Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => Anastasia Nicholaievna => Topic started by: aya-anya on May 25, 2005, 08:01:46 AM

Title: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: aya-anya on May 25, 2005, 08:01:46 AM
Hi. I am writing a research-report on Anastasia since I am a fan of her and I have read the fact that there was a book that Anastasia liked. Was she the Grand Duchess who read lots of books?

I'm wondering what kind of book, "The Millionaire Girl" (Anastasia liked this book, correct?)written by Arthur Marchmont was.  I'd like to read the book but it was published when Anastasia was alive, and it seems very difficult to take a look at it. I just would love to know the brief synopsis of the book and perhaps some of the fans of Anastasia have read the book, so if somebody can share the details of "The Millionaire Girl," I would be honored. Thank you.  

aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on May 25, 2005, 11:02:18 AM
Hey!
I have tried many times to find the book. It is mentioned many times in the letters and diarys of the IF. It seems that all of them read it. I suggest searching for the authors name. The only thing I found out without reading the book was that it was a detective story and was published in 1908. If I find out anything else I'll be sure to tell you!
     ,Holly
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Lanie on May 25, 2005, 01:34:41 PM
Quote
Hi. I am writing a research-report on Anastasia since I am a fan of her and I have read the fact that there was a book that Anastasia liked. Was she the Grand Duchess who read lots of books?

I'm wondering what kind of book, "The Millionaire Girl" (Anastasia liked this book, correct?)written by Arthur Marchmont was.  I'd like to read the book but it was published when Anastasia was alive, and it seems very difficult to take a look at it. I just would love to know the brief synopsis of the book and perhaps some of the fans of Anastasia have read the book, so if somebody can share the details of "The Millionaire Girl," I would be honored. Thank you.  

aya-anya


Anastasia wasn't much for books; that was Olga, her eldest sister.  I used to know the name of the author for The Millionaire Girl, but I completely forget.  It's probably one of those syrupy novels from the time period that Alexandra enjoyed...
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on May 25, 2005, 02:03:04 PM
Nicholas often read Chekhov's short stories to the girls especially Olga. If you search his name along with  "short stories" you can find a place online where you can read them. Olga mentioned in her diary "The Princess"  I tried to read it...but...my short attention span got the best of me!  ;D
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Robert_Hall on May 25, 2005, 02:19:42 PM
A, Marchmont wrote quite a few books in that era. Perhaps "Millionaire Girl" was  titled differently if published in the US perhaps ? Try looking him up on Bookfinders and see if any of the titles may sound similiar.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on May 25, 2005, 03:02:13 PM
I think the real title is "A Millionaire Girl"
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Georgiy on May 26, 2005, 11:08:40 PM
A W Marchmont was quite a prolific writer in the late 19th early 20th Century. I've read The Man Who Was Dead, kind of a thriller type book. I think (judging by the titles) most of his books were of the thriller/detective type with Edwardian sentimentality in it. I have never come across A Millionaire Girl though (but have looked hard), and yet his other books seem freely available at reasonable prices. maybe it was indeed also published with a different title in different territories. I know Agatha Christie books often had different titles in America as opposed to in England.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: aya-anya on May 27, 2005, 07:18:49 AM
Thank you very much, Holly, Lanie, Robert_Hall, Georgiy!
"A Millionaire Girl" seems a detective story as Holly wrote.

By the way, I am interested in another evidence of Anastasia as a reader.

I read that Anastasia had read a poem by Robert Browning's "Evelyn Hope" and she wrote a summary of the poem and I am trying to read the poem carefully, considering "Evelyn Hope" might show Anastasia's feelings.

Has anybody read the poem?

aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on May 27, 2005, 12:11:34 PM
Yes, I have read her poem. My favorite line from it is in my signature. I think its beautiful, and after I read it, it just kept going through my head over and over again.  I know the poem by heart.
I have thought that it may reflect her own predicament in life. It is even stranger that it stops in mid-sentence.  If it did reflect her life, -"There was a man who loved her, without having seen her, but knew her very well."-  I wonder who that would be?  ;)  
I also think it is funny because i read it in her own spelling and grammer..... ;D
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on May 27, 2005, 02:33:43 PM
Here is the poem for those who haven't read it. It is in her own English.

"A young girl who was called Evelyn had just died. She was lying in the cofen, very pretty. All her things [were] on the same place nothing was changed and even the flower which she gatherd, stood in the glace, but was beginning to faid. Whe[n] she died she was only sixteen years old. Ther[e] was a man who loved her without having seen her but knew her very well. And she herd of him also. He never could tell her that he loved her, and now she was dead. But still he thought that when he and she will live [their] next life whenever it will be that --"

It stops there.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Lanie on May 27, 2005, 02:50:58 PM
It's not a poem. ;)  It's Anastasia's paper about the poem; she was probably asked to summarize it.  It's rather sad how her spelling and grammar was so poor.

Here is the poem:

I.
Beautiful Evelyn Hope is dead!
Sit and watch by her side an hour.
That is her book-shelf, this her bed;
She plucked that piece of geranium-flower,
Beginning to die too, in the glass;
Little has yet been changed, I think:
The shutters are shut, no light may pass
Save two long rays thro' the hinge's chink.

II.
Sixteen years old, when she died!
Perhaps she had scarcely heard my name;
It was not her time to love; beside,
Her life had many a hope and aim,
Duties enough and little cares,
And now was quiet, now astir,
Till God's hand beckoned unawares,---
And the sweet white brow is all of her.

III.
Is it too late then, Evelyn Hope?
What, your soul was pure and true,
The good stars met in your horoscope,
Made you of spirit, fire and dew---
And, just because I was thrice as old
And our paths in the world diverged so wide,
Each was nought to each, must I be told?
We were fellow mortals, nought beside?

IV.
No, indeed! for God above
Is great to grant, as mighty to make,
And creates the love to reward the love:
I claim you still, for my own love's sake!
Delayed it may be for more lives yet,
Through worlds I shall traverse, not a few:
Much is to learn, much to forget
Ere the time be come for taking you.

V.
But the time will come,---at last it will,
When, Evelyn Hope, what meant (I shall say)
In the lower earth, in the years long still,
That body and soul so pure and gay?
Why your hair was amber, I shall divine,
And your mouth of your own geranium's red---
And what you would do with me, in fine,
In the new life come in the old one's stead.

VI.
I have lived (I shall say) so much since then,
Given up myself so many times,
Gained me the gains of various men,
Ransacked the ages, spoiled the climes;
Yet one thing, one, in my soul's full scope,
Either I missed or itself missed me:
And I want and find you, Evelyn Hope!
What is the issue? let us see!

VII.
I loved you, Evelyn, all the while.
My heart seemed full as it could hold?
There was place and to spare for the frank young smile,
And the red young mouth, and the hair's young gold.
So, hush,---I will give you this leaf to keep:
See, I shut it inside the sweet cold hand!
There, that is our secret: go to sleep!
You will wake, and remember, and understand.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on May 27, 2005, 03:15:30 PM
  Yes, I know what she wrote wasn't really a poem ,but a summary of Browning's poem. But to me it reads like a poem and I like it. Plus, I didn't really know what else to call it! ;D
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Laura Mabee on May 29, 2005, 05:27:31 PM
Beautiful Lanie, Thanks for posting.

Also, thanks Holly for posting Anastasia's summery of it aswell  :)
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: RealAnastasia on May 29, 2005, 08:29:30 PM
Thank you for the poem, Lanie, and for the other Anastasia's text, Holly. I really liked them both. I don't know Anastasia's age when she wrote this , but I suppose that if she could live more years, her style would have improve.

 But the thing that makes me sad in the poem is this line: "...Sixteen years old when she died!..." It sounds almost premonitory. Anastasia , herself died (if she died) when she had only 17 years old.  :'( Poor Nastenka!!!

  My opinion is that Anastasia was more a writer than a reader, aya-anya....But perhaps, later in life, Anastasia should have liked to enjoy herself reading, like Olga.

RealAnastasia
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: zoya_konstantinovna on May 30, 2005, 06:47:01 PM
that poem and the summary were so beautiful :'( i wonder if it reflected any of anastasia's beliefs? :)
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on May 30, 2005, 08:08:08 PM
Hi and welcome to the forum Zoya!
I agree the summary is beautiful. I don't think Anastasia intentionally wrote it as if it were her own predicament, but it certainly sounds as if it were!  I don't think we will ever know!
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: aya-anya on June 01, 2005, 11:01:39 AM
Thanks for the responses!

I think the summary Anastasia wrote somehow sounds more romantic than Browning's poem.  

Does anybody know exactly when she wrote the summary? I wonder if Anastasia was 16 years old just like "Evelyn Hope" when she learned the poem.  And, only Anastasia learned that poem?

I found the summary that Anastasia wrote  in Peter Kurth's "Anastasia--The Riddle of Anna Anderson" but in "Note" page of this book, I found it was "Transcribed from endpapers in Trein, The House of Special Purpose"---perhaps more information on the summary that Anastasia wrote is in this book?      

I agree with RealAnastasia. She had talents for painting and writing!

Holly, I saw your website, and I liked the song "Once Upon a December" in your website! I love the songs of the cartoon movie of Anastasia in 1997...

aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Georgiy on June 01, 2005, 04:05:59 PM
I don't think there's any further info in Tutor to the Tsarevich other than the story being reproduced for all to read. I think it was done after the abdication. Maybe she thought about her own future while reading the poem, who knows? In hindsight it seems very sad and quite like a premonition.
Anastasia also wrote an interesting account of their train journey from Tsarskoe to Tobol'sk, in it she mentions that at some wayside stop a little boy called her 'uncle', but she said that she was not an uncle but an 'anty' (I think that's how she spelt it!), and wondered why he would call her uncle until she remembered her hair had been cut short!
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Lanie on June 01, 2005, 04:16:51 PM
This was in her composition book, most likely just for an English exercise (complete with her spelling errors):

My dear Friend.  I will tell you who [how] we travelled.  We started in the morningand when we got into the train I went to sleap, so did all of us.  We were very tierd because we did not sleap the whole night.  The first day was very hot and very dusty.  At the stations we had to shut our window curtanse that nobody should see us.  Once in the evening I was loking out the window we stoped near a little house, but there was no station so we could look out.  A little boy came to my window and asked: "Uncle, please give me, if you have got, a newspaper."  I said: "I am not an uncle but a anty and have no newspaper."  At the first moment I could not understand why did he call me "Uncle" but then I rememberd that my hear is cut and I and the soldiers (which were standing next to me) laught very much.  On the way many funy things hapend, and if I shall have time I shall write to youn our travell farther on.  Good by.  Dont forget me.  Many kisses from us all to you my darling.  Your A.

Anastasia's handwriting is rather hard to read, not as hard as Tatiana's, though...

Here's what she wrote about Evelyn Hope in full:

A young girle who was called Evelyn had just died.  She was lying in the cofen very pretty.  All her things wher in the same place nothing was changed and even the flower which she gatherd, stood in the glase, but was begining to faid.  When she died she was only sixteen years old.  Ther was a man who loved her without having seen her but new her very well.  And she herd of him also.  He never could tell her that he loved her, and now she was dead.  But still he thought that when he and she cold live life when ever it will be, that ....
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: aya-anya on June 07, 2005, 08:27:44 AM
Hi,

I'm wondering, if many people who know "Russian writing style," write "Don't forget me" as complimentary close (for example, "My Best" or "Sincerely yours"?)  

aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Georgiy on June 07, 2005, 03:33:39 PM
I don't think so, but a native speaker could answer this better. So far as I know, the usual sign-off is tseluyu (Kisses, - or literally: I kiss you)
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Shvibzik on June 07, 2005, 03:58:47 PM
Well, since they did live in the early twentieth century, they were not ashamed to "express themselves" (i.e. "Many kisses to you my darling") like we are somewhat today.  So, if you read their notes and letters to another, they usually end off in some kind of affectionate salutation.

Are you looking for how the Romanovs ended their letters, or just for a Russian salutation in general?
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Lanie on June 07, 2005, 05:28:00 PM
Letters from the girls often ended in 'Kisses!  I embrace you' to those they knew.  Example being Anastasia to her aunt Ksenia in 1918: We embrace all of you.  Good bye, darling Auntie.  God bless you.  Loving you, Your A.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: grandduchess_sofia on June 09, 2005, 11:28:01 AM
tseluyu, thats such a beautiful word! it really suits what it means. :)
sopzxx
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: aya-anya on June 12, 2005, 09:06:46 AM
Quote
Well, since they did live in the early twentieth century, they were not ashamed to "express themselves" (i.e. "Many kisses to you my darling") like we are somewhat today.  So, if you read their notes and letters to another, they usually end off in some kind of affectionate salutation.

Are you looking for how the Romanovs ended their letters, or just for a Russian salutation in general?


Thanks! I just wondered why Anastasia wrote "Don't forget me" in her letter before she killed...in my personal opinion, "Don't forget me" sounded like, resurrection-- "She will rise again" as her name, "Anastasia" meant...

aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: aya-anya on August 14, 2005, 02:04:01 AM
Hi.
I've been wondering whether or not the poem(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y142/aya-anya0112/008.jpg) (This photo is from "Anastasia's Album" p26) is composed by Anastasia. Or is this quoted? If anyone knows what this poem is, please tell me!


aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on August 14, 2005, 10:44:58 AM
Thank you for posting this close up picture of her workbook! I love looking at her letters and writings!
This page is from her english workbook and I'm sure it is just an exercise with writing sentences. It wasn't written to anyone.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: rosebud on August 14, 2005, 02:09:20 PM
About the books the girls read. I dont know if Anastasia read it or not but at least Maria did. And Nicholas.
It is written by Florence Barclay, bestseller author of her time and it is called The rosary. It is quite an experience, in an oldfashioned way and gives a good laugh because it has gone out of date long ago, but it still is a rather beautiful lovestory. My friend is able to quote it in every possible situation and what could be more fun than that.
R
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Georgiy on August 14, 2005, 04:48:51 PM
I very much like the book "The Rosary" it really is very sentimental, but it is a nice and moving story.

By the way, Anastasia does not mean "She who will rise again", it is Greek for 'Resurrection' (i.e. of Christ) in its Feminine form. There is no future tense in the name as far as I know. The male version is Anastasios (Greek), Anastasiy (Russian). There are about two or three early Christian Martresses of this name, one of whom was Anastasia's patron Saint.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: aya-anya on August 15, 2005, 01:12:06 AM
Thank you, Holly, rosebud, and Georgiy!!

aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on August 15, 2005, 10:52:43 AM
They also read Chekov's short storys. Nicholas read them to the girls. There are alot of books mentioned in letters.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: imperial angel on October 04, 2005, 11:23:25 AM
I don't think Anastasia was much of a reader except for popluar novels of the day, and simliarly light hearted things. I think she liked life and people better and learned from them more. But her summary of the poem was fascinating, it does have some errors, but it is more nostalgic, and romantic than the poem. It shows Anastasia had a gift for illustrating things through selection of details, tone of writing etc.
But it is so sad, especially the line ''When she died she was only sixteen years old''. Anastasia was a month past her 17th birhday when she died. It seems almost like a descriptioon of herself, in some ways although Anastasia would think us silly for reading so much into a school writing of hers. ;) still, the first time I read that in a book, I got cold chills. Maybe there should be a thread did Anastasia have the gift of second sight? :D
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: imperial angel on February 03, 2006, 10:15:04 AM
Ok, this is the poem thread. She did not write the poem but rather the summary. :)
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on February 05, 2006, 11:20:58 AM
I get chills each time I read it.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: aya-anya on February 07, 2006, 11:24:01 PM
Hi. Indeed, I also get chills whenever I read Anastasia's precis of "Evelyn Hope" and her other writings.

By the way, some of you might have noticed that the precis/summary that Anastasia wrote, "Evelyn Hope" became a song for a musical play about AA in 2004...Has anybody listened to it on the web? (Also this site has a great lecture by Peter Kurth in mp3) I found thie site when I was doing a research for my thesis at school.

"Unbekannt: A New Musical Based on the Life of Anna Anderson" http://silvertone.princeton.edu/~wjoyce/unbekannt.html

http://silvertone.princeton.edu/~wjoyce/synopsis.html
(Click the "Prologue" and mp3 starts)

I did quote Anastasia's "Evelyn Hope" for my paper and I thought that Anastasia was a "silent observer (I'm not good at naming though)" when she wrote something. I compared hers with the poem by Robert Browning and Browning wrote about Evelyn and the man whom Evelyn loved in such a romantic way, and Anastasia wrote about them in a simple way, but something's strong in Anastasia's writing, like in the last  lines, "when ever[sic] it will be that." I wondered why and encountered a book entitled The House of Special Purpose: An Intimate Portrait of the Last Days of the Russian Imperial Family by J.C. Trewin and in page 75,

Anastasia's writing is rather harder to read than her sister's. [......] Suddenly, in the midst of the dictated paragraphs and of the prose renderings, plodding on with a charming naivete, misspellings and all, and powdered with Gibbes's corrections, there occurs a single fragment of Anastasia's own experience.

Anastasia's "Evelyn Hope" might sound naivete but unforgettable.

aya-anya
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: imperial angel on February 08, 2006, 08:04:49 AM
It is unforgetable- as soon as I read it, it grabbed me, and it stays with you. I first read it in the book described above.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Violette on May 16, 2006, 09:36:24 AM
Just so you know its actually Holly! I forgot my password.  ;D
Quote
Here's what she wrote about Evelyn Hope in full:

A young girle who was called Evelyn had just died.  She was lying in the cofen very pretty.  All her things wher in the same place nothing was changed and even the flower which she gatherd, stood in the glase, but was begining to faid.  When she died she was only sixteen years old.  Ther was a man who loved her without having seen her but new her very well.  And she herd of him also.  He never could tell her that he loved her, and now she was dead.  But still he thought that when he and she cold live life when ever it will be, that ....
Actually Lanie, thats not the full version. Looking at Anastasia's English workbook, here is what I am 99.9% sure is the rest. It continues from "that". I hand copied it from her workbook and here it is with her spelling and grammer mistakes. Also there were corrections by Gibbes.
  
 
               "A young girle who was called Evelyn had just died. She was lying in the cofen very pretty.  All her things wher in the same place nothing was changd and even the flower which she gatherd, stood in the glase[glass], but was begining to faid.  When she died she was only sixteen years old. Ther was a man who loved her without having seen her but new her very well.  And she herd of him also.  He never could tell her that he loved her, and now she was dead.  But still he thought that when he and she could live next life when ever it will be that again thay [they] will meet and then he will tell her ('who' has been crossed out and 'how' added by Gibbes) how long he loved her. And know [now] he lives without  her, [illegible. looks like 'LOOKS'] goes about, but he always thinks and loves her know [now] she lay so pritty [pretty] before him. He tore a leaf from her flour [corrected by Gibbes into 'flower'] and pat [put] it in her called [corrected into 'cold'] hand and said, "When you will awayke [awake] then you shall remember and understand and that is our secret."


I also have something she wrote called "The Glove". Its quite amusing.  :)
                    
                                                                                                           Holly
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: imperial angel on May 18, 2006, 02:34:02 PM
I am sure it is, Anastasia certainly wrote in a vivid way, I think.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on December 17, 2006, 06:38:05 AM
I decided to just post this question here instead of making a new topic.  :)

Among the things left behind in the Ipatiev House were some of Anastasia's books; Four books of the Works of Lazietnikov, volumes 1 & 2 with glossy colored cover. Does anyone know what they were about or any info about them?
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Sarushka on December 17, 2006, 08:07:20 AM
I decided to just post this question here instead of making a new topic.  :)

Among the things left behind in the Ipatiev House were some of Anastasia's books; Four books of the Works of Lazietnikov, volumes 1 & 2 with glossy colored cover. Does anyone know what they were about or any info about them?

I can't find ANYTHING on the name Lazietnikov. The closest thing I could come up with was a Russian mathematician named Aleksey Vasilievich Letnikov (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksey_Letnikov)....  :-\
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on December 17, 2006, 09:57:30 AM
Thanks Sarah! That's also the only thing I can come up with. Maybe they were school books or something. I'm pretty sure Anastasia wouldn't be spending her free time reading about analytic geometry.  ::)
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: GD_Sasha on December 22, 2006, 05:29:29 PM
I was hoping I could be a help; and looking at this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grunwald-Letnikov_differintegral), I doubt Anastasia would spend spare time reading about that! The only other thing I got was a link to the AP (list of Yekaterinburg items). Maybe it's not something that is really around anymore? Or like Holly mentioned, probably just a school-book.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: grandduchess_42 on December 22, 2006, 07:25:43 PM
it probably was a school book
they were the imperial children. i think they were required to learn arithmetic and science.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: granduchess_leah on December 16, 2007, 03:18:06 PM
i heard she read a book something callled the millionaire girl am i right
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Holly on December 17, 2007, 10:53:31 PM
I've only heard about her reading it on, "My Name is Anastasia", but I've never heard it anywhere else. I do know that other members of the family (can't remember who) read it because I read it in letters.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: grandduchess_42 on December 18, 2007, 08:44:20 PM
it might have been olga who read it
because i know she read
something about trolls?
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: rosieposie on December 21, 2007, 05:57:37 AM
it might have been olga who read it
because i know she read
something about trolls?

The book is The Princess and the Goblin.   It was a great book I read that when I was 13.    I didn't even know the IF had that book in their collection.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: grandduchess_42 on January 01, 2008, 06:18:09 PM
it might have been olga who read it
because i know she read
something about trolls?

The book is The Princess and the Goblin.   It was a great book I read that when I was 13.    I didn't even know the IF had that book in their collection.

Thats it :)
i remember a thread.. talking about it!

i loved the movie!
yes... i think Olga read the most books out of all of them!! the girls speaking.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: Sarushka on January 01, 2008, 08:33:50 PM
it might have been olga who read it
because i know she read
something about trolls?

The book is The Princess and the Goblin.   It was a great book I read that when I was 13.    I didn't even know the IF had that book in their collection.

It was given to Olga in 1903 by her aunt Irene. The book was found among her possessions in Yekaterinburg.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on January 02, 2008, 06:01:44 AM
I was very excited when I heard Olga had read The Princess and the Goblin. I wonder if she would have liked the movie.  :P

Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: grandduchess_42 on January 02, 2008, 08:24:26 AM
oh i'm sure she'd love it
i wish i had it DVD

Here (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107875/) is a link, about the movie.
Title: Re: Anastasia; a reader
Post by: clockworkgirl21 on January 02, 2008, 10:38:31 AM
A very wonderful person posted it on youtube, too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sfKJ7-hfds
Title: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: AnastasiaNikolaevna on July 18, 2010, 06:19:26 PM
Hello! Does anyone happen to know  what Ana's favorite book was? I recall reading that Olga preferred Les Miserables, but I have no idea about Ana's.
Title: Re: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on July 18, 2010, 07:24:18 PM
I read somewhere that she liked a book called The Millionare Girl, but I don't know anything about it, i.e. what the plot was, who wrote it etc. I researched it a little bit, but didn't find anything.  ???
Title: Re: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: Holly on July 19, 2010, 08:25:28 AM
The whole "Millionaire Girl" thing was only something I've seen stated on the My Name Is Anastasia website.

Obviously, you're not going to find any source direct from the familiy where it says, "My favorite book ever is _______."

They read a lot of books so it would be too hard to say for sure. Anastasia read The Millionaire Girl but so did the rest of the family. No telling what her favorite book was.
Title: Re: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: Sarushka on July 19, 2010, 02:11:03 PM
What Holly said. (Same goes for Olga and Les Miserables.)



I read somewhere that she liked a book called The Millionare Girl, but I don't know anything about it, i.e. what the plot was, who wrote it etc. I researched it a little bit, but didn't find anything.  ???

It's a detective story by Arthur Williams Marchmont.
Title: Re: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: MademoiselleAndrea on July 19, 2010, 03:25:29 PM
A detective story sounds like something Anastasia would like; wouldn't you think so?
Title: Re: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: AnastasiaNikolaevna on July 19, 2010, 07:06:07 PM
A detective story sounds like something Anastasia would like; wouldn't you think so?

Definitely--I can see her reading it and wanting to go on a devious adventure!
Title: Re: Anastasia's Favorite book?
Post by: amartin71718 on July 19, 2010, 11:49:19 PM
What Holly said. (Same goes for Olga and Les Miserables.)
I read somewhere that she liked a book called The Millionare Girl, but I don't know anything about it, i.e. what the plot was, who wrote it etc. I researched it a little bit, but didn't find anything.  ???
It's a detective story by Arthur Williams Marchmont.
Any idea of what the plot was?