Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => Olga Nicholaievna => Topic started by: Holly on March 20, 2005, 10:26:10 AM

Title: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Holly on March 20, 2005, 10:26:10 AM
I know some of you probably dont want to hear any more of these...but I think we should have a section like this for all of the girls.
So...if you have any good anecdotes of Olga, please post them.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Czarevna Colleen on March 20, 2005, 01:10:08 PM
One of my favorite Olga Anecdotes involves the books that were laid out for her mother in the mauve boudoir and Olga would borrow them before her mother had even had a chance to read them.  When Alix caught her, Olga would say, with a smile, "You must wait, Mama, until I find out whether this book is a proper one for you to read!"  I think that's really cute and sweet.  :D ;D :-* 8)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Abby on March 20, 2005, 01:52:26 PM
I like the story about Olga reading one of Pierre Gilliard's assigned books and coming across a bad French (I think it was French) word or phrase that Gilliard forgot was in there and didn't cross out...then Olga repeated it and Nicholas teased Gilliard about' teaching his daughter new words!'
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sarai on March 20, 2005, 01:52:52 PM
There are lots of cute OTMA anecdotes in M. Eagar's book Six Years at the Russian Court. Here are some related to Olga:

"One day during Eastertide we were out driving on the Nevski Prospect, and the little Grand Duchess Olga was not good. I was speaking to her, trying to induce her to sit down quietly, when suddenly she did so, folding her hands in front of her. In a few seconds she said to me, 'Did you see that Policeman?' I told her that was nothing extraordinary, and that the police would not touch her. She replied, 'but this one was writing something; I was afraid he might have been writing 'I saw Olga, and she was very naughty.' "

"While we were in Moscow the Empress thought she would like to have the children's portraits painted, so an artist was engaged to paint them. They were at this time four years, two and a half years, and two months.[...] I begged him to remember what babies they were, and to work from photographs. But, no! even to paint their frocks he insisted upon them sitting to him for three or four hours each day. Of course the poor children got very impatient, and one day the little Grand Duchess Olga lost her temper, and said to the artist, 'You are a very ugly man, and I don't like you a bit.' "

"I was reading 'Alice in Wonderland' and 'Through the Looking Glass' to them lately, and she was horrified at the manners of the queens. 'No queens,' she said, 'would be so rude.' "

"She read about the English cutting off the Welsh Prince Llewellyn's head, and sending it to London. She was awfully shocked, and read the story again. Then she exclaimed, 'Well, it was a good thing he was dead before they cut off his head; it would have hurt him most awfully if he was alive.' I said that they were not always so kind, and sometimes cut the heads off living people, and later she would read of them doing such things. She said, 'Well, I really think people are much better now than they used to be. I'm very glad I live now when people are so kind.' "

"On Christmas morning when Olga awoke, she exclaimed at once, 'Did God send for cousin Ella's body in the night?' I felt startled at such a question on Christmas morning, but answered, 'Oh no, dear, not yet.' She was greatly disappointed, and said, 'I thought He would have sent for her to keep Christmas with Him.' "

"Shortly after I first went to Russia the little Grand Duchess Olga was very naughty. I said to her, 'I am afraid you got out of bed with the wrong foot foremost this morning.' She looked a little puzzled, but said nothing. Next morning, before getting out of bed, she called me and asked which was her right foot. I showed her, and she most carefully descended on it. 'Now,' said she, 'that bad left foot won't be able to make me naughty to-day; I got out on the right.' "
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Abby on March 20, 2005, 07:11:17 PM
Quote
She said, 'Well, I really think people are much better now than they used to be. I'm very glad I live now when people are so kind.' "




Oh, this is so ironically tragic!! :'(

Thanks for posting those lovely stories Sarai!!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Lanie on March 20, 2005, 07:38:20 PM
Gleb Botkin on Olga: "She was an avid reader and a poetess of considerable talent.   In spite of the great difference in age Grand Duchess Olga was particularly friendly with my father with whom she felt free to discuss anything that interested or worried her.  She said always that my father was 'a deep well of profound ideas,' and even addressed him in all her letters as 'Dear Well.' [...] Olga and I were working seriously on poetry, and the Grand Duchess became interested in my verses.  Her interest naturally added more zeal to my endeavors and from then forward I submitted every new piece of verse I wrote to Olga which she analyzed very carefully, often giving me valuable advise, and exchanging opinions about rhymes, rhythms, and other problems which are supposed to preoccupy the poets.  Thus it was that I came to know and appreciate fully the fine sensitive character of Grand Duchess Olga."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Czarevna Colleen on March 20, 2005, 08:29:13 PM
I'd never heard these other stories before!!!  Thanks for posting them, everyone!!!!!!  :) :'( :D
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: julia.montague on October 17, 2005, 03:15:10 PM
Quote
I like the story about Olga reading one of Pierre Gilliard's assigned books and coming across a bad French (I think it was French) word or phrase that Gilliard forgot was in there and didn't cross out...then Olga repeated it and Nicholas teased Gilliard about' teaching his daughter new words!'


I read that somewhere too.
It was the word "Merde" which means "Shit"
Olga didn't know what it means. In the afternoon she was on a walk with Nicholas and asked him about it.
The next day Nicholas asked Gilliard why he teaches his daughter that kind of words
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: James_Davidov on March 09, 2006, 06:05:00 PM
Quote
I like the story about Olga reading one of Pierre Gilliard's assigned books and coming across a bad French (I think it was French) word or phrase that Gilliard forgot was in there and didn't cross out...then Olga repeated it and Nicholas teased Gilliard about' teaching his daughter new words!'  
 

 
I read that somewhere too.
It was the word "Merde" which means "sh**"
Olga didn't know what it means. In the afternoon she was on a walk with Nicholas and asked him about it.
The next day Nicholas asked Gilliard why he teaches his daughter that kind of words


I believe Nicholas saw the humour in that the book was Les Miserables, by Victor Hugo

James
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dasha on March 09, 2006, 07:05:36 PM
Quote

I believe Nicholas saw the humour in that the book was Les Miserables, by Victor Hugo, set during the French Revolution during which King Loui & Marie Antionette were executed.

James


I hope you don't think me too impertinent for correcting you in regards to the work "Les Miserables" by Victor Hugo.

It's set during the uprisings of the early 1830s and not during the French Revolution of 1789.

I apologize for correcting you.  I hope you don't think me rude.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: James_Davidov on March 09, 2006, 08:51:57 PM


phhh, im not hypersensative, thanks for correcting me..
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on April 16, 2006, 05:21:34 AM
Thanks for all those Olga anecdotes, everybody!!! You might see that I've listed them on my site - so thanks for all your help!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: marina on May 01, 2006, 07:07:28 PM
When Olga was a nurse , she frequently spoke with soldiers without revealing her identity when she could...
I translate one of these discussions:
Soldier: "Are you tired?"
Olga: "Yeah, a little bit but it's good to be tired!"
-Why it is good?
-It means I worked.
-You have only to sit down here. Would you like to go to the front?
-Yes it's my dream: being there.
-So what? Go ahead!
-I would like but my father won't let me leave. He says my health is too fragile.
-You don't care a damn about your father! Go ahead!
Grand duchess began to laugh.
-It's impossible. I couldn't care less about my father. We both like very much!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Georgiy on May 02, 2006, 10:31:54 PM
Where did you come across that particular conversation?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: marina on May 03, 2006, 06:04:51 AM
http://www.st-nikolas.orthodoxy.ru/biblio/tzar/pedagogy/glava9_2.html
It's a book about the family, here is the index:
http://www.st-nikolas.orthodoxy.ru/biblio/tzar/pedagogy/index.html#oglav
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on June 22, 2006, 02:07:09 AM
Quote
http://www.st-nikolas.orthodoxy.ru/biblio/tzar/pedagogy/glava9_2.html
It's a book about the family, here is the index:
http://www.st-nikolas.orthodoxy.ru/biblio/tzar/pedagogy/index.html#oglav

Um I might be a little late but thanks for that link marina!! :) i'll try to understand it!  ;)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: marina on June 22, 2006, 07:56:09 AM
This is never too late... :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on June 27, 2006, 11:08:01 PM
LOL, thanks marina :)

As a continuation to the one with Olga and the policeman, when Olga returned home that day she asked everyone around the palace if a policeman had dropped by (all of them of course saying no). She also asked her father if he had ever been to prison. Nicholas replied that he was never that naughty enough to go to prison, when then Olga said with great admiration, "Oh - how good you must have been!"

I think we might have skipped one ... one that is a personal favourite of mine which shows Olga's generosity:

When in 1899, Olga, Tatiana and their cousin Ella went to a toy shop in Darmstadt, escorted by their nurse, Ms. Eagar. They were each allowed to buy a toy for themselves. After a long time of looking around, Olga chose the smallest toy and announced that that would be all she was getting. Ms. Eagar was surprised at her decision and asked her why she was doing this. Olga replied, "But the beautiful toys belong to some other little girls, I am sure; and think how sad they would be if they came home and found we had taken them while they were out."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on June 27, 2006, 11:16:11 PM
Another one I have:

Olga completely admired and was devoted to her father. As a Christmas gift, Olga made him a potholder. When Christmas came, she presented it to her father, saying: "Nana [Ms. Eagar] is afraid it won't be much use to you, but you can put it on your table for a mat, or hang it on the wall for a picture."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on June 28, 2006, 02:12:21 AM
And another one:

After the death of Olga's cousin Ella, a war began between Russia and Japan. Olga said to Ms. Eagar, "I hope the Russian soldiers will kill all the Japanese-not leave even one alive." Olga then began asking other questions such as if Japan had an emperor. After a while Olga went quiet for a moment when she then looked up and said, "I did not know that the Japanese were people like ourselves. I thought they were only like monkeys." After this event it was never heard of Olga saying that she was pleased after hearing deaths of the Japanese.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Guinastasia on July 03, 2006, 12:25:38 PM
I think I read in A Lifelong Passion a letter where Olga says that she and Anastasia locked a bratty cousin of their's in the bathroom.  Heh!

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on July 08, 2006, 03:37:09 AM
Here is the letter:

I am sitting in Mr. Gilliard's rooms near the door of his water-closet where Trina's little nasty girl Katya is sitting locked in by Anastasia and myself. We've just drawn her along the dark passage and pushed her in. The weather became very cold and it was snowing today and the snow didn't melt. We had a lot of fun when we went for a drive with Isa but Mama was receiving visitors all the time which was rather dull. Mordvinov had breakfast with us and told us a lot of interesting things but we interrupted him every moment as usually and didn't let him go on. It's always a great pleasure for us to read Alexei's letters. He writes such nice and funny letters without Pyotr Vasilievich's help. Katya is still locked in the W.C. She is knocking and wailing behind the door but we are implacable.

Thanks to Rob and Sarushka, perhaps more anecdotes can be posted from Six Years At The Russian Court ;)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: tatianolishka_ on October 05, 2006, 03:27:36 PM
Even though it's sad, the anecdote I remember about Olishka the best is the one when she woke up on Christmas day after Ella died and asked her governess (I think) "Did God send for Ella's body in the night?"
And when the governess said no (or something along that line), she said "I thought God would let Ella come and have Christmas with him!"

Aww.. she really loved her little cousin :'(

TatianOlishka
Woof!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on October 05, 2006, 04:25:59 PM
This I read in Nicholas and Alexandra: the Family Albums. I'd assume it was Olga, since she was the oldest. If you know who it was, please correct me!

Quote
Nicholas never carried any money, and one day, during a religious ceremony, he saw a priest approach with a collection plate. Anxious glances were exchanged between Nicholas and Alix, and between Alix and her daughters. Nobody had any money. One of the girls approached the lady-in-waiting, Isa Buxhoeveden, and in a whisper explained their embarrassment. The obliging Isa gave them her golden rouble. The next day, she recieved another rouble in a beautiful little enamel box, with this note: "To the generous donor on the part of the grateful recipient, Nicholas."

I know it's actually an anecdote about Nicholas, but I'm interested in who the little girl was! It could have been Tatiana also, because she loved doing favors.  ;D
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: kelly_anne_wright on October 06, 2006, 09:21:38 PM
This is a very vague memory of mine. I think it's from Romanov Autumn. Apparently Olga saw a ghost, then recognized her in a portrait as a long-dead empress after pointing the portrait out to Ms. Eager.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on October 06, 2006, 11:35:13 PM
This is a very vague memory of mine. I think it's from Romanov Autumn. Apparently Olga saw a ghost, then recognized her in a portrait as a long-dead empress after pointing the portrait out to Ms. Eager.

 :o

And thanks for that last anecdote! Something tells me it was Tatiana, or maybe even Olga. :P
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: RealAnastasia on October 07, 2006, 08:05:38 PM
This is a very vague memory of mine. I think it's from Romanov Autumn. Apparently Olga saw a ghost, then recognized her in a portrait as a long-dead empress after pointing the portrait out to Ms. Eager.

A ghost?  :o I never read this anecdote...I would like to know it in a whole! Did you have any link to read it?

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: kelly_anne_wright on October 08, 2006, 10:06:45 AM
Page 48 of Romanov Autumn:

On a number of occasions Grand Princess Olga, who was only three, told Miss Eager about an old lady in a blue dress, whom  she had seen in her room. The nurse saw nothing. Then, as they walked through the Rotunda on the first floor of the palace, the child pointed to a portrait of Maria Alexandrovna and identified her as the old lady. Stories like these show how deeply the idea of Maria Alexandrovna's unhappiness had penetrated the memory of the Russian Court, which never quite accepted her as one of its own.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Princess_Olishka on October 10, 2006, 01:00:58 AM
Thank you for that
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: tatianolishka_ on November 03, 2006, 08:01:24 PM
I like the one where Olga was telling her friend about Alexei's overactive imagination. She said he had a little boat that would go into a river, but it was actually just a place with barely any water. The next day she fell into that place and found it had quite enough water in it  :D
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: grandduchess_42 on November 03, 2006, 08:53:39 PM
Page 48 of Romanov Autumn:

On a number of occasions Grand Princess Olga, who was only three, told Miss Eager about an old lady in a blue dress, whom  she had seen in her room. The nurse saw nothing. Then, as they walked through the Rotunda on the first floor of the palace, the child pointed to a portrait of Maria Alexandrovna and identified her as the old lady. Stories like these show how deeply the idea of Maria Alexandrovna's unhappiness had penetrated the memory of the Russian Court, which never quite accepted her as one of its own.

Really!?
thats awesome!

well awesome in the sense that she saw somthing...

how old was she?
is there a picture of this painting?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: tatianolishka_ on November 03, 2006, 08:59:29 PM
Three years old, my friend. As for the painting, how would we know? :) ???
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: grandduchess_42 on November 04, 2006, 01:58:06 PM
oh such a tiny little thing she was!

i just thought there was a picture or somthing, that it might have been auctioned off!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: kelly_anne_wright on November 04, 2006, 08:23:25 PM
Perhaps this: http://www.abcgallery.com/W/winterhalter/wilterhalter3.JPG (http://www.abcgallery.com/W/winterhalter/wilterhalter3.JPG) is the portrait Olga saw. It's listed as being in the Hermitage now.

edit: The link works kind of funky. If you get an error, just re-enter the URL and the picture shows up.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: grandduchess_42 on December 12, 2006, 07:08:15 PM
oh thank you so much for it!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: mr_harrison75 on May 13, 2007, 12:03:21 PM
I've never read some of the previous anecdotes...thank you!

I've just learned of another that was posted in another thread, but since it concerns Olga...

Olga, apparently wasn't a good swimmer at all, and at one time (in 1915), she was taking a bath in her father's big tub, when she somehow slipped and went under water, remaining there a long time before finally being able to get out.

And shortly before leaving the Alexander Palace, she was on a gang plank with her brother (there's a photograph of it), and apparently, Olga was pushed (with her clothes on) in the water by Alexei (that's what he wrote in his diary).

Ahhh, brotherly love...  :D
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: rosieposie on May 16, 2007, 12:00:42 AM
These are great  ;D
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: mr_harrison75 on May 16, 2007, 04:19:31 PM
Yes they are isn't it?  :)

I was wondering if there were some Olga anecdotes more specific to the last years (1917-18)?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Raegan on May 18, 2007, 07:49:12 AM
I was wondering if there were some Olga anecdotes more specific to the last years (1917-18)?

Well at one point in early 1917 (before the revolution) Olga and her sisters used skis to get around the grounds of the Alexander Palace. However they couldn't keep their balance and kept falling down.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: mr_harrison75 on May 19, 2007, 09:48:53 PM
A good one!

I didn't know the grand princesses were skiing (or at least trying to)! That would make a nice addition in a novel about Olga, though....

Anything else, anyone?  :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Holly on May 26, 2007, 06:36:48 AM
I was wondering if there were some Olga anecdotes more specific to the last years (1917-18)?

Well at one point in early 1917 (before the revolution) Olga and her sisters used skis to get around the grounds of the Alexander Palace. However they couldn't keep their balance and kept falling down.
Haha. Really? That's hilarious. Where did you read of that?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: mr_harrison75 on May 27, 2007, 05:55:32 PM
Quote
Olga, apparently wasn't a good swimmer at all, and at one time (in 1915), she was taking a bath in her father's big tub, when she somehow slipped and went under water, remaining there a long time before finally being able to get out.

I was wondering why she'd have some trouble to get out, but I've read something today in Massie's book Nicholas and Alexandra, saying that the grand-duchesses, starting in their teens, took warm baths late in the evening (instead of cold ones when younger). So you can imagine Olga, always a bit unsafe in the water, with not much lighting, slipping under water...
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Raegan on June 05, 2007, 10:29:43 AM
Haha. Really? That's hilarious. Where did you read of that?

I have done a lot of research in the State Archives of the Russian Federation, and I read the information about Olga and her sisters trying to ski in her 1917 diary.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Raegan on June 05, 2007, 10:33:29 AM
Sorry for the double post! Don't know how it happened!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on October 11, 2009, 03:52:16 PM
Page 48 of Romanov Autumn:

On a number of occasions Grand Princess Olga, who was only three, told Miss Eager about an old lady in a blue dress, whom  she had seen in her room. The nurse saw nothing. Then, as they walked through the Rotunda on the first floor of the palace, the child pointed to a portrait of Maria Alexandrovna and identified her as the old lady. Stories like these show how deeply the idea of Maria Alexandrovna's unhappiness had penetrated the memory of the Russian Court, which never quite accepted her as one of its own.

Really!?
thats awesome!

well awesome in the sense that she saw somthing...

how old was she?
is there a picture of this painting?

Here´s the whole anecdote:

When the Grand Duchess Olga was three years old, she was taken ill with a gastric attack from which she did not fully recover for two or three weeks, the attack itself, in its severe form, keeping the Royal child in bed three or four days. The first time Miss Eager left the bedside of the sick child for a breath of fresh air, she went for a walk
along the quays of the Neva. Upon her return, as she entered the room, little Olga looked up and said, "An old lady was here!" "What old lady?" she asked. "An old lady who wears a blue dress," the child replied. Miss Eager was frankly puzzled because the Court was in mourning at that time and there was no one wearing a blue dress.
"Surely, you mean blue. What kind of blue?" questioned Miss Eager. "It was not like Mamma's," and the child paused. Miss Eager thought perhaps one of the maids had had a visitor and so they were all questioned, but nobody knew of any visitor during Miss Eager's absence, and so the matter for the moment was dropped and dismissed by Miss Eager as a possible vagary of the child's imagination. A few days later, Miss Eager was sitting on the floor with the Royal children in a certain room in the Royal Palace playing at building castles of cards. Suddenly, Olga looked up and exclaimed, "There is the old lady in blue!" "Where? Where?" said Miss Eager and the other children. "There! she
came through the bedroom door; she is standing at the door now!" Miss Eager quickly caught up the child and ran through the bedroom into the room beyond and into yet another room, but she could find no one nor could she hear any footsteps. "Well," said Olga to Miss Eager, " you must be very stupid because the old lady was there." Two
days later, the Empress directed Miss Eager to take the child to the Chapel in the Winter Palace and there, in the hall on the way to the chapel, are two life-sized portraits of the Emperor Alexander II and his wife. Looking at the picture of Alexander IPs wife, Olga said, "Why, that is the lady I saw in the blue dress and see, her dress is not the
dress Mamma wears." The identification was made by the Grand Duchess with the utmost assurance.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on October 11, 2009, 04:06:56 PM
From "Royal romances of today" by Kellog Surland (1911)

Ladies of the Court were always loath to talk about Olga. "She is cranky," said one. "She is not nice," said another. And one grand lady of honour went so far as to shrug her shoulders and say: "She is like her mother!" When I pressed this and begged her tell me more, the lady merely referred to the haughty, disdainful manner of the Empress....

The Empress received very little sympathy and consideration from the ladies of her Court from her first coming to Russia, and she soon came to hold her head high and walk heedless through the throng..... Perhaps the consciousness of her lack of popularity wore upon her, and rasped. That wide popularity of the Dowager Empress, and her lack
of cordiality toward her young successor doubtless tended to further develop the very qualities that have been her bane. At all events her disposition toward most of the people of her Court has never been happy, and their silent resentment of her coolness has driven her more and more into herself, to the consolations of religion, and her family.

One Lady-in-Waiting, for example, told me that she had been attached to the person of the Empress from time to time for a number of years. She herself is a Princess of old family and in excellent standing at Court. One day, when the Grand Duchess Olga was three years old the Princess and the child were together in one of the nursery rooms.
The Princess stood with her back to one of the walls and Olga came toddling across the room as fast as her little legs would carry her. The Princess stretched out her arms, caught up the child and lightly tossed her ceilingwards, then bringing her slowly down toward her own upturned face, kissed her and set her down. At that moment the Em-
press entered the room. She had no sooner seen this very natural action on the part of her own Lady-in-Waiting than she exclaimed: "The most you may do is to kiss the hand of my daughter!"

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: aleksandr pavlovich on October 11, 2009, 05:19:54 PM
PRESUMING  that this anecdote (of the lady-in waiting and the 3 year old GD Olga N.) is TRUE, regardless of the ancestry or office of that particular lady-in-waiting, IMO her actions were a faux pas of displaying highly uncalled-for familiarity. Given her alleged years of experience, she should have known better, regardless of whatever "natural" waves of maternalistically-derived emotions may have assailed her.  And this was PUBLISHED in 1911?  How remarkable!  It is doubtful that she was still "in service" at that time.  Sounds as if someone had "an axe to grind !"  And I don't mean the Empress!  AP
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on October 11, 2009, 10:44:08 PM
I was  thinking of two Olga N. anecdotes today and how they were related

When she was a child

We took the children to a toy shop, and they were told that they might choose what they liked for themselves, and also for relations and friends at home. Olga looked at the things, and finally chose the very smallest she could find, and said, politely, "Thank you very much." Vainly the shop people showed her more attractive toys; she always replied: "No, thank you; I don't want to take it." I took her on one side and asked her why she would not buy the toys. I said that the people would be very sad if she would not take more, and that she could not leave the shop without buying more. So she said: "But the beautiful toys belong to some other little girls, I am sure; and think how sad they would be if they came home and found we had taken them while they were out." I explained to her, and she and Tatiana laid in a large stock.


I mean how cute is that?

This coupled in my mind with an anecdote from so much later, in May of 1918 when Olga and her sisters  were rejoining their parents and Marie at Ekaterinburg. The ship, the Rus , was being loaded with thier luggage. But along with their possessions, other  items that did not  belong  to the family were being loaded as well . Some things  had been  scooped up from the governors house, but the  big item was a  horse and carriage on the dock loaned to them by the local bishop because Alexi couldn't walk to the boat.

To the soldiers, it did not matter whose it was,  everything on the dock got sucked up on to the Rus and Olga was very distressed that the bishop would suffer for his kindness. These two stories seemed linked in my mind . They show  Olga's inborn caring nature for others ..

So many stories of how Olga  knew thier terrible situation better than the others. How difficult that must have been and lonely too.
How could one share such feelings when it would  crush a loved one's hope? You couldn't . It's  no wonder to me she withdrew more as time went on.

I'm just so glad the other two children were found, and  family is finally together. Because that was the most important thing to them .
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on October 12, 2009, 01:09:16 AM
I also have an anecdote which I got from a Romanov website (the name I don’t remember):
A teacher in his memoirs recalled an incident when the little Grand Duchess Olga with her father went to Smolensk to see an exhibit. Small as she was that time, she could not see what were laid on the tables. “Well, Grand Duchess, what would you do if you could not look at the things on the tables?”, asked a student who was walking beside the little Grand Duchess. Olga contemplated for a while, and then answered: “I don’t know! Ask Papa–he knows everything!”. After saying that, she ran to her father and asked him.

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on October 12, 2009, 02:11:23 AM
I have that one on my website, but not full. Thank you.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: RHB on October 14, 2009, 05:05:40 AM
Just because I'm curious does anyone know what year the "incident" with Olga reading Les Miserables happened?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: nena on October 14, 2009, 05:46:01 AM
It happened with Monsieur Gilliard, and afterwards Tsar urged to him about learning her daughter inappropriate words. I really don't know a date. To look in Gilliard's 'The Thirteen Years'. Olga said something like 'Merde'. (sh**). So sorry for beng rude. Mods can freely delete my post. Could it be as early as 1910s?

I have read it in Massie's 'Nicholas and Alexandra'. (Thanks to kind warmhearted people who presented it to me).
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sarushka on October 14, 2009, 08:11:42 AM
The Les Miserables incident in full:

An omission of mine cost me one of the most unpleasant moments in my professional career, but, thanks to the Tsar's presence of mind, the incident ended better than I could have hoped.

Olga Nicolaievna was reading "Les Miserables," and had reached the description of the battle of Waterloo. At the beginning of the letter she handed me a list of the words she had not understood, in accordance with our practice. What was my astonishment to see in it the word which is forever associated with the name of the officer who commanded the Guard. I felt certain I had not forgotten my usual precautions. I asked for the book to verify my marginal note, and realised my omission. To avoid a delicate explanation I struck out the wretched word and handed back the list to the Grand-Duchess.

She cried, "Why, you've struck out the word I asked papa about yesterday!"

I could not have been more thunderstruck if the bolt had fallen at my feet.

"What! You asked your... "

"Yes, and he asked me how I'd heard of it, and then said it was a very strong word which must not be repeated, though in the mouth of that general it was the finest word in the French language."

A few hours later I met the Tsar when I was out walking in the park. He took me on one side and said in a very serious tone.

"You are teaching my daughters a very curious vocabulary, monsieur. . . . "

I floundered in a most involved explanation. But the Tsar burst out laughing, and interrupted:
 
"Don't worry, monsieur. I quite realised what happened so I told my daughter that the word was one of the French "army's greatest claims to fame."


It appears in Chapter VI of Gilliard's memoir, which is labeled "The winter of 1913-14."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: RHB on November 20, 2009, 05:35:00 PM
One of my favorite Olga Anecdotes involves the books that were laid out for her mother in the mauve boudoir and Olga would borrow them before her mother had even had a chance to read them.  When Alix caught her, Olga would say, with a smile, "You must wait, Mama, until I find out whether this book is a proper one for you to read!"  I think that's really cute and sweet.  :D ;D :-* 8)

I must say i just have to laugh every time i read that "You must wait, Mama until find out whether this book is proper for you to read" i could see Olga saying it with a somewhat i don't if mischievous is the right word but some kind of big smile like that with Alix shaking her head not really angry but shaking with a sigh and then leaving so Olga could continue reading. It's just funny!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on November 20, 2009, 11:09:00 PM
" You must wait, Mama, until I find out whether this book is a proper one for you to read!"  

I think it's very witty, shows a fine dry humor and who but Olga would say such a thing to Alix even in jest ?
But it's hilarious
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on November 21, 2009, 10:10:37 PM
She's acting like she's older than her own mother! Thanks for posting that, blessOTMA!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on November 22, 2009, 06:36:10 PM
She's acting like she's older than her own mother!

Indeed,  that is the joke! And  Olga is  saying  she has to see if it's fit for Alix to read! lol!
Very funny.  Since Alix was usually  the one to judge the fitness of all things, not just books.
But  Olga said it in such a witty manner, Alix was naturally amused,  not angry.

One of the reasons I love Olga is she had both the wit to come up with such a fine joke
and the boldness to say it to her mother. It was a very nimble performance.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: RHB on November 22, 2009, 08:52:18 PM
Quote
I must say i just have to laugh every time i read that "You must wait, Mama until find out whether this book is proper for you to read" i could see Olga saying it with a somewhat i don't if mischievous is the right word but some kind of big smile like that with Alix shaking her head not really angry but shaking with a sigh and then leaving so Olga could continue reading. It's just funny![/color

Yes only she would be that witty and bold at the same time to her mother... by the way i said "Alix shaking her head not really angry but shaking with a sigh" i didn't actually say Alix was angry about it but i should have added that she was probably kind of amused and probably after a while she started to expect it from Olga... but it's all good and funny!  ;)  :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on November 23, 2009, 01:46:11 AM
Quote
I must say i just have to laugh every time i read that "You must wait, Mama until find out whether this book is proper for you to read" i could see Olga saying it with a somewhat i don't if mischievous is the right word but some kind of big smile like that with Alix shaking her head not really angry but shaking with a sigh and then leaving so Olga could continue reading. It's just funny![/color

Yes only she would be that witty and bold at the same time to her mother... by the way i said "Alix shaking her head not really angry but shaking with a sigh" i didn't actually say Alix was angry about it but i should have added that she was probably kind of amused and probably after a while she started to expect it from Olga... but it's all good and funny!  ;)  :)

Oh I think you got that across  and quite nicely . And indeed, I think Alix was amused by and even  rather proud of the wit found in Olga's joke. I say that because we know about it today, so it was repeated to others, and I believe with, enjoyment. It's not a simple joke. The remark has at least two jokes within it. The two jokes then stike in our minds, and a  100 years later we are laughing too! ! 
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Beautiful_Anastasia on January 03, 2010, 07:53:32 AM
I LOVE all of these! Thanks guys, these are so funny! Happy 2010 to you all by the way! ;D
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: RomanovMartyrs on January 05, 2010, 02:43:01 AM
This one's precious!

From Margaret Eager:
"...We come to the Hermitage, with all its art treasures. In the picture gallery here is the finest collection of Rembrandts extant. One of these represents the visit of the Trinity to Abraham. I was one day looking at it, trying to make out what it meant, when the little Grand Duchess Olga ran up to me, and, putting her hand in mine, asked me what I was looking at. I told her; she then looked at it earnestly, and suddenly burst out laughing, exclaimed: "Oh! What a very funny picture - a man holding a leg of mutton in his hand, and carving it with a knife, and a bird sitting at the table." The bird, needless to say, was one of the angels. He is represented with his back out, and has neatly folded his blue-and-white feather wings..."

And I believe I've found a photo...

(http://christ.church.montreal.music.googlepages.com/RembrandtAbrahamandtheThreeAngels.jpg/RembrandtAbrahamandtheThreeAngels-large.jpg)

Someone correct me if the painting isn't right. :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Holly on January 05, 2010, 12:06:19 PM
How cute. Thanks for posting the painting as well. That is the same one.  :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on January 05, 2010, 12:34:50 PM
Love the story and seeing the painting too! Marvelous!! Thanks!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on January 05, 2010, 05:20:54 PM
Thanks for successful finding the painting, RomanovMartyrs :-) I am thinking whether Olga recalled all about the amusing things she said when she was young. I could just imagine her laughing!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on January 06, 2010, 12:00:44 AM
Speaking of Olga saying amusing things, I believe that was a trait thought out her life. I recently saw this photo of her disembarking from a boat on the Dnieper River in 1916. The little cadet, Zehnya Makarov, is looking after Olga  and is laughing his head off from something she just said and it looks like Countess Hendrykova is behind her, laughing as well. It has to be funny for a little guy like that to laugh,turn his head and look you after you have passed .Sorry for the small size. If you have it bigger, you'll see what I mean even more. I believe this photo, along with another was recently up for sale. It was on that site, I could see the photo bigger somehow .
(http://i792.photobucket.com/albums/yy202/blessOTMA/art%20and%20romanovs/river.jpg)
 
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Douglas on January 06, 2010, 12:41:01 AM
Here is a larger restored version.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v475/Douglas606/river2.jpg)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on January 06, 2010, 02:04:17 AM
Here is a larger restored version.
Thank you Douglas! I'm not surprised you have a photo that's  boat related!  ;)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Tasia on January 07, 2010, 10:19:08 AM
Speaking of Olga saying amusing things, I believe that was a trait thought out her life. I recently saw this photo of her disembarking from a boat on the Dnieper River in 1916. The little cadet, Zehnya Makarov, is looking after Olga  and is laughing his head off from something she just said and it looks like Countess Hendrykova is behind her, laughing as well. It has to be funny for a little guy like that to laugh,turn his head and look you after you have passed .Sorry for the small size. If you have it bigger, you'll see what I mean even more. I believe this photo, along with another was recently up for sale. It was on that site, I could see the photo bigger somehow .
(http://i792.photobucket.com/albums/yy202/blessOTMA/art%20and%20romanovs/river.jpg)
 

That's cool blessOTMA & Douglas !! Maybe Olga did something funny that they were laughing and looking at her xxDD.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on January 07, 2010, 01:04:27 PM
That's cool blessOTMA & Douglas !! Maybe Olga did something funny that they were laughing and looking at her xxDD.
Olga also has that look on her face one gets when one's jokes gets a good laugh....bemused self satisfaction...lol! I noticed this scene when I enlarged the photo and the first one I saw was Zehnya Makarov,the cadet. His giggling expression and board smile stuck me. He was really looking at something....so when I viewed out, I could see who he was looking at as he laughed. It's not surprising. Olga was wiity.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Tasia on January 19, 2010, 07:49:27 AM
That's cool blessOTMA & Douglas !! Maybe Olga did something funny that they were laughing and looking at her xxDD.
Olga also has that look on her face one gets when one's jokes gets a good laugh....bemused self satisfaction...lol! I noticed this scene when I enlarged the photo and the first one I saw was Zehnya Makarov,the cadet. His giggling expression and board smile stuck me. He was really looking at something....so when I viewed out, I could see who he was looking at as he laughed. It's not surprising. Olga was wiity.
For me it's surprising! I'm still learning about her personallity ^^. Hehe
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: RomanovMartyrs on February 02, 2010, 06:54:06 AM
It's been a few weeks since I read this thread in its entirety, so I apologize if any section of this has already been posted. Just came upon it while reading Six Years at the Russian court.

Margaret Eager, of course:

We went to St. Petersburg on the last day of the old year (Russian counting). On New Year's Day there was a great ceremony in the palace cathedral. The Emperor and Empress and the Dowager Empress went to church in state, accompanied by their own courts and all the grand ducal courts, all wearing full court dress. We saw the Empress when she was dressed; very magnificent she looked in her court dress of white satin with its long train of brocade, seven chains of diamonds round her neck, a girdle of the same sparkling gems round her waist, the ends falling to the hem of her dress. On her head she wore the kokoshnik, the crescent-shaped head-dress, in white brocade, lavishly decorated with large single stone diamonds. A rich lace veil depended from it and hung at the back almost to her knees.

The little girlies were delighted to see her so gorgeously attired; they circled round her in speechless admiration for some time, and suddenly the Grand Duchess Olga clapped her hands, and exclaimed fervently, "Oh! Mama, you are just like a lovely Christmas tree!" After divine service was finished there was a drawing-room, at which all the debutantes were presented.

The Grand Duchesses Olga and Tatiana Nicholaivna were fond of listening to stories. On one occasion Tatiana told Olga a story, the end of which was as follows: "So my little girl and my niece went into the wood and a big wolf ate my little girl, so she went to heaven." Olga was horrified at such theology. "Oh no!" she cried; "she could not have gone to heaven, because the wolf ate her, and God does not allow wolves to go to heaven. She is walking about the wood inside the wolf." The other child calmly accepted this wonderful correction. I found I had to be very careful in telling them stories. On one occasion I told Olga the story of Joseph and his brethren. She was deeply interested, and exclaimed, "What a shame!" I said, "Yes; it was indeed a terrible shame for them to be so jealous and so cruel to their young brother." She exclaimed, "I mean it was a shame of the father. Joseph was not the eldest, and the beautiful coat should have been given to the eldest son; the other brothers knew that, and perhaps that was why they put him in the pit." Explanations were useless; all her sympathies were given to Reuben. She was angry with King David because he killed Goliath, and said, "David was much younger and smaller, and poor Goliath never expected him to throw stones at him." "Jack the Giant Killer" gave her no pleasure; it upset her idea that might was right. Once there was a cinematograph exhibition for the children and some friends. One picture showed two little girls playing in a garden, each with a table before her covered with toys. Suddenly the bigger girl snatched a toy from the little one who, however, held on to it and refused to give it up. Foiled in her attempts, the elder seized a spoon and pounded the little one with it, who quickly relinquished the toy and began to cry. Tatiana wept to see the poor little one so ill-treated, but Olga was very quiet. After the exhibition was over she said, "I can't think that we saw the whole of that picture." I said I hoped the end of it was that the naughty big sister was well punished, adding that I thought we had seen quite enough as I had no wish to see anything more of such a naughty girl. Olga then said, "I am sure that the lamb belonged at first to the big sister, and she was kind and lent it to her sister; then she wanted it back, and the little sister would not give it up, so she had to beat her."

;)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on February 02, 2010, 10:34:35 AM
RomanovMartyrs, I love the Margaret Eager stories! ,....Thank goodness she wrote that book! .
Quote
and suddenly the Grand Duchess Olga clapped her hands, and exclaimed fervently, "Oh! Mama, you are just like a lovely Christmas tree!
Adorable. Also a child can give you no higher praise than that! lol!
Quote
....Tatiana wept to see the poor little one so ill-treated, but Olga was very quiet. After the exhibition was over she said, "I can't think that we saw the whole of that picture." I said I hoped the end of it was that the naughty big sister was well punished, adding that I thought we had seen quite enough as I had no wish to see anything more of such a naughty girl. Olga then said, "I am sure that the lamb belonged at first to the big sister, and she was kind and lent it to her sister; then she wanted it back, and the little sister would not give it up, so she had to beat her."
And here perhaps we see the beginnings of Olga's" swinish hand" as Anastasia called it years later, as she ran to avoid Olga's  smack!lol! See, Anastasia was picking her nose...so of course the big sister had to beat her lol!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Beautiful_Anastasia on February 02, 2010, 03:00:37 PM
Olga Nikolaevna felt that the rights of elder siblings had to be protected, when she was told the biblical story of David and Goliath, she sympathized with Goliath instead of with David, and when told the tale of Joseph and the technicolour dreamcoat, she sympathized with the elder brothers instead of with Joseph.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on February 17, 2010, 11:13:44 PM
I guess this is a Big Pair anecdote,  but  one day during the war years  after their hospital shift was over and due to some mishap, the girls were left without a lady in waiting for the drive home to AP. Probably for the  first  time in their lives, they were on their own out side the  palace walls . They made a break for it and told the driver to take them to the local shops! lol! They went  in one, but because they were in their uniforms, they were not recognized and I'll wager  they were not recognized  also because it was inconceivable  that HIH Olga and Tatiana Nicholaievna would be in a shop without a good number of attendees . But oops , they had not a kopeck  between them  and didn't really know HOW to buy items in a store anyway.  (That these  practical considerations were over looked, make me think it's was mostly Olga's idea lol! ) The next day they asked their nurse  friends, just  how does one buy items in a shop? But I love how they didn't just go home, but immediately seized the  opportunity !
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: EmmyLee on February 18, 2010, 08:20:18 PM
Haha, thank you Annie, for sharing that anecdote. It shows that the girls, while they may have been sheltered from society, definitely weren't afraid to venture out into it. Especially if it offered an adventure and an escape. :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: matushka on October 25, 2010, 03:26:08 PM
A story I found in N V. Galoushkin's book about the Joint Regiment.
Showing here again the delicacy of the Grand-Duchess and their love and concern for their soldiers.
"Once when a kozack of the Joint Regiment was on duty in the Alexander Palace and was saluting the GD Olga Nikolaevna, who went past him, he moved a little forward and broke a big vase which stood behind him. The Grand Duchess stoped, took from the floor a piece of the brocken vase and said: "I beg you to remember that I have done it!" After his duty, the kozack reported to the chief of the guard. Learning this, the GD ON worried and declared: "I am the only one guilty for all!" (Во всем виновата только одна я)"

Unfortunetly there is no datation.

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on October 26, 2010, 01:22:16 AM
..... "Once when a kozack of the Joint Regiment was on duty in the Alexander Palace and was saluting the GD Olga Nikolaevna, who went past him, he moved a little forward and broke a big vase which stood behind him. The Grand Duchess stopped, took from the floor a piece of the broken vase and said: "I beg you to remember that I have done it!".....
You know because it happened when he was saluting her,   Olga Nikolaevna,  may have  indeed  felt she was responsible for the broken vase  ...and was not simply being polite. As you say matushka ,  it shows's the GD's delicacy

(http://i792.photobucket.com/albums/yy202/blessOTMA/Romanov%20this%20and%20that/th_Aug1913.jpg) (http://i792.photobucket.com/albums/yy202/blessOTMA/Romanov%20this%20and%20that/Aug1913.jpg)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dust_of_History on November 06, 2010, 02:56:19 PM
I found another anecdote on the German Wikipedia site which might need varification.

"One day Olga got a picture of Michelangelo's naked David. Her sister Tatiana was quite amused but Olga was so disgusted that she could even look at it."

Did this really happen?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: voyageroffreedom on November 06, 2010, 03:45:02 PM
Yes the officers at the standart gave Olga in 1911 a picture of David (and Tatinana mention this incident to her aunt Olga A. in a letter) ; some says it was a the picture of prince of wales Edward son of George V (because there were rumors that he and Olga will marry), and some says it was the nude portrait of Michelangelo.

This from wiki: Olga and her younger sisters were surrounded by young men assigned to guard them at the palace and on the imperial yacht Standard and were used to mingling with them and sharing holiday fun during their annual summer cruises. When Olga was fifteen, a group of officers aboard the imperial yacht gave her a portrait of Michelangelo's nude David, cut out from a newspaper, as a present for her name day on July 11, 1911. "Olga laughed at it long and hard", her indignant fourteen-year-old sister Tatiana wrote to her aunt Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia. "And not one of the officers wishes to confess that he has done it. Such swine, aren't they?"

So it’s seem on the contrary to what you found on German wiki, it was Tatiana who was upset with this picture and Olga was rather amused by it. Keeping in mind we don't know if it was a the nude portrait of Michelangelo or the picture of prince of wales (sorry but I always doubt the information on wiki as they are not 100% true ::) )
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dust_of_History on November 06, 2010, 04:06:08 PM
Oh sorry, you are absolutely right, it was Tatiana who was upset. It's the same in the Geman version. I mixed them up. *embarrassed* But thanks for your reply voyageroffreedom. :-)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: voyageroffreedom on November 06, 2010, 04:19:48 PM
You're welcome Dust of History, no need to feel embaressed we all make mistakes especially me (i make lots of typos and i misread many info  :-[) after all we come here to learn from each other  :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dust_of_History on November 06, 2010, 05:03:59 PM
That's right, thanks again voyageroffreedom. :-) I just had to ask, because I thought it to be too funny to be true. ^^ It's even funnier to read that it indeed happened. ^^
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sarushka on November 06, 2010, 05:04:52 PM
The source of that anecdote is probably Romanovs: Love, Power & Tragedy (http://www.alexanderpalace.org/palace/books.html?sku=39). A caption on page 185 reads:
Tatiana's letter to Auntie Olga Alexandrovna recounting the "swinish" joke the officers of the Standard played on Olga's namesday. Tatiana wrote: "...Olga received a mass of presents and a lot of flowers. In the morning the officers gave me an envelope for Olga...What do you think it was?... A portrait of David [Michelangelo]... Such swine, aren't they?"

Obviously, some of the letter's text was omitted from the caption. There's a small scan of one page of the letter, but it's in Tatiana's notoriously difficult-to-read handwriting. All I can make out is the name "David" written in English and underlined. Incidentally, Tatiana does not seem to specify whether the portrait was of the statue or their royal cousin -- the reference to Michaelangelo is an addition to the caption by the editors.

Personally, I don't have the impression that Tatiana was upset by the joke. "Swine" was not necessarily a strong insult among the grand duchesses -- remember that Anastasia once called a math problem "pig and filth."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dust_of_History on November 06, 2010, 05:31:30 PM
Thanks for the info Sarushka. :-) I've noticed that it seems to be common to omit certain parts of letters. I think that's very problematic, because authors often have the tendency to omit important information. -.-

Yes, it's possible that Tatiana wasn't really upset but it seems that she did not think it was funny at all. ^^
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on November 06, 2010, 11:44:49 PM
.... All I can make out is the name "David" written in English and underlined. Incidentally, Tatiana does not seem to specify whether the portrait was of the statue or their royal cousin -- the reference to Michaelangelo is an addition to the caption by the editors.....

Thank you for pointing that out Sarushka . I feel it was in reference to their royal cousin...I believe he was made Prince of Wales within two weeks of the letter...certainly within the month....and many photos of him would be in the newspapers at this time. Also David underlined twice seems to suggest TN was speaking of their cousin to her Aunt .

The swinish part to TN was perhaps because when they gave her the envelop to give to her sister, Tatiana  was made an unwitting  party to the prank. It was a joke on her as well. That  might of been part of her complaint...but I too don't think she was too upset ....She seems to be boasting about their cheek ! 
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sarushka on November 07, 2010, 07:51:03 AM
Thank you for pointing that out Sarushka . I feel it was in reference to their royal cousin...I believe he was made Prince of Wales within two weeks of the letter...certainly within the month....and many photos of him would be in the newspapers at this time. Also David underlined twice seems to suggest TN was speaking of their cousin to her Aunt .

Actually, it was only underlined once. To my mind, the underlining suggested the sculpture -- the way one might underline or italicize a book title. But unless the omitted parts of the letter contain some clues, we'll never know for certain.


Quote
That  might of been part of her complaint...but I too don't think she was too upset ....She seems to be boasting about their cheek !

I agree.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Rodney_G. on January 25, 2011, 05:35:09 PM
 It may be a moot point at this point, but the key to the David is whether or not the portrait was of a nudeDavid. I don't think a nude picture or portrait of the Prince of Wales was appearing in any newspaper, then or ever. If it was nude, it was of Michaelangelo's David. If it was simply a portrait of "David" , most likely it was Olga's cousin the POW, who in fact definitely would have been in the news at that time, and whom the naval officers might have thought it funny to link teasingly to Olga.  I think in that vein it was a more clever tease than it would have been if the David was Michaelangelo's. Also, Michaelangelo's David was a sculpture, not a portrait, and unlikely to be in a 1911 newspaper anyway.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on January 25, 2011, 09:01:51 PM
I agree...the officers would not give Tatiana a picture of the nude David to give to her sister , Olga...and frankly would the nude David even be printed in a 1911 newpaper? The family member David, however, was about to become the Prince of Wales...his photo would have been everywhere...plus much comment  would have been made about his investiture as POW ...which would make giving his photo to Olga,  as a possible suitor for her , a funny prank .
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: RealAnastasia on January 25, 2011, 10:27:40 PM
I think it could have been a joke inspired in Prince of Wales name, which was indeed ,David. They gave the "David" of Michelangelo to Olga, maybe to tease her, for she was supposed to marry "the other David".

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on January 25, 2011, 10:50:37 PM
Since we know how this event because it is in  letter of Tatiana's to her aunt ... if it was the statue, David, instead of their relative in the news , I believe Tatiana would have said " a photo  of the statue, David ".  or some such. If one has a David in the family....one wouldn't think of the statue in a letter when the name David is used....the joke was there had been talk of a marriage between Olga and David...the officers were pulling her leg about a known and accepted concept...her possible marriage to the future King of England...who recently took a step closer to becoming so . This would be just the sort of running romance joke that went on between the officers and the girls. imo 
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sarushka on January 26, 2011, 08:01:03 AM
The portion of Tatiana's letter that's translated in LPT doesn't say anything about the photo being nude, or cut from a newspaper.

As for the appropriateness of nudity at the time, remember that the grand duchesses' own photo albums contained photos of their father & brother swimming in the buff, and Olga's diary mentions going skinny-dipping. I don't think nudity was such a big taboo with the IF as it is nowadays.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on January 26, 2011, 08:34:30 AM
Also, Aleksey mentioning in a letter to Nicholas that he wanted his sisters to watch him do swimming tricks in the deep bath tub. And Maria and Anastasia bathing together.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on January 26, 2011, 01:05:23 PM
Thanks for the clarification about newspaper...an important point. Of course they were used to seeing others nude while swimming and even took photos of such activities ...but imo printed matter given by the officers would be quite diffrent.  Besides where would the officers get such an art print? In the usual media the statue would be printed with a fig leaf if at all ...and there for rather pointless ....unless in 1911 David with a fig leaf was considered racy enough to be used in such a joke.  We can't know of course , but would TN expect her aunt  think of the statue when  she  wrote " David? " ...or a family member in the news. 
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on October 06, 2011, 04:12:02 PM
From the extended " Six years at the Russian Court"  by Margaretta Eagar

One day she (Olga) was looking out of the window and  a quantity of snow fell past it, and rather startled her. I told her that the men were clearing snow from the roof, so she immediately asked" What's a roof?" I explained and she said with great scorn" the roof !I should call it the lid lol!!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sunny on October 07, 2011, 12:34:15 AM
She was a genius ^^
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on October 07, 2011, 10:54:55 AM
She was a genius ^^
In her way, indeed....Olga's thinking was extraordinary and vigorous. Miss Eagar also reports Olga woke her up past midnight one time and wanted to know how water could travel  upstairs and come into the bathroom?

You have to love such inquiring and her urgency. Olga could not wait till morning to know! lol!

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on October 07, 2011, 07:02:00 PM
Haha, what is the origin of the word roof anyways?

[ Old English hrōf "roof, ceiling, top" < Germanic]
Encarta ® World English Dictionary © & (P) 1998-2005 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.


^ Well, shrewd as she might have been, little Olga couldn't have been expected to know that! "Lid" is a sensible name! lol

Waking up in the middle of the night with a question/statement reminds me of one time when I was a 6-year-old aspiring poet and I woke up my mother in the middle of the night to make her write down a poem that had popped into my head. (It was a very silly thing about some toast or something--nothing brilliant!)

Olga's thinking was extraordinary and vigorous
You have to love such inquiring and her urgency.

Agreed! Her perceptive, witty remarks never fail to make me smile!

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sunny on October 08, 2011, 12:35:21 AM
Olga could not wait till morning to know! lol!

Of course she didn't want & couldn't! I'm sure that the water running in pipes awaken her, so she had to have an answer immediately!
Little Ol'ga is really funny; i'm going to read Miss Eager's book as well, it seeems it will be funny!!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on October 08, 2011, 02:25:32 AM
This is the Gilbert edition that has extra short articles she wrote after the book.  Eager's stories about the girls  were very popular in the British magazines. So much so,  one editor said they were stopping them to make room for other Princesses !( I guess British ones! ) ...but OTMA mania has been around for over 100 years  it seems...from the start
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Rodney_G. on October 08, 2011, 02:10:01 PM
 Sunny: I'm surprised you haven't read M. Eagar's book. You're really going to like it.

blessOTMA:  I'm not aware of the Gilbert edition you mention, only the original Six Years At The Russian Court which I read some time ago and consider one of the very best for original OTMA material.  I'd love to read anything else she may have written about the children. I presume the water flowing upstairs anecdote comes from some later Eagar writing. Could you identify that, either here or by pm. Much appreciated.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on October 08, 2011, 09:04:11 PM
Sunny: I'm surprised you haven't read M. Eagar's book. You're really going to like it.

blessOTMA:  I'm not aware of the Gilbert edition you mention, only the original Six Years At The Russian Court which I read some time ago and consider one of the very best for original OTMA material. 
I couldn't agree more.
Quote
I'd love to read anything else she may have written about the children. I presume the water flowing upstairs anecdote comes from some later Eagar writing. Could you identify that, either here or by pm. Much appreciated.
That is correct. M. Eagar wrote or was interviewed a few r short articles for  UK magazines...which stopped around 1910 I believe Thses   are included in the recent  Gilbert Books edition.This edition also has an introduction by Charlotte Zeepvat that goes into Eagar'a later life. She had to be dismissed because England supported Japan in the 1904 war. AF didn't want to let her go, but finally bowed to the general court's demand....Eagar's very much felt the loss of the children...that part is actually heartbreaking

here is another Which I will tap out with my one typing finger for my follow AP members! lol

One day when they were playing rather noisily  and old Mrs Orchard, who had brought up the Tsaritsa, came into the room . She began to rebuke me for letting them romp, and declared that their mother had never made a noise in all her life . And I said "We have all heard so often that the Tsaritsa was a perfect angel when she was a child, but she has given me human children to look after "Olga was listening and rushed across the room , threw her arms round me and exclaimed earnestly, "I  won't be a human child, I'll be an angel child too" She was greatly comforted when I told her I preferred has she was

Classic Olga  lol!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sunny on October 09, 2011, 02:15:34 AM
One day when they were playing rather noisily  and old Mrs Orchard, who had brought up the Tsaritsa, came into the room . She began to rebuke me for letting them romp, and declared that their mother had never made a noise in all her life . And I said "We have all heard so often that the Tsaritsa was a perfect angel when she was a child, but she has given me human children to look after "Olga was listening and rushed across the room , threw her arms round me and exclaimed earnestly, "I  won't be a human child, I'll be an angel child too" She was greatly comforted when I told her I preferred has she was

Classic Olga  lol!


Thanks Annie for this excerpt!
Sweetie Olga *___* and Miss Eager's answer was indeed very smart! I had no doubt Alix was a boring child, LOL  It's not being angels of humans, but being happy or sad children.
OTMA, thanks God, were happy and normally lively children. Alix was a sad child, and she was also brought up in a much severer way.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sarushka on October 09, 2011, 08:00:29 AM
This is the Gilbert edition that has extra short articles she wrote after the book.  Eager's stories about the girls  were very popular in the British magazines. So much so,  one editor said they were stopping them to make room for other Princesses !( I guess British ones! )

I have a copy of Eagar's article from Girl's Own Paper and Women's Magazine in 1909 ("Further Glimpses of the Tsaritsa's Little Girls") and also a chapter I believe she wrote on Alexandra from Royal Romances of Today. Does the new Gilbert edition of Six Years at the Russian Court include these and/or others?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sunny on October 09, 2011, 08:07:48 AM
I have a copy of Eagar's article from Girl's Own Paper and Women's Magazine in 1909 ("Further Glimpses of the Tsaritsa's Little Girls") and also a chapter I believe she wrote on Alexandra from Royal Romances of Today.

Sarah, can you advice me where i can find them please?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on October 09, 2011, 10:25:11 AM
I have a copy of Eagar's article from Girl's Own Paper and Women's Magazine in 1909 ("Further Glimpses of the Tsaritsa's Little Girls") and also a chapter I believe she wrote on Alexandra from Royal Romances of Today. Does the new Gilbert edition of Six Years at the Russian Court include these and/or others?
Further glimpses is there as well as an article called"  More about the Little Grand Duchesses of Russia " . I don't believe it has the article about  Alexandra ....but you know how things appear in such books and then seem to disappear when trying to find them. Zeepvat 's introduction is well researched. What I also find interesting is how old OTMA mania is. It was there from their first appearance to the reading public.  They could have no finer introduction to the  public eye than M. Eagar, who loved them so much
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Bernice on October 09, 2011, 04:30:13 PM
So, is M. Eagar's book suggested material for me to read? It sounds like it's pretty good!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Janet Ashton on October 09, 2011, 04:34:55 PM
I have a copy of Eagar's article from Girl's Own Paper and Women's Magazine in 1909 ("Further Glimpses of the Tsaritsa's Little Girls") and also a chapter I believe she wrote on Alexandra from Royal Romances of Today. Does the new Gilbert edition of Six Years at the Russian Court include these and/or others?
Further glimpses is there as well as an article called"  More about the Little Grand Duchesses of Russia " . I don't believe it has the article about  Alexandra ....

The "Royal Romances of Today" book is ostensibly by Kellogg Durland. Charlotte Zeepvat believes that Eagar had a lot of influence on his opinions, and may have been interviewed by him, or talked to him generally, but I don't think she has ever claimed that M.E. actually wrote the article, so i assume that is why it isn't included in this new compilation.
Could be wrong about that, of course!

I do recommend "From Cradle to Crown", Charlotte Zeepvat's most recent book. This is very well researched, has a LOT about the people who looked after royal kids, and about the kids themselves. And I say this as someone who didn't really like Charlotte's "Romanov autumn" - so I am far from being an uncritical audience. Cradle to Crown is very realistic; the other one - well - isn't.....IMHO of course.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sarushka on October 09, 2011, 06:35:37 PM
So, is M. Eagar's book suggested material for me to read? It sounds like it's pretty good!

You can read the book itself for free, here (http://www.alexanderpalace.org/eagar/eagar.html).
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sunny on April 16, 2012, 06:35:09 AM
Thanks to BlessOTMA i found it is possible to write online the memories of Sofia Tjutcheva, governess of the imperial children (In russian) here: http://lib.rus.ec/b/327889/read (http://lib.rus.ec/b/327889/read)
I read&translated just some bits of it, but this sound particulary interesting. My translation is not the best at all, and my English neither, but hope you'll enbjoy it anyaway.

"I want to write yet anectode, perfectly describing my favorite pupil, Olga. It was on the solemn days of the church liturgy held in the Great Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo. The children stood with me in the gallery. The day of the Emperor's birthday, May 6, I arrived at the palace with the girls . the Emperor was not there yet , and before his arrival the service couldn't start. Downstairs in the church were gathered dignitaries, generals and courtiers.
Looking at Olga, I noticed that she was frowing and expresseing signs of displeasure.
"What's wrong with you, Olga? "- I asked.
"I am shocked that all these gentlemen talk so loudly in church, except Pyotr Stolypin; is that really a priest? "- she said.
I had a look." He's Father Bishop Arseny of Novgorod, "- said I.
"So why did he not stop them?"
"He does not consider himself a master of this church, since he is the rector Archpriest of the Annunciation Church," - I said.
Olga was not satisfied: "Is the priest at the altar of the Annunciation old and deaf? This is not because of this, Savannah, he's just afraid. And when Dad comes, all at once they make silence. But who is higher? God or Papa? Indeed, Metropolitan Philip was not afraid to speak the truth itself Ivan the Terrible. "


One can't deny ON was such a witty and clever girlsince childhood... and wise, i'd add.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on April 16, 2012, 12:04:52 PM
Thanks for the translation Sunny ! " But who is higher? God or Papa? " I just love that. Reminds me of what  Gilliard wrote about Olga's comments, spoken " ...with that disingenuous frankness all her own " . I don't think that unique element of Olga's thinking and speaking has been better described.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Rodney_G. on April 16, 2012, 01:09:02 PM
Mille Grazie,Sunny, per la Sua brava traduzione! (Nice translation, Sunny)

I looked at the site you took this anecdote from, but I couldn't find the date. I wanted to know because I wondered how old Olga
was when she was thinking and speaking like this. Do you have the date for this event?

Rodney
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Jen_94 on April 16, 2012, 04:29:55 PM
Thanks for the translation, Sunny! She sounds so clever and witty indeed! I would too like to know a date for this event too.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on April 16, 2012, 07:57:46 PM
It would be good to known when it happened and that might be in the book. From the current text we know it's before Sofia Tjutcheva left her position and also before Stolypin assassination .It's interesting that Olga makes note of Stolypin's reverential behaviour in the church while everyone is waiting for the Tsar. It's puts another light on his gesture of making the sign of the cross and blessing the Tsar at his assassination later . We now know it was characteristic of the man. It was a  gesture Olga was witness to of course....and indeed she is reported to have done the same at her own assassination.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sunny on April 17, 2012, 07:57:54 AM
Mille Grazie,Sunny, per la Sua brava traduzione! (Nice translation, Sunny)
Rodney

Prego, di nulla! (You're welcome!)

I looked at the site you took this anecdote from, but I couldn't find the date. I wanted to know because I wondered how old Olga
was when she was thinking and speaking like this. Do you have the date for this event?

Thanks for the translation, Sunny! She sounds so clever and witty indeed! I would too like to know a date for this event too.

I had a look too but couldn't find, i suspect it is in the middle of other anecdotes, so i'll have to read the whole text better; i'll do it as soon as i can to see whether i can find the date. I am very interested in this, too!

It would be good to known when it happened and that might be in the book. From the current text we know it's before Sofia Tjutcheva left her position and also before Stolypin assassination .It's interesting that Olga makes note of Stolypin's reverential behaviour in the church while everyone is waiting for the Tsar. It's puts another light on his gesture of making the sign of the cross and blessing the Tsar at his assassination later . We now know it was characteristic of the man. It was a  gesture Olga was witness to of course....and indeed she is reported to have done the same at her own assassination.

So it is of course before September 1911, so Olga should be not older than 15.
I have to admit i can't remember the exact year when Tjutcheva left her position, though.
I had made up the idea that Stolypin was a man of great Faith, who understood that Nicholas was justr a human being and needed to be entrust to God, and this epsode confirms my (very personal) thought.

Reminds me of what  Gilliard wrote about Olga's comments, spoken " ...with that disingenuous frankness all her own " . I don't think that unique element of Olga's thinking and speaking has been better described.

You're perfectly right, and i can't thank you enough to make me find this wonderful text so i could translate the episode. This passage is so evocative, and it explains really well Olga's frankness; it also helps us better understand her; i mean, it was something great for me, i suddenly realized better than ever what she was like, i saw her in adifferent light, and loved her more than ever for this. She was a girl of great wit indeed. That kind of person who always look "beyond" in every situation, who makes up questions in her mind. I think this is also the cause not only for her Faith (people who asks big questions generally try to find answers above, in a way or another), but also for her "depression" during exile - she was the one who could form deep questions in her hearth, and understand better than anyone else how dangerous their situation was.
I can say, because of my experience, that making questions is not always interesting - going on asking and trying to understand, you can scratch the surface and find the evil things around you... or at least, it was so for me. But it can helps us understand her mood during exile.
Well, sorry for this kind of pshycological analysis, LOL


Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on April 17, 2012, 10:35:49 AM
Quote
Well, sorry for this kind of psychological analysis, LOL
oh you know it's meat and drink to me ( that is ,I enjoy it  lol  ).Olga makes her statement in the form of a  question, but she knows the answer.  In a way she wants the listener, in this case Sofia Tjutcheva, to ask themselves the question.  Even the way Olga  posed it..." But who is higher? God or Papa? " She gives the answer....by placing God first. And it's  interesting to note Tjutcheva says this  anecdote, " perfectly describes.... Olga" ...so it's pretty significant .
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Kassafrass on May 08, 2012, 10:24:15 AM
So glad to find a section like this. Olishka is my favorite and it's nice to see things that she actually said. Perfect for signatures and such :)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on August 02, 2012, 08:48:48 PM
 
From Meriel  Buchanan's  book : Recollections of Imperial Russia
On the occasion of the Romanoff Tercentenary there was also a ball given in the Assembly Hall of the nobles which the Emperor and Empress opened in a formal polonaise and where Grand Duchess Olga fair and graceful in a soft white dress , danced every dance and enjoyed her self as simply and whole-heartly as any girl at her first ball.

I have a vivid recollection of her, standing on the top of the steps leading down from the gallery to the floor of the ball room , her hair shining golden against the crimson velvet curtains, her cheeks softly flushed, her blue eyes very bright , while one or two of her cousins and several young officers all clamoured for her attention
 

few can put you there like Meriel Buchannan. Of course we know a ball in 1913 was not Olga's first. However such events were rare enough that I can see her enjoying it as if it was.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: edubs31 on August 02, 2012, 11:06:50 PM
Simply majestic :-) Isnt there a new article on the AP homepage about Olga's 16th birthday ball?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on August 03, 2012, 02:06:38 AM
Simply majestic :-) Isnt there a new article on the AP homepage about Olga's 16th birthday ball?
Yes I just read that. It seems TMA and Alexis were there as well. I thought that was new!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: edubs31 on August 03, 2012, 08:29:02 AM
Simply majestic :-) Isnt there a new article on the AP homepage about Olga's 16th birthday ball?
Yes I just read that. It seems TMA and Alexis were there as well. I thought that was new!

Well actually Anne it was 101 years ago when Olga turned 16. It's only its presence on the AP that's new :-)

Smack me, you're entitled!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on August 03, 2012, 11:14:35 AM
Well actually Anne it was 101 years ago when Olga turned 16. It's only its presence on the AP that's new :-)

Smack me, you're entitled!
  don't tempt me!  lol  yes, new to AP!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Jen_94 on August 03, 2012, 03:39:41 PM

From Meriel  Buchanan's  book : Recollections of Imperial Russia
On the occasion of the Romanoff Tercentenary there was also a ball given in the Assembly Hall of the nobles which the Emperor and Empress opened in a formal polonaise and where Grand Duchess Olga fair and graceful in a soft white dress , danced every dance and enjoyed her self as simply and whole-heartly as any girl at her first ball.

I have a vivid recollection of her, standing on the top of the steps leading down from the gallery to the floor of the ball room , her hair shining golden against the crimson velvet curtains, her cheeks softly flushed, her blue eyes very bright , while one or two of her cousins and several young officers all clamoured for her attention
 

few can put you there like Meriel Buchannan. Of course we know a ball in 1913 was not Olga's first. However such events were rare enough that I can see her enjoying it as if it was.


Thanks for that! I love the way Meriel has worded/described Olga, especially in the second paragraph!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on August 03, 2012, 05:56:53 PM
I'm reading her book Recollections of Imperial Russia online

http://archive.org/stream/recollectionsofi00buchuoft#page/n13/mode/2up

The first part is especially  good because she  describes Russia as she first knew it in 1910. The  later part is a history of Russia that is a good read. She was haunted by Ekaterinburg, as anyone would be. But again for Buchanan, she had the memory of other times always before her . She puts side by side her memory of  the hearing girl's laughter ring though the woods of Peterhof as they rode on a sunny morning along with what happened later and the reader can't help but shutter along with her . If the thoughts of the cellar are painful to  us, how much more so those who actully  knew the family even in passing?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: edubs31 on August 03, 2012, 10:44:56 PM
I'm reading her book Recollections of Imperial Russia online

http://archive.org/stream/recollectionsofi00buchuoft#page/n13/mode/2up

The first part is especially  good because she  describes Russia as she first knew it in 1910. The  later part is a history of Russia that is a good read. She was haunted by Ekaterinburg, as anyone would be. But again for Buchanan, she had the memory of other times always before her . She puts side by side her memory of  the hearing girl's laughter ring though the woods of Peterhof as they rode on a sunny morning along with what happened later and the reader can't help but shutter along with her . If the thoughts of the cellar are painful to  us, how much more so those who actully  knew the family even in passing?

Thanks Anne and of course I completely agree. Here is the full paragraph from page 47.

Quote
In he hideous tragedy of Siberia, the grim awfulness of the days recorded, read like an incredible, ghastly nightmare too frightful to be true, the most heartbreaking note of all I think, is the marvelous, unselfish love that united the Imperial Family. And for me the saddest memory of all is the picture of Grand Duchess Olga, radiant and laughing at the ball in the assembly hall of the Nobles, or, sadder still, that other vision I have of her riding through the park at Peterhof one early summer morning with her sisters, the Grand Duchess Tatiana and Anastasia, the light of youth and glowing health on their faces, and the clear sound of their laughter echoing back through the sunny dew drenched woods.

Sigh!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on August 04, 2012, 09:35:06 AM
Thank you for that, I couldn't type that too!  ...my eyes keep misting up!

Quote
the most heartbreaking note of all I think, is the marvelous, unselfish love that united the Imperial Family

I found it remarkable how this was known so early on...how the family reacted to thier situation and thier example of love.  It was not something discovered years later by a review of thier letters etc.  It's really the foundation of thier passion bearing sainthood status today  ...how they meet thier captivity. As my husband says , " they were never more noble than after they were royal ".

Also Buchanan always has an extra source  of pain when thinking on this as her father, UK ambassador to Russia, Sir George Buchanan, was wholeheartedly involved in trying to get the family out. The  failure of that and what happened later shattered him . So for Meriel Buchannan, events in  Ekaterinburg were very  personal in an unique way.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Sunny on August 04, 2012, 10:02:25 AM
I've noticed too that none like Meriel B. is able to describe memories in such a vivid way you can actually see them like it was a movie; and when she writes about NAOTMAA, this is particularly touching for us.
 i liked "City of trouble" so much, that i wanted to read her other books too, but "An ambassador's daughter" seems to be impossible to find!

Bless, thank you; i have  not read that book yet, but i'm going to do immediately <3
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on August 04, 2012, 08:33:39 PM
I haven't read "  City of trouble" but will do so! Thanks Sunny!

 Her work is a gold mine for any one writing about
this time in Russia as there are so many  day to day details  etc.

Here's Meriel Buchannan in the 20's I believe

(http://i792.photobucket.com/albums/yy202/blessOTMA/AP%20Postings%202/th_meriel.jpg) (http://i792.photobucket.com/albums/yy202/blessOTMA/AP%20Postings%202/meriel.jpg)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ortipo on September 11, 2012, 07:03:10 PM
тяв-тяв!

This one is my personal favorite - I can't believe it hasn't been posted yet!

From M. Eagar's Six Years In The Russian Court - Chapter 12


"There is a collection in the museum of old state carriages -- wonderful erections, all gilding and velvet, with delicately painted panels. Catherine's travelling carriage is there. There is a long table down the middle of it, and how it could be turned I know not; it is rather larger than an ordinary tramcar or 'bus. Indeed, I do not believe that there is a street in Moscow in which one of those carriages could be turned. The little Grand Duchess Olga sat in each carriage in turn; finally she selected the largest and handsomest, and said, "I'll have this one." She then gave orders quite seriously that the carriage should be sent to Tsarskoe Selo for her. She was told that could not be, so she ordered that it should be prepared for her daily drive. I was very pleased that her ideas on the subject of the carriage were not carried out."

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Jen_94 on September 12, 2012, 04:11:58 AM
I love that little anecdote! So sweet.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Duchess Hydrangea on September 12, 2012, 09:59:01 AM
My favorite is the policeman one already mentioned. It's funny because Olga knew she was being bad.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Jen_94 on September 12, 2012, 10:46:27 AM
Mine too!! I always laugh at that one.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on September 12, 2012, 05:53:34 PM
I like when she gets back to AP, and  after  Olga  asks if the police had been  there for her, ( lol)
she then asked her father if he was ever in prison? When she got his bemused answer," no"
she says"  oh you must of been very good! " Cute, but kind of chilling too
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Jen_94 on September 13, 2012, 11:23:52 AM
That is cute but a little chilling, I agree.

What I love about little Anecdotes about Olga is that she always seems to come out with pretty some smart answers or some clever questions.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Rodney_G. on September 13, 2012, 03:40:34 PM
 
That is cute but a little chilling, I agree.

What I love about little Anecdotes about Olga is that she always seems to come out with pretty some smart answers or some clever questions.

"Out of the mouths of babes."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Duchess Hydrangea on September 13, 2012, 05:28:41 PM
I like when she gets back to AP, and  after  Olga  asks if the police had been  there for her, ( lol)
she then asked her father if he was ever in prison? When she got his bemused answer," no"
she says"  oh you must of been very good! " Cute, but kind of chilling too

That's what I thought when I first read it. Chilling.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on September 13, 2012, 10:44:10 PM
What I love about little Anecdotes about Olga is that she always seems to come out with pretty some smart answers or some clever questions.
and usually very quickly.....she was known for her quick repartee though out her life
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on October 06, 2013, 07:28:39 PM
From Sophia Ivanovna Tyutcheva’s Memoirs:
(Concerning the difficulty in dealing with OTMA)

….“I decided to talk to Olga, she being the eldest. “You could help me in many ways”, I told her. “How could I help you?”, she asked. “You can persuade your sisters: you are older than they are and you can make them listen to me and be less naughty”. “Oh no,” she said, “because if I do, it also means I always have to behave properly, and that is impossible!”
In my heart, I could not agree more to the fact that it is difficult for a twelve year old girl to be constantly held as an example to her siblings. However, later on she was able to stop Anastasia from doing more mischief; “Stop or else we will go to Savannah*, and we might also get punished”….

*According to Sophia Ivanovna, it is the nickname which the children invented for her. She assumed they made it by shortening her name and patronymic.

LOL, no wonder why when they got older, Olga “bestowed” the eldest’s role to Tatiana ^^

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Rodney_G. on October 07, 2013, 06:11:03 PM
GP Shandroise, a priceless Olga  anecdote, a nice tidbit of info about Sophie Tyutcheva, and, I would say, some  real insight into Olga's  thinking and sisterly relations.

The obvious next questions  for me, though, are : What's the title of Sophie's memoir; when was it written; has it been translated ; is it publicly accessible? It sounds like a goldmine of OTMA material as well as of larger Russian and Imperial Family 'insider' info.

Any help?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on October 07, 2013, 07:49:40 PM

The obvious next questions  for me, though, are : What's the title of Sophie's memoir; when was it written; has it been translated ; is it publicly accessible? It sounds like a goldmine of OTMA material as well as of larger Russian and Imperial Family 'insider' info.

Any help?
You're welcome!  The link to the memoirs has been posted by Sunny in page 8 of this thread ^^ http://lib.rus.ec/b/327889/read
I don't know if other things she mentioned are reliable, most especially about Empress Alexandra (because she had been dismissed by her). There are only 3 anecdotes about the children: 2 of Olga and one of Alexei. I already translated Alexei's anecdote a year ago if you want to read it. You'll find the other one of Olga in the pg. 8 here translated by Sunny : )  The rest of info about them talk about their life in general.
Unfortunately, I couldn't find the date when she wrote these memoirs.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Rodney_G. on October 08, 2013, 05:06:15 PM
Thanks again, Grand Princess. It's been a while since I checked this topic and had lost memory of that earlier post and citation.

Sophie's assertions of fact may not be completely reliable, but her reactions would be telling in any case. And her access to the children would have been unique, that is, giving her access to them , and a relationship, that few others would have. I wish she had written more about her young charges.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Kassafrass on November 09, 2013, 12:38:59 AM
From Margaret Eager:

"There was a tall young German officer in the Guards, and he used to ask the Grand Duchess Olga for a doll; a little tiny one that he could keep in his pocket and play with while he was on guard would give him much pleasure, so he declared. Poor little Olga Nicolaivna did not know if he was joking or in earnest. I told her I was sure the doll would give him much pleasure, and that it should be a very small one. She presently brought me a couple of very tiny dolls dressed as boys, one minus a foot, the other without an arm. I said I thought it would be better to give unbroken dolls, and she replied, "Yes, but these are boys and he is a man, I am afraid he would not like a little girl dollie." I then told her to ask him when she saw him.

Next morning the doll was put into her pocket and in the course of our walk we met Captain S., who immediately began to reproach her for having forgotten how lonely he was and what company a little doll would be to him. She plunged her hand into her pocket and produced the doll, holding it behind her back. "Which would you rather have," she said seriously, "a boy or a girl doll?" He answered, quite seriously, "A little girl doll would be like you, and I should love it very much, but a boy would be very companionable." She was quite delighted and gave him the doll, saying, "I am glad, I was so afraid you would not like the girL" He put the doll away most carefully.

Shortly afterwards the young officer went for his holidays. When he returned, the first day he saw the little Grand Duchess he began as formerly to beg for a doll. She said reproachfully, "Is it possible you have already broken the nice little doll I gave you?" With great tact he explained that the little doll was lonely all by itself, and wanted a companion, and that it did not matter if it was broken; so another dollie was carried about for several days till she met him again and gave it to him."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Rodney_G. on November 09, 2013, 01:25:08 PM
That anecdote, and Olga herself, is priceless on so many levels.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on November 10, 2013, 02:58:02 AM
That's a very cute anecdote of Olga, one of my favorites!
I wonder if that German officer kept those dolls wherever he went, and saw Olga grow into a lovely lady. LOL, he surely would have felt so proud saying "This beautiful grand duchess gave me these dolls to keep me company."

I also wonder if Olga remembered these anecdotes; what could she have felt about these? Oh, only she and God know!

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Kassafrass on November 18, 2013, 01:13:52 AM
Small mentions of Olga Nikolaevna from the guards at Yekaterinburg:

"The eldest, Olga Nicolaevna, was, like her brother, pale and sickly, but that did not prevent her from being boisterous. Her eyes, most of the time, appeared sad and tired. During the walk she stood apart from her sisters and looked sadly into the distance. She played the piano more often than her sisters, and when she would play a piece, she would choose something sad and plaintive."

"The eldest daughter stayed mostly away from her younger sisters, behaving like her arrogant mother. By the end, she was only skin and bone."
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on November 19, 2013, 10:31:53 AM
From this report it would seem at this time Olga joined the ill members of the family ( Alix and Alexi ) The ill can seem arrogant...one is just trying to keep it together ...give and take is  difficult
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on November 20, 2013, 12:54:35 AM

Small mentions of Olga Nikolaevna from the guards at Yekaterinburg:
"The eldest, Olga Nicolaevna, was, like her brother, pale and sickly, but that did not prevent her from being boisterous. Her eyes, most of the time, appeared sad and tired. During the walk she stood apart from her sisters and looked sadly into the distance. She played the piano more often than her sisters, and when she would play a piece, she would choose something sad and plaintive."

"The eldest daughter stayed mostly away from her younger sisters, behaving like her arrogant mother. By the end, she was only skin and bone."
Buxhoeveden also sadly described Olga in her book Left Behind (Chapter 7 - Journey to Ekaterinburg) ...

"Olga Nikolaevna had also greatly changed. The suspense and anxiety of her parents' absence and responsibility she bore when left as head of the house with her sick brother to look after, had changed the lovely, bright girl of 22 into a faded and sad middle-aged woman."

Most probably that's the time she also began eating less (despite her already usual insufficient meals in Tobolsk) which further worsened in Ekaterinburg, so she eventually became skin and bone  :'(
It's still saddens me to read those although I've read such description of her for 5 years of being a fan. I can't picture her being like that even if I've seen many photos where she looked sad or deeply thinking about something. However, I'm delighted to know that she also became boisterous at times in her last home.
From where did you get that anecdote, Kassy? Thank you in advance!

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Kassafrass on November 20, 2013, 01:09:51 AM
If reports on her depressed and sad are true, which they seem to be, then it makes sense that she would seem arrogant and probably even ornery. I wonder if she would have been quite so angry with Maria for her excursions with the guard toward the end had she not been in the state that she was.

I can, unfortunately, speak from experience when it comes to having a bad attitude while being ill and depressed.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on November 21, 2013, 09:06:13 PM
What is remarkable is how many of Olga's saying were remembered and relished ...she was very funny and original and told it like it was
As M. Gilliard  wrote " ....She suddenly asked me a question with that confident and disingenuous frankness which was all her own...
Everyone had an Olga quote 
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on November 22, 2013, 02:15:22 AM
Quote
Quoted from  Kassy:If reports on her depressed and sad are true, which they seem to be, then it makes sense that she would seem arrogant and probably even ornery. I wonder if she would have been quite so angry with Maria for her excursions with the guard toward the end had she not been in the state that she was.

Regarding arrogant and ornery, I think so, too. People like that cannot/would not listen to what other people say for they are too absorbed of their feelings, and only want to do what they want to do - worrying as long as they want.

Had she not been like that, she would have just let Maria do it without any anger. I think for that incident, she only was angry of Maria because she feared her hearing bad things from them and get hurt. Or just seemed to be angry but in fact she wasn't, that her expression was just like that. I thought that because those who said Olga treated Maria that way observed them outside their room (I'll be wrong unless the one testified seeing it was a guard observing them 24 hours a day inside their room).
Quote
Quoted from blessOTMA (Annie):she was very funny and original and told it like it was

That's the reason why I can't totally  imagine she became like that in the end :'(
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: blessOTMA on November 22, 2013, 07:08:48 AM
Well it's interesting...if you didn't know the girls well, you might mistake their rough housing for anger. They would shove and shout often..and guards changed a good bit . It's hard to tell what was going on.

I find that part about Olga looking at the distances quite moving because many years earlier Alix wrote to Nicky about keeping the girls quite with a game... a guess what I'm  thinking game. Olga was always thinking of the sky , the sun,  stars and the like . When asked why she said they make me the  happiest...and it seems she was still seeking solace there
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on November 23, 2013, 02:47:43 AM
Quote
Quoted from blessOTMA:
if you didn't know the girls well, you might mistake their rough housing for anger. They would shove and shout often..and guards changed a good bit . It's hard to tell what was going on.

Very much agreeing with you! Other people can judge but not everything that they say is true. They themselves (NAOTMAA) only know the things that they had with each other.

Amusing... I find that answer of Olga very similar to what Alexei answered to Olga when she asked him what he's thinking about while he was looking at the sky (if my memory serves me right, alas!) She spoke about how lovely the moon is in her letter to her mama during captivity (while they were separated). I'll type the whole letter for you tomorrow as I'm going to look for it in my perfectly disorganized collection of Romanov info.

(lol unrelated: may I also say those are also some of the few things I love most in this world ~ from Monday to Tuesday this week, the moon was full so I was stuck photographing it and of course, adoring the beauty of the whole night sky plus the blowing wind : )

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on November 24, 2013, 02:07:05 AM
2/15 May, 1918. Tobolsk

My dear little Mama,

Since your birthday, we had no news of you, I mean that's why we're waiting for some news of you impatiently. And you, do you not receive our letters? We sent, all in all, two telelgrams. I'm writing near the wide open window. Today the weather is splendid; no wind. The little one is out in the garden. They moved him there in his wheelchair. He also got up and put his clothes on yesterdaybut he didn't get out. We also cut some wood for the bath. Zhilik and Trina had cut it before with the saw. We were on the roof, sleeping under the sun. Yesterday there was a splendid sunset, and a maervelous evening. It was so luminous, and the sky was filled with the stars! You certainly don't have such a deep silence when the night has arrived... My dearest, how do you live and what are you doing? I would like so much to be with you! We don't know when we'll leave. My little brother must go in the garden more often and regain more strength, then, I think we will be able to leave. I've sent a card to Kay these days. Today I got a letter from Trofimov. He salutes you all, and send his regards. He's writing that the little Anatoly, his son, sends his wishes to his grandmother. There's a lot of funny couples coming and going in the street, even sometimes on bicycles. Tell Mashka that I saw N. Dim and Pimy from afar. We have moved the piano in your lounge, also the couch that was impeding us during Mass. Last night, the fan exploded with a lot of noise, and in our rooms upstairs, we had no electricity. I hope that, at least, yo get our letters. A strange man has just passed, with a red fez on his head. Well it's time. May the Lord protect you, my dear Mama, and all of you. I kiss Papa, you and Mashka, I take you in my arms and love you all.

Your Olga.

----
Very many thanks to the one who translated it a long time ago in "Olga's letters' thread".

I made a mistake in my recent post. She didn't mention the moon - (apparently, I haven't yet recovered from my "moon madness" xD  )  Nevertheless, the letter is very touching, showing her cheerfulness and melancholy in it.

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Lady Macduff on December 30, 2013, 02:28:45 PM
"The grand duchesses changed in front of Varvara Afanasievna, and chose their jewels. Olga said: "Only such a shame that no one can have the pleasure of seeing me, only Papa!" complete absence of brashness."

From Chebotareva's memoir
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on January 14, 2014, 10:17:12 PM
"The grand duchesses changed in front of Varvara Afanasievna, and chose their jewels. Olga said: "Only such a shame that no one can have the pleasure of seeing me, only Papa!" complete absence of brashness."

From Chebotareva's memoir
Oh, everyone would have the the greatest pleasure to see her in beautiful clothes & jewels (even without the jewels and she's wearing ordinary clothes)!!
Thank you many times for this translation, Lady MacDuff! I wanted to know this badly! Kkk,  I wonder why they have to dress up like that in front of Varvara Afanasievna.



Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: rosieposie on January 15, 2014, 12:31:36 AM
Love these Ancedotes,   her description of the sun and sunset was beautiful.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Lady Macduff on January 15, 2014, 07:27:54 PM
"The grand duchesses changed in front of Varvara Afanasievna, and chose their jewels. Olga said: "Only such a shame that no one can have the pleasure of seeing me, only Papa!" complete absence of brashness."

From Chebotareva's memoir
Oh, everyone would have the the greatest pleasure to see her in beautiful clothes & jewels (even without the jewels and she's wearing ordinary clothes)!!
Thank you many times for this translation, Lady MacDuff! I wanted to know this badly! Kkk,  I wonder why they have to dress up like that in front of Varvara Afanasievna.





I should have been clearer. In the context of Olga's diary, when she talks a lot about her crushes, it is very clear that in this anecdote Olga is talking about people seeing her naked.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: rosieposie on January 15, 2014, 09:01:24 PM
Yeah it does have a tone of "Nakedness"  lol.    They are just like any other person no matter what era people have similar thoughts.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: KarinK on February 03, 2014, 11:46:53 AM
Translated by Elizabeth Smith for Romanov Russia Today (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Romanov-Russia-Today/540410679314852?hc_location=timeline):

Quote
Claudia Bitner remembers Olga at Tobolsk: "She inherited many traits of her father. To me she produced her own kindness, an enchanting impression all her own of a sweet, good Russian girl. She disliked domestic [activities]. She loved solitude and books. She was well-read. In general she was mature. It seemed to me that she, much more than all her family, knew her position and was aware of the danger of it. She cried terribly when her father and mother left Tobolsk. Maybe she knew something then. She strikes me with the impression of a person who has experienced something unfortunate. Sometimes she laughs and you feel that her laughter is from above, but there, deep down, she’s not at all funny, but sad. Just like her father, she was totally simple and affectionate, helpful and welcoming. She loved more than anyone else, it seems, Maria Nikolaevna."

This is a sweet description of Olga, but it also reiterates that there was something melancholy about her in those days and that the danger of their situation affected her.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Olga Maria on February 04, 2014, 08:20:46 AM
Oh, sooo many thanks for being updated with this, Karin, and for sharing the anecdotes here!!
(of course, special thanks to Elizabeth Smith, too : ))
Quote
She loved more than anyone else, it seems, Maria Nikolaevna.
Oh this one struck me most from this anecdote. It is said that Olga seemed to show dislike on Maria in Yekaterinburg.  I am one of the people who didn’t believe that.
This recollection by Bitner proves that belief of mine (that Olga & Maria remained close in Yekaterinburg despite observations of Olga said by soldiers). How can a sister’s love suddenly disappear in just a little time? I think sisters love their sisters no matter who and what they are.
Eh well, I am not sure of Claudia’s statement because of the words “it seems”.

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dev on February 09, 2014, 01:48:02 AM
Grand Duchess Shandroise,
I too agree Olga did not dislike Maria. I do believe, however, she was angry with Maria for her kindness towards their captors. But dislike her? Noooo.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on February 09, 2014, 06:01:59 AM
As far as I know Olga´s "dislike" or I would rather call it "reservation" towards Maria only happened after Maria got over-friendly with Ivan Skorokhodov. And Alexandra was supposedly giving Maria the same cold treatement. It doesn´t mean they stopped loving her, but obviously she fell out of favour with behaviour that was probably not considered proper and that too with a person who was actually "an enemy". I don´t have difficulties believing Alexandra and over-sensitive Olga gave Maria a cold-shoulder for some time because of that.

That said it is interesting to see the anecdote, it is the only instance I can recall when somebody actually talks about Olga/Maria "pair". Then again they were "daddy´s girls" and Maria was a source of energy and zest for life, so perhaps that is why Olga clung to her a lot in captivity, since Tatiana tended her mother and brother most of the time?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Kassafrass on February 10, 2014, 09:20:55 PM
I find it completely believable that Olga would grow upset with Maria after the incident with Skorokhodov. They were sisters and I can tell you from personal experience that sisters care about each other but fight at times. Obviously my little sister and I don't have the same relationship as Olga and Maria, but I think it is in the nature of siblings. While I believe that their was distance in the last weeks or days, their love wouldn't have diminished.

And while Olga and Tatiana were close for their entire lives, I feel as though we have several photos of Olga and Maria together which suggests that even before the revolution they got along well.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: edubs31 on February 11, 2014, 09:35:31 AM
I agree with what has been said above. I'm neither female nor do I have siblings but it seems to me that Olga's reaction to Marie after the "incident" is that of someone mildly heartbroken. Nothing she wouldn't have gotten over in due time but Olga clearly held Marie dear, especially so. When you place someone on a higher pedestal (than she might have her brother and other two sisters) and then they disappoint you it hurts/offends that much more.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Lady Macduff on February 16, 2014, 12:24:27 PM
I've decided I don't think anything happened between Maria and Skorokhodov, and I don't believe Olga and Maria drifted apart in Ekaterinburg. The story about Maria being found with the guard comes from Ermakov, and the story about Maria being shunned by the family comes from Yurovsky. We know that Ermakov made up huge chunks of his memoir, so that alone makes me doubtful of everything he says. But on top of that he does not say that Maria and Skorokhodov were found together - just that he brought her a cake.

As for Yurovksy saying Olga and Alix turned against Maria toward the end, I call bullpucky on that too. My thought is that Maria in some way undermined his authority, or he was annoyed by her friendliness with the guards. And so, much like Anna Vyrubova writing about Derevenko betraying the family at Tsarskoe, a personal dislike has resulted in a story that has come down through history and is by some regarded as fact.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Georgiy on February 17, 2014, 01:44:50 AM
I think you could be right.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dev on March 10, 2014, 12:19:05 PM
I did a post about Olga for International Women's day which related the well-known Karol anecdote and the considerably less known Olga's dreams: http://lost-fairytale-empire.tumblr.com/post/79036560197/international-womens-day-8-march-2014-many (http://lost-fairytale-empire.tumblr.com/post/79036560197/international-womens-day-8-march-2014-many)

Olga wrote down her dreams of happiness: "'"Get married, always live in the countryside, winter and summer, see only good people, no one official.'"
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 10, 2014, 04:54:44 PM
That sounds so sweet.... What was your source please?
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Lady Macduff on March 10, 2014, 07:24:50 PM
That's from Chebotareva's memoirs. I assume Dev found it on page 59 of Olga's diary.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 11, 2014, 02:48:46 AM
Thank you! Those came out only in Russian, am I right? Oh.... I just really should learn Russian finally.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dev on March 11, 2014, 04:59:05 AM
You can find it in Valentina's memoirs as well as translated into English in Helen Azar's book!
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dev on March 11, 2014, 05:01:02 AM
Ally, oh no! They are available in English translated from the wonderful Russianist Helen Azar: http://www.amazon.com/The-Diary-Olga-Romanov-Revolution/dp/1594161771 (http://www.amazon.com/The-Diary-Olga-Romanov-Revolution/dp/1594161771)
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Dev on March 11, 2014, 05:07:36 AM
Ally, oh no! They are available in English translated from the wonderful Russianist Helen Azar: http://www.amazon.com/The-Diary-Olga-Romanov-Revolution/dp/1594161771 (http://www.amazon.com/The-Diary-Olga-Romanov-Revolution/dp/1594161771)
Olga is so funny and witty and kind
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: KarinK on March 12, 2014, 02:38:42 PM
Romanov Russia Today (https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=702413849781200&id=540410679314852&stream_ref=10) has a quote from Olga Alexandrovna about Olga:

Quote
“I was very fond of all my brother’s children but perhaps most of the eldest, Olga. The two of us were soul mates. She resembled me in character, and that was perhaps why we understood each other so well. It often happened that I was able to tell her how she was thinking in one or the other specific situation, and that always took her by surprise. “How do you know that?” she would ask with blushing cheeks.”
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Lady Macduff on April 22, 2014, 09:29:16 PM
Interesting, considering how Anastasia is usually considered to be Olga A's favorite.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on April 23, 2014, 06:43:30 AM
Interesting, considering how Anastasia is usually considered to be Olga A's favorite.

This is because Olga Alexandrovna herself in her memoirs (penned down by Vorres) states about Anastasia that she "was my favourite God-daughter indeed!" and follows that with some heart-touching memories of the youngest Grand Duchess.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: edubs31 on April 23, 2014, 11:20:10 AM
Interesting, considering how Anastasia is usually considered to be Olga A's favorite.

This is because Olga Alexandrovna herself in her memoirs (penned down by Vorres) states about Anastasia that she "was my favourite God-daughter indeed!" and follows that with some heart-touching memories of the youngest Grand Duchess.

Right. I think people understandably took that quote to mean that Anastasia was her favorite niece overall, when she may have specifically been referring to her only as her favorite "God daughter".
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: Ally Kumari on April 23, 2014, 12:16:25 PM
But Olga Nikolaevna was her God-daughter as well :-P

Basically I think there were really no "favourites", just Olga Alexandrovna enjoyed Anastasia´s mischief and could relate to the youngest sister status, and with Olga she actually could talk about things which in later years would lead to more serious bonding.
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: AnnaLivadia on July 23, 2015, 04:36:59 AM
A few months ago , I read one anecdote about Olga . I can't remember where . According to my memory , Olga was little and she saw a little girl crying on the road because she didn't get any présents at Christmas from Father Christmas and Olga apparantly told her not to cry because he didn't know where the little girl lived . Do you know this anecdote ? If you do , please , tell me the full anecdote . Maybe I got confused but I really remember reading it . I would appreciate your help . Thank you .
Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: GDSophie on September 28, 2016, 10:03:44 AM
This is one of my favourites of Olga:

The little Grand Duchesses went to church regularly from the time they were babies. It was during this year that the Grand Duchess Olga began to notice what was said there. She came home one day and told me " the priest prayed for mama and papa, and Tatiana and me, the soldiers and the sailors, the poor sick people, and the apples and pears, and Madame G." I exclaimed at this last, so she said: "But I heard them say 'Marie Feodorovna.'" I said I thought they meant her grandmama. She said, "No, AmamaÕs called Amama, and your Majesty, but not Marie Feodorovna." I said "and also Marie Feodorovna," but she now replied "no one has more than two names, and I am quite sure Madame G. would be very much pleased if she knew that the priests prayed for her in church." - Six Years at the Russian Court, Margaretta Eagar.

Who was this Madame G? I don't remember seeing her name anywhere else.

Title: Re: Olga Anecdotes
Post by: GDSophie on September 17, 2017, 01:37:01 PM
Another favourite Olga anecdote of mine!

'...And plus a letter came from Shakh-Bagov (Olga's Mitya)-Olga Nikolaevna threw all of her things around in delight, and threw a pillow up on a top shelf. She felt feverish and she jumped around: "Can someone have a stroke at 20 years old? I think I am having a stroke!" But Varvara Afanasievna declared: "Young blood is warm; the years pass, and the blood cools off." - from the memoirs of V.I Chebotavera, page 59 of The diary of Olga Romanov: Royal Witness to the Russian Revolution by Helen Azar.

Olga being that excited to see Dmitri Shakh-Bagov again makes me smile.