Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => Having Fun! => Topic started by: edubs31 on February 19, 2014, 11:30:16 PM

Title: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 19, 2014, 11:30:16 PM
Thought some of the folks here might find this interesting...On Wednesday's I host a trivia game (sometimes referred to as 'Pub Quiz' or just 'Quizzo' depending on where you live) at a local bar/restaurant. Since I'm also responsible for coming up with the questions I decided to put together a Russian round for this week's game!

Below are the questions and a list of the scores. No doubt most of you on this forum will find these laughably easy to answer, but I think it interesting to see what type of knowledge there is (or lack thereof in many instances) for this particular topic among the general population. Keep in mind the clientele at this establishment is mostly upper-middle class 20s and 30-somethings (those you might refer to as "young professionals"). It's a pretty healthy split between male and female with a fair share of 50+ year olds as well.

Russian Round Questions

1) Technically the Sochi games are the first ever Olympics hosted by Russia. The Soviet Union however did host the 1980 Summer Games. In what city did it take place?
2) This cultural capital of Russia was renamed Petrograd in 1914 and then Leningrad from 1924 to 1991.
3) This 18th century female ruler led Russia through its “golden age”.
4) Perhaps the greatest of all Russian Tsars this ruler who reigned from 1682 to 1721 was responsible for bringing Russia into the modern age.
5) The Russian revolution that toppled Nicholas II and the Tsarist regime took place in March of what year?
6) Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov, the only son of Tsar Nicholas II, suffered from what debilitating disease? It was nicknamed the “Royal Disease".
7) What infamous Russian mystic & holy man was murdered by members of the royal family in December of 1916?
8 ) The "1812 Overture" from what Russian composer is often ranked as one of the ten greatest classical pieces of all-time.
9) This stunning Russian born female tennis player has won four grand slam singles titles in the past decade.
10) In 2012 three members of what outspoken female punk rock group were each sentenced to two years in prison for "Hooliganism"?

Scores By Team

Team A) 10
Team B) 9
Team C) 9
Team D) 9
Team E) 8
Team F) 7
Team G) 7
Team H) 6
Team I) 6
Team J) 4
Team K) 4
Team L) 4
Team M) 4
Team N) 4

Average Score - 6.5
Questions Ranked Easiest to Hardest - 1, 8, 10, 9, 2, 7, 6, 4, 3, 5
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: TimM on February 20, 2014, 11:17:19 AM
 Technically the Sochi games are the first ever Olympics hosted by Russia. The Soviet Union however did host the 1980 Summer Games. In what city did it take place?

Moscow


This cultural capital of Russia was renamed Petrograd in 1914 and then Leningrad from 1924 to 1991.

St. Petersburg


This 18th century female ruler led Russia through its “golden age”.

Catherine the Great


Perhaps the greatest of all Russian Tsars this ruler who reigned from 1682 to 1721 was responsible for bringing Russia into the modern age.

Peter The Great


The Russian revolution that toppled Nicholas II and the Tsarist regime took place in March of what year?

1917


Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov, the only son of Tsar Nicholas II, suffered from what debilitating disease? It was nicknamed the “Royal Disease".

Hemophilia


What infamous Russian mystic & holy man was murdered by members of the royal family in December of 1916?

Gregory Rasputin


The "1812 Overture" from what Russian composer is often ranked as one of the ten greatest classical pieces of all-time.

 Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky      


This stunning Russian born female tennis player has won four grand slam singles titles in the past decade.

Maria Sharapova


In 2012 three members of what outspoken female punk rock group were each sentenced to two years in prison for "Hooliganism"?

Pussy Riot
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 20, 2014, 11:39:31 AM
That's a TEN for Tim! But of course you're like an expert on the subject.

It's pretty sad that a number of teams could only scrape together four correct answers. But that's the world we live in. If I did a straight up American history round there would surely be some frighteningly low scores as well.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: TimM on February 20, 2014, 04:28:15 PM
I guess the patrons of that bar do not come here a lot.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: historyfan on February 20, 2014, 08:26:30 PM
Thought some of the folks here might find this interesting...On Wednesday's I host a trivia game (sometimes referred to as 'Pub Quiz' or just 'Quizzo' depending on where you live) at a local bar/restaurant. Since I'm also responsible for coming up with the questions I decided to put together a Russian round for this week's game!

Below are the questions and a list of the scores. No doubt most of you on this forum will find these laughably easy to answer, but I think it interesting to see what type of knowledge there is (or lack thereof in many instances) for this particular topic among the general population. Keep in mind the clientele at this establishment is mostly upper-middle class 20s and 30-somethings (those you might refer to as "young professionals"). It's a pretty healthy split between male and female with a fair share of 50+ year olds as well.

Russian Round Questions

1) Technically the Sochi games are the first ever Olympics hosted by Russia. The Soviet Union however did host the 1980 Summer Games. In what city did it take place?

Moscow.

2) This cultural capital of Russia was renamed Petrograd in 1914 and then Leningrad from 1924 to 1991.

St Petersburg.

3) This 18th century female ruler led Russia through its “golden age”.

Catherine the Great.

4) Perhaps the greatest of all Russian Tsars this ruler who reigned from 1682 to 1721 was responsible for bringing Russia into the modern age.

Peter the Great.

5) The Russian revolution that toppled Nicholas II and the Tsarist regime took place in March of what year?

1917.

6) Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov, the only son of Tsar Nicholas II, suffered from what debilitating disease? It was nicknamed the “Royal Disease".

Haemophilia.

7) What infamous Russian mystic & holy man was murdered by members of the royal family in December of 1916?

Grigori Efimovich Rasputin.

8 ) The "1812 Overture" from what Russian composer is often ranked as one of the ten greatest classical pieces of all-time.

Tchaikovsky?

9) This stunning Russian born female tennis player has won four grand slam singles titles in the past decade.

Maria Sharapova?

10) In 2012 three members of what outspoken female punk rock group were each sentenced to two years in prison for "Hooliganism"?

Pussy Riot.


I am NOT going to cheat and look at other responses. :) My answers are below the question, above. How'd I do? ; )
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 20, 2014, 08:42:52 PM
Aced it there Historyfan. Honestly though if be pretty critical of anyone on this forum who couldn't score at least an right of ten on my Quiz.

It was designed to be reasonably challenging to the general trivia crowd, not the AP crowd.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 20, 2014, 09:37:20 PM
I knew all the answers except Maria Shaparova. I don't do female tennis players. Gay ones, like Gustaf V, are my limit!
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: historyfan on February 20, 2014, 09:44:44 PM
Aced it there Historyfan. Honestly though if be pretty critical of anyone on this forum who couldn't score at least an right of ten on my Quiz.

It was designed to be reasonably challenging to the general trivia crowd, not the AP crowd.

The composer question almost got me. : )
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 20, 2014, 10:06:37 PM
Rereading my last post that was supposed to say "an EIGHT out of ten"...damn "smart" phones! :-)

Preved)  Should I quiz you on a "gay athlete" round?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Greenowl on February 21, 2014, 05:49:23 AM
I was not sure about Maria Shaparova either....otherwise it was no problem!
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Vecchiolarry on February 21, 2014, 09:50:14 AM
Hi,

I got 9 - and as others didn't know the tennis player.  I thought it was Martina Navratolova (sp?)

I think you should do an American quiz about history, geography and music (culture)...  I'd be interested in the results..

Larry
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 21, 2014, 10:49:43 AM
Funny how the Sharapova question was one of the easier ones for my crew. Most of those who got it wrong wrote down Anna Kournikova instead...they were on the right track with another high profile blonde-haired bombshell. Difference is that Sharapova is also a superb player unlike the now retired Anna.

I've done various rounds involving some type of American history. Last week I did a President's round in honor of the approaching holiday. I don't remember the scores offhand but it wasn't pretty.

Like most bar crowds - and even though Quotations caters to a fairly well educated set of patrons - they do best on the pop culture rounds; Music, movies, TV, celebrities, some sports, etc. History is a struggle but it's usually a round like this one on Russia that decides who wins and loses the game.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 21, 2014, 11:05:52 AM
Actually you might all get a kick out of this. These were the most entertaining and/or ridiculous answers I got for each question...

1) Technically the Sochi games are the first ever Olympics hosted by Russia. The Soviet Union however did host the 1980 Summer Games. In what city did it take place?

Prague (Russia eh? Well at least they didn't leave it blank! Prague has never hosted an Olympics either)

2) This cultural capital of Russia was renamed Petrograd in 1914 and then Leningrad from 1924 to 1991.

Moscow (which was the correct answer to #1 which they inexplicably left blank!)

3) This 18th century female ruler led Russia through its “golden age”.

Anastasia (why am I not surprised by the two or three teams who put this?)

4) Perhaps the greatest of all Russian Tsars this ruler who reigned from 1682 to 1721 was responsible for bringing Russia into the modern age.

Alexander the Great (Compliments of my wife/cousin's team who never the less scored a nine on the round. Guess I can't be too hard on them!)

5) The Russian revolution that toppled Nicholas II and the Tsarist regime took place in March of what year?

1743 (Well at least they didn't leave it blank!)

6) Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov, the only son of Tsar Nicholas II, suffered from what debilitating disease? It was nicknamed the “Royal Disease".

Measles (Well, yes, he did suffer from that too at one point!)

7) What infamous Russian mystic & holy man was murdered by members of the royal family in December of 1916?

Jack the Ripper (Could have been worse. At least they were both alive at the same time)

8 ) The "1812 Overture" from what Russian composer is often ranked as one of the ten greatest classical pieces of all-time.

Stravinsky (Not a terrible guess. But funny they'd be smart enough to know who Stravinsky was and yet not know the composure of a piece as iconic as "1812 Overture".)

9) This stunning Russian born female tennis player has won four grand slam singles titles in the past decade.

Anastasia (I've seen video of the Imp playing tennis and just don't think a professional career was ever in the cards!)

10) In 2012 three members of what outspoken female punk rock group were each sentenced to two years in prison for "Hooliganism"?

The Go-Go's (Setting aside for a moment that they're an 80s American group. Did the Go-Go's ever say anything controversial much less get themselves arrested and sentenced for Hooliganism?)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: TimM on February 21, 2014, 12:02:17 PM
Quote
Actually you might all get a kick out of this. These were the most entertaining and/or ridiculous answers I got for each question...

1) Technically the Sochi games are the first ever Olympics hosted by Russia. The Soviet Union however did host the 1980 Summer Games. In what city did it take place?

Prague (Russia eh? Well at least they didn't leave it blank! Prague has never hosted an Olympics either)

2) This cultural capital of Russia was renamed Petrograd in 1914 and then Leningrad from 1924 to 1991.

Moscow (which was the correct answer to #1 which they inexplicably left blank!)

3) This 18th century female ruler led Russia through its “golden age”.

Anastasia (why am I not surprised by the two or three teams who put this?)

4) Perhaps the greatest of all Russian Tsars this ruler who reigned from 1682 to 1721 was responsible for bringing Russia into the modern age.

Alexander the Great (Compliments of my wife/cousin's team who never the less scored a nine on the round. Guess I can't be too hard on them!)

5) The Russian revolution that toppled Nicholas II and the Tsarist regime took place in March of what year?

1743 (Well at least they didn't leave it blank!)

6) Alexei Nicholaevich Romanov, the only son of Tsar Nicholas II, suffered from what debilitating disease? It was nicknamed the “Royal Disease".

Measles (Well, yes, he did suffer from that too at one point!)

7) What infamous Russian mystic & holy man was murdered by members of the royal family in December of 1916?

Jack the Ripper (Could have been worse. At least they were both alive at the same time)

8 ) The "1812 Overture" from what Russian composer is often ranked as one of the ten greatest classical pieces of all-time.

Stravinsky (Not a terrible guess. But funny they'd be smart enough to know who Stravinsky was and yet not know the composure of a piece as iconic as "1812 Overture".)

9) This stunning Russian born female tennis player has won four grand slam singles titles in the past decade.

Anastasia (I've seen video of the Imp playing tennis and just don't think a professional career was ever in the cards!)

10) In 2012 three members of what outspoken female punk rock group were each sentenced to two years in prison for "Hooliganism"?

The Go-Go's (Setting aside for a moment that they're an 80s American group. Did the Go-Go's ever say anything controversial much less get themselves arrested and sentenced for Hooliganism?)


Oh.......my..........God!

Jack the Ripper!?  Alexander The Great!?  Prague!? 

Wrong nationality, wrong nationality and century, wrong country!  Sounds like answers Sarah Palin and/or Michelle Bachmann would give.

At least those that picked Anastasia got the nationality right, if nothing else.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 21, 2014, 01:04:10 PM
Preved)  Should I quiz you on a "gay athlete" round?

Only gay royal athletes. I'm the current title-holder, but I guess it only counts as esoterica.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 21, 2014, 01:55:49 PM
Preved)  Should I quiz you on a "gay athlete" round?

Only gay royal athletes. I'm the current title-holder, but I guess it only counts as esoterica.

Does bisexual count? If so, here's a three-part question for you...

Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich competed in equestrianism at the 1912 Summer Olympic Games in Stockholm.

1) What was the name of individual event he competed in?
2) What was the name of his horse?
3) What place did he finish?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 21, 2014, 02:03:03 PM
Does bisexual count? If so, here's a three-part question for you...

Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich competed in equestrianism at the 1912 Summer Olympic Games in Stockholm.

1) What was the name of individual event he competed in?
2) What was the name of his horse?
3) What place did he finish?

Cool!

I'm actually quite blank regarding him, but let's have a try:
1. Show jumping?
2. Sultan?
3. Third?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 21, 2014, 02:11:15 PM
Does bisexual count? If so, here's a three-part question for you...

Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich competed in equestrianism at the 1912 Summer Olympic Games in Stockholm.

1) What was the name of individual event he competed in?
2) What was the name of his horse?
3) What place did he finish?

Cool!

I'm actually quite blank regarding him, but let's have a try:
1. Show jumping?
2. Sultan?
3. Third?


No worries. Those were tough questions.

1) Technically it was simply called "Men's Jumping", but "Jumping" being operative word. So that gets you a point.
2) Unite' was the name of his horse. I wonder how many Romanov/Pavlovich buffs are aware of that?
3) His finished ninth out of 31 competitors. Pretty solid showing when you consider that he was one of the youngest to compete that year. Dmitri was only twenty and everyone else who finished 1st to 13th was at least twenty-five years of age. He was also the highest finisher among the six Russian competitors.

I found this on a cool Olympic site that I think I'm going to share in another thread.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 21, 2014, 02:34:28 PM
Return question:
Which Olympian ranking among the top 10 most medal-winning ever was born a subject of NII?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 21, 2014, 04:45:27 PM
Not a clue, sorry. Can't think of anyone born before March, 1917 that would be a top-ten all-time medalist.

Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 21, 2014, 04:48:58 PM
Not a clue, sorry. Can't think of anyone born before March, 1917 that would be a top-ten all-time medalist.

No? Paavo Nurmi, long distance runner, the Flying Finn, born 1897 in Åbo / Turku, Grand Duchy of Finland. 12 medals, 9 gold.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 24, 2014, 01:24:03 PM
Romanov quiz for real Russophile Romanovophiles:
Googling is for cheaters!

1. Who was "наш друг"?

2. Which Магистраль is associated with NII?

3. Who lived at Видёре?

4. Who had a special relationship with Vederlax Fjärd?

5. Whose birthplace was named after the Intercession of the Virgin?

6. Who in the imperial entourage descended from a Khan of Siberia?

7. Why were the Russian Emperors наследники норвежские / Heirs of Norway?

8. Which place started out as Saarenkylä?

9. NII didn't care for икра, what is it?

10. By which brand name are императорские пасхальные яйца better known?

11. How come what happened at Paatio didn't stay on Paatio?

12. Which Romanov is associated with "The Tsar of the Jews"?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Georgiy on February 26, 2014, 01:32:58 AM
Don't know att of these but will give it a go.
1. G Rasputin
2. ?
3. Maria Feodorovna
4 Alexander III?
5. Our Friend, Rasputin.
6. ?
7. Would like to know!
8. Tsarskoe Selo
9. Caviar
10. Faberge
11.  ?
12.  ?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 26, 2014, 07:06:06 AM
Georgiy I got most, but not all, of what you got. Didn't bother posting because there were several that stumped me and I wanted to try to answer without looking things up online. I'd say you did a pretty good job though! Care to fill in the blanks there Preved?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 26, 2014, 01:27:21 PM
It will be a pleasure!

Don't know att of these but will give it a go.
1. G Rasputin
2. ?
3. Maria Feodorovna
4 Alexander III?
5. Our Friend, Rasputin.
6. ?
7. Would like to know!
8. Tsarskoe Selo
9. Caviar
10. Faberge
11.  ?
12.  ?

(
1. Correct. "Nash drug" = Our friend. (I must admit I got inspiration for this question when seeing a news report from Victor Yanukovych's native village (the Pokrovskoe of our days?) and the old babushkas there kept repeating наш Виктор, наш мальчик.
2. Транссибирская магистраль = Transsiberian Mainline. (NII was on the committee in his youth, inagurated it on his way to Japan and used it for the Russo-Japanese war.)
3. Correct. Видёре = Hvidøre.
4. NAOTMAA. Vederlax Fjärd (in Swedish) = Virolahti = Bay of Štandart (Alexander III favoured Högsåra in Åbolands Skärgård and of course Langinkoski.)
5. Correct. Pokrovskoe < pokrov = intercession < protection, cloak
6. The Yusupovs.
7. Because Norway was a hereditary kingdom, while Denmark was an elective one (untill 1660), when the Holstein-Gottorp line branched off from the main, royal Oldenburg line reigning in Denmark-Norway in the 16th century. Since the term "prince" did not come into general usage in North Europe untill the 17th century (and then mostly for a crown prince), it basically means "Prince of Norway". The original German term was Erbe zu Norwegen. For this reason both Oldenburg, Delmenhorst, Ditmarsken, Schleswig, Holstein and Norway figured in the Imperial arms, but Denmark didn't.
8. Correct. Finnish Saarenkylä = Island Village > Tsarskoe Selo.
9. Correct.
10. Correct. императорские пасхальные яйца = Imperial Easter eggs.

11. NAOTMAA did not have much interaction with the locals during their Finnish summer cruises because of the strict security measures and because of the language barrier.
There were a few instances however when the IF met with the locals. For instance in 1913 locals were invited to an al fresco supper and dance on the island of Paatio close to the Virolahti Bay. The young fishermen discussed who should have the honour of asking the Emperor's eldest daughter for a dance. A certain Matti Mikkola assembled the courage to ask the Grand Duchess Olga for a dance and they danced a polka in the Nordic midsummer night.... Perhaps not as al fresco as this "Ievan Polkka"! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sx1vZJSDNHc9)

Strangely enough this innocent swing with a son of the people had political consequences. A Finnish satirical newspaper called "Fyren" (= The Lighthouse) grabbed these news of the usually so secluded IF interacting with their Finnish subjects and published a rather charming sketch of a petite young woman with a tiara on her head dancing with a young big burly fisherman. The Imperial censorship authority accused the paper of lèse-majesté, but the Finnish judges only laughed at the charge. Three years afterwards, however, in the middle of WW1, the artist and editor were arrested by order of the Finnish Senate and had to serve a short prison sentence!

Here is the offending sketch: Venäjän hovi tanssii Paatiossa - The Russian Court Dancing on Paatio (http://hs11.snstatic.fi/webkuva/taysi/560/1383972975049?ts=993)

12. KR wrote a play called "Царь Иудейский" - the King of the Jews.

6 of 12, Giorgyiy! Хорошо!  
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 26, 2014, 03:06:10 PM
5. Correct. Pokrovskoe < pokrov = intercession < protection, cloak

I can't help being thrilled every time I discover one of these Northern prism titbits:
As a Protestant whose mother tongue isn't English "Feast of the Intercession" really means nothing, literally, to me. But then I see that in Russian it's Покров день and celebrated on the 14th of October as the first day of winter, just like in Scandinavia! Lovely Russian folk allegory with the veil, shroud or cover of the Mother of God covering the landscape as snow from now on.

Another way of illustrating that I only get the soul of Orthodox Russia via the materialistic side of a Northern culture: Красный угол and icons are fine and fascinating, but what realy moves me is the exterior сруб угол of an izba:

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/Oblo-angle.JPG/178px-Oblo-angle.JPG)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Georgiy on February 26, 2014, 11:27:48 PM
Indeed, Pokrov is celebrated on a different day altogether in the Greek tradition.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 08, 2014, 05:52:11 AM
7. Because Norway was a hereditary kingdom, while Denmark was an elective one (untill 1660), when the Holstein-Gottorp line branched off from the main, royal Oldenburg line reigning in Denmark-Norway in the 16th century. Since the term "prince" did not come into general usage in North Europe untill the 17th century (and then mostly for a crown prince), it basically means "Prince of Norway". The original German term was Erbe zu Norwegen. For this reason both Oldenburg, Delmenhorst, Ditmarsken, Schleswig, Holstein and Norway figured in the Imperial arms, but Denmark didn't.

Of course this was not so during the reign of the Ascanian Catherine the Great.
BTW she did have some interesting Norwegian ancestry too: The Ascanians (and the Guelphs) were the cognatic heirs of the Billung Dukes of Saxony. The only direct bloodline from Saint Olav of Norway, rex perpetuus Norvegiæ, and the Hairfair dynasty of the Viking Age goes through his daughter Ulvhild / Wulfhild, married to Duke Ordulf of Saxony and the great grandmother of Albrecht the Bear of Ballenstedt, Brandenburg and Saxony, the great ancestor of the Ascanians.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Rodney_G. on March 08, 2014, 03:31:48 PM
P... me off that I didn't catch this topic  when it first appeared. Very engaging even late.

Got a 9 1/2, I think. Might have snagged Sharapova for no. 9. A coin toss in my mind, you might say.

I don't know if the results are heartening or not,edubs. I can imagine them being worse, though maybe they would have been, minus the current events/ pop culture angle.

If you're around, Preved, yes, I came up with Paavo Nurmi, tentatively, my only doubt being the age. I thought his being in prime running age for his Olympic triumphs  somewhat unlikely. What years were they?

I think I got about a six on your quiz, Preved. I'd be more sure except that it's possible to mentally hedge one's bets, or fake it, on some of them. Nicely challenging,in any case.
 
Is it possible you could  do another Russian-themed one, edubs, or would you be pushing your luck? Exiled to the Siberia of another bar if you tried?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 08, 2014, 03:39:52 PM
If you're around, Preved, yes, I came up with Paavo Nurmi, tentatively, my only doubt being the age. I thought his being in prime running age for his Olympic triumphs  somewhat unlikely. What years were they?

Well done! Nurmi won his medals 1920-1928, thus he was 23 - 31 years old.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Inok Nikolai on March 25, 2014, 03:22:40 PM
5. Correct. Pokrovskoe < pokrov = intercession < protection, cloak

I can't help being thrilled every time I discover one of these Northern prism titbits:
As a Protestant whose mother tongue isn't English "Feast of the Intercession" really means nothing, literally, to me. But then I see that in Russian it's Покров день and celebrated on the 14th of October as the first day of winter, just like in Scandinavia! Lovely Russian folk allegory with the veil, shroud or cover of the Mother of God covering the landscape as snow from now on.


I just happened upon this thread -- like many things on this Forum.

For the record, the Feast of Protection falls on October 1st. (It's October 14 on the Gregorian calendar.)

Although the events commemorated took place in Constantinople, the feast was first instituted by the Russians in the 12th century.
The Greeks only began to celebrate it relatively recently. And after WW II, they moved it to October 28th -- "Oxi Day".
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 26, 2014, 04:05:51 PM
For the record, the Feast of Protection falls on October 1st. (It's October 14 on the Gregorian calendar.)
Ah, OK. So only since 1700 (Denmark-Norway) and 1753 (Sweden-Finland) have the dates approximately corresponded.

Quote
Although the events commemorated took place in Constantinople, the feast was first instituted by the Russians in the 12th century.

It would be interesting to know if there was a pagan Slavic or Finno-Ugric festival lurking further back. In the Nordic countries the date was officially the feast of Saint Calixtus, but in pagan times it was the autumn blót (blood sacrifice festival), four weeks after the autumnal equinox, which is one week before Michaelmas, which strangely enough the Orthodox churches don't celebrate, as far as I can see.

I do wonder where in Carelia you'll find the Nordic-Catholic Winter Day on the 14th of October juxtaposed with the Slavic-Orthodox Pokrov on the 1st of October, and whether you'll find some Finno-Ugric level beneath!
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Georgiy on March 26, 2014, 09:43:23 PM
Would Michaelmas not be the Synaxis of the Archangel Michael and the Other Bodiless Powers? That is celebrated on November 8/21.

According to the OCA: "A Feastday was established in November, the ninth month after March (with which the year began in ancient times) since there are Nine Ranks of Angels. The eighth day of the month was chosen for the Synaxis of all the Bodiless Powers of Heaven since the Day of the Dread Last Judgment is called the Eighth Day by the holy Fathers. After the end of this age (characterized by its seven days of Creation) will come the Eighth Day, and then “the Son of Man shall come in His Glory and all the holy Angels with Him” (Mt. 25:31). "

http://orthodoxwiki.org/Archangel_Michael also has information about the Archangel Michael from an Orthodox viewpoint.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 26, 2014, 09:53:47 PM
Would Michaelmas not be the Synaxis of the Archangel Michael and the Other Bodiless Powers? That is celebrated on November 8/21.
Oh, I see. And oh dear, the Orthodox churches really likes those quirky, intriguing terms!



Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Georgiy on March 26, 2014, 11:27:17 PM
As on Big,Fat Greek Wedding, all these words come from Greek!
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 27, 2014, 04:35:32 PM
Lol yes, Σύναξις των αρχιστρατήγων Μιχαήλ και Γαβριήλ και των λοιπών αγίων ασωμάτων και ουρανίων Ταγμάτων = Synaxis of the Archistrateges Michael and Gabriel and other Asomatic Saints and Uranic Hosts.

As crazy as the spelling Πριγκίπισσα Αλίκη του Μπάττενμπεργκ (Prigkipissa Aliki ton Mpattenmpergk)!



Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on July 28, 2015, 11:06:59 AM
Here is a new one for the quizzical seeking a summer challenge:

Royal Genealogical-Etymological East and West Slavic Summer Quiz
1. Which European monarchy is currently the only one in line to get a future sovereign consort speaking Russian?
2. Which Slavic-speaking kingdom did a dynasty originating in this country also rule?
3. Which Western European dynasty had at one time subjects that spoke both Germanic, Celtic, Romance and Slavic languages?
4. Which German dynasty employed Slavic nursemaids for religious reasons?
5. Which modern German dynasty is the only one with agnatic Slavic origin?
6. Which current European princess with certain East Slavic connections has a maiden name and title that is derived from the Slavic word for "fish"?
9. Which German dynastic residence has a Slavic name meaning "here be wild animals"?
7. Which current princess in a non-reigning house has a comital grandmother whose name and title means "fatty"?
8. Which current, reigning European queen is related to the outgoing president of a Slavic country?
10. Which former imperial residence has a Slavic name meaning "swamp"?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: TimM on July 28, 2015, 12:55:40 PM
Quote
Which Slavic-speaking kingdom did a dynasty originating in this country also rule?

What country is "this" country?  You have to be more specific.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on July 28, 2015, 04:29:18 PM
Quote
Which Slavic-speaking kingdom did a dynasty originating in this country also rule?

What country is "this" country?  You have to be more specific.

Sorry, mean the country referred to in #1.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Janet Ashton on August 02, 2015, 03:52:17 PM

3. Which Western European dynasty had at one time subjects that spoke both Germanic, Celtic, Romance and Slavic languages?
4. Which German dynasty employed Slavic nursemaids for religious reasons?
5. Which modern German dynasty is the only one with agnatic Slavic origin?


5. Mecklenburg?
4. Is this one Saxony?
3. Coburg. I don't know if this was the answer you were thinking of, but it works...;-) What is "western european", though? Is Coburg western?

I won't try the rest, as many of them seem to concern current royals or would-be royals, and they don't interest me, so 'd need to do some research. :-) Would be curious about the castles, though,s o might follow those up as I can't think off-hand.....

BTW, do you know which European dynasty ruled subjects who spoke Germanic, Slavic, Romance languages, Albanian and Greek? :-)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Kalafrana on August 03, 2015, 01:49:49 AM
Is 10 Tsarskoye-Selo?

Ann
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 09, 2015, 02:37:23 PM
Correct answers to the Royal Genealogical-Etymological East and West Slavic Summer Quiz:
1. Which European monarchy is currently the only one in line to get a future sovereign consort speaking Russian?
Luxembourg. Hereditary Grand Duchess Stéphanie spent a year studying art and literature in Moscow and speaks Russian.

2. Which Slavic-speaking kingdom did a dynasty originating in this country also rule?
The medieval Counts of Luxembourg inherited the Kingdom of Bohemia. The most famous of the Czech Lucemburkové was Emperor Karel IV.

3. Which Western European dynasty had at one time subjects that spoke both Germanic, Celtic, Romance and Slavic languages?[/b]
The Hanoverians. Their subjects spoke:
Germanic: English, German, Scots, Dutch (in New York State), Norn on Shetland and the Orkneys and  some Frisian (Helgoland from 1807).
Celtic: Irish and Scottish Gaelic, Manx, Welsh and Cornish.
Romance: French (on the Channel Isles and in Québec).
Slavic: Polabian in the Hanoverian Wendland, untill it died out in the 1750s, approximately at the same time as Cornish.


4. Which German dynasty employed Slavic nursemaids for religious reasons?[/b]
The Albertine Wettins in Saxony, as the (Upper) Sorbs were the only native Catholics in the Kingdom of Saxony.

5. Which modern German dynasty is the only one with agnatic Slavic origin?
Mecklenburg.

6. Which current European princess with certain East Slavic connections has a maiden name and title that is derived from the Slavic word for "fish"?
Princess Michael of Kent, née Marie-Christine Freiin von Reibnitz. Reibnitz / Rybnica is derived from Slavic ryba, fish.

9. Which German dynastic residence has a Slavic name meaning "here be wild animals"?
Schwerin, grand-ducal mecklenburgian residence, is derived from Slavic zver, (wild) animal (Russian зверь, beast).

7. Which current princess in a non-reigning house has a comital grandmother whose name and title means "fatty"?
Princess Sophie of Prussia, married to the Prussian pretender, née Princess of Isenburg, is the granddaughter of Countess Irina Tolstoya. Tolstoy means fat, thick, stout in Russian.

8. Which current, reigning European queen is related to the outgoing president of a Slavic country?
Queen Mathilde of the Belgians is the 6th cousin once removed of (Count) Bronisław Komorowski, untill three days ago President of Poland.

9.
Where did that one go?

10. Which former imperial residence has a Slavic name meaning "swamp"?
Berlin is derived from Proto-Slavic brl, swamp (Silesian Polish: barzoł).

So 2 points to Janet :-)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 09, 2015, 02:41:50 PM
Is 10 Tsarskoye-Selo?

Tsarskoye Selo (Tsarist Village) is allegedly a corruption of Finnish Saarenkylä - island (Finnish saari > saaren) village.

BTW, do you know which European dynasty ruled subjects who spoke Germanic, Slavic, Romance languages, Albanian and Greek? :-)

The Savoys after WW1?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Janet Ashton on August 12, 2015, 03:35:05 AM

BTW, do you know which European dynasty ruled subjects who spoke Germanic, Slavic, Romance languages, Albanian and Greek? :-)

The Savoys after WW1?

Quite so! I think only German entered the lexicon with the Sudtirol after the War (there may have been some small number of German speakers before then, but 'm not sure); before 1914, they already had thoroughly multilingual subjects, with autochthonous enclaves of Greek and Albanian speakers on Italy's east coast, as well as a small group nearby speaking a language considered to be a Serbo-Croatian variant. All these people must have crossed the Adriatic to settle centuries before. The biggest group of Slavic speakers was of the Slovenes in the north-east, however (which became much bigger again after the war, followed by aggressive efforts to force them to speak Italian).
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 14, 2015, 02:26:11 PM
Quite so! I think only German entered the lexicon with the Sudtirol after the War (there may have been some small number of German speakers before then, but 'm not sure);

There have been small enclaves of German (or rather High Alemannic) speaking villages in Piedmont since the medieval Walser emigration, but of course the French element was far more predominant in the Savoyan lands untill 1860. (And has continued untill the present in the Aosta Valley.) And of course only educated Italians spoke "Italian" before WW2, the masses spoke very divergent regional dialects that even may be classified as distinct languages (Sicilian, Piedmontese, Venetian, Lombard, Sardinian etc.)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Janet Ashton on August 15, 2015, 01:33:03 PM
And of course only educated Italians spoke "Italian" before WW2, the masses spoke very divergent regional dialects that even may be classified as distinct languages (Sicilian, Piedmontese, Venetian, Lombard, Sardinian etc.)

This is the irony of Italy's participation in World War One: fighting to "redeem" lands which weren't Italian, using an Army which was in a sense pretty unredeemed itself: they should have dedicated their efforts to promoting literacy and alleviating poverty in the country they already had, which was often unaware that it was even one country.  The Entente powers made much noise about the fact that the Austro-Hungarian imperial Army spoke a variety of mutually incomprehensible languages, while ignoring the fact that the armies of several of the other "modern, national" states had just as many difficulties with understanding each other.

I believe the House of Savoy originally spoke French at home. Certainly, the ardent Italian nationalist the Duchess of Aosta (Helen d'Orleans) still did in 1914.

It also occurred to me after I posted the question about the mix of Germanic, Romantic, Slavic languages, Albanian and probably Greek, that the answer could also be the Karageorgevic dynasty, certainly after 1918 - throwing in Hungarian and Turkish as well. 
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 23, 2015, 07:29:39 AM
4. NAOTMAA. Vederlax Fjärd (in Swedish) = Virolahti = Bay of Štandart (Alexander III favoured Högsåra in Åbolands Skärgård and of course Langinkoski.)

Elementary, my dear Watson: How come I didn't see that before the Russian Wikipedia told me:
Название в переводе с финского означает «Эстонский залив».

Estonia is Viro in Finnish, thus Virolahti = Estonian Bay. Evidence of ancient contacts across the Gulf of Finland.
(In Estonian it is, in the form Virumaa, the regional name of northeastern Estonia, the part directly southwest of Virolahti.)

Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 23, 2015, 01:42:33 PM
A Quiz for those who know their Fantasy and Sci-Fi literature better than Russian:

Which famous fantasy and sci-fi sagas have these titles in Russian?
Googling is for cheaters!

1. Песнь Льда и Огня - Pesn Lda i Ognya
2. Звёздные войны - Zvyozdnye voyny
3. Лев, колдунья и волшебный шкаф - Lev, koldunya i bolshebnyy shkaf
4. Игра престолов - Igra prestolov
5. Путеводитель автостопщика по галактике - Putevoditel avtostopshchka po galaktike
6. Голодные игры - Golodnye igry
7. Гарри Поттер - too easy if transliterated :-)
8. Звёздный путь - Zvyozdnyy put
9. Властелин колец - Vlastelin kolets
10. Алиса в Стране чудес - Alisa v Strane chudes
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 30, 2015, 02:28:17 PM
A Quiz for those who know their Fantasy and Sci-Fi literature better than Russian:

Wow, this was disappointing!

Correct answers:

1. Песнь Льда и Огня - Pesn Lda i Ognya = A Song of Ice and Fire
2. Звёздные войны - Zvyozdnye voyny = Star Wars
3. Лев, колдунья и волшебный шкаф - Lev, koldunya i bolshebnyy shkaf = The Lion, the Witch and the (Magic) Wardrobe
4. Игра престолов - Igra prestolov = Game of Thrones
5. Путеводитель автостопщика по галактике - Putevoditel avtostopshchka po galaktike = Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy
6. Голодные игры - Golodnye igry = Hunger Games
7. Гарри Поттер - too easy if transliterated :-) = Harry Potter
8. Звёздный путь - Zvyozdnyy put = Star Trek
9. Властелин колец - Vlastelin kolets = Lord of the Rings
10. Алиса в Стране чудес - Alisa v Strane chudes = Alice in Wonderland
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on August 30, 2015, 07:33:46 PM
A Quiz for those who know their Fantasy and Sci-Fi literature better than Russian:

Wow, this was disappointing!

Correct answers:

1. Песнь Льда и Огня - Pesn Lda i Ognya = A Song of Ice and Fire
2. Звёздные войны - Zvyozdnye voyny = Star Wars
3. Лев, колдунья и волшебный шкаф - Lev, koldunya i bolshebnyy shkaf = The Lion, the Witch and the (Magic) Wardrobe
4. Игра престолов - Igra prestolov = Game of Thrones
5. Путеводитель автостопщика по галактике - Putevoditel avtostopshchka po galaktike = Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy
6. Голодные игры - Golodnye igry = Hunger Games
7. Гарри Поттер - too easy if transliterated :-) = Harry Potter
8. Звёздный путь - Zvyozdnyy put = Star Trek
9. Властелин колец - Vlastelin kolets = Lord of the Rings
10. Алиса в Стране чудес - Alisa v Strane chudes = Alice in Wonderland

Tim would have been your guy here but to the best of my knowledge he doesn't speak/read Russia.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 31, 2015, 04:30:30 AM
Tim would have been your guy here but to the best of my knowledge he doesn't speak/read Russia.

It was not intended for people who speak and read Russian. Many of these words you pick up learning about the Romanovs.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on August 31, 2015, 11:51:39 AM
Tim would have been your guy here but to the best of my knowledge he doesn't speak/read Russia.

It was not intended for people who speak and read Russian. Many of these words you pick up learning about the Romanovs.

Most certainly...

I learn all about "Star Wars", "Star Trek" and "Lord of the Rings" from my Romanov studies. Who doesn't???
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on August 31, 2015, 12:17:28 PM
I learn all about "Star Wars", "Star Trek" and "Lord of the Rings" from my Romanov studies. Who doesn't???

The vocabularies of monarchy and fantasy have a lot in common. (The Romanovs were sitting on their престолы, wearing their орденские звезду, ruling their страна льда.:-)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Rodney_G. on September 01, 2015, 10:29:20 PM
Tim would have been your guy here but to the best of my knowledge he doesn't speak/read Russia.

It was not intended for people who speak and read Russian. Many of these words you pick up learning about the Romanovs.
I had more difficulty with the items of sci-fi and fantasy than with the Russian clues.Does that make me more or less a nerd? Don't answer that.Still, a fun reverse(?) challenge.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on September 03, 2015, 05:25:39 PM
Current affairs quiz question:

Which person in the news these days has grandparents born in the former territory of a mediatized dynasty with a claim to the Russian throne?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on September 26, 2015, 03:08:51 PM
Which person in the news these days has grandparents born in the former territory of a mediatized dynasty with a claim to the Russian throne?

No-one who managed to guess it's US presidential candidate Donald Trump, whose paternal grandparents were born in Kallstadt, today in the German federal state of Rheinland-Pfalz, untill the Napoleonic Wars in the County of Leiningen. The head of the mediatized house of Leinigen, Prince Karl Emich of Leiningen, has a claim to the Russian throne through his mother, Grand Duchess Maria Kirillovna of Russia, if you view her brother Grand Duke Vladimir Kirillovich of Russia's marriage as unequal and his daughter Maria Vladimirovna thus not as a dynast.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on December 20, 2015, 05:21:40 PM
Russian Christmas Geography Quiz:

My Norwegian local paper has a 43 questions Christmas current affairs / geography quiz that requires quite a bit of research (fun family activity for the holidays). It takes you on a tour of the world and I challenge you to crack the two questions relating to places in the Russian Empire. (I know the answers :-):

1. In this annihalated village in a country where every fourth inhabitant was killed during WW2 and where the president this autumn was re-elected with a huge majority, lies a national war memorial. A massacre of a type described by a recent prize winner with a new type of literature took place here. In another country a very famous massacre with probably more than 20.000 victims took place near a village with almost the exact same name (just remove one letter) as the place we are looking for.

2. Activists in the mountains have this year tried to change this town's name in order to immortalize a man who has "done a lot for the country". The town lies barely 40 km from the regional capital, which due to samples taken here, has given its name to a period covering about 50 million years of Earth's history. The regional capital's name is also a popular Norwegian short form of a period of uncertain length (and in English the short form of a hairstyling technique).


Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Rodney_G. on December 22, 2015, 02:18:35 AM
I really like this challenge. Not too easy, but nicely  demanding.
Is it kosher to provide partial answers ? or solutions to the clues, but not the actual answer? Or to discuss the same in print? What the hell, I'm going to , while hoping not to spoil the fun.
1.   Babi Yar in Ukraine  is likely the answer  here,though I don't know if it was a village as well as a ravine. Alternatively, it could be the place mentioned in the last sentence clue "In another country..." if it's not the real answer.

2. In reverse order, the regional capital is Perm, hence Permian Period. I don't know the town's name, or whether it has some relation to V.V.Putin, who in the eyes of many  Russians, "has done a lot for the country". The  tense there ,"has done" , suggests someone alive and active, which narrows the choices considerably. But Putinograd? Heaven forfend!

To the extent that I may be wrong above,would it be possible to give further hints,( unless one knows the right answers,of course)?

Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on December 23, 2015, 05:08:15 PM
Is it kosher to provide partial answers ? or solutions to the clues, but not the actual answer? Or to discuss the same in print? What the hell, I'm going to , while hoping not to spoil the fun.
Sure, no problem.


Quote
1.   Babi Yar in Ukraine  is likely the answer  here,though I don't know if it was a village as well as a ravine. Alternatively, it could be the place mentioned in the last sentence clue "In another country..." if it's not the real answer.
Wrong track, wrong country.

Quote
2. In reverse order, the regional capital is Perm, hence Permian Period. I don't know the town's name, or whether it has some relation to V.V.Putin, who in the eyes of many  Russians, "has done a lot for the country". The  tense there ,"has done" , suggests someone alive and active, which narrows the choices considerably. But Putinograd? Heaven forfend!
You're on the right track.




Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Rodney_G. on December 24, 2015, 08:02:46 PM
As we say in American slang, "Yes folks!" I knew I could come up with the answer to this sucker. And with only a slight confirmation of instincts/ aid via Google. There's something to be said for following one's first impulse.
1. This would be Khatyn in Belarus, the obvious answer after a little thought about the Katyn Forest massacre. I had never heard of Khatyn, but then , sadly, there were many similar atrocities during the war.

2. Theoretically, this could be any town within 25 miles of Perm, some of whose residents are enthused enough about some man to want to rename the town for him. The man in question may  not even have
 any personal links to this town, so it's  a pretty vast field of candidates. I would consider Garry Kasparov, but I don't know if its safe to openly boost him in Russia today.
For some reason I thought it might be someone non-political, like maybe Valery Brumel. Or Tamara  or Irina Press, who it could be argued fell into the man category.
Other than this line of thought, I'd need another hint or two.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on December 25, 2015, 05:37:15 PM
As we say in American slang, "Yes folks!" I knew I could come up with the answer to this sucker. And with only a slight confirmation of instincts/ aid via Google. There's something to be said for following one's first impulse.
1. This would be Khatyn in Belarus, the obvious answer after a little thought about the Katyn Forest massacre. I had never heard of Khatyn, but then , sadly, there were many similar atrocities during the war.
Correct! Sadly, yes, there are too many similar histories similar Khatyn's, which this year's Nobel laureate in literature, Svetlana Alexievich, tell us about.

Now, let's see if you or somebody else can find out the next one.....
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on January 02, 2016, 08:02:53 AM
Russian Christmas Geography Quiz:

My Norwegian local paper has a 43 questions Christmas current affairs / geography quiz that requires quite a bit of research (fun family activity for the holidays). It takes you on a tour of the world and I challenge you to crack the two questions relating to places in the Russian Empire. (I know the answers :-):

1. In this annihalated village in a country where every fourth inhabitant was killed during WW2 and where the president this autumn was re-elected with a huge majority, lies a national war memorial. A massacre of a type described by a recent prize winner with a new type of literature took place here. In another country a very famous massacre with probably more than 20.000 victims took place near a village with almost the exact same name (just remove one letter) as the place we are looking for.

2. Activists in the mountains have this year tried to change this town's name in order to immortalize a man who has "done a lot for the country". The town lies barely 40 km from the regional capital, which due to samples taken here, has given its name to a period covering about 50 million years of Earth's history. The regional capital's name is also a popular Norwegian short form of a period of uncertain length (and in English the short form of a hairstyling technique).

1. As Rodney already guessed, the answer is Khatyn in Belarus, where 1 in 4 of every inhabitant was killed during WW2. Khatyn is one letter less than the more famous Katyn in Russia.

2. It's Krasnokamsk, outside Perm. People have launched a campaign to rename the town "Putin", in order to attract state subsidies for a better water supply: The argument is that a town named Putin has to have top notch facilities! Perm is not only a geological term, but also short for perm(anent) in hairstyling and in Norwegian perm(isjon) (permission), leave (of absence).
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 12, 2016, 04:10:13 PM
A new quiz question, from the depths of Hyberborean mediæval history!

Which ancient Russian geographical designation was translated as "Sauløke" in a Norwegian-Russian treaty?
In Norwegian the name is very similar to sauløk, "sheep + onion / leek" > the plant arrowgrass / triglochin, but in the original Russian it means "(land) beyond the portages".

(NB googling is recommended!)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 19, 2016, 11:00:17 PM
A new quiz question, from the depths of Hyberborean mediæval history!

Which ancient Russian geographical designation was translated as "Sauløke" in a Norwegian-Russian treaty?
In Norwegian the name is very similar to sauløk, "sheep + onion / leek" > the plant arrowgrass / triglochin, but in the original Russian it means "(land) beyond the portages".

(NB googling is recommended!)


Tried but couldn't find anything online. It's been a week. Care to reveal the answer to us?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 20, 2016, 08:18:29 AM
Tried but couldn't find anything online. It's been a week. Care to reveal the answer to us?

Not yet, but I can point you in the right direction by googling it for you: https://www.google.no/search?q=Saul%C3%B8ke&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&gws_rd=cr&ei=c3XIVsnNMcWbsAGPvpmAAw#q=Saul%C3%B8ke&nfpr=1 (https://www.google.no/search?q=Saul%C3%B8ke&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&gws_rd=cr&ei=c3XIVsnNMcWbsAGPvpmAAw#q=Saul%C3%B8ke&nfpr=1)
:-)

Which person in the news these days has grandparents born in the former territory of a mediatized dynasty with a claim to the Russian throne?

No-one who managed to guess it's US presidential candidate Donald Trump, whose paternal grandparents were born in Kallstadt, today in the German federal state of Rheinland-Pfalz, untill the Napoleonic Wars in the County of Leiningen. The head of the mediatized house of Leinigen, Prince Karl Emich of Leiningen, has a claim to the Russian throne through his mother, Grand Duchess Maria Kirillovna of Russia, if you view her brother Grand Duke Vladimir Kirillovich of Russia's marriage as unequal and his daughter Maria Vladimirovna thus not as a dynast.

Interestingly the Heinz family of ketchup fame also hails from Kallstadt and a documentary is evidently being made about this interesting fact: Vimeo: Kings of Kallstadt (https://vimeo.com/134821795)

Kallstadt is famous for its delicasy for its alcohol (wine) and animal stomach (hog maw, Saumagen, to which fellow Palatine Chancellor Kohl was very partial). Fun coïncidence then that Trump's mother was from the Scottish Hebrides, famous for haggis and whisky!

I see that Trump, in his early career, allegedly referred to his family origins as "Swedish", because he was wary of being identified as German-American. Dutch-American would have made more sense, because of his near (last) namesake Maarten Tromp, naval hero of the Dutch Republic. What could have been more fitting and genteel for a "King of New Amsterdam York" than being of Knickerbocker descent?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 10, 2016, 11:07:26 AM
Tried but couldn't find anything online. It's been a week. Care to reveal the answer to us?

Not yet, but I can point you in the right direction by googling it for you: https://www.google.no/search?q=Saul%C3%B8ke&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&gws_rd=cr&ei=c3XIVsnNMcWbsAGPvpmAAw#q=Saul%C3%B8ke&nfpr=1 (https://www.google.no/search?q=Saul%C3%B8ke&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&gws_rd=cr&ei=c3XIVsnNMcWbsAGPvpmAAw#q=Saul%C3%B8ke&nfpr=1)
:-)

I'm astonished no-one has found the answer!

On the 3rd of June 1326 representatives of King Magnus Eiriksson of Norway and Sweden and the Republic of Novgorod signed the Russo-Norwegian Peace Treaty of Novgorod (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Novgorod_%281326%29), defining the borders between Norway and Novgorod. In Latin it said:

Compositio et Pax, factæ inter Noricos et Rutenos
Nuntius Magnifici principis, Magni Norvegiæ, Svetiæ, Gotorumque Regis, nominatus Haquinus conformavit pacem ex parte totius Regni Norvegiæ cum Episcopo Nogardensi, nomine Moyse & cum Borgravio Olphomøy, & cum duce Astaphio, & cum omnibus & singularis Nogardensibus sicut prius fuerat ante prædecessores nostros. Ubi Regis Norvegiæ terra & aqua sua extenderit se, ibi debent Norici pertransire, inhabitare & agnoscere terram suam & aquam, secundum antiquam terræ considerationem, signationem vel divisionem. Item si Norici transgressi sunt antiquam terrarum signationem istis annis, debent dimittere ac reddere Rutenis terram suam per osculationem crucis. Item Nogardenses non debent transgredi antiquam terrarum signationem & divisionem, per osculum crucis & si transgressi sunt, reddere debent similiter Noricis terram suam.

Item quando nuncii veniumt de Nogard ad Regem Norvegiæ, debent dividere terras secundum antiquas terrarum signationes & divisiones, per osculum crucis sicut unus quisque tenetur habere terram suam. Istam autem diviosonem terræ committimus Deo ac Regi Norvegiæ, qualiter ut velit, dividat super animam suam. Item dampnum quod Norici fecerunt Nogardensibus, in terra vel in aqua, vel in homicidiis, vel in aliis dampnis, Nogardenses non debent hoc vindicare, neque ducere ad memoriam. Et si Nogardenses aliquod dampnum fecerint Noricis, similiter & Norici non debent excitare ad memorandum. Item si Norici transgrediuntur metam & divisionem terrarum volentes mala facere & e contrario, si Nogardenses terrarum divisionem transgrediuntur de sua terra in Noricorum male faciendum; tales sie volontes mala facere, debent corripi ac cmpesci secundum crucis osculationem, pacem non infringendo. Item hospites de Norvegia debent transire versus Nogard & Sauløke, sine omni impedimento, et sic e contrario, hospites de Nogard & Sauløke debent transire versus Norvegiam, sine omni impedimento.

Item pax ista est firmata per x annos. Et super istam pacem osculatus est crucem borgravius ac dux prædicti, ex parte omnium Nogardensium. Item Haquinus, nuncius prædictus, osculatus est crucem, super pacem istam, ex parte regis Norvegiæ ac totius regni Norvegiæ. Inter istam pacem factam fuit Verneknius interpres. Et sicut pacem Nogardenses cum Noricis fecerunt, in eadem pace sunt & illi de Sauløke. Item quicunque infregerit istam osculationem crucis, vindicet ac judicet cum deus. Super istam pacem, annis præstatutis firmius duraturam, sigilla prædictarum personarum, videlicet episcopi, borgravii, ac ducis, præsentibus sunt appensa. Datum & actum Nogard. Sub Anno Domini m ccc xx sexto. iii Non Junii.

In Russian (modernized spelling) it said:
Договорная грамота Новгорода с Норвегией о мире
Посол великого государя Магнуса, короля Норвегии, Швеции и Готов, именуемый Гакон, установил мир со стороны всего королевства Норвегии с епископом новгородским, по имени Моисеем, и с посадником Олфромеем, и с тысяцким Остафием, и с новгородцами, всеми и каждым, как бывало прежде между нашими предшественниками. Где простирается земля короля Норвегии и вода его, там норвежцы могут проходить, жить и признавать своей землю и воду, согласно древнему установлению, означению либо рубежу земли. Также, если норвежцы в течение последних лет перешли древнее означение или рубеж земель, то должны оставить и отдать русским их землю, по крестному целованию. Также, новгородцы не должны переходить древнее означение и рубеж земель, по крестному целованию, а если перешли, должны точно так же отдать норвежцам их землю.

Также, когда придут послы из Новгорода к королю Норвегии, они должны делить земли согласно древним означениям и рубежам, по крестному целованию, сообразно тому, чем каждый, считается, владеет. Этот раздел земли поручаем богу и королю Норвегии, чтобы делил, как пожелает, по своей совести. Также, за обиды, какие норвежцы причинили новгородцам на земле либо на воде, либо убийствами либо иными обидами, новгородцы не должны мстить, ни припоминать о них; и если новгородцы причинили какой-либо ущерб норвежцам, то и норвежцы точно так же не должны напоминать. Также, если норвежцы переходят меру и рубеж земель, желая сделать зло, и если, наоборот, новгородцы переходят рубеж земель, со своей земли на норвежскую, чтобы сделать зло, то таковые, желающие таким образом сделать зло, должны быть схвачены и наказаны, по крестному целованию, без нарушения мира. Также, гости из Норвегии должны иметь проезд к Новгороду и Заволочью без всякого препятствия, и, наоборот, гости из Новгорода и Заволочья должны иметь проезд в Норвегию без всякого препятствия.

Также, мир этот установлен и утвержден на 10 лет и на этом мире целовали крест вышесказанные посадник и тысяцкий со стороны всех новгородцев. Также, Гакон, вышесказанный посол, целовал крест на этом мире со стороны короля Норвегии и всего королевства Норвегии. При заключении этого мира был Вернекин толмач. И каков новгородцы заключили мир с норвежцами, в том же мире быть и заволочанам. Также, всякого, кто нарушит это крестное целование, пусть судит и накажет бог. Чтобы этот мир прочнее длился в течение выше установленных, лет, к настоящей [грамоте] привешены печати вышесказанных лиц, то есть епископа, посадника и тысяцкого. Дано и совершено в Новгороде в год господень 1326, за три дня до июньских нон.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 10, 2016, 11:07:46 AM
In English this is:
The ambassador of the Great Prince Magnus, King of Norway, Sweden and the Goths, by the name of Hákon, entered into an alliance on the part of all the Kingdom of Norway with the Bishop of Novgorod, by the name of Moses, and with the Burggrave / Posadnik Olfomøy / Barpholomey, and the Duke / Tysyatskiy Astoph / Ostaphiy, and with each and every inhabitant in Novgorod, one and all, as it happened earlier, before our predecessors. As far as the lands and waters of the King of Norway Norwegian stretch, the Norwegians should have full access and habitation and recognize it for their lands and waters, according to the ancient establishment, division and partitions. Also, if the Norwegians in the last years have trespassed the ancient boundaries or divisions, they should cede and surrender to the Russians their land by kissing the cross. Likewise, the Novgorodians  should not trespass the ancient boundary and landmark, by kissing the cross; if they trespass it, they should likewise surrender the land to the Norwegians.

Also when envoys come from Novgorod to the King of Norway, they should divide the lands by the old boundary marks and lines, by kissing the cross, like each one is obliged to make to do with his land. But this division we leave to God and the King of Norway; he divides, according to his conscience, like he wants to. Also concerning the damage which the Norwegians have caused the Novgorodians, by land or by water, in homicide or other damage, then ought the Novgorodians not to seek revenge or bring it up again. And if the Novgorodians likeweise have caused the Norwegians any damage, they neither should refresh the memory thereof. Likewise if the Norwegians, in order to cause damage, trespass the frontier mountain, and the other way around, if the Novgorodians, in order to do damage, cross from their land to that of the Norwegians, they should be caught and punished after kissing the cross, without breaking the peace. Also guests / travellers from Norway should be able to cross over to Novgorod and Sauløke / Zavolochye, without hindrance, and the other way guests / travellers from Novgorod and Sauløke / Zavolochye should without hindrance cross over to Norway.

This peace has been agreed upon for ten years. And to confirm it the aforementioned Burggrave and Duke kissed the cross on behalf of all Novgorodians, just like Hákon, the aforementioned amabssador, has kissed it on behalf of the King and kingdom of Norway. Varnekin served as interpreter at the conclusion of this treaty. In this peace, which the Novgorodians have concluded with the Norwegians, those of Sauløke / Zavolochye are also included. Also, may God punish anyone who breaks this kissing of the cross. In order that this conclusion of peace shall endure in the fixed years, are the seals of the aforementioned men, namely the Bishop, the Burggrave and the Duke attached to this letter, which was given in Novgorod on the 3rd of June in the year of Our Lord 1326.


Sauløke < Zavolochye < za + volok = beyond the portages, was the fur-rich northern hinterland of the Republic of Novgorod east of Lake Onega, in the basin of the Northern Dvina. (Some have claimed it corresponds to the Finnish region Savolax / Savo, but this is impossible, because Norwegians had nothing to seek there and Savolax had been established as Swedish by the Treaty of Nöteborg, from 1323, which defined the Swedo-Russian border in Finland more clearly than the very vague Russo-Norwegian border, but still not very clear, except concerning the Carelian Isthmus (where it ran along the Systerbäck river untill NAOTMAA's time) . It roughly separated Carelia (in the Russian zone of influence) from Savolax (in the Russian zone of influence), but ended "north in the sea", leaving it open to interpration whether it ended in the Gulf of Bothnia (less likely) or the Arctic Ocean (more likely).
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 10, 2016, 04:25:23 PM
It roughly separated Carelia (in the Russian zone of influence) from Savolax (in the Russian zone of influence)
Uffda, that should be "Savolax (in the Swedish zone of influence)".

The treaty was written in two editions, one in Latin and one in Russian.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 28, 2016, 01:13:11 PM
New quizz riddle:

Where did the No-Spitting Romanov cousins lord it over Putin's ancestors?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on May 28, 2016, 07:45:24 AM
New quizz riddle:

Where did the No-Spitting Romanov cousins lord it over Putin's ancestors?

Nobody who knows?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on September 17, 2016, 09:26:09 AM
New quizz riddle:

Where did the No-Spitting Romanov cousins lord it over Putin's ancestors?

Since no-one has cracked this one, I guess I will have to reveal it:

At Bordino, a village in Tverskaya Gouvernement / Oblast (Kalininskiy Rayon) and the nearby estate of Turginovo. According to recent studies into Putin's genealogy, one of Putin's earliest ancestors, the peasant Yakim Nikitin lived there before 1677, as a serf of the boyar Nikita Ivanovich Romanov, first cousin of Tsar Mikhail Fyodorovich Romanov. When Nikita Ivanovich Romanov died childless in 1654, his estates (and serfs) reverted to the Crown (Tsar Alexey Mikhailovich). Tsar Fyodor Alexeyevich III gave them to his mother-in-law Domna Apraxina. They were then in turn inherited by successive Counts Apraxin untill her great-granddaughter Countess Yelena Alexandrovna Apraxina married Peter the Great's cousin Alexander Lvovich Naryshkin. In 1760 their daughter Agrefena Alexandrovna Naryshkina married Nikolay Ivanovich Neplyouyev (Неплюев) and the estates stayed with the Neplyouyevs untill the Revolution.

They were distant cousins, or rather collateral descendants, of the Romanovs, being descended from 14th-century boyar Andrey Ivanovich Kobyla (= Mare), also the first known ancestor of the Romanovs. Their surname means "no spitting" and is derived from a nickname of a great-great grandson of Andrey Kobyla.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 19, 2017, 06:04:49 PM
Time for a new Russian geography + royalty quiz:

Which large Russian island is named in honour of an important Romanov relative, with the neighbouring island not named in honour of this relative's mother, as one would presume, but in honour of the predecessor of a princess of an Ascanian fief on the Lahn?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 19, 2017, 08:13:11 PM
Alexandra Land? :-)
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 20, 2017, 05:06:23 AM
Alexandra Land? :-)

That is correct as answer to a part of the question, but not all of it. Please explain how and why.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 20, 2017, 08:19:13 AM
Don't know the second part. Side question...did Alexandra Pavlovna die in child birth? So young...very sad.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 20, 2017, 11:56:02 AM
Side question...did Alexandra Pavlovna die in child birth? So young...very sad.

Yes, from puerperal fever, only 17 years old, in the city where Ignaz Semmelweiss were to make his groundbreaking discovery regarding puerperal fever a few decades later.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on February 20, 2017, 12:08:02 PM
Side question...did Alexandra Pavlovna die in child birth? So young...very sad.

Yes, from puerperal fever, only 17 years old, ithe city where Ignaz Semmelweiss were to make his groundbreaking discovery regarding puerperal fever a few decades later.

Thanks for that. I didn't know for certain but looking at the closeness of dates between giving birth to her stillborn child and her own death made it seem likely the two were connected.

Additional side question...with higher mortality rates and shorter life expectancy it made sense for most couple to get started in the child bearing process sooner rather than later. That said was their thought given at the time to a young woman's age and how that could be a benefit or detriment in having a healthy pregnancy?

17 is obviously young. I assume 16 - female "adulthood" at the time - was the cutoff. Were there higher rates of infant mortality and death of the mother having children between, say 16-18 than maybe waiting til the mother was a few years older (20-22 range)?
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on February 20, 2017, 04:26:50 PM
Additional side question...with higher mortality rates and shorter life expectancy it made sense for most couple to get started in the child bearing process sooner rather than later.

For royals who were desperate for (male) heirs, yes, but not for most people, who rather wanted to limit the numbers of mouths to feed and the number of heirs sharing an inheritance / farm / livelihood. One of the traits that made Western Europe stand out from the rest of the world and spearhead modernity (and romantic love?) was exactly this pattern of late marriage (mid to late 20s) and a significant minority remaining lifelong singles and thus fewer children, who were better provided for. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_European_marriage_pattern (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_European_marriage_pattern). Russia and European royalty were in this respect "east of the Hajnal line", while you can observe the pattern very well in Norwegian peasants before industrialisation, with mothers as young as Alexandra Pavlovna being very uncommon and mostly tragic cases of out-of-wedlock births, arranged marriages for very rich heiresses (early marriage as some kind of status symbol or pawn in alliance building) or other odd circumstances.

Most peasant girls and boys worked for a few years in their teens and early 20s as maids and farmhands (and engaged in nattefrieri, night courting, i.e. all kinds of romantic sleepovers, heavy petting and probably oral sex etc. without full intercourse), saved money and didn't marry (someone more or less of their own choosing) untill they could support a family, which could be the stereotypical 10-15-20 children where half of them died in infancy, but just as likely 5-6-7, where most survived. Upper-class women who did not breastfeed their babies themselves were probably fertile more often than peasant women, whose fertility was not only limited by their later marriage, but also by breastfeeding.

Quote
That said was their thought given at the time to a young woman's age and how that could be a benefit or detriment in having a healthy pregnancy?
I'm sure there was, but as with Semmelweis's case I'm sure there were very conflicting opinions.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on March 11, 2017, 04:20:14 PM
Which large Russian island is named in honour of an important Romanov relative, with the neighbouring island not named in honour of this relative's mother, as one would presume, but in honour of the predecessor of a princess of an Ascanian fief on the Lahn?

edubs almost cracked this one, but no-one took it further:

These Russian islands are part of the Arctic Franz Joseph Land / Земля Франца-Иосифа in the Barents Sea (east of Svalbard / Spitsbergen). (And as a Norwegian I of course think they should have gone with the post-Revolutionary proposal Fridtjof Nansen Land. (Another pre-Revolutionary proposal was Romanov Land / Земля Романовых!))

The large westernmost islands of the archipelago are called Prince George Land / Земля Георга, named by a British explorer for George V of the UK. The neighbouring island Alexandra Land / Земля Александры was named in honour of Grand Duchess Alexandra Pavlovna (1783–1801), married to Archduke Joseph of Austria, Paladin of Hungary, who after her early and tragic death due to childbirth remarried to Princess Hermine of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (Anhalt = Ascanian, Schaumburg is on the Lahn - see this post for more info (http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=10740.msg421798#msg421798)). This according to the English Wikipedia, which leads you to believe this island was named by the Austrian-Hungarian North Pole Expedition who named the archipelago itself.

But then I now see that the Russian and German Wikipedias claim that Alexandra Land was actually named by a British explorer after George V's mother, Alexandra of Denmark! It is more logical, as the Austrian-Hungarian expedition seems to have concentrated on the islands further east (Prince Rudolph Island, Wiener Neustad Island! etc.)

Anyways lots of turn-of-the-century royal names up there in the realm of die Könige auf dem ewigen Eis - the kings on the eternal ice (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPS7ljgav9g). (Ostalgic pop hit about polar bears from DDR / GDR.)

Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: edubs31 on March 12, 2017, 12:10:16 AM
Thanks for shedding some light there. I have always been curious about how & why those islands got their names and their etymology. It would seem that it's less straight forward than we'd assume.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on December 08, 2017, 04:01:43 PM
An Advent quiz question:

Which royal, whose son has a typical Romanov name and sports a title previously enjoyed by a Romanov by right of marriage, hails from the same region as a famous royalty-related monumental vase in a Russian location better known for a huge piece of the same type of material? The son's father shares a name with the donator of the vase, who also had a monumental vase from this material in the grounds of his palace on an island neighbouring the one where the boy and his family live; the boy's first cousin is the namesake of the recipient of the vase.
Brownie points for explaining all the details.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on December 25, 2017, 04:40:20 PM
Merry Christmas, everyone!
No-one who can crack the one above?

This one, from my local paper's Christma tour of the world in quiz questions, I'm struggling with myself. Any help is appreciated!

"In a Norwegian reference work, from November this year, a group of people [Native Americans] will not be called the same as before [Indians]. Many in this group [Native Americans] are found in a region that has the same name as a geographic point where copper, mountains, honey bees and the good feeling meet. Six governments have jurisdiction here, and the point is administered by an ethnic / cultural nation. Almost everyone who visits the site also visits an almost 450 km long area where one can study two billion years of development."

The last sentence makes me think of the Grand Canyon (the numbers fit), but the answer must be placed roughly between Québec and Ohio because of the preceding and following questions. Six governments administering an area makes me think of the Arctic, with Russia as one of them.


Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: TimM on December 26, 2017, 11:21:25 AM
Quote
Six governments administering an area makes me think of the Arctic, with Russia as one of them.

Here are six possible nations.

1.  The United States
2.  Canada
3.  Russia
4.  Norway
5.  Sweden
6.  Finland
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on December 26, 2017, 05:17:25 PM
This one, from my local paper's Christmas tour of the world in quiz questions, I'm struggling with myself. Any help is appreciated!

"In a Norwegian reference work, from November this year, a group of people [Native Americans] will not be called the same as before [Indians]. Many in this group [Native Americans] are found in a region that has the same name as a geographic point where copper, mountains, honey bees and the good feeling meet. Six governments have jurisdiction here, and the point is administered by an ethnic / cultural nation. Almost everyone who visits the site also visits an almost 450 km long area where one can study two billion years of development."

The last sentence makes me think of the Grand Canyon (the numbers fit), but the answer must be placed roughly between Québec and Ohio because of the preceding and following questions. Six governments administering an area makes me think of the Arctic, with Russia as one of them.

I am leaning more and more towards the point being Four Corners, the quadripoint where the four states Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah meet, in addition to the Navajo nation and Ute Mountain Ute tribe, thus six governments have authority there. The mysterious names / things represent the states and their symbols, mottos and nicknames:
Copper - Arizona - the copper state
Honey bees - Utah - the beehive state
Good feeling - New Mexico? - Land of Enchantment
Mountains - Colorado - the Rocky Mountain state

OK, so the route from Québec to Ohio via the Southwest is not quite logical, everything fits too well with Four Coners and the Grand Canyon.

Quote
Six governments administering an area makes me think of the Arctic, with Russia as one of them.

Here are six possible nations.

1.  The United States
2.  Canada
3.  Russia
4.  Norway
5.  Sweden
6.  Finland

Denmark is actually more of an Arctic and polar state than both Sweden and Finland, because of Greenland.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on December 26, 2017, 05:33:45 PM
BTW this Christmas tour of the world quiz also contains this gem:

"A monarchist would like to buy areas in this state, which might disappear. There he wants to build a safe haven for supporters of a dynasty that was abolished in 1917, and to restore a form of government. The state has a geographical position like no other country."

This one should be easy for the esteemed members of this forum!
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: TimM on December 27, 2017, 11:07:13 AM
Quote
Denmark is actually more of an Arctic and polar state than both Sweden and Finland, because of Greenland.

Whoops, forgot about Greenland.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on January 14, 2018, 12:07:35 PM
An Advent quiz question:

Which royal, whose son has a typical Romanov name and sports a title previously enjoyed by a Romanov by right of marriage, hails from the same region as a famous royalty-related monumental vase in a Russian location better known for a huge piece of the same type of material? The son's father shares a name with the donator of the vase, who also had a monumental vase from this material in the grounds of his palace on an island neighbouring the one where the boy and his family live; the boy's first cousin is the namesake of the recipient of the vase.
Brownie points for explaining all the details.

I am disappointed that nobody cracked this one:
Which royal = Princess Sofia of Sweden
whose son has a typical Romanov name = Prince Alexander
and sports a title previously enjoyed by a Romanov by right of marriage = Duke of Södermanland, Maria Pavlovna being Duchess of Södermanland
hails from the same region as a famous royalty-related monumental vase in a Russian location better known for a huge piece of the same type of material? = Princess Sofia hails from Älvdalen, just like the Porphirovaya (Porphyrite) or Elfdalenskaya (Älvdaleian) Vaza (Vase) (see Wikipedia (https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9F%D0%BE%D1%80%D1%84%D0%B8%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B0%D1%8F_%D0%B2%D0%B0%D0%B7%D0%B0)) in the Summer Garden of St. Petersburg , which is more famous for the Bronze Horseman on a huge slab of Finnish granite
The son's father shares a name with the donator of the vase = Prince Carl Philip and King Carl XIV Johan
who also had a monumental vase from this material in the grounds of his palace on an island neighbouring the one where the boy and his family live = Rosendal Palace (with porphyrite vase in the garden) on the island of Djurgården, opposite Sofia and Carl Philip's home on Norra Djurgården (OK, not an island, but a distinct peninsula and part of the larger North Stockholm peninsula)
the boy's first cousin is the namesake of the recipient of the vase. = Princess Madeleine's son Prince Nicolas and Emperor Nicholas I.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: Превед on January 23, 2018, 03:43:09 PM
BTW this Christmas tour of the world quiz also contains this gem:

"A monarchist would like to buy areas in this state, which might disappear. There he wants to build a safe haven for supporters of a dynasty that was abolished in 1917, and to restore a form of government. The state has a geographical position like no other country."

This one should be easy for the esteemed members of this forum!

The answer is the Pacific state of Kiribati, which straddles both the Equator and the 180th meridian, putting the country in both the northern, southern, eastern and western part of the Earth. The Yekaterinburg native Anton Bakov, a Russian businessman and leader of the Russian Monarchist Party, is negotiating with several small states, among them Kiribati, concerning aquiring territory where he can set up an independent micro state called the Romanov Empire.
Title: Re: Russian Quizzo/Trivia Round
Post by: TimM on March 26, 2019, 12:03:18 AM
Quote
The Yekaterinburg native Anton Bakov, a Russian businessman and leader of the Russian Monarchist Party, is negotiating with several small states, among them Kiribati, concerning aquiring territory where he can set up an independent micro state called the Romanov Empire.

Well, fancy that.