Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => Having Fun! => Topic started by: infanta on October 29, 2017, 03:41:26 PM

Title: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on October 29, 2017, 03:41:26 PM
Well, this subject is called "Romanov story" because so far I could not find a title for it. I started writing it in May, and so far only 4 people have read it. I'm a Spanish speaker and this is the first thing I write in English, besides essays for college, et all.
I hope you enjoy.

Ps. I'll try to upload chapters as soon as I have them.

The first sensation I had was cold, extremely cold. I felt wetness on my forehead. Immediately I opened my eyes to discover I was in the middle of the woods. I had a towel on my head. Next to me was Olga sleeping, curled up in a blanket.
-What..?- I tried to ask when I was suddenly interrupted by a familiar voice.
-Shhh, stay still.- said a male voice. It was Malama.
My face must've been dramatic. He was as handsome as ever.
-How..? What are you doing here?- I asked.
-We were approaching Ekaterinburg, but one of our spies was patrolling by that house and heard some noises. He came back and told us. Luckily it wasn't too late -he replied with a smile.
-How did we get here? Where are we?- I tried to remove the towel from my head but he stopped me.
-Leave it there. You had fever. You probably still have. I carried you out. You were unconscious, so was Olga and Maria.
-Where's​ Alexei? Or Papa and Mama?
The look on his face changed, he went on his knees to speak softly.
-I’m deeply sorry... -Dmitri said.
Tears came to my eyes. I couldn’t continue listening to him. I hid my face behind my hands, that were covered by a mix of blood and mud. I cried harder, I couldn't understand why I had blood. Was I injured? Whose blood was it?
I wanted answers.
________
I woke up again, this time I was in a tent, Maria was drinking something and Olga was laying next to me. There was another man drinking what I assumed was tea in front of Maria. She seemed relaxed, but I couldn’t. The last thing I remembered was Dmitri telling me how, Papa, Mama and Alexei were not longer in this world. My mind was blocking everything that happened in that house, on that day, 17th July. And I didn't want to ask, because it was obvious. The only relief is they were by God's side now.
-Where’s Dmitri?- I asked softly.
-He’s outside, patrolling- said the young man- my name is Ivan. I'm a friend of Dmitri.  
-Can he come inside please?
Ivan said yes and went outside.
In that moment Olga started yelling in her sleep. There was pain in her voice. I instinctively put my hand over her mouth to try and calm her.
-Are you alright?- Masha asked.
I touched her forehead and her temperature was high.
-Get me a cold towel, please.
-Here - Maria said.
I was worried. Olga wouldn't wake up. She was shaking, and continued saying things we couldn't understand from her nightmare.
-Dmitri! Come here please!- I begged.
Right away the two men came in. Olga seemed to have a wound somewhere.
-Help me out, take her boots off. And keep the towel on her head.
I checked her. She had nothing on her abdomen, chest or legs. We rolled her to the side and I could see a gigantic blood stain on her white blouse.
-Please don't look. I need to remove the blouse and corset so I can see how bad is it. Maria helped me cover Olga's torso with a blanket as I approached the wound. It seemed like a burn. The men kept holding her as she continued shaking, which was making my job harder.
-I need hot water and alcohol. Is there any here?
-We’ll get you hot water. Sadly the only alcohol we have is vodka.
I raised my eyebrows. I couldn't picture Dmitri with a bottle of vodka and getting drunk.
-Is it useful or not?- he insisted.
-It is. Do you have any bandages? Anything?
He bit his lip trying to think.
-Probably not.
I looked down to the ground. I contemplated my blouse. It was a little big.
-Give me that blanket Maria.
She handed it to me. I started taking my shirt off and replaced it with the blanket.
-Can you make sure they boil the fabric? I'm trying to make a decent bandage, I don't want the wound to get infected.
Maria went outside, she was walking with difficulty. I continued pressing Olga's back trying to avoid her bleeding to death.
Dmitri came back with vodka and the boiled water. He looked a little shocked and covered his eyes with his hands.
I started doing my work. I poured some vodka on the burn. It looked really bad, but it could've been worse. I cut my blouse in two with my hands, and wrapped it around her torso, especially pressuring her back. Now the challenge was, to make her sleep on her side. We couldn’t let her roll over, now that she wasn’t shaking. Maria was by my side, and I decided to let her watch our sister while I went out to talk with Dmitri.
The night was cool. There was a full moon and the silence in the middle of the forest was frightening. I had a constant fear, being aware of dangers such as to be eaten alive by a bear, or killed by the reds.
-Is Olga any better?- Dimitri asked walking towards me.
-I tried to do my best. Now only God will tell. Even though the wound is not the worse, it's still big enough to worry. - I said sitting down next to the fire.
Dmitri sat down next to me.
-Tatiana…-he started- We do not know for sure where is Anastasia. One of our men was in charge of taking her out. I don't know if…
A tear rolled down my cheek. Disgrace was all I could think. A tiny voice inside me told me to not to cry, because now her fate was already sealed. Slowly all the memories of my childhood went through my eyes, knowing those times were over. This episode proved the land I loved dearly, that I considered my home, and its people were trying to kill us. It was very sad, but I felt somehow it was up to me to change this situation.
-Go to sleep please -Dmitri said.
-Like if I could.
-Please - he begged.
I stood up and went inside the tent. Maria fell asleep next to Olga, while Ivan was trying not to fall asleep. It was his turn to patrol.
__________

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on October 31, 2017, 11:55:05 AM
This looks good so far. 

An alternate history story.  I like those.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on November 01, 2017, 07:36:12 AM
Thank you! 😊😊😊 I'm glad you like it!
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on December 07, 2017, 05:32:27 PM
How's this story coming?  You haven't updated it in over a month now.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 05, 2018, 10:18:25 AM
I'm sorry I took so long to upload a new chapter, the holidays season made it a little imposible, but here it is. Enjoy.

By the time of dawn I was already awake. It was hard to sleep knowing that we were in the middle of a forest, with a thousand poisonous plants and animals. Without even mentioning that we could be easily found by the Bolsheviks.
I sat down on the ground covered by the blankets. I wanted to get out of the tent but I remembered I had no blouse. Only my corset. Maria was snoring next to me. On the other side of the tent was Ivan, asleep too. Dmitri was probably patrolling, or outside sitting. Finally I decided to cover myself up with a blanket and see where he was. I found him sitting next to a tree. He seemed lost in his own thoughts. When he saw me he looked away.
-It’s fine- I said- I have the blanket on.
I sat down next to him.
-What’s the plan? Where are we going?
Dmitri stared at me, then he kept lost in his own thoughts.
-So…?- I insisted.
-We’re going to get out of the country.
The news took me by surprise.
-Why?
-Isn’t it clear? Russia has changed, the people did too and it’s too hostile to stay. Sadly they were trying to erase you- Dmitri said.
It was one of the saddest thing that has ever happened to me before; my own country didn't want me there. Didn't want me alive. I was -we were- nothing.
-How’s Olga? - he asked.
-She’s still asleep.
We kept watching how the sun rose in between the trees while the birds were chirping.
After an hour Ivan got out of the tent and talked to Dmitri in private. I went to where my sisters were to check on Olga. She briefly opened her eyes; the fever was persistent and still high. I rolled her to see how her wound was. The fabric of my shirt was clean; at least for a couple hours it didn't need to be changed. In the following half hour Maria woke up and the men gave us bread and honey as breakfast. After that, it was necessary to keep traveling to get out of the country, we packed everything, including the tent and blankets. As Olga was still asleep, Ivan and Dmitri were taking turns to carry her in their arms as we walked. It was a very hot day, and after 5 hours we found a small cottage by a pond. It was very rare having a pond in the forest.
Ivan knocked on the door. Nothing. Just silence. Dmitri checked for a back door.
-It's open in the back - he informed.
We walked in to find an old man lying on the floor. He was probably dead for a few days, and the smell wasn't pleasant. Many flies were around him. He didn't have any wounds, so it seemed he died naturally. Dmitri and Ivan took him out, and buried him.
Maria checked the small kitchen for food: we were starving.
The cottage had a tiny bedroom where we placed Olga. In the meantime, we sat in the kitchen to eat some berries Maria had found.
-I have a bad feeling about this -I confessed.
-Why? It's like an oasis in the middle of the woods -replied Maria.
-I just don’t.
-At least Olga will be resting in a better place -commented Ivan.
He had a point, but my instinct was on high alert.
After gaining strength from what we ate, I decided to check the place for clothing, since I was still using a blanket. I found some shirts and a needle. The job wasn't easy, but at least after sewing them and adjusting two of the shirts to my size, I had finally something to put on.
Maria was the first one to use the water from the pond to get a bath. It was such a relief to be able to wash the dirt and blood out of my hair and body.
The night came and we decided to sleep while Ivan stayed awake to patrol in case the reds came. Maria and Olga shared the bed, and Dmitri placed in the living room a lot of pillows on the floor, so I could sleep on them.
-Where are you sleeping?
-Don’t worry about me - he smiled- I'll sleep on the chair.
-Are you serious?
-I am -he was being stubborn.
-I don't mind if you put blankets on the floor and sleep near me. I won’t bite.
He did as I suggested and after tossing and turning a little, he fell asleep. On the other hand I couldn't. All I wanted was to cry, I missed darling Mama, Papa, Nastya and Alexei. I knew they with God, but we had no news about Nastya. I said a prayer for her and asked God to help me sleep. Seemed like it wasn't effective.
I kept sobbing in the darkness. But after a couple minutes, Dmitri woke up.
-Is everything alright? -he whispered.
-It is.
-Crying isn't always an indicator that everything is fine. Tatiana, you know you can trust me. I'd give my life for you, your family. I know things are rough, I know the situation is sad, but please, don’t cry because of the reds. You’re alive, so are Olga and Maria. We are going to survive this revolution. God gave you a second chance: he gave us a second chance.
His words only made me cry harder.
-Shhh, stop please -he begged.
At that moment I couldn't control my tears. I couldn't control my emotions. I could no longer hide them away.
-Tatiana, I'm begging you, stop crying. You're not solving anything.
-Leave me alone Malama.
-I can't. You don't know what I felt knowing the Bolsheviks had you imprisoned. I was afraid they'd beat you, yell at you and much worse. I can't live without thinking about you. Even if we can't be together, I'm happy enough to know you're breathing.
Suddenly I felt how he held my hand. I tried to escape but I couldn't, I had no strength. In the total darkness I could sense how his face was only a couple centimeters away from mine. I could feel his breath. The next thing I knew, is that his lips were pressing mine.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 05, 2018, 11:35:06 AM
This is a great chapter.  Well worth the wait.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 05, 2018, 01:33:45 PM
A couple of practical points:

1) Tatiana had quite a lot of nursing experience, so tearing up a shirt to make bandages would not be an issue. My grandmother, born in 1891 and so of the same generation, did some part-time nursing during the First World War (she was a teacher). Her First Aid exam included a question on what to do if the bandages ran short. Her reply, 'I would tear up my petticoat.'
2) I hope Marie would not be snoring, as this is associated with excess weight. Could you simply say that she was dead to the world.
3) I'm not sure about washing in a pond, as they are often fairly stagnant. How about a stream?

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 05, 2018, 06:15:22 PM
A couple of practical points:

1) Tatiana had quite a lot of nursing experience, so tearing up a shirt to make bandages would not be an issue. My grandmother, born in 1891 and so of the same generation, did some part-time nursing during the First World War (she was a teacher). Her First Aid exam included a question on what to do if the bandages ran short. Her reply, 'I would tear up my petticoat.'
2) I hope Marie would not be snoring, as this is associated with excess weight. Could you simply say that she was dead to the world.
3) I'm not sure about washing in a pond, as they are often fairly stagnant. How about a stream?


1) Well, she could have had 30 years of experience in nursing but when you have limited resources, you must work with what you have or you sit and watch how the patient dies.

2) People snores when they're stressed and tired, and it has nothing to do with weight. I know what you're making reference of, but it doesn't apply to this case, because obviously, Maria had a normal weight in that time.

3) To write this scene (and the upcoming ones) I had to take a look into the map of the Ekaterinburg region. There are only three rivers near, one is the Chusovaya, the other is Isets (the third one I don't remember).

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 06, 2018, 02:33:08 AM
A small stream that isn't marked on your map?

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 06, 2018, 11:28:09 AM
I've always enjoyed AU stories.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 06, 2018, 04:58:10 PM
What's AU?
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 06, 2018, 05:01:48 PM
AU=Alternate Universe or Alternate History. 

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Превед on January 06, 2018, 06:11:39 PM
A small stream that isn't marked on your map?

From another thread about the offensive Yermakov Street in Yekaterinburg:

And this murdering thug still has a street in Ekaterinburg named for him?  Why?  I can understand it in Soviet times, but the USSR has been gone for more than a generation now.  Why was that street not renamed?

Apparently it has been renamed. See ru.wikipedia.org: Ключевская_улица_(Екатеринбург) (https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9A%D0%BB%D1%8E%D1%87%D0%B5%D0%B2%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B0%D1%8F_%D1%83%D0%BB%D0%B8%D1%86%D0%B0_(%D0%95%D0%BA%D0%B0%D1%82%D0%B5%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%BD%D0%B1%D1%83%D1%80%D0%B3)), Ключевская улица, Klyuchevskáya úlitsa (=Springs Street), Verkh-Isetsk, Yekaterinburg
История
Улица появилась не ранее 1788 года (точное время формирования неизвестно). До революции 1917 года улица носила название 3-я Ключевская. Всего Ключевских улиц было девять, все они заканчивались у торфяного болота, близ которого, возможно, находились ключи, используемые местными жителями. В 1921 году улица получила название Лассаля, в 1960-х годах переименована в улицу Ермакова в честь Петра Захаровича Ермакова — большевика, организатора боевой дружины верх-исетских рабочих в 1905 году и одного из организаторов Красной гвардии на Урале. Однако более известен Ермаков как убийца царской семьи Романовых. В 1990-х годах из-за неоднозначного восприятия личности Ермакова улица его имени была переименована в Ключевскую.

=
History
The street appeared not earlier than 1788 (the exact time of formation is unknown). Before the revolution of 1917 the street was called the 3rd Kliuchevskaya. There were nine Klyuchevskaya streets, all of them ending at a peat bog, near which, perhaps, there were springs used by local residents. In 1921, the street was named Lassalya [after the German Socialist Ferdinand Lasalle], in the 1960s it was renamed Ermakova Street in honor of Peter Zakharovich Ermakov - Bolshevik, the organizer of the fighting squad of the Upper Isetian workers in 1905 and one of the organizers of the Red Guard in the Urals. However, Ermakov is more famous as the murderer of the imperial Romanov family. In the 1990s, because of the ambiguous perception of the personality of Ermakov, the street bearing his name was renamed Klyuchevskaya.

3) To write this scene (and the upcoming ones) I had to take a look into the map of the Ekaterinburg region. There are only three rivers near, one is the Chusovaya, the other is Isets (the third one I don't remember).

Both of these rivers form quite large lakes (ozero in Russian) in the region. These would perhaps be called "ponds"in certain North American dialects. Indeed the sizeable lake formed by the Isets in Yekaterinburg itself is called Prud Verkh-Isetskiy - Upper Iset Pond.

To me it sounds strange that anyone on the run from mortal danger would bother with such hypothetic, hygienic dangers in a pristine Siberian forest.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 06, 2018, 06:35:40 PM
I don't understand what it had to do with what I wrote...
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Превед on January 06, 2018, 06:47:36 PM
I don't understand what it had to do with what I wrote...

Well, if you are looking for symbolism in your story, I just thought I'd mention that the street in Yekaterinburg named for the killer Yermakov actually originally and now refers to a supply of clean water. But of course it might not be of interest to you, if you place the characters in your story far out in the forest at this point. However, if you mention the Iset, experienced Romanov romantics will think of some lines in Vladimir Mayakovsky's poem about the execution site. (And coïncidentially it actually starts with a reference to washing.) And if you or your potential readers don't know it, why not get to know it and include a reference to this hauntingly sad and beautiful poem:



The Emperor

I remember –
it was either Easter or Christmas:
everything was washed and then dried
for the celebration.
Along the Tverskaia
in lines stand privates
before the privates – police officers.
The policemen stare obsequiously
at their officers:
"Your Excellency, shall we arrest him?"
The police chief hooks his mustache
behind his ear.
The police officer salutes: "Yes, sir!"
And I see –
a landau is rolling
and in this landau sits
a young officer with a well-groomed beard.
Before him,
like blocks of wood,
four little daughters.
And on their pave-stoned backs
as on our own backs,
his suite follows him
covered in eagles and coats of arms.
And the mighty ringing of the bells
grows thin, a ladylike squeal:
"Hurrah! Tsar Nicholas
Emperor and autocrat of All the Russias!"

The snow covers
the sloping roofs,
it silvers
the telegraph network.
He gripped the cold wire
and was left to hang on it.
The whole of Siberia,
the whole of the Urals,
is covered by the fog of a blizzard.
Beyond the Iset,
where there are mines and cliffs,
beyond the Iset,
where the wind whistled,
the driver of the executive committee
fell silent and stopped
at the ninth verst.

The universe was covered in snow.
You can’t see a thing –
more’s the pity.
And only the traces of wolves’ bellies
follow the track
of wild goats.
Six puds (to make a round figure)
as if in charge of a regiment of cedars is he, -
the snow squeaks
under the feet of Paramonov,
the chairman of the executive committee.
He opens his coat,
he kicks the snow
with his boots.
"Was it here?"
- No, not here.
We’ve passed it! –
Here a cedar
was marked by an axe,
incisions to the root of the bark,
at the root,
under the cedar,
a road,
and under it –
the emperor is buried.
Only the clouds float like flags,
and in the clouds the lies of birds,
raucous and one-headed,
the crows curse.

Many are lured by the rays of a crown.
Welcome, nobility and gentry.
In our country you can get a crown
but only with a mine.

Sverdlovsk, 1928.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 08, 2018, 02:10:55 PM
A small stream that isn't marked on your map?

Ann




You do have to keep in mind there wasn't pollution like now in those times... And this is life or death for them. Perhaps now we are very aware of the dangers of drinking water or bathing in water from a stream or pond, but back then, things were different.

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 09, 2018, 02:50:38 AM
I'm thinking more in terms of the kind of stagnant scummy water that doesn't look very clean.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 10, 2018, 08:06:45 AM
Like a swamp.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 10, 2018, 11:23:31 AM
Yes. In England ponds tend to be isolated and often stagnant or nearly so. The word 'pond' is used of small bodies of fresh water. Anything more than about 100 yards across is usually called a lake (if I remember correctly, anything more than an acre in size is legally a lake).

For drinking, cooking or washing the advice is to go for a fast-flowing stream, with a rocky, gravel or sandy bottom, as far upstream as possible, and check for dead sheep further up! Incidentally, on Dartmoor, near where I live in Plymouth, dead sheep are often to be found in nice clear-looking streams.

Now our three heroines, plus Dimitri and Ivan,  are on the run and desperate, but the capable Tatiana will be aware that they need to avoid making things worse by drinking dirty water and catching bugs as a result. They have the peasant's kitchen, and so presumably some pots and means of making a fire, so if they have to rely on pond water I would suggest boiling it.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Превед on January 10, 2018, 02:50:58 PM
You do have to keep in mind there wasn't pollution like now in those times...

Exactly. Things were very different in Russia, especially in Siberia, in contrast to England, where the population density already in 1918 was much, much higher than in Russia and Siberia. (English agriculture, with the manure it produces, was also much more intensive than Russian agriculture.) The problem was not so much industrial pollution of water (more of a direct problem for aquatic creatures and other parts of the environment than for humans). For humans the main direct health hazard was untreated sewage emptied directly into rivers, lakes and the sea. This is hardly an issue in a sparsely populated Siberian forest.

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 10, 2018, 05:37:37 PM
Quote
Incidentally, on Dartmoor, near where I live in Plymouth, dead sheep are often to be found in nice clear-looking streams.

Ew!

No doubt that is why it's recommended to boil such water before drinking it.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 14, 2018, 09:07:23 PM
Here it goes another chapter. There's a part (that you'll find without problem) which is not detailed, and it's open to the reader's imagination. Enjoy!


In the morning I woke up to see Olga sitting, raising an eyebrow, probably because how close Dmitri was from me. Or most likely because his hand was around my waist. Rapidly I removed it and sat down.
-How are you feeling? -I asked trying to wipe away the guiltiness from my face.
-I’ve been better, thanks -she said in a sarcastic tone -first Maria, now you?
-It's not what you're thinking about.
-I don't know, you tell me.
It didn't take her long to get stubborn and sarcastic again. But after all I was glad she was awake and able to walk.
We had breakfast all together in the kitchen, while we were sitting eating I could see how Dmitri's eyes were sparkling. I couldn't help it but blushing. Maria could sense something was going on, so when we resumed our journey -not after grabbing soap,  food, and clothes from the cabin- she asked softly:
-What's going on?
-We're walking, Maria. -I played the innocent card.
-No, I mean with Dmitri. He seems happier, and so do you. You're radiant.
-It probably must've been because I didn't sleep surrounded by bugs, and mosquitoes.
-Oh seriously? -she looked at me raising her eyebrows.
-Yes, seriously, my dear. - I smiled.
We kept walking. The idea was to reach the Chusovaya river. And there see if the other man was there with Nastya.
Dmitri told us we were 2 days away from the river. In the evening we stopped again; we couldn't feel our legs. Again the fever made another visit to Olga, I changed her bandage and cleaned the wound. It seemed to be better but it was still infected. She drank some milk and fell asleep. The temperature outside was still high to be at night. The stars were shining in the sky, and the air smelled like fresh pine. Ivan and Dmitri armed the tent again. We placed again the blankets in the inside, now we also had some pillows we took from the cabin. Surprisingly we weren't hungry. But we definitely were tired. Maria was the first one to fall asleep, and of course, to snore. A couple minutes later, Ivan did the same. Only Dmitri and I were up. We hadn't exchanged many words since the kiss, and to be honest, I didn't know what to say.
I decided to go outside. I could feel the tension in the air. Of course he followed me.
-Are you alright?
-I am, thanks for asking.
-Look, I'm sorry about what happened last night. It was improper, and won't happen again -he apologized.
-It's fine, really. It was the moment, I get it -I replied.
He looked up, to the sky, like trying to find strength.
-Good Lord, there’s no moment in the day in which you don't appear on my mind -he whispered.
I smiled delicately. But still, I didn't know what to do. Or say. It was the first time in my life I didn't know what to do next. I couldn't decide, even though, people always said I was good at making decisions. He seemed to understand what kind of struggle I had.
-Nothing is stopping us from being happy, and I won't push you to do anything you don't want. I am here for you, I am here and I'm not going anywhere.
Of course I had the same feelings, but I didn't know how to react to them. Dmitri looked me in the eyes and gave me a kiss on the cheek. I felt how my heart stopped for a second. I didn't know what was going on with me, I felt so weak and pleased at the same time. His lips were warm and I felt butterflies in my stomach. Why was I so weak to surrender my pride for a kiss?
An awkward silence followed next but we kept talking and enjoying the breeze, then we decided to get in the tent for some sleep. For our surprise, my little sister had found solace in the arms of Ivan.
-For God's sake, Maria, behave a little- I said.
Nothing. They ignored us.
-We'll sleep outside Tatiana. C'mon- Dmitri said.
I was furious. Dmitri actually had to drag me out because the anger was preventing me from moving.
-How am I supposed to sleep? How? - I asked - Thank God Papa and Mama are not here to see this shaming.
I sat down on my blanket trying to calm myself down. But it was impossible.
-I wish I could give you an answer, Tatiana. Let's better try to get some sleep.
He was right. But I still couldn't get into a sleeping mood. I was too angry, too worried and too scared to do it.
On the other hand, sleeping -or trying- in the middle of the forest wasn't something I was eager to try. We were too exposed to being found by the wrong people.
I kept awake, trying to be alert.
-When I say trying, I don't mean keeping your eyes open, Tatiana. -Dmitri pointed out.
I looked at him.
-You know I actually can't.
-Are you going to give up your sleep for this? We have a long journey tomorrow. You need rest. And please, stop worrying or overthinking something you can't fix.
-For you it's not a problem, clearly - I responded mad.
I saw guilt in his eyes.
-I’m sorry,  honestly I think Maria will regret it when she's older, just like I regret things -his face showed deep grief.
I felt very guilty for my sharpen words. I put my hand on his chest. He held it and kissed it.
-I am truly sorry. It wasn't my intention, but sometimes when I'm angry I can't really watch what I say.
-It doesn't matter. Would you hug me, please?
Of course I gave him a hug. The warmth of his body made me forget about everything and calmed me down.
We fell asleep hugging each other.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 15, 2018, 07:22:04 AM
Ah, another chapter.  Thanks for posting this.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 23, 2018, 02:02:14 PM
Here is an update! Enjoy!


We were awoken by galloping noises.
-Oh no - I panicked- Dmitri, wake up - I gave him little slaps on his cheeks.
-What’s going on? -he said with a sleepy voice without opening his eyes.
-Listen to that- the gallops were louder now, the man riding the horse was getting close to us.
-We got to go- wake the people inside the tent. - he said standing up.
Of course they were still sleeping, unaware how the danger was close to us.
When I was about to get into the tent, I heard Dmitri yelling:
-Run, run Tatiana.
I looked back at him, he pointed to me the man on the horse that was 5 pines away from me.
I softly lifted my skirt and did what he said. I ran what seemed fast, still being able to hear the horse behind me. Suddenly I felt something hurting me on my left leg. I fell, the next thing I remembered hearing was a gunshot.
_______
I opened my eyes and saw Olga's worried face.
-Thank the Lord you woke up. We were very scared.
Next to her was Maria and Ivan.
-Where’s Dmitri? - I asked because I didn't see him around, and I remembered clearly the gunshot.
-I am here -the voice came from behind me.
I had my head resting on his chest. I looked behind to see his smile.
-My leg is still in pain, did you put a bandage or something, Olga?
-Um, about that…-she said nervous- You have an arrow.
-I have what? -me ears couldn't believe it. Neither could my brain -Did you try to remove it?
-No.
-Olga, are you serious? Do you want it to get infected and compromise my entire leg?
-I offered myself to help her -implied Dmitri- she didn't want to.
I was furious. Again. And that was sad. People got on my nerves easily, because I'm the one who is always making decisions and thinking about others before me. I couldn't believe my own sister had put her own fears before my wound.
-Alright, this is what you're going to do Olga -she was listening carefully- first you will get a piece of fabric from the clothes we got for the cabin. Second, you will get the fabric boiling in water. Third, you will get vodka. Fourth, you will grab a knife and sterilize it with vodka. Finally you will get the arrow out of my leg.
My sister was pale. She had terror to blood. Back in 1915 she was reassigned to do administrative work at the hospital because she couldn't tolerate seeing bleeding wounds.
-Are you deaf, dear sister? - I insisted.
 -No.
-And why if you heard what I said are you still paralyzed?
She knew I was right, so she went to do what I mentioned before. Once she had all ready to perform that “surgery” on my leg, I could swear she was going to have a panic attack.
-I will hold you- smiled Dmitri.
Everything was ready. But my sister was shaking. She grabbed the vodka and poured some around the wound. She held the knife with her shaking hands. “God in your Mercy- I thought- get me through this”.
-Don't doubt so much, you can do it- I encouraged her.
She looked at me as the knife was approaching my skin. Dmitri's arms were around me. He held me tighter when the knife cut my skin. I couldn't avoid screaming of pain. By the time I realized, Olga already had taken the arrow out of my leg. Then she poured some more vodka. Out of the silk of her blouse, she got a bit of thread, to give me a few stitches, which was really smart. When she finished, I thanked her. She did a good job beyond the nerves. Also, Dmitri whispered close to my ear:
-You were really brave -he kissed my hair.
I wished Mama would have been here to tell her everything. To confide her my worries and thoughts, but I couldn't, because she was gone. I kept thinking of her, as the pain in my leg increased. I remember letting some tears run down my face, and Dmitri drying them with his hand.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 23, 2018, 05:12:30 PM
Nice to see that Tatiana has Dimitri here.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 23, 2018, 05:45:45 PM
Nice to see that Tatiana has Dimitri here.

I'm sure he would have been there if he had the chance... Let's not forget he voluntarily got into the battle he was killed in, fighting with bravery and seeking death after hearing what happened to her. He was only two weeks away from his 28th birthday....
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 24, 2018, 03:15:22 AM
Good stuff! But a practical point, where did they get the vodka?

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 24, 2018, 09:59:34 AM
Good stuff! But a practical point, where did they get the vodka?

Ann

Men back then didn't drink coke as you can imagine. Vodka was like water for them, because back then drinking water could mean getting typhus if it was contaminated... So they had Vodka as when now we go for a hike and pack a bottle of water...
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 24, 2018, 11:10:42 AM
I know perfectly well that coke was not widely available then - certainly not in Siberia.

But we are dealing here with a small group of young people on the run, with not much of anything, so my immediate thought is, inevitably, 'where do they get X?' Besides, the books I really like tend to explain how the characters do things or get hold of things. So, how about:

Tatiana: 'We really need some surgical spirit, but there isn't any.'
Dimitri: 'I've still got some vodka in my hip flask. Is that any good?'
Tatiana: 'Perfect!'

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on January 25, 2018, 07:57:50 AM
I know perfectly well that coke was not widely available then - certainly not in Siberia.

But we are dealing here with a small group of young people on the run, with not much of anything, so my immediate thought is, inevitably, 'where do they get X?' Besides, the books I really like tend to explain how the characters do things or get hold of things. So, how about:

Tatiana: 'We really need some surgical spirit, but there isn't any.'
Dimitri: 'I've still got some vodka in my hip flask. Is that any good?'
Tatiana: 'Perfect!'

Ann

Don't you think that if I stopped to write about such details the narration would be slow, and boring? Certainly the reader would be asking himself/herself "who cares where they got the vodka?" or the blankets, or anything. The main topic here is not the vodka. Besides, such detailed narrations are usually for kids, because they need to have everything explained and detailed as they're not capable of imagining things themselves. Another point, do you think writers like Ken Follett, Julio Cortázar, Roal Dahl, Charlotte Brontë, among others, waste their time narrating where the characters got "X"? Let me spoil you the answer: no. I understand that's your preference, but in this story, that kind of way of describing does not have place. I'm sorry if by any means I sound rude. It's not my intention. I am of those that aspire to make the reader think.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 25, 2018, 09:40:47 AM
Clearly I write and think differently from you! I like my fiction to be planted in reality.

I would add that I am not alone. If you read the comments on Tim M's 'Operation Rod of Iron, you will see that the discussion is nearly all about practical issues - currently whether the assassins would be able to find a working telephone box in Perm during the Russian Civil War.

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 25, 2018, 05:13:39 PM
This story clearly is more AU, like mine and Wakas's Days fic.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on January 25, 2018, 10:00:28 PM
Any outdoorsman will tell you that you always boil water from ponds, rivers ect. in the wild no matter how clear the stream looks the water will in a lot of cases give you some thing you don't want.

A cabin in the wood in Siberia should have pots, pans, jars, cups ect along with some food, tools clothes ect even if it was looted. Time for these people to stock up on supplies and gear.

An arrow in Siberia in 1918???? 1718 or 1818 yes 1918 no way. and taking one out of Tatiana's leg is something Dr Botkin would have problems doing let alone Olga.

For TimM on your posting Black Future the Germans called insurgents partisans later in 1942 they were ordered to refer to them as Bandits see archive.org "The Soviet Partisan movement 1941-1944 PAM 20-244
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on January 26, 2018, 06:07:05 AM
To add to what I said earlier, the way people cope with practical issues in a crisis says a lot about their character.

Here you have three young girls who have led very sheltered lives, and have now just escaped from a massacre. This is a classic situation where people's true nature will come through. Do they have the inherent capability to rise above everything, and grow as people, or not?

I've just been thinking that this is probably the first time in the girls' lives that they have spent more than a few hours away from their parents. Now they are having to make decisions and take charge of things themselves - or are they just going to leave everything to Dimitri and Ivan?

James is right that getting arrows out is difficult, as they normally have barbed heads. If you want to make it straightforward, have to go right through Tatiana's leg, so that all that needs doing is to cut the head off and then pull the shaft out backwards. If the head is embedded, then things become much more complicated. Three possibilities:
a) If possible, push the head right through, or cut a channel to push it through, then cut it off and pull the shaft out backwards;
b) Cut away enough flesh around the head to release the barbs and then pull it out backwards
c) An instrument was developed in medieval times, I think, for getting arrows out. Essentially it was shaped like a pair of spoons. The surgeon needed to cut away enough flesh to get the spoons over the barbs, and could then pull the arrow out without doing further damage.

A bullet is more likely in this scenario, and with any luck, at the sort of range we're talking about it would go right through.

James is very well-informed and always makes sensible suggestions..

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on January 26, 2018, 11:50:10 AM
Quote
For TimM on your posting Black Future the Germans called insurgents partisans later in 1942 they were ordered to refer to them as Bandits see archive.org "The Soviet Partisan movement 1941-1944 PAM 20-244

Thanks, James.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Превед on January 26, 2018, 03:02:21 PM
Any outdoorsman will tell you that you always boil water from ponds, rivers ect. in the wild no matter how clear the stream looks the water will in a lot of cases give you some thing you don't want.

In Norway, a country of dedicated outdoorsmen and cabin owners, this (boiling the water) is not common and you very seldom hear about people getting sick from polluted water in the outdoors. Food poisoning from restaurants is much more common. Perhaps it's because of our chilly temperatures, even in summer.

Actually, I experienced my father and my brother getting violently sick once after a biking trip in the mountains. Either because they had drunk water directly from melting snow in an area with many rodents (never a good idea) - indeed the infamously suicidal Norwegian lemmings -  or because they had drunk (one!) beer at some craft brewery in a busy cruise port in the fjords at the end of the day. I had neither, so we couldn't tell.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on January 31, 2018, 04:39:45 PM
Boiling water is always recommended from what I have read in US outdoor magazines like Field & Stream, Outdoor Life and Fur Fish game. These are people who live in Alaska Canada and the northern US. One account a man fell in a clear trout stream got a mouth full of water and had a bad case of Beaver Fever as they say for 3 weeks vomiting and dysentery.

On cabins in the woods people who live in them are usually busy in the summer getting food for the winter they also chop a lot of fire wood. A small cabin for one man would probably be just one room containing a bed, a fireplace or stove, a table, and a chair. It would be stocked with food, clothes, pots, and pans.  There would be a lot of firewood outside, a garden, most likely a shed for more food and spare stuff in case the cabin catches fire which does happen in winter. There would be a least a shot gun and possibly a rifle in the cabin. I don't think Tatania would bother adjusting the shirt she would put in on as is. Olga would put one on too since the only thing it looks like she is wearing is on top is Tatania's white silk blouse. I don't think the cabin would have had more than one or two pillows. This is from reading accounts over the years in the above magazines about people who live out in the woods in the US and Canada.

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on January 31, 2018, 04:58:23 PM
archive.org has FM 21-76 Survival, the US military's survival manual. I would say Dmitri and Ivan would know a lot on how to live off the land being soldiers and having to live in a country that has fallen apart. Ivan could have a peasant background.

What they would be wearing and have with them

Dmitri and Ivan army uniforms rifles, most likely each would have a pistol on them. If they took part in rescue mission they would have some hand grenades. canteen haversack and bread bag. Hip flasks which many men and some women carried back then.

OTM they usually wore a long dark skirt with a white silk blouse and boots.

I don't think they would bother with a tent. Its just to big to carry around especially if you are on the run. the men would have their overcoats and they could have picked up some blankets somewhere. I also don't think they would stay long at the cabin if they are on the run. They would bury the man boil some water, get some food and a few other things and keep going.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on February 01, 2018, 05:37:27 AM
I agree with James about the shirts - you can always say that fortunately the peasant was not a big man, so that his shirts were a reasonable fit on Olga and Tatiana.

They should also be able to find a rucksack in this cabin, otherwise all these useful items are going to be hard to carry comfortably.

How are they finding their way? Forests are difficult to navigate in unless you have a good map and a compass - all the paths look the same. If Dimitri and Ivan were doing a rescue mission they would have maps and compasses and know how to use them. You can find north by the sun using the hands of an analogue watch, but that depends on being able to see the sun. what about the weather? From what I've read, Ekaterinburg is hot in summer, but there are periodic thunderstorms in which the heavens open.

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on February 02, 2018, 09:00:57 PM
Glad to of help Tim

I got most of my info on how to live in the woods from Fur-Fish-Game magazine see  furfishgame,com

I would also say the man had a garden and as Ann points out he would have had a least one rucksack and one or more haversacks. He would also have a few leghold traps and snares. Fur trapping is a big business in Siberia. He would also have a bottle or two of moonshine.

Navagating in the woods as Ann points out is difficult being officers Dmitri and Ivan would have had compasses but accurate maps of large parts of the Russian Empire didn't exist back then. Note in Soviet times a regular road map as we have in the US was a classified document. I would say this group would try heading northeast at first then head east for White Russian lines.

the condition of OTM at this time:
Olga looked sad, tired, weak and thin in the weeks before the murder. The murder of the rest even though she got away would of shook her up even worse. Getting wounded sure didn't help her. She is going to be a woman on the edge.

Tatania: She was naturally thin to begin with. The last weeks in the house she looked even thinner. However "the Governess" is still able to take charge and get things done. If she was hit with an arrow and it didn't hit bone there wasn't much meat to her it would have gone through. Also note this in not a western movie. People hit by arrows in the leg have problems walking for awhile even after the arrow is removed.

Maria: was still in her last weeks as strong as any man. She would have been shook up about the death of the others. She will be a big help in helping her two sisters along and doing any heavy work.

On drinking water in the woods as the man said about Norway yes there are places where the water is safe to drink. Like spring water right out of the ground. There are also lakes in places like the Boundry Waters Canoe Area where I believe you can drink water right out of the lakes there if you go out in the middle of one of them

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on February 04, 2018, 02:38:06 AM
Tatiana and co will find a still for the moonshine in one of the outhouses. There are a couple of bottles ready to drink, and more in production.  May be useful to take a couple of sharp knives away with them in addition to the items James suggests.

They will be able to cut a walking stick for Tatiana from a branch. As to their general condition, the girls initially keep going on adrenaline, but when that runs out they will find things very hard, and the differences in physical condition will really start to show. THere will also be arguments between them when one wants to stop for a while and the others want to push on.

The Czech Legion was only a week from Ekaterinburg at the time of the murders, and distant artillery fire could be heard from the Ipatiev House. If they keep going north-eastwards, as James suggests, they will eventually reach the battle zone between the Czechs and the Reds, where they will need to be extra careful. Eventually, they reach a Czech patrol and are able to identify themselves. What insignia will the Czechs be wearing? I imagine they will be clothed in a motley mixture of Austro-Hungarian uniforms, civilian clothes and bit of Russian uniform, but will have distinctive badges. THey will be able to communicate with our party in German.

Just a thought. Instead of an arrow in the leg, Tatiana puts her foot into a trap.

Hope that helps

Ann

Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on February 04, 2018, 08:17:46 AM
Another point to bear in mind is that the girls have been confined in very small areas for almost a year, so they won't have been able to do much walking. Their feet will therefore be soft and prone to blisters. Olga and Tatiana have lost a good deal of weight, some of which will have come off their feet, so their shoes don't fit properly, making matters worse.

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on February 06, 2018, 06:13:25 AM
These are great tips, Ann.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on February 06, 2018, 02:15:58 PM
Blush!

I do a fair amount of long-distance walking, and though I seem to have fairly good feet for it, in that I don't get many blisters, I have seen plenty of fit people practically crippled by them. My worst troubles involve my little toes - my feet are very wide and they get squashed. Result - wrap-round blisters and nails coming off!

The only way to prepare for long walks is to walk - in the shoes and socks you are going to use and gradually increasing the distances. Provided their boots fit properly, then Dimitri and Ivan will probably be all right, but the girls will suffer 
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 06, 2018, 02:22:39 PM
Another point to bear in mind is that the girls have been confined in very small areas for almost a year, so they won't have been able to do much walking. Their feet will therefore be soft and prone to blisters. Olga and Tatiana have lost a good deal of weight, some of which will have come off their feet, so their shoes don't fit properly, making matters worse.

Ann

Oh my, seriously? Is it relevant if they get blisters or not? Besides, yes, they lost weight, but unless you're 300 lbs your feet won't get skinnier.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 06, 2018, 02:25:18 PM
Boiling water is always recommended from what I have read in US outdoor magazines like Field & Stream, Outdoor Life and Fur Fish game. These are people who live in Alaska Canada and the northern US. One account a man fell in a clear trout stream got a mouth full of water and had a bad case of Beaver Fever as they say for 3 weeks vomiting and dysentery.

On cabins in the woods people who live in them are usually busy in the summer getting food for the winter they also chop a lot of fire wood. A small cabin for one man would probably be just one room containing a bed, a fireplace or stove, a table, and a chair. It would be stocked with food, clothes, pots, and pans.  There would be a lot of firewood outside, a garden, most likely a shed for more food and spare stuff in case the cabin catches fire which does happen in winter. There would be a least a shot gun and possibly a rifle in the cabin. I don't think Tatania would bother adjusting the shirt she would put in on as is. Olga would put one on too since the only thing it looks like she is wearing is on top is Tatania's white silk blouse. I don't think the cabin would have had more than one or two pillows. This is from reading accounts over the years in the above magazines about people who live out in the woods in the US and Canada.

I appreciate your comment. You're assuming the peasant always lived alone. He died naturally, just like it would have died any other relative that lived with him.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on February 06, 2018, 02:35:25 PM
I think our party would be wondering what he had died from, and whether it was something infectious.

If it had been dysentery or typhoid, then the evidence would be there, but I'm assuming that you are thinking along the lines of a heart attack or similar.

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 06, 2018, 02:37:23 PM
I think it's kind of silly of me not doing the following declaration before posting the very first chapter: I started to write this May last year. I currently have a 90 pages document. At its time I researched and consulted a Russian friend of mine who is very enlightened about this period and the conditions people lived in. However, the topics here are love, courage, personal growth, and one of the most important: faith. You might find here and there parts where "they have it too easy" considering where they are, and what they're going through. OTM and white officers were very religious. Of course after the disgrace they lived since their father's abdication I had to make room for God's influence and their faith in the whole story. Also you might find later on, they don't seem very affected by the loss of their family. Let me spoil you, they won't now, because they're on the constant run, fear, and their minds are occupied. This will be something that will mark them and affect them as long as they live, one way or another.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 06, 2018, 02:39:28 PM
I think our party would be wondering what he had died from, and whether it was something infectious.

If it had been dysentery or typhoid, then the evidence would be there, but I'm assuming that you are thinking along the lines of a heart attack or similar.

Ann

Exactly, when I wrote I thought of a heart attack.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Grandoffsky on February 06, 2018, 03:29:29 PM
I just wanted to say that sometimes it is worth remembering that fiction is fiction for a reason - it gives the author more freedom of what they choose to write and in how much detail they are willing to go. While we may each have our own tastes in what we like or not, it is up to the author to decide how much information they are willing to share at each point. And threre are many different styles and voices in which one can write that don't all ask for complete historical or even practical credibility in all things. But that, of course, is just my philological opinion.

Meanwhile, infanta, good job and keep it going!
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 06, 2018, 03:39:44 PM
I just wanted to say that sometimes it is worth remembering that fiction is fiction for a reason - it gives the author more freedom of what they choose to write and in how much detail they are willing to go. While we may each have our own tastes in what we like or not, it is up to the author to decide how much information they are willing to share at each point. And threre are many different styles and voices in which one can write that don't all ask for complete historical or even practical credibility in all things. But that, of course, is just my philological opinion.

Meanwhile, infanta, good job and keep it going!

I agree! That's what I said not long ago. If it was a history book I was writing of course it would need every detail. I'm very glad you like it! :)
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 06, 2018, 06:16:48 PM
Another chapter. A surprise is about to come for Tatiana...


I was awoken by continuous soft moves; like if I was riding a horse. To my surprise, I actually was. Dmitri had me tied up to his back, and we marched while the others walked. I thanked his smart decision, because the leg still hurt.
-Where are we going?
-Chusovaya river. I hope we are closer now. It's a really beautiful place. Besides, we will go down the river until we get to the Kama. Then we will go down the Volga to get out of the country. Also I have a surprise for you once we arrive to a town.
-Really?
-Yes, really- he smiled looking back.
We rode for a few hours until we finally distinguished a shiny thing moving in between the pines. It was the Chusovaya river. Dmitri was right, it was such a beautiful place. The birds were chirping, and as drew closer, we could hear the sound of the water flow. It was very relaxing.
-Finally some decent water to drink -commented Maria.
She made a good point.
-Now we'll have to look for a good spot to sleep- suggested Ivan- this shore is too rocky to walk at night, besides- he observed the grey clouds above us- it won’t take much for it to rain.
That was what the others did, while I sat with Dmitri’s help on a rock. But not much time went by, and it started pouring.
-Just what we needed- I heard Olga complaining a few meters away from me.
-If my memory doesn't fail, I think around here there's a cave in which we could stay -said Ivan, who was born and raised in the area.
-What if there's a bear inside?- asked Maria.
Dmitri covered my head with his jacket, held me in his arms, following the rest. Just like Ivan said earlier there was a cave not far. Before getting inside, the men checked for bears, but thank God, it was empty. We were drenched, and we sat next to the small fire Dmitri prepared. .
We didn't have much food left: all we had was a small piece of bread. Ivan didn't eat and gave his part to Maria; Olga only drank tea and Dmitri wanted to give me his portion
-No, you should eat too -I implied.
-I’m not wounded, you are. So eat my bread -he smiled.
-I don't want to. Eat your bread. I'll eat mine, there's no reason why I should have your part too.
-You’re very thin, you're wounded and we still have a long and tiring trip ahead. Eat.
-Fine, only if you have one big bite.
He did as I said, and we drank tea from the same cup. After eating, the rest remained silent, looking how the fire was almost getting extinguished.
-I’m going to check if it’s still raining outside- said Dmitri standing up- Would you accompany me, Tatiana?
I raised my eyebrows, and doubted whether it was a wise thing to do. But finally I gave up to his insistent stare, and assumed he wanted to discuss something.
-The past nights you have been having nightmares. Do you remember them?- he asked leaning me against the entrance of the cave.
-I don’t.
-You cry and sweat. And I'm very worried. I wish so fervently to have you avoid seeing what you saw that night- he said with a sad expression in his face.
-Actually, I don't remember much. We were awoken, and they told us we were being moved to a safer location. I remember we waited in the cellar, and then it all became so confusing, the door…
-Please don't, I don't want you to remember- he interrupted me- now we should only seek for the future ahead us-he kissed my hand.
It had stopped raining, and the wind was cool. In almost darkness I kept my eyes fixed on his, having doubts about bringing up a topic.
-I need to know something- I started- but promise me you will be honest with your response.
-Always.
I made a pause, to inhale air.
-Do you think Nastya is well and safe?
He sighed, and right after, I felt how he squeezed my hand.
-I don’t know how it went for Alexander, our other partner. Anastasia was wounded, I don’t know if it was severe...
Instinctively, I leaned my head on his shoulder as tears flowed down my cheeks. Dmitri gave me his handkerchief, as well as his arms to comfort me. Besides the disgrace, I felt safe with his company. A strong, powerful feeling gained my heart once more.
-I think it’s late, and the rest are already asleep. You will feel better too once you do.
I nodded, and with his help we walked in again. There was only one piece of a thin log ignited. In silence, we arranged with a blanket the spot we’d rest on. Before dozing off, I checked my wound to make sure it wasn’t infected. Thank God, the stitches looked fine. Once I sat down, I gazed at my sisters, who were resting peacefully. From the bottom of my heart I thanked that they were alright, and that we were together. I turned to the side, and Dmitri smiled to me.
-Good night- he whispered covering me with his jacket.
In response, my hand reached out for his.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on February 07, 2018, 06:37:48 AM
A good chapter, with nice Tatiana/Dimitri scenes.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 07, 2018, 09:12:40 AM
A good chapter, with nice Tatiana/Dimitri scenes.

Thank you!
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on February 08, 2018, 08:09:38 PM
The Czech legion as Ann mentions did wear Russian Khaki, KUK grey and some civilian. For identification they wore a white/Red ribbon in their caps. They also had a sleeve patch. The White Siberians used a White over green patch from July 1918. The White forces in Siberia used a White over green flag. The RKKA Workers and Peasants Red Army some units had a red star in their caps worn point down in 1918. and point up afterwards. They also wore a red diagonal band in their caps for the people who could get red stars of which there were more than a few in 1918.

Russia after March 1917 became a arms and ammo depot without a government. There were plenty to go round so lets have Tatania getting shot in the leg. Olga bandages her up and the whole party grabs some stuff quickly and runs for it because there are people after them. Dmitri might want to give his rifle, haversack and bread bag to Maria so he can carry Tatania. The party goes a few versts and stops for a quick break. Ivan has the others slip into the woods while he continues on the trail for about half a verst dropping a bloody bandage then he walks backwards a few hundred meters gets off the trail and backtracks an meets up with the rest.
 A verst is about a kilometer.

The book "Woodcraft" by EH Kreps written in 1919 is on both the Guttenberg press and archive.org for those who want to know about building a log cabin, fire starting ect.

In the Russian Civil war the country was big the armies were small and there were large areas of the front that were thinly held so slipping past the reds would be no problem. In meeting the Czechs OTM spoke Russian, French and English and I believe Maria did start learning some german in 1917-18. The Czechs did know some german and learned Russian. it should be pointed  out in the Austro-Hungarian Empire something like 14 languages were spoken. Add to this in at least one regiment the main language used was English. The officers learned it in school the enlisted men learn it because they planned on emigrating to a English speaking country. After having problems trying to communicate with the Czechs in Russian or German. OTM says something in English and a Czech soldier would had lived in the US replys in New York City American English.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on February 09, 2018, 02:53:03 AM
James

All this sounds ideal.

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on February 09, 2018, 07:38:46 AM
The Czech legion as Ann mentions did wear Russian Khaki, KUK grey and some civilian. For identification they wore a white/Red ribbon in their caps. They also had a sleeve patch. The White Siberians used a White over green patch from July 1918. The White forces in Siberia used a White over green flag. The RKKA Workers and Peasants Red Army some units had a red star in their caps worn point down in 1918. and point up afterwards. They also wore a red diagonal band in their caps for the people who could get red stars of which there were more than a few in 1918.

Russia after March 1917 became a arms and ammo depot without a government. There were plenty to go round so lets have Tatania getting shot in the leg. Olga bandages her up and the whole party grabs some stuff quickly and runs for it because there are people after them. Dmitri might want to give his rifle, haversack and bread bag to Maria so he can carry Tatania. The party goes a few versts and stops for a quick break. Ivan has the others slip into the woods while he continues on the trail for about half a verst dropping a bloody bandage then he walks backwards a few hundred meters gets off the trail and backtracks an meets up with the rest.
 A verst is about a kilometer.

The book "Woodcraft" by EH Kreps written in 1919 is on both the Guttenberg press and archive.org for those who want to know about building a log cabin, fire starting ect.

In the Russian Civil war the country was big the armies were small and there were large areas of the front that were thinly held so slipping past the reds would be no problem. In meeting the Czechs OTM spoke Russian, French and English and I believe Maria did start learning some german in 1917-18. The Czechs did know some german and learned Russian. it should be pointed  out in the Austro-Hungarian Empire something like 14 languages were spoken. Add to this in at least one regiment the main language used was English. The officers learned it in school the enlisted men learn it because they planned on emigrating to a English speaking country. After having problems trying to communicate with the Czechs in Russian or German. OTM says something in English and a Czech soldier would had lived in the US replys in New York City American English.

All this sounds very nice, but I already wrote this part last year. I don't understand why you're saying "In meeting the Czechs, OTM (...)". What makes you think they'll meet the Czechs? Also, what makes you think Dmitri and Ivan are fully equipped. You don't know yet how they managed to rescue them being outnumbered by the Bolsheviks in the Ipatiev house. It's funny also how you say "let's have Tatiana getting shot in the leg and Olga bandages her up", you're talking like if you could control what I write, as if you were doing a dictation and I was the one copying. Let it be clear I value feedback, but I think this way you have of expressing it it's... Strange.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on February 09, 2018, 05:14:24 PM
Sorry for being a historical pain :( infant.a The Czech legion was the best fighting force on the White side at this time in Siberia. there were a lot White Russians with them when they captured Ekaterinburg who sometimes get left out.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Превед on February 09, 2018, 06:41:18 PM
The book "Woodcraft" by EH Kreps written in 1919 is on both the Guttenberg press and archive.org for those who want to know about building a log cabin, fire starting ect.

100 years later we have bushcraft Youtube videos for that purpose!
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bushcraft+log+cabin
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bushcraft+start+a+fire

Watching someone build something from scratch with their bare hands is also quite nice for meditation :-) (Check out this guy, he is a Stone Age god: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAL3JXZSzSm8AlZyD3nQdBA)
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Kalafrana on February 10, 2018, 04:23:01 AM
I referred to meeting the Czechs because they were the nearest White troops to Ekaterinburg.

I like James's idea of a Czech speaking English with a Brooklyn accent!

Ann
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: Превед on February 10, 2018, 08:07:19 AM
Don't forget that Czech and Russian are mutually intelligible on the same level as English and German and English and French, so there will be many similar words, even though they don't understand each other's sentences. Especially basic nouns which have to do with nature and stuff in a forest setting (osa / osʲ = axe etc.).
See this post about romantic inter-Slavic intelligibility: http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=18845.msg552113#msg552113 (http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=18845.msg552113#msg552113)
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: infanta on March 01, 2018, 02:25:29 PM
I'm sorry for not updating in a while... My grandfather passed away and it had been very complicated. I hope you enjoy this chapter


I opened my eyes in the middle of the night, frightened. Something woke me up and I couldn't identify what was it. I tried to distinguish anything in the darkness, but I was unsuccessful. I could hear Maria snoring and Dmitri breathing calmly. Outside the cave I heard an owl. A few minutes passed by and nothing strange happened. When I was decided to go back to sleep, a voice outside said:
-They are all there. In the morning we will kill them.
I was paralyzed. I feared my heart would get out of my chest. Someone touched my arm several times. I couldn't avoid screaming.
-What happened? -asked Dmitri worried- a nightmare again?
-I woke up and heard a voice saying “they're all there. In the morning we will kill them”.
-Are you sure it's not a nightmare?
-I am.
He woke Ivan, and told him what had happened. They decided it was convenient to go check outside.
-We can not leave three women alone here- said Ivan.
-You are totally right. Maybe you could take Maria with you and I'll stay here with the rest.
They woke her up and told my sister what was going on. Ivan and Maria were careful to not wake Olga when they left.
Dmitri had prepared another fire with some small logs. He sat down next to me and looked me in the eyes. He kept staring at me thinking in only God knows what. After a few minutes he said:
-Do you want to know what surprise I was preparing for when we arrive to Chusovoy?
-If it's a surprise, why would you ruin it telling me?
-Because the evil is still surrounding us, and I was always told to fight the evil with good actions.
-Then I'm willing to know.
He searched something in the pocket of his jacket. He opened his hand and showed me a big diamond. Probably it was the biggest I've ever seen. Even if my sisters and I had jewels hidden in our corsets, that diamond was far more valuable.
-With this I was hoping to buy food, a boat, some clothing and a wedding ring.
Almost everything he said made sense. My heart skipped a beat. Why a wedding ring? Was he engaged to someone and I didn't know?
-I was hoping to ask… -he paused- Maybe you think it's too fast or too precipitated, but we were apart four years. I rescued you from that bloody cellar room, and you were alive. During the years I spent at the front seeing how my friends died one by one, knowing I was fighting to keep you, and your family safe were my only solace. I dedicated you more thoughts than I did to my own mother and sisters… And I’d be incredibly happy if you accept what I'm going to ask: Tatiana Nikolaevna, would you be my wife?
His face was full of nervousness, and I could swear he was struggling to not get emotional. When I was growing up I never thought under these circumstances I would be asked to marry someone. I never imagined Papa was not going to give his blessings, because he was going to be dead by the time it’d happen. Marriage was something I never desired fervently. But there I was, I had this wonderful man in front of me asking me to spend life together. How could I say no to him?
-I would, yes. -and I fell into his arms.
Title: Re: Romanov story
Post by: TimM on March 02, 2018, 05:37:21 PM
Thanks for the new chapter.

Sorry about your grandfather.  It's never easy to lose a family member.