Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about Russian History => Rasputin => Topic started by: nigbil on February 23, 2005, 04:54:24 AM

Title: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: nigbil on February 23, 2005, 04:54:24 AM
Hi all,
I'm wondering what the general view is of this Rasputin prediction. The source is Massie and it concerns Rasputin's village of birth.

"His birthplace was Pokrovskoe, a village on the Tura River in western Siberia, 250 miles east of the Ural mountains"

"Near midnight on August 17th (1917), the train crawled slowly into Tyumen on the Tura River. At the dock across from the station, the river steamer Rus was waiting......Nicholas spent the voyage pacing the steamer's upper deck and staring at the villages scattered along the bare shores. One of these villages was Pokrovskoe, Rasputin's home. As P glided past, the family gathered on deck to look. They saw a prosperous village with flowers in the windowboxes and cows and pigs in the barnyards. Rasputin's house was unmistakable: two storeys tall, it loomed above the simple peasant huts. The passengers were fascinated to see this remote but famous hamlet. Long before, Rasputin had predicted to the Empress that one day she would visit his village. He had not foretold the circumstances, and the family accepted this glimpse as a fulfilment of the prophecy."

"Further south, reaching the Tobol River, they found the ice beginning to crack. For safety sake, the entire party dismounted and crossed the river on foot. They changed horses frequently. The last of these remount stations was Pokrovskoe, and the change was carried out directly beneath the windows of Rasputin's house.
There sat the Tsar and the Empress, prisoners in a caravan of peasant carts, while in the windows above them the family of the man who had done so much to destroy them stood looking down, waving white handkerchiefs. Before the procession moved on, Rasputin's widow, Praskovie, looked directly at Alexandra and carefully made the sign of the cross."

I wonder what were the odds of the Tsar of All the Russias visiting a village, any village, one of tens of thousands?
Nigbil
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Forum Admin on February 23, 2005, 09:45:13 AM
Nigbil,
While I for one hate to challenge Bob Massie, Volkov, who was on that trip himself has a different story:

"At Tiumen, we transferred over on board the ship "Russ". The trip down the river went very well. While we passed the town of Pokrovskoe, Rasputin's birthplace, the Empress pointed out the town to me saying "Here is where Grigori Efimovich lived. He used to fish in this river and would bring us the fish in Tsarskoe Selo." The Empress had tears in her eyes.

The ship arrived in Tobolsk on August 6/19, after five o'clock in the afternoon."

I think Mr. Massie may have been using second or third hand sources for that particular information.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: nigbil on February 23, 2005, 09:54:19 AM
FA,
Massie is clearly describing two 'visits' here. The first, as per Volkov, is the one where they just sailed past the town/village - not really a visit at all.
The second, and the more interesting to me, is them, the IF, actually in the village outside R's house.

nigbil
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Olga on February 24, 2005, 04:07:26 AM
I thought Grigori Yefimovich's wife was Marfa.  ???
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Forum Admin on February 24, 2005, 09:58:40 AM
nigbil.
There was NO second visit. Volkov is describing the trip in August 1917 to Tobolsk.  They simply never got off the Rus until they reached Tobolsk.  I have no idea where Massie got the information that they disembarked.  AND, why in the world would there be dangerous ICE in the river in August??
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 24, 2005, 10:12:39 AM
I also remember that the whole family looked on Pokrovskoe as they were passing by it on the river in the boat on the way to Tobolsk. But didn't Nicholas and Alexandra and Maria pass through Pokrovskoe again when they were being taken to Yekaterinburg from Tobolsk? I remember reading that they had to change the horses there, or something like that, and that it was done right near Rasputin's house, and that Rasputin's family members looked out the window at them and crossed themselves. I don't remember where I read this, but I just remember that I did. Maybe this is what is meant by the "second" visit.. Nigbil, is this what you are talking about?
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: nigbil on February 24, 2005, 01:38:05 PM
Helen, that is exactly what I meant. The first time they saw Pokrovskoe was on the Rus and Volkov's description largely matches Massie's. That was en route to Tobolsk and most of that journey was by boat.
That is para 2 of my quote from Massie.

The 2nd time, the third and final paragraph, was when they were moved from Tobolsk en route for Ekaterinberg ( I think). This is the time they were moved in 'peasant carts' and its the only time that they actually stopped in the village. Clearly this was the depth of winter. This is to what Helen Azar is refering. I cannot give you the date because Massie does not mention one.

I'd don't know if I am explaining it badly but FA does not seem to be able to understand what I am saying :-(
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 24, 2005, 01:45:00 PM
I think that they were moved to Yekaterinburg some time in March, which could still mean snow and very cold in Siberia. This was also when they had to use a couple of warm winter coats because they were travelling in a tarantas which is kind of open. I remember reading that Dr Botkin gave either the emperor or the empress his fur coat because they didn't have an approapriate one for this trip.
In any case, this second trip through Pokrovskoe was definitely in winter-like conditions.... I think I read it in Massie's book too.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Forum Admin on February 24, 2005, 01:45:45 PM
When Nicholas, Alexandra and Maria went from Tobolsk to Ekaterinburg, they went the entire way on board a train, there is no mention of going thru Pokrovskoe in a cart, or being on the Rus again, in any of the source material I can find.  There IS a good deal about Yurovsky's train trip with them.  This was in early April, and Yurovsky did chide Nicholas about not taking an overcoat with him when they left.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 24, 2005, 01:46:58 PM
Quote
There IS a good deal about Yurovsky's train trip with them.


Do you mean Yakovlev's?
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Forum Admin on February 24, 2005, 01:47:30 PM
Sorry, YES, my bad. Thanks Helen.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 24, 2005, 01:55:58 PM
I can't remember exactly what book I read this in, I think it was in N & A, but I clearly remember that it said something about Rasputin's prophecy coming true about N & A's visit to Rasputin's house or his village, and that they changed the carriage or the horses right in front of his house. And that Rasputin's wife was at the window watching them and blessed them by making the sign of the cross. I don't know if this really happened or not, but it definitely was written somewhere, most likely by Massie. For some reason I can't find my N & A to look it up... But it sounds like Nigbil remembers this same passage from there.

P.S. They took the tarantas initially and then the train in the end of the journey.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 24, 2005, 04:40:04 PM
Ok, I found this here on the AP site, an excerpt from Felix Yussupov's "Lost Splendor":

The journey was extremely tiring and arduous. It was made in a tarantass (a wicker cart without seats, used by peasants in the Ural district), over terrible roads with deep ruts. They changed horses in Pokrovskoe, under the windows of Rasputin's house. The next stop, an unexpected one, was in Ekaterinburg.

http://www.alexanderpalace.org/lostsplendor/xxvii.html
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 24, 2005, 04:47:43 PM
Quote
I thought Grigori Yefimovich's wife was Marfa.  ???


Olga Rodionovna, Grigori' Yefimovich's wife's name was Praskovia Feodorovna.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Ortino on February 24, 2005, 05:25:03 PM
Quote
I can't remember exactly what book I read this in, I think it was in N & A, but I clearly remember that it said something about Rasputin's prophecy coming true about N & A's visit to Rasputin's houseor his village, and that they changed the carriage or the horses right in front of his house. And that Rasputin's wife was at the window watching them and blessed them by making the sign of the cross. I don't know if this really happened or not, but it definitely was written somewhere, most likely by Massie. For some reason I can't find my N & A to look it up... But it sounds like Nigbil remembers this same passage from there.  


Yes it does say that in there. You have a good memory.  ;)

Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 24, 2005, 07:59:07 PM
From "A Lifelong Passion", p. 616:

Nicky, Diary - 14/27 April - Tiumen

...We had to change horses in the village of Pokrovskoe, which meant standing for a long time right opposite Grigory [Rasputin] house, and we saw his whole family looking through the window...


So there we have it - it really happened - from the horse's mouth (no pun intended  ;) )  


Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: nigbil on February 25, 2005, 01:36:16 AM
Good on you, Helen. So now we seem to have it finally established and agreed, I return to my initial observation.

Is it not an extraordinary co-incidence that Nicholas (et al) should stop not just in Rasputin's village/town but outside or opposite his house?

Now its possible to debunk every prophesy Rasputin made (and I think the 'debunkers' are in a majority on this website) but it seems that this one is more difficult to set aside. Now all we need to find is a primary source that either noted that Rasputin said this to the Empress or commented that they had heard from someone else that Rasputin had said this to the Empress - and before 1917.

The last thing would be to mathematically calculate the odds against a Tsar visiting a remote village in the largest country in the world. Is there any record of any other Tsar visiting this place? Presumably there might have been something in the village itself if it had ever happened.

To me, if the truth of one 'prophesy' can be substantially verified, it would add credence to the rest.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 25, 2005, 07:58:01 AM
I am wondering, do we know for sure that this "prophecy" was legit and not something someone came up with or "readjusted" after the fact? Sort of like the one about the whole family ending up dead within a year of Rasputin's death (they say that one was made up). Is it possible that Rasputin's words were sort of distorted after someone found out that N & A had gone to Pokrovskoe, in order to make the story sound "juicier"? After all, when Nicholas writes about it in his diary, he doesn't sound very surprised or even mentions the fact that "Grigory predicted that we would be here", or something to that affect. He just very matter-of-factly mentions the fact that they were stading for a long time in front of Grigori's house while the horses wer changed.... I think that at least Alexandra would have written something about this in her diary - if it really was something she remembered Rasputin saying, since she was a big believer in his prophecies. As far as I know she didn't mention it, or maybe she did?

Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Arleen on February 25, 2005, 09:25:23 AM
There is a picture of the CARTS that N&A were taken from Tobolsk in, would someone look for it and post it here??
..Arleen
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 25, 2005, 09:47:32 AM
Here is the description of the "tarantas":

A Russian tarantass:  

"Has the reader any idea what the vehicle called tarantas in Russian is really like? Capable of being driven over rocks, boulders or, as a matter of fact, over any imaginable surface, it must have been invented in the days when no roads existed at all. It consists of two long, springy poles, about four inches thick, placed parallel and bridging the two wheel axles to which they are attached. A large wicker-work body, broad enough to hold two people, is placed between the two poles in the centre between the axles. A light seat is sometimes fixed inside the body, and the more luxurious tarantasses are provided with a hood. The coachman perches on a small seat over the fore-axle and the whole contraption is harnessed to three horses, the one in the centre running between two shafts. When passengers are about to leave a posting inn, a mattress covered with a feather blanket is spread over the bottom of the body. With a little luck one is able to snatch some sleep stretched out at full length provided the doing is not too rough. In theory, the springy poles are supposed to take up the bumping, but in actual practice they are usually so stiff and strong for the sake of solidity that one is mercilessly jolted about or bounced to and fro if the pace is hot. Because of this, and the fact that as an inspecting Senator and consequently an important personage I was always driven at top speed, we called the tarantass a 'horse-powered liver-massaging device'.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Arleen on February 25, 2005, 10:06:41 AM
Oh Helen, It just makes me hurt all over reading that.....poor Alexandra!  ...And you know they say she never complained!
 ..Arleen
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 27, 2005, 08:40:05 PM
Back to Nigbil's original question, does anyone know if this "prophecy" was for real or was it embellished after the fact?
Title: Villa Rhode and Rasputin's Other Haunts
Post by: Grigorevna on May 04, 2005, 06:57:18 AM
... the restaurant in Petersburg where Gregory Yefimovich is said to have had his "orgies" - where exactly was it situated? What happened to it?

//Grigorevna
Title: Re: Villa Rode...
Post by: rudy3 on May 05, 2005, 06:16:52 AM
The address was Stroganovskaja ulica, nr 2, next to the Stroganov bridge. in the outskirts of the city, in a place called "Novaja Derevnja". Founded in 1908. On its place today stands metrostation Chernaja Rechka.
Title: Pokrovskoye
Post by: Grigorevna on July 21, 2005, 05:15:08 AM
Dear all,
I have tried to figure out a bit about Pokrovskoye, but it is indeed quite hard - the descriptions of Gregory Yefimovich's village are scarce. Not to mention incorrect, as well.

So does anyone know more in detail what Pokrovskoye looked/looks like? How many families lived there? Did they have their own church/priest? What was the economic status of the village? Did they have their own mir? Did they answer to any nobleman? (Probably not, no?) In other words - what was its socio-economic place in the rural society?

If anyone has any pictures, it would be great to see them!!  :)

//Grigorevna
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Richard_Cullen on July 21, 2005, 10:03:29 AM
When I was working on the TimeWatch programme 'Who Killed Rasputin?' there were some clips used in an older BBC programme on Rasputin that showed the village.  This was old, early moving image stuff that had been reproduced.

Although I need to search through some of the books that I have on Rasputin I think there are some photographs of the village at the trun of the 20th century (up to about the time of his death) plus some details of the number of villagers etc.

Richard
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Annie on July 23, 2005, 08:16:36 PM
I can't wait to see your show, Richard!

I know Sydney Gibbes took some pictures of it as he traveled across Siberia out of Russia. I think the pics are in the Left Behind book by Sophie Buxhoevedon?

That's another of Rasputin's weird predictions. He told Alexandra she would see his village, but not visit it. She thought, how could that be. But she did see it, out the train window, on her way to exile, but could not stop!
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Grigorevna on July 24, 2005, 03:59:23 AM
Thanks, Richard, it would be fantastic to share some of that material.  :)  

//Grigorevna
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: AlexP on August 06, 2005, 09:15:54 AM
Pokrovskoye still exists as a village in the Tyumen Region.

Tourists are regularly lead to visit Rasputin's village.

His family home has been well-preserved.

If you look on the Internet, under Pokrovskoye, Tyumen, you will find pictures of interest I believe.

Hope that helps you.
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Grigorevna on August 06, 2005, 11:02:33 AM
Lovely, I'll do that. :)
//Grigorevna
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: AlexP on August 06, 2005, 11:13:04 AM
Additionally, Pokrovskoye in English would mean "the Village of the Protection of the Most Blessed Mother".

Pokrov (October 14 oldstyle) or the Holiday of the Protection of the Blessed Mother is one of the most important holidays in the Russian Church Calendar.  The Blessed Mother is the patron saint of Russia (many think it is St. Andrew, but it is not).

Anyway, if you can't find what you  are looking for or need more help, or a Russian translation, please let me know.

Regards,

A.
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Grigorevna on September 08, 2005, 07:58:38 AM
Sorry, Alex P, I have surfed all over the web, and I can't find any pictures of either old or contemporary Pokrovskoye. Could I have some help, please?
;)


//Grigorevna
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Sarushka on September 08, 2005, 08:04:29 AM
Gibbes' photo of the skyline, so-to-speak, of Pokrovskoye is in House of Special Purpose, by Trewin. Unfortunately I've just returned the library's copy of the book...

I know that at the time, the Rasptuin home was the only two-storey house in the village. I think there were some photos in Rasputin, the Saint Who Sinned, but that's gone back to the library as well! I'll check The Rasputin File and see what I can find.
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Sarushka on September 08, 2005, 08:44:17 AM
The Rasputin home:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Rasputinhome.jpg)

believed to have been taken inside the house:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Rasputinhomeinterior.jpg)

Rasputin & a bunch of women in Pokrovskoe (the building in the background is unidentified:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/scan0089.jpg)

(all come from The Rasputin File, by Radzinsky)
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Sarushka on September 11, 2005, 10:04:24 PM
Here's a photo of modern Pokrovskoe, with an inset taken by Sidney Gibbes in 1917. I'll post a larger copy of the B&W picture later in the week, when my copy of House of Special Purpose arrives (courtesy of Lanie!)
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Pokrovskoethennow.jpg)
(from Tsar, by Peter Kurth)
Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: Grigorevna on September 12, 2005, 04:30:35 AM
Great!  :D  Thanks! Actually, quite as i imagined it.

//Grigorevna
Title: Rasputin's home and village- still standing?
Post by: Annie on January 30, 2006, 09:05:02 AM
Does anyone know for sure if Rasputin's hometown and house are still standing, and are there any recent photos? If they are not still standing, when and why were they destroyed? Thanks for any info.
Title: Re: Rasputin's home and village- still standing?
Post by: rudy3 on January 30, 2006, 10:29:10 AM
Rasputin's house was torn down on order of the local soviet authorities in 1980.
http://ldn-knigi.lib.ru/R/Foto/Rasputin/B8_9.jpg
Title: Re: Rasputin's home and village- still standing?
Post by: ferngully on February 24, 2006, 07:32:41 AM
shame. could have made an interesting tourist site :P
selina                      xxxxxxxx
Title: Re: Rasputin's home and village- still standing?
Post by: Grigorevna on February 26, 2006, 03:37:19 PM
hi Rudy!

I must say that you have provided this forum with some very unusual pictures! I have seen the one with the house, but never the one with R in the telega.
And it really looks like him!!
Thanks!!
//Grigorevna
Title: Re: Rasputin's home and village- still standing?
Post by: Johnny on March 02, 2006, 11:50:01 AM
That's more or less about the same time when the governor of Yekaterinburg, who was none other than our dear old Boris Yeltsin, ordered the demolition ot the Ipatyev House which was becoming a place of pilgrimage. I wouldn't be surprised that Rasputin's house was demolished for similar reasons. As far as tourism is concerned, Russians have absolutely no sense for that. Rasputin's Saint-Petersburg apartment which is still standing and which I saw 4 years ago while was still occupied by some tenants is now converted into tastelessly furnished little apartments for short time rental by tourists and such. That also means that the interiors were completely demolished and altered.
Title: Rasputin's Haunts
Post by: thedarkone on March 15, 2007, 06:04:52 PM
Does anyone have any pictures/details about the places Rasputin liked to visit such as the Villa Rhode, the Donon, the Yar (in Moscow), and the gypsy camps? 
Title: Re: Rasputin's Haunts
Post by: Lemur on April 12, 2007, 09:09:51 AM
I had always wondered what the gypsy camps looked like. I can imagine them along the riverside in summer.
Title: Re: Rasputin's Haunts
Post by: rudy3 on April 12, 2007, 12:53:24 PM
Villa Rode

http://ldn-knigi.lib.ru/R/Foto/Rasputin/B66.jpg

Title: Re: Rasputin's Haunts
Post by: rudy3 on April 12, 2007, 12:56:20 PM
Banquet at the Donon restaurant

http://www.encspb.ru/en/bigimage.php?kod=2803991737
Title: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: Nomine on August 17, 2007, 05:27:51 AM
I am in St. Petersburg now. Could you advise me what places to see, I mean those connected with Grigori Rasputin. Or also places connected with some of his admirers. Please try to describe the way or suggest the address.

All advices are welcome!! Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: ChristineM on August 17, 2007, 02:15:14 PM
There was a restaurant called 'The Bear'.   He visited it frequently.   It was situated on the bank of the Catherine Canal - not far from the Cathedral of the Saviour of the Spilled blood.   Additionally, his favourite 'banya' still exists.   Unfortunately I cannot give you the exact address, but it is situated close to the Mariinsky Theatre.   Rasputin visited that banya on the day he was murdered.   Of course there is Anya Vyroubova's house in Pushkin.   He did visit the Feodorovsky Sobor and his body lay there overnight before he was buried.    It is also possible to see the home at Chesme where his remains were taken for post mortem.   And you can even see the exact spot on the bridge where his body was tossed over into the Malaka Nevka.   I am trying to remember where he lived in St Petersburg before moving to Gorokovaya.   Perhaps someone else can help.

Enjoy your visit to St Petersburg.   I'm sure you will find it memorable.

tsaria
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: rudy3 on August 17, 2007, 04:22:40 PM
Addresses, where Rasputin lived before moving to Gorokhovaja: Litejnij Prospekt 37, Nikolayevskaya (today called: Marat) Street 70, Anglijskij Prospekt 3.
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: ChristineM on August 18, 2007, 03:47:59 AM
Rudy - you are a hero.

Thanks

tsaria
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: Belochka on August 19, 2007, 05:11:52 AM
There was a restaurant called 'The Bear'.   He visited it frequently.   
tsaria

There is a restaurant called "Rasputin" located on Nevskii Prospekt just beyond Ploshad Vosstaniya where the road divides into two for one way traffic. It is located almost below street level down a small flight of stairs. The sign outside is very prominent. There is live music and the food is very tasty Russian cuisine.

Also try visiting the Alexandro-Nevskaya Lavra (Monastery), which is located further along at the end of Nevskii Prospekt (walking distance). There is a Metro station opposite (Ploshad Alexandro-Nevskago). The location was Grigorii Rasputin's first stop in St. Petersburg. If anything, the two main cemeteries have fascinating permanent residents of some note, including Petr Tchaikovsky and Fedor Dostoyevsky.

Of course the "Rasputin tour" down to the basement at the Yusupov Place on Moika, 94 cannot be missed! Unfortunately the adjoining famous coutyard is fenced off (now a kindergarten or such like).

Margarita
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: rudy3 on August 19, 2007, 09:52:55 AM
Actualy, Restaurant Rasputin is at the far end of the Nevsky Prospekt, Nr 163, almost opposite Hotel Moskva, closest metro stop Ploschad Aleksandra Nevskogo - Alexander Nevsky Square.
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: Nomine on August 21, 2007, 05:25:10 AM
Thank you all for your great suggestions!! It is really helpful for me.

Just one or two other things...

To Fred: At your own topic, showing the Rapsutin's flat, I asked you for some infos cocnerning entering the flat. Please, be so kind and share your experiences, it would be really helpful for me.

To All: does anyone know the name of the bridge from which Rapsutin's body was thrown down? Is there any notice or something like that marking the exact place?

As I have already said, thanks for all your answers!
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: ChristineM on August 21, 2007, 11:43:36 AM
There is no mark on the bridge.   It is a wooden bridge which joins Krestovsky and Petrovsky Islands and bridges the Malaya Nevka.

If I remember correctly, Rasputin's flat is on the lst (Russian 2nd) floor.   The entry is from the back of the courtyard.

tsaria
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: Belochka on August 21, 2007, 07:32:44 PM
The Bolshoi Petrovskii Most (Bridge) over the Malaya Nevka River during Rasputin's era served two-way vehicular traffic.

In its place today there is a narrow pedestrian bridge.

Margarita
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: Belochka on August 21, 2007, 07:46:12 PM
There is no mark on the bridge.   It is a wooden bridge which joins Krestovsky and Petrovsky Islands and bridges the Malaya Nevka.

If I remember correctly, Rasputin's flat is on the lst (Russian 2nd) floor.   The entry is from the back of the courtyard.

tsaria

Rasputin's apartment from 1914, on Gorohovaya Ulitsa was apartment # 20.

Margarita
Title: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: Nomine on August 22, 2007, 12:55:16 AM
Is Rasputin's house in Pokrovskoe still standing? Some books say it was pulled down during the Soviet era, in other ones it written the museum can be now found in this house. Thanks!
Title: Re: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: Belochka on August 22, 2007, 01:20:36 AM
The Rasputin family home in Pokrovskoye was demolished by the soviets in 1980.

Today only a black wicker chair (a wedding gift) remains as the focal exhibit in the local Rasputin museum.

Margarita
Title: Re: Bridge, from which Rasputin was thrown
Post by: Svetabel on August 28, 2007, 04:24:20 AM
That was a one of the wooden bridges on Kamenniy ostrov (island) aka Kamennoostrovskiy bridge.
Title: Re: Pokrovskoe
Post by: Sarushka on November 11, 2007, 08:21:26 PM
Volkov is describing the trip in August 1917 to Tobolsk.  They simply never got off the Rus until they reached Tobolsk.  I have no idea where Massie got the information that they disembarked.

I know this is an ancient thread, but I ran across it during a search today and have something to add.

Some of the imperial family did indeed disembark from the Rus in the area of Pokrovskoye in August of 1917. From the Russian edition of Alexandra's diary (http://www.alexanderpalace.org/palace/books.html?sku=29):

August
5 [O.S.]
Saturday
On board the vessel "Rus" on the river.

All day in bed. Around 10 got stuck in a sand bar. Stopped for three hours in order to get firewod, milk, and food for the soldiers.
Aleksei and Tatiana gathered flowers along the bank -- on the bank opposite Pokrovskoye.
Title: Re: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: nena on April 03, 2009, 06:14:17 PM
Here is :

(http://i185.photobucket.com/albums/x139/nemanjapr/Romanov/Raspucin/th_rasputin_dom.jpg) (http://s185.photobucket.com/albums/x139/nemanjapr/Romanov/Raspucin/?action=view&current=rasputin_dom.jpg)
Title: Re: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: Rasputin New on April 04, 2009, 01:18:27 PM
(http://rasputin-photos.narod.ru/scan/b1/R-4.jpg)
http://rasputin-photos.narod.ru/scan/b1/R-4.jpg
Title: Re: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: Rasputin New on April 04, 2009, 01:18:56 PM
(http://rasputin-photos.narod.ru/scan/b1/R-5.jpg)
http://rasputin-photos.narod.ru/scan/b1/R-5.jpg
Title: Re: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: Rasputin New on April 04, 2009, 01:19:59 PM
(http://rasputin-photos.narod.ru/scan/b1/R-6.jpg)
http://rasputin-photos.narod.ru/scan/b1/R-6.jpg
Title: Re: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: nena on April 04, 2009, 01:29:58 PM
I think so. But, anyway, thanks for posting. Upper floor was in good conditions, with quality furniture,  Rasputin there got guests, and one chair survived, I think, from his house.  ;-)
Title: Re: The House in Pokrovskoe
Post by: Annetta on April 07, 2009, 12:49:26 PM
This is house in the siberian village Pokrovskoye where museum comemorated to the peasant was arranged. I suppose it's new building. Original one was demolished as Belochka noticed.
I have some pics, they are not mine, but i think curious.

new building made for museum
(http://i679.photobucket.com/albums/vv155/Annetta_apforum/70fabe1e.jpg)
This's original house of Rasputin's relatives
(http://i679.photobucket.com/albums/vv155/Annetta_apforum/c6bc4ed5.jpg)
There are pieces exhibited in that museum
(http://i679.photobucket.com/albums/vv155/Annetta_apforum/--2.jpg)
(http://i679.photobucket.com/albums/vv155/Annetta_apforum/--1.jpg)
(http://i679.photobucket.com/albums/vv155/Annetta_apforum/a7ac5dd5.jpg)
(http://i679.photobucket.com/albums/vv155/Annetta_apforum/-.jpg)

Title: Re: Pokrovkoye
Post by: nena on April 24, 2009, 10:24:38 AM
believed to have been taken inside the house:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Rasputinhomeinterior.jpg)

Sarushka, do you believe it was taken in Rasputin's home at Pokrovskoye? I am not sure. I read House's interior description, but it seems unlikely to know where exactly photo was taken. Maybe at Olga Lohtina' flat? Only guessing.

From Rasputin File, by Razdinksy. I doubt if it is his Pokrovskoye Home, but I am not sure.
Title: Re: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN
Post by: Sarushka on April 24, 2009, 10:40:23 AM
Probably his house in Pokrovskoye (otherwise I probably would have said "apartment"). However, it's been a long time since I posted that picture, so I'm not sure. I don't remember now where I found that photo. I'll have to take a look at my Rasputin books next time I'm home.