prince Barby Stirbey, Princess Sophie of Albania(zu Wied) and so on...

For example,here is the line to Prince Felix Yusupov from the Manos family:

Georgios Manos
I
Manolaki Manos (born in 1655)
I
Michail Manos (1695-1752)
I
Zoe Manos (died in 1759)
I
Prince Scarlet Ghika,Prince of Moldavia and Wallachia (1715-1766)
I
Princess Zoe Ghika (born in 1760)
I
Alexandra Pavlovna Maruzzi dei Marchesi Maruzzi
I
Countss Jelena Sergeevna Sumarokov (1825-1901)
I
Count Felix Sumarokov-Elston,Prince Yusupov (1856-1928)
I
PRINCE FELIX YUSUPOV (1887-1967)



Here is the line to Crown Prince Alois von und zu Liechtenstein:


Georgios Manos
I
Manolaki Manos (born in 1655)
I
Michail Manos (1695-1752)
I
Zoe Manos (died in 1759)
I
Princess Ruxandra Ghika (born in 1730)
I
Princess Zoe Sturdza
I
Princess Elena Basaraba Brancoveanu (died in 1809)
I
Princess Elisabeth Cantacuzene-Pascanu (1802-1874)
I
Princess Elena Stirbey,daughter of Prince Barbu Dimitrie Stirbey (1831-1864)
I
Countess Henriette Larisch von Moenich (1853-1916)
I
Countess Eleonore Larisch von Moenich (1888-1975)
I
Countess Henriette von Ledebur-Wicheln (1910-2002)
I
Countess Marie Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau (born in 1940)
I
COWN PRINCE ALOIS VON UND ZU LIECHTENSTEIN (born in 1968)


And here is the line to the famos Greek actress Melina Mercouri:


Georgios Manos
I
Manolaki Manos (born in 1655)
I
Michail Manos (1695-1752)
I
Zoe Manos (died in 1759)
I
Prince Scarlet Ghika,Prince of Moldavia and Wallachia (1715-1766)
I
Princess Zoe Ghika (born in 1760)
I
Marques Constantin Maruzzi (1784-1846)
I
Marina dei Marchesi Maruzzi (born in 1815)
I
Chariklea Zotoglou (died in 1919)
I
Dimitrios Lappas (1859-1934)
I
Irini Lappas
I
MELINA MERCOURI (1920-1994)


And here is the line to Princess Aspasia of Greece:


Georgios Manos
I
Manolaki Manos (born in 1655)
I
Michail Manos (1695-1752)
I
Dr.Nikolaos Manos (born in 1720)
I
Boyar Dimitrie Manu/Manos, Postelnic of Wallachia, Csaimacam of Moldavia (died in 1828)
I
Konstantinos Manos (1785-1835)
I
Trasybulos Manos (1835-1922)
I
Colonel Petros Manos (1871-1918)
I
PRINCESS ASPASIA OF GREECE (1896-1972)