Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => The Windsors => Topic started by: Prince_Lieven on July 15, 2005, 11:52:24 AM

Title: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 15, 2005, 11:52:24 AM
Like everyone, Alix had her ups and downs. I think she was a charming, beautiful woman, who always meant well, but treated her children like they were toddlers well into middle age! Her possessivness of Princess Victoria in particular is striking - author John Van Der Kiste says that Toria's cousins could remember many a time when Toria would have to leave them to rush urgently to her mother's side only to find that Mama had forgotten what she wanted in the first place. Whenever the topic of Victoria's marriage came up, Alix would use her deafness as a weapon. What do you all think of her as a person?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on July 15, 2005, 05:14:54 PM
As you said, Prince, Alix was a charming and beautiful woman.  She had a winning touch with the common man but was still Royal to her fingertips.

She did seem unfortunately possessive with her children and did not really attempt to raise them to be independent of her.  This at least in part would be due to her husband's well known neglect of her and her increasing deafness, both very isolating problems.

I think her treatment of Toria was thoughtless and selfish but not deliberate at all - knowing Alix's personality, she was probably airily unaware of her daughter's resentment and unhappiness and would, I'm sure, have made at least some effort to change things for her if she had some degree of awareness of this.

As far as I can see, this is the only grievous fault in Alix's otherwise kind, well balanced character and, to me, her virtues far and away outweigh her faults.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Mandie, the Gothic Empress on July 24, 2005, 05:20:14 PM
Alexandra was strong and pretty.
Her Husband's unfaithfulness just made her stronger. Her reject of her daughter Victoria marring? not so sure of.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 24, 2005, 05:29:18 PM
Thank you so much for posting. I was afraid this thread was dead in the water! Yes, Alix endured Bertie's affairs with commendable patience. Didn't she say 'He always loved me best.'
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on July 25, 2005, 01:35:11 AM
Yes, Prince Lieven, I am surprised that this thread did not receive more attention as I think it is an excellent topic.

Perhaps it would have done better if posted under the Windsor site.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 25, 2005, 06:44:55 AM
Your probably right, Grace. Anywho, maybe we can stir up a bit of interest. I'm prepared to bet that Alix was QV's favourite daughter-in-law, though in the early years of her marriage to Bertie QV thought their lifestyle was 'fast'. Vicky, though (always the peacemaker) soon brought them back together. All her life, Alix remained in awe of the Queen, I think, as did Bertie.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on July 25, 2005, 11:58:37 AM
Quote
Yes, Prince Lieven, I am surprised that this thread did not receive more attention as I think it is an excellent topic.

Perhaps it would have done better if posted under the Windsor site.  :)


Probably so. There are lots of threads dealing with aspects of her character and life but not one that ties all the elements together.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 25, 2005, 12:23:22 PM
<sighes>. Well, it's here now, anyway. GDella, maybe your presence will attract custom, Your Imperial Highness. Did I get it right? Imperial Highness? ; - )
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on July 26, 2005, 01:45:55 AM
Quote
Your probably right, Grace. Anywho, maybe we can stir up a bit of interest. I'm prepared to bet that Alix was QV's favourite daughter-in-law, though in the early years of her marriage to Bertie QV thought their lifestyle was 'fast'. Vicky, though (always the peacemaker) soon brought them back together. All her life, Alix remained in awe of the Queen, I think, as did Bertie.


Prince Lieven:

I think you are right regarding Alix being QV's favourite daughter-in-law - QV did criticise Alix from time to time for not taking her advice about raising the children and her social life with Bertie etc. but, I think, grew to think of her as if she were her own daughter... :)

I agree with your comments regarding Alix and Bertie's awe of QV and about Vicky also...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kevin From Australia on July 26, 2005, 05:41:16 AM
I think that Alexandra saw the Queen firstly as her mother-in-law then as the Queen, I think that the Duchess of Albany also saw her this way.  The Duchess of Connaught I believe saw her firstly as THE Queen, where as the Duchess of Edinburgh only saw her as "A MOTHER-IN-LAW"!!!  

I remember reading a book on Sir Henry Ponsonby where he was amazed that the Duchess of Albany was not afraid to confront the Queen over an issue, where as the rest of teh family would always use a member of the houshold or write a letter.

Sorry to get the subject off Alexandra!!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 26, 2005, 06:24:14 AM
I think that QV was delighted with Alix because Alix was perfectly content to be Princess of Wales, and not try to usurp Victoria's position as first lady of the land, as, say, the Duchess of Edinburgh might have had she been in Alix's place. Also, Alix's upbringing was so humble that she had absolutely no pretentions (again, the contrast with Duchess Marie). And, of course, like everyone, QV was simply charmed by Alix!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on July 26, 2005, 06:41:37 AM
Well, to be honest, it probably wouldn't be really difficult to be a more popular daughter-in-law than Marie of Edinburgh!  :(

But yes, Alix was just a beautiful person, inside and out.  Just love her... :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 26, 2005, 06:51:37 AM
Well, not all QV's daughters-in-law where as horrible as Marie. She adored the Duchess of Connaught, and it was her who set Leopold up with Helen of Albany. But I agree that Alix was indeed a lovely person. Has anyone seen the 1975 serial drama King Edward the Seventh (you might know it as Edward the King or In Victorian Days)? Alix is portrayed wonderfully first by Deborah Grant and then by Helen Ryan. It's well worth watching.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kevin From Australia on July 26, 2005, 08:00:47 AM
EDWARD VII - That was the series that first got me interested in Royalty - way back in 1975 - I recently bought it on DVD and was surprised how good it still was - and yes and how they portrayed Alix was very good.

I agree that the difference between Alix and Marie was that Alix was indeed content to be the Princess of Wales - in fact there was an article in Royalty Digest a few years ago by John Wimbles (I think) - he quoted from a letter from Marie written after QV's death - how Alix refused to be acknowledged as Queen until after the funeral, Marie and Louise Connaught insisted that she be treated like a Queen.  I will try and did the article out.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 26, 2005, 08:08:31 AM
Thanks, Kev. Can you imagine if Marie had been in Alix's shoes? The minute QV drew her last breath Marie would have proclaimed herself Queen of Great Britain and Empress of India! Wasn't one of Marie's biggest gripes the fact that Alix (princess of lowly Denmark) outranked her, the daughter of the mighty tsar of Russia? Ironically, at the Diamond Jubilee, she did outrank Alix as the wife of a German reigning duke. I beleive she's the only woman to ever be a Russian Grand Duchess by birth, an English Royal Duchess by marriage and a German reigning Duchess by her husband's inheritance . . . Ooops! I've deviated slightly from Alix. Sorry.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kevin From Australia on July 26, 2005, 09:02:23 AM
This is from an article John Wimbles wrote on Marie that appeared in Royalty Digest April 2001 -  It is a quote froma letter of Marie's to her eldest daughter.
"Naturally, good Aunt Alix out of false sentimentality, said she did not wish to be called Queen as long as she was at Osborne.  Too naif for words! But so they are here.  One would really think one was living among a pack of babies."

It is an excellent article as are all John Wimbles's, but now this has become a Marie Edinburgh thread instaed of a Alix Wales - so I stop!!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 26, 2005, 09:48:33 AM
On the topic of 'favourites', I beleive I once read that Leopold was Alix's favourite brother-in-law. He was only ten when Bertie married her. Perhaps he developed a crush? Didn't Affie hope that Bertie would turn her down so he could have her? I've sometimes read that it was only Alix's popularity in the late 1860s that stemmed the tide of republicanism in Britain.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on July 26, 2005, 06:14:05 PM
Quote
On the topic of 'favourites', I beleive I once read that Leopold was Alix's favourite brother-in-law. He was only ten when Bertie married her. Perhaps he developed a crush?.


When Alix first arrived in England, Leopold was one of the first to greet her, holding a bouquet of flowers. Alix surprised everyone by rushing up to the little boy, and picking him up in her arms. Imagine what Alix must have appeared like to Leo...he hadn't had the easiest of lives, with his illness, and the often harsh comments from his mother, then sudden loss of his father, and his mother's tormented grief! Alix's arrival was a breath of fresh air which the family and the whole country sorely needed. Imagine Alix with her childish sense of fun, I'm sure Leopold enjoyed every minute with her, and vice versa.


Quote
Didn't Affie hope that Bertie would turn her down so he could have her?


Yes, Affie did have a huge crush on Alix!  ;D So much so, that Queen Victoria had him sent away because she was worried things between the two would grow too heated! (On his part anyway.) And this was after Alix and Bertie were already married! At first, when Bertie was dithering over becoming engaged to Alix, Affie made no secret of the fact that HE would be more than happy to take Alix off Bertie's hands!  ;)

Quote
I've sometimes read that it was only Alix's popularity in the late 1860s that stemmed the tide of republicanism in Britain.


It was Alix's popularity, and Bertie's recovery from typhoid in 1871 (and the service of Thanksgiving which followed in 1872) which did A LOT to save the monarchy, in my opinion. Bertie being so close to death made many (QV included, I think) realise what they could have lost. It was almost a redemption, albeit a temporary one, from the negative press/scandals that his name had become associated with.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 27, 2005, 07:46:14 AM
Thanks for your contribution, Mrs Eddy. This is indeed an interesting topic. I was wondering if anyone knew how close Alix was to her brother Frederik, or her youngest sister Thyra? Anyone have any idea?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: bluetoria on July 27, 2005, 08:18:38 AM
 I think Alix had style & charm & was a great Queen, but as a person I think she lacked depth. Some of her comments about Thora of Schleswig-Holstein & the Edinburghs were very cutting & rather cruel. Here is what others said of her:

Drino:

She was so jealous of the English Royal Family that she never asked any of her English sisters-in-law to Sandringham, whereas she would fill the place with her Danish relations.

Queen Victoria :

...Spoils [her children] terribly.

...Is unfortunately most unreasonable and injudicious about her children.

...Is like a distinguished lady of society but nothing more

...Is quite a daughter to me.

...Is rather stiff and cold, and not what people are accustomed to.

...She is dear and good and gentle but looking very thin and pale

...I am sorry too for Bertie; I don’t think she makes his home comfortable; she is never ready for breakfast – not being out of her room till 11 often, and Bertie breakfasts alone and then she alone.

...so dear and sweet. She is a most loveable creature.

...A pattern of self-denial

...Is not clever and her feelings are so anti-German and yet so little really English that she is no real help – good, kind, dear as she is and much as I love her.

...Does not dress her hair to advantage just now, too high and pointed & close at the sides for her small head.

KR:  

She is 51 years old but looks 30. she is marvellously slim and her bright kind smile creates an enchanting impression.

Marie Mallett:

Her restlessness is alarming and her one idea is to be constantly travelling, she looks ill, so do her daughters, and I hear she dreads the possibility of reigning.  

Vicky:

“She is the sweetest girl who ever lived, and full of life and spirits…She has always been strong and healthy as possible and has never ailed anything in her life except having the measles…I own Princess A. of Holstein is the only one of these princesses for whom I feel portée – it would be dreadful if this  pearl went to the horrid Russians.”

I know she is not brilliant in mind or conversation but I respect her and look to her as she is so thoroughly good, straightforward and unaffected, so equal in temper, so pure in mind. She hides under a little stiff manner, the kindest heart…

To be intimate with her, one must see much of her; she never makes advances of her own and has nothing overflowing or warm or tender about her relations with others and yet she is kind and good and affectionate, and one cannot be in the house with her without loving her. She is never maussade or out of temper or cross or impatient; her household are very fond of her.

Princess Alice:

How glad I am to hear you praise dear Alix! She is so good tactvoll and true. I love her very much.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 27, 2005, 01:53:08 PM
Yes, I do beleive she was very cruel about poor Thora. And whenever a suitor was proposed for Toria she would appear to agree, and then later protest that she hadn't heard a word of the conversation. She never had much a rapport with Queen Mary, but then again none of George's family did except Maud and QV. I don't think she ever really left Denmark behind. They were such a close-knit family.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on July 28, 2005, 02:21:54 AM
Quote
Well, not all QV's daughters-in-law where as horrible as Marie. She adored the Duchess of Connaught, and it was her who set Leopold up with Helen of Albany. But I agree that Alix was indeed a lovely person. Has anyone seen the 1975 serial drama King Edward the Seventh (you might know it as Edward the King or In Victorian Days)? Alix is portrayed wonderfully first by Deborah Grant and then by Helen Ryan. It's well worth watching.



Yes, Prince, I have that series on DVD and it still hold up extremely well today, I believe.  Helen Ryan in particular is marvellous as Alix!

And like Kevin, seeing this series began my interest in the royals of this period.

Also, Bluetoria, your information on the family's various opinions on Alix is really interesting too.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on July 28, 2005, 09:23:30 AM
Quote
On the topic of 'favourites', I beleive I once read that Leopold was Alix's favourite brother-in-law. He was only ten when Bertie married her. Perhaps he developed a crush? Didn't Affie hope that Bertie would turn her down so he could have her? I've sometimes read that it was only Alix's popularity in the late 1860s that stemmed the tide of republicanism in Britain.


Leopold of Albany was also Marie of Edinburgh's favorite brother-in-law!

TampaBAy
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: bluetoria on July 28, 2005, 11:04:55 AM
...and the favourite uncle of the Hessians. He seems the sort of man whom everyone couldn't help but like.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on July 28, 2005, 04:46:45 PM
Quote


Yes, Prince, I have that series on DVD and it still hold up extremely well today, I believe.  Helen Ryan in particular is marvellous as Alix!

And like Kevin, seeing this series began my interest in the royals of this period.

Also, Bluetoria, your information on the family's various opinions on Alix is really interesting too.



I bought Edward the Seventh of VHS last year (not having the money for DVD [!]). Unfortunatley, I wasn't . . . around when it came out in 1975, but I think it still holds up extremely well nowadays. Annette Crosby is absolutely superb as Queen Victoria and Helen Ryan's Alix is charming and convincing - wonderful stuff. Back on topic, it seems that Alix enjoyed mostly amicable relations with her in-laws, but she was really closer to her Danish family. Was she fond of Nicky? Minnie was her favourite sibling.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on February 21, 2006, 02:33:54 PM
I'm using this thread - the other takes too long if one wants to post and one does!  ;D

I'm pretty sure this may have been one of the photos Vicky sent to Bertie (and QV and Albert) too.  I had the idea it was the one where Albert claimed "from the photograph, I'd married her myself..." but I could be mistaken.

I apologise as I think this photo has been seen and discussed elsewhere but, frankly, it'd take my dial-up more time than I have to find it.  >:(
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums//v667/Obesemia/ff_1_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Aliss_Kande on February 21, 2006, 04:25:22 PM
On the last post on the old Alexandra thread, someone said something about a scar on her neck.  I don't mean to be a bother but could someone please give me a brief summary about it?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Booklady on February 21, 2006, 04:40:30 PM
Thank you Grace.  Indeed, there may be three or four photos that Bertie saw, or perhaps Vicky requested.  One answer might lie in Vicky's correspondence to QV on the subject of a bride for Bertie.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on February 22, 2006, 11:25:34 AM
Quote
On the last post on the old Alexandra thread, someone said something about a scar on her neck.  I don't mean to be a bother but could someone please give me a brief summary about it?

I don't think it has ever been conclusively explained but it was said to have been a scar that had resulted from a childhood illness; scrofula was one such illness that has been suggested and there were fears in some quarters that it might suggest tubercular tendancies and therefore prove an obstacle to her marriage to the Prince of Wales.

However, QV was assured that it was merely the result of a neglected cold, although I have no idea what that means - whether it was a medical procedure that was carried out as a result of the cold or something else.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on February 22, 2006, 01:20:01 PM
For more information, Aliss_Kande, refer to the other Queen Alexandra thread.

The "scar" is dicussed in depth there.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Aliss_Kande on February 22, 2006, 04:27:54 PM
Quote
I don't think it has ever been conclusively explained but it was said to have been a scar that had resulted from a childhood illness; scrofula was one such illness that has been suggested and there were fears in some quarters that it might suggest tubercular tendancies and therefore prove an obstacle to her marriage to the Prince of Wales.

However, QV was assured that it was merely the result of a neglected cold, although I have no idea what that means - whether it was a medical procedure that was carried out as a result of the cold or something else.


Ok, Thank you.

Quote
For more information, Aliss_Kande, refer to the other Queen Alexandra thread.
The "scar" is dicussed in depth there.  


I don't need a long explaination, just a quick explaination, that's all.  And I got it, so now I'm happy.   ;D

Let's see some more Alexandra Pictures! :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: boffer on February 25, 2006, 04:55:50 PM
I wondered if we could possibly start a new thread on this topic as the first is extremely long now and takes time to load.

Does anyone happen to have a picture of the coronation portrait of alexandra that hangs in buckingham palace?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on February 25, 2006, 05:06:18 PM
Boffer, if you look down the index a little, you will see that a thread called "more Queen Alexandra" has already been started.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ChristineM on February 25, 2006, 06:12:28 PM
Now my head's spinning.

Please lets stick with Queen Alexandra Part 2.  

Unless, of course, we have any volunteers prepared to severely edit the previous threads down to at least a quarter of their lengths.

Perhaps the time has come to think of creating new threads for Prince Eddy and Queen Mary.

It must be very disheartening waiting for ages for these unwieldy threads to load.   It is a matter of consideration for everyone.

tsaria
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 25, 2006, 06:33:47 PM
Quote
Yes--I think we can draw several comparisons between her and Diana, beauty and fashion-wise.

Can someone post a photo or two of Alex and Affie together?  I know they were photographed together, particularly at the time when he had a crush on her, and they made a charming couple themselves.

Thanks!


(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/File0527w.jpg)

This is one of at least 3 poses--one with Alix, Affie, Eddy & George; the other with Affie, Eddy & George--from the sitting. All 3 were published in various contemporary magazines and in all 3 Affie was ID'd as Bertie.    :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ChristineM on February 25, 2006, 06:36:44 PM
Excellent.   Thank you grandduchessella.

tsaria
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 25, 2006, 06:41:38 PM
I'll try. I've got lots of good QM photos but I"m running dry on Eddy.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on February 25, 2006, 06:44:52 PM
Running dry on Eddy? Whatever will Grace and Mrs E do?  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 25, 2006, 06:48:01 PM
LOL We'll have to see. RoyalNetherlands is cornering the Eddy market.  :) I'm really scrambling now.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Booklady on February 25, 2006, 07:09:22 PM
Yes, thank you GD ella.  They do look very much alike here, don't they?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 26, 2006, 02:05:55 AM
Did Alix like Arthur ? I guess they were not close due to his chosing of a Prussian wife.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on February 26, 2006, 02:41:23 AM
Quote
Running dry on Eddy? Whatever will Grace and Mrs E do?  ;D


I'll probably start to develop some sort of bizarre withdrawal symptoms, I shouldn't wonder... ::)

But not to worry, people, there'll always be some unknown, unseen Eddy photo or personal item out there somewhere... :D :-*
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ChristineM on February 26, 2006, 03:34:34 AM
I doubt anyone will complain about seeing the same photographs two, three even ten times.

Duplication should not be a concern.   Never forget, there are new people joining all the time.   Why should they be denied the pleasures?

So... 'More of Queen Alexandra' please.

tsaria

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 26, 2006, 06:31:21 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80786_128529.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80792_128536.jpg)
family pictures :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 26, 2006, 06:35:20 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/10083765a.jpg) (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/10083766a.jpg)
With little Olav. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 26, 2006, 10:36:22 AM
In the Olav photos, it looks like the first was touched up while the 2nd was not.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 26, 2006, 10:41:20 AM
Yes I tought the same about the second not being  touched. ???
But why it looks that way I dont know, the pictures were taken at the same time. ( I think)
Mabye the run out of make up. ;) ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: B5218 on February 26, 2006, 11:34:30 AM
There is at least one studio photograph of Alexandra taken on the day of the coronation that was not retouched.  I saw it pre-scanner days.  Has anyone a copy?

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 26, 2006, 11:41:33 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/scan0003.jpg)
do you mean this one?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 26, 2006, 12:04:37 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra7-628945.jpg)
the retouched version.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 26, 2006, 12:56:53 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/nla.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 26, 2006, 01:03:32 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/queenalexandra.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/princessalexandra_in_costume.jpg )
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: brnbg aka: liljones1968 on February 26, 2006, 05:50:23 PM
Quote
Yes I tought the same about the second not being  touched. ???
But why it looks that way I dont know, the pictures were taken at the same time. ( I think)
Mabye the run out of make up. ;) ;D
 



almost from the very first printed photograph, there have been ways to make realistic (and unnattractive) images more flattering.   everything from filters to printing techniques ("burning & dodging" etc).     in all likelihood, the 2nd (untouched) image was never intended for general distribution, and indeed, may never even have been shown to queen Alexandra (or anyone else)....perhaps only being released after the studio's image archive/library passed into someone else's posession.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 27, 2006, 08:52:25 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/LouiseAlexandraQueenAlexandra.jpg )
With Louise.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 27, 2006, 09:06:56 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3665.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3665-h.jpg) (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3665_j.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3665_f.jpg) (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3665_e.jpg)
I just love this picture it is one of my favourits.
Espially Queen Alexandra,she looks so royal and the expresion is also verry beatifull.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 27, 2006, 09:10:00 AM
Quote


almost from the very first printed photograph, there have been ways to make realistic (and unnattractive) images more flattering.   everything from filters to printing techniques ("burning & dodging" etc).     in all likelihood, the 2nd (untouched) image was never intended for general distribution, and indeed, may never even have been shown to queen Alexandra (or anyone else)....perhaps only being released after the studio's image archive/library passed into someone else's posession.



Thank you fore the info brnbg aka: liljones1968. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 27, 2006, 12:08:48 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/gurutiek/alvm.jpg)
Alix with her girls


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 27, 2006, 12:10:51 PM
Royal_netherlands, the close ups you did (especially the one of Alix :D) are wonderful, thank you!  :-* :-* :-*
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 27, 2006, 01:20:37 PM
Quote
Royal_netherlands, the close ups you did (especially the one of Alix :D) are wonderful, thank you!  :-* :-* :-*


Youre Welcomme Mrs Eddy. ;)
Yes the one of Alix is one of my favourits of her.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Aliss_Kande on February 27, 2006, 07:58:27 PM
Quote
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/LouiseAlexandraQueenAlexandra.jpg
With Louise.


Is the child Alix's granddaughter, Alexandra?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on February 27, 2006, 08:13:25 PM
Yes, it is, Aliss - Louise's eldest daughter.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 27, 2006, 09:11:05 PM
Who Alix tried to marry to her nephew Prince Christopher of Greece.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 27, 2006, 10:52:46 PM
Can we watch the size of the photos? That's part of the reason that the other threads were getting so unwieldy. We've been asked repeatedly by the moderators and the FA to do so.  :-/ Here is what it says in the Rules:

GUIDELINES for sending us your pictures

2. Please use only 72 dpi image sizes and keep the image size to about 4"x4" as the images load to the size you make it. Bigger images would exceed the boundaries of your posting page.  

3. Keep the total file size down, please. Try to keep them no more than about 100k....large files, like 1meg, would slow things way down. we LOVE files between 40 and say 80k, but even up to the low 100s can work ok.




Yes, the one of Alix with Louise on the prior page also has Louise's daughter Alexandra Fife. It was taken on the occasion of Maud's wedding in 1896 at which Alexandra was a bridesmaid. This photo can be found in Geoffrey Munn's great book Tiara's. Louise, of course, is wearing my favorite tiara, the Fife tiara. Alix's is the Rundell Tiara, I think, but I don't have my book in front of me.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 27, 2006, 10:56:40 PM
I think Louise's tiara was still in the family... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 28, 2006, 04:06:55 AM
Regarding photo sizes, is the one I posted of Alix and her girls coming up really big on your screeens? It's quite small on mine, yet I'm wondering why the post is spaced out like that..... ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ChristineM on February 28, 2006, 04:56:45 AM
Your photo size is just fine Mrs Eddy.

I adore the size of photograph - and breakdowns of the photograph - posted by royal netherlands, but that is for purely selfish reasons.

Grandduchessella is absolutely correct.   Those huge images, wonderful though they may be, are impossible for some posters to load.  

We must consider every one.

Thanks

tsaria
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: B5218 on February 28, 2006, 07:10:38 AM
Another way to save computer "JUICE" is for people to be careful when they reply to a post with pictures.  It is not unusual to find a picture copied in each reply to a single post or the entire text of the original post to be part of the reply.

The IT staff where I work is very strict about teaching the correct way to reply.  It happened after someone did "reply all" on the wrong memo.  Everybody gets a lesson on how NOT to reply to email.

Those members who have a good connections will still appreciate receiving a link to the large version.  I have especially appreciated the quality of Royal Netherland's photo !


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 07:48:47 AM
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/hakimis1b.jpg
Well here you go.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 28, 2006, 08:19:16 AM
That's great RN--thank you.  :)  I hate to be such a stickler, but when I was temporarily exiled to dial-up land for several weeks, I couldn't bring up many threads at all so now I'm always aware of others with the same problems. Like tsaria, I love big images as well, just with a nagging sense of guilt.  :)  

I'll cop to occasionally quoting photographs though.   :(
I try not to (and to only quote pertinent parts of text) but it can be difficult when trying to make a reference to something in particular.  :-/  That's an additional side benefit of smaller pictures--if you do have to quote them, it doesn't take up much space.

Another photo of Alexandra with long hair taken soon after Louise's birth--again, you can see the toll her illness (rhematic fever) had taken.

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/queen%20alexandra/img577QAw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 08:34:25 AM
You're welcome grandduchessella, I will try not to post big images.
But don't be angry if I accidentally post a big image( which I did a the Queen Mary part 2).
Sometimes I just forget to give the address of the picture.
But I hope it doesn't happen  again.
I'm on the good way, I going to do my best. ;)  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 10:03:59 AM
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/00424.jpg
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/76676_124388.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 28, 2006, 10:26:50 AM
The above is one of the famed Alexandra Rose Days. That's Toria in the corner of the carriage, leaning over--she's partially obscured.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 28, 2006, 10:35:00 AM
Quote
 (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3665-h.jpg)  

The occasion was a 'Tree Planting' on the Sandringham Estate to mark the 61st birthday of King Edward VII on 9 November 1902. The location was near the 'Coronation Oval' in the centre of the 'King and Queen's Avenue', presented by the tenants, residents and work people of the Sandringham Estate as a 61st birthday present to the King. The Kaiser's visit to Sandringham 8-15 November 1902.

I'm sure Bertie couldn't think of a better birthday present that to spend a whole week with his favorite nephew.  :)



Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 12:03:23 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/1898alicehughes1xn.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 12:13:45 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alex-f.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 12:33:15 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/derhyeytsy.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 01:01:00 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/qualex02.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Q-Alexandra-rundell.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/prod_13277.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/prod_13230.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/prod_13228.jpg)
One of my favourit poses of Queen Alexandra.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2006, 01:03:10 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra10.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/rundell2a.jpg) (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/storbritannien20alexandra20av201844.jpg )
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/QA510.jpg)
Does any one has more pictures of these serie.
Are other poses in this serie because its one of my favourit serie pictures.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: boffer on February 28, 2006, 04:29:54 PM
The Sitting also included a group picture of Queen Victoria and Bertie.
(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e367/Bofferding/QueenAlexandra-BertieandQueenVictor.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 28, 2006, 04:34:43 PM
Those Victorians and their snazzy photo montages. You can see the shadows falling on different sides of their faces, most definitely a fakie!  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: boffer on February 28, 2006, 04:39:25 PM
it is from the archives of the  'Popperfoto Library' in a book i have had fore many years although not about royalty in its entirety it has some good pictures  . . . .  however i never studied it that closely and the shadows are different, could this not just mean there were a number or light sources?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 28, 2006, 07:25:55 PM
I don't think different light sources are likely....unless it was my friends, the little spacemen zooming by. Besides, I've seen this as three separate images, which may have all been taken on the same day, but Victoria, Bertie and Alix did not pose together.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 28, 2006, 09:03:59 PM
I agree...

I think Alix looked beautiful and innocent wearing that lovely dress with stars and the Dagmar necklace. I think it was the height of her beauty.  :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on March 01, 2006, 06:37:30 AM
There were some other shots from this sitting posted a few pages earlier, and I thought I'd add this one. Is it just me or is their disillusionment with eachother starting to show.....?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/gurutiek/walescouple.jpg)

The Victorian Diana and Charles. I wonder how aware Diana was of Alix's story, and how much they had in common.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 01, 2006, 09:50:55 AM
It very well could be, though I still think part of Alix's expression and looks in the photo has to do with her being rushed into being photographed when she was basically still convalescent.

She had to be perturbed with Bertie though. He was off partying in London while she was expecting Louise. He came home when she went down with rheumatic fever but soon grew restless. One Court observer (I forget who it was--a Ponsonby or Mallet maybe) remarked on how badly he was behaving. Alix, when she needed to be sleeping, would wait up for him to return. He certainly didn't provide much comfort during her illness or recovery.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Booklady on March 01, 2006, 10:36:54 AM
 :'(It's certainly a far cry from those engagement pictures when Alex was smiling.  I suppose the pictures were somewhat hurridly done so the public could rest assured that she was recovering.  But it is unusual that she left her hair down so untidy as she did.  She certainly looks drained.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on March 01, 2006, 11:15:24 AM
Quote
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/rundell2a.jpg[/IMG].


What tiara is this please? :) who owns it now?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 01, 2006, 03:05:42 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/queenalexandra-presentation1898.jpg)
A verry beatifull picture.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 01, 2006, 03:06:19 PM
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/queenalexandra-presentation1898.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 01, 2006, 03:39:44 PM
The tiara was part of a parure that Bertie gave to Alix as a wedding present. It consisted of the tiara, a necklace, earrings and a brooch. It was those jewels she wore on their wedding day. (There is a photo of the complete parure on page 3 in "Queen Maud of Norways wardrobe").
I think it is very unlikely that her children would split up the parure after Alix's death, and there is a photo of Queen Mary wearing the brooch in 1938. So I think the tiara and the rest of the parure was given to George and Mary. The necklace and the brooch was owned by the queen mother until her death. Since Elizabeth by then already owned the earrings, she probaly inherited the necklace, brooch and the tiara. (She has only been seen wearing the brooch once, back in 1972 on a state visit to France).

Of course, this is only my guess. But I think it's very easy to imagine that Bertie and Alix's children felt, that their father's wedding present to their mother, should remain in the reigning monarch's family.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 01, 2006, 05:56:11 PM
Yes, welcome!  :)

I think I read somewhere that QM decreed that wedding gifts (of jewelry) given to members of the family not be allowed to be sold? I don't know if this was grandfathered in to include any gifts given to QV or QA but with her love of history, it could have been. I don't think it extends past the monarch though as the Kents have sold wedding gifts, such as the Cambridge tiara.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 01, 2006, 07:10:00 PM
list of wedding presents from Bertie

pearl & diamond necklace formed of 8 circular clusters of brilliants, with a large pearl in the centre of each, and connected by festoons of diamonds; from each of the 3 principal clusters is suspended a fine pear-shaped pearl

a brooch of oblong form, with 3 very fine pearls set with large brilliants, and 3 large & fine pearls pendent

a pair of earrings to match (from Garrard)

a diadem of fine brilliants; the circlet is formed of 2 rows, with 10 large brilliants; it is surmounted by scroll ornaments having in the centre of each a large drop-shaped brilliant; these are connected by Greek devices, also in brilliants; the various pieces are made to form separate ornaments at pleasure (Garrard)

a waist-clasp, formed of 2 large turquoise, inlaid with Arabic characters and mounted in gold in Oriental style

(from the ILN wedding issue)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 01, 2006, 07:17:32 PM
wedding gifts from QV 'in the name of HRH the Prince Consort and the Queen, from designs by HRH':

a parure of very large and fine opals (which Albert was very fond of) and brillians, consisting of 3 circular brooches, pair of earrings, cross and bracelets (Garrard)

from QV:

(among other gifts)
The V&A badge, formed of fine Oriental onyx, with portraits of QV and Albert encircled by a border of fine brilliants, and surmounted by a crown of diamonds, with carved ruby cap (Garrard)

suit of Indian ornaments of pearls, emeralds, and diamonds, consisting of a corsage, pair of bracelets, and an armlet (QA was often photographed in this I believe)

From Alfred, Helena, Louise, Arthur, Leopold and Beatrice: an oval brilliant pendant, having in the centre 5 sapphires in the form of a cross, and a fine pearl suspended

from the Duchess of Cambridge: a flower-pattern brilliant brooch, with emeralds forming the centre of the flowers & buds

From Mary Adelaide: a bracelet with a clasp of enamel & diamonds

from the Duke of Cambridge: wove gold band bracelet, with blue enamel and diamond centre & plume (Garrard)

from Landgrave Wilhelm of Hesse & sisters--antique gold parure, diadem, necklace, bracelet, brooch and earrings

from her uncle the King of Denmark--the famed 'Dagmar necklace' which QA wore frequently throughout her life

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 01, 2006, 08:23:15 PM
Alix did not like the opals (whom she considered unlucky) changed.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 01, 2006, 08:32:00 PM
I think, based on the sketch & description in the ILN, that this is from Margaret of Connaught's wedding in 1905.

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/queen%20alexandra/queenalexandra1905w.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 02, 2006, 11:08:21 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Insight_jan03_focus_alexandra_large.jpg )
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 02, 2006, 11:10:17 AM

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/11a.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 02, 2006, 11:14:38 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alix20with20Alexandra20McDuff2C2018.jpg )
Thank you fore the info on the tiara Zanthia.
And welcomme to the forum. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 02, 2006, 11:24:43 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra8-388767.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80784_128528.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 03, 2006, 11:03:25 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/10083785a.jpg)
Thank you. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 03, 2006, 11:26:35 AM
This is a composite photo. QA's Mary Queen of Scots cap was drawn in...I think ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 03, 2006, 11:41:40 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra-courtdress.jpg)
I dont know???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 03, 2006, 11:45:41 AM
Notice the necklaces are different. The second one is clearly a portrait, while the first one was based on a photo.  8)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 03, 2006, 11:50:49 AM
Ok you win  ;) you are right the first one is a little bit wierd. ;D

royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 03, 2006, 11:56:56 AM

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/DagmarAlexandratobeEnglandRussia.jpg)
With her so beloved sister Dagmar.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ChristineM on March 03, 2006, 12:02:30 PM
Queens Mary and Alexandra (+ all the other privileged woman who echoed their style) were very fortunate they did not suffer from what I can only call body claustrophobia.  

I only need to look at those high necks and chokers to feel that is precisely what is happening to me - choking!

tsaria
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 03, 2006, 12:09:35 PM
Queen Alexandra wearing the superb Cartier choker necklace...The Ultimate Dog-collar ! My favourite piece ! Image seeing the beautiful Queen walking and her neck glittering...It must be quite a sight to behold !  8)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: emeraldeyes on March 03, 2006, 12:13:46 PM
Does anyone know where that large photo of Alexandra and Dagmar (wearing white dresses) was taken?  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 03, 2006, 12:14:29 PM
Quote
Queens Mary and Alexandra (+ all the other privileged woman who echoed their style) were very fortunate they did not suffer from what I can only call body claustrophobia.  

I only need to look at those high necks and chokers to feel that is precisely what is happening to me - choking!

tsaria

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/ryse.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/tiaranecklacediamondandpearlmaryast.jpg)

Yes I was thinking the same tsaria a while ago.
What where the doing to there self.
Poor woman( but the look beatifull do  ;D)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 03, 2006, 08:58:59 PM
The picture of Dagmar & Alexandra was taken in Denmark. There are a number of pictures of them together and with other family members at the same time. There are also a few poses in the polka-dot dresses.

Queen Alexandra's necklace was discussed once or twice before. Queen Mary wore it at least once (but not often) but it hasn't been seen in a very long time apparently.

Can we please not put pictures (unless very small) side-by-side? It's starting to distort this thread as well.  :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 03, 2006, 09:24:50 PM
Chokers are nice ! The late Princess of Wales also wore them early in her marriage with great effect !  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 03, 2006, 09:36:01 PM
Maud's looks rather extreme though.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: B5218 on March 03, 2006, 09:48:52 PM
There have been a lot of photos posted or linked lately for Q Alexandra and Q Mary.  Everything is black or white.  We can't discern the feeling of the dress since we don't know the color.  For example, the photos posted recently of Q A wearing the Rundell tiara, all those diamonds and a "black" dress.  Maybe a royal blue, maybe a dark rose ...

The only thing I ever read was that she wore mourning shades (lavender, grey, mauve) after the death of her son Eddy.

With the exhibit of Queen Maud's wardrobe and the subsequent color photos, we get a better sense of the woman.  I am looking forward to seeing QE II's 40's and 50's dresses, back from the day when the printing of photos in books and periodicals was usually in black and white.

Is there any authoritative reference to the gowns of these ladies which could tell us about their color preference?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ChristineM on March 04, 2006, 03:29:19 AM
These chokers and necklaces are absolutely magnificent and both women wore them to great effect.  However, imagine the weight, how tightly they were fastened to keep them in place and the length of time it took to fasten and undo them.   Along with the tight corsets they were tied into, both women really suffered to be beautiful.

I well remember the late Diana Princess of Wales wearing her choker.  I had a look-alike one.   Hers was a relatively simple piece of jewellery which was simply clipped on and off.

'Chokers' get their name from precisely that... they choke.

All I can say is they were fortunate not to suffer from 'body claustrophobia' -  they would have been tearing them off.

tsaria

tsaria
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 04, 2006, 10:27:10 AM
I think QA looked like Tatiana, the fairy queen with all her diamonds and pearls with her beaded dresses. QM looked more majestic than innocent in her grap.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: boffer on March 04, 2006, 01:21:42 PM
I think that although QA definately had the most amazing shoulders that showed off the many necklace that she wore to perfection, i however think that compared to QM she was somewhat ostentatious in her bejewellment, this is shown clearly with what each consort wore for their own coronations.
(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e367/Bofferding/QueenAlexandra-CoronationRegilia.jpg)(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e367/Bofferding/QueenMary-CoronationRobeswithregili.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 05, 2006, 01:25:52 AM
That is what I said...QA wore her jewels like props, while QM made them part of her.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 05, 2006, 04:42:50 AM
I think it's all a question of one's own personal taste, really.

I think both Alexandra and Mary looked splendid and entirely appropriate in their own very individual ways.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 05, 2006, 10:15:20 AM
Yes, but as this is Alexandra's thread and I am a fan of hers. SHE RULES HERE !!! Three Cheers for the Fairy Queen !  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 05, 2006, 11:24:42 AM
The only problem with QA's piling them on is it makes one go cross-eyed trying to identify some of the pieces.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 05, 2006, 12:11:25 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/images.jpg)
Look at the beatifull face. 8)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: boffer on March 05, 2006, 12:38:06 PM
I have just noticed that Queen Alexandra set the trend of wearing the central part of Queen Victoria's Stomacher and since then all consorts of the 20th century for their cornoations.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 05, 2006, 12:57:34 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra4-560147.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra5-344070.jpg)
Yes I see it never notiched it before, maybe it became some traddition wearing it at the coronation?
Well thank you fore showing boffer.
And talking about coronation here are two more.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: boffer on March 05, 2006, 02:00:04 PM
Does anyone have a picture of the coronation portrait of Queen Alexandra, which hangs in buckingham palace, on the previous page of this thread there is a section of it, i was wondering if anyone has a picture of the whole painting?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: B5218 on March 05, 2006, 04:45:19 PM
Besides going cross-eyed trying to identify her jewels because of the sheer numbers that she wore at once, I think that the retouching done of her photos taken in later years served to blur the detail.

Even little Olav looked a little blurry in the photo of him and his Gran posted earlier in reply 15 of this thread
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 06, 2006, 09:43:49 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Queen20Alexandra.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/QUEEN20ALEXANDRA27S20TIARA20II.jpg )
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 06, 2006, 09:44:14 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80801_128545.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 06, 2006, 10:54:26 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/bc129.jpg)

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AG2751.jpg)

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AG2750.jpg)

In these images Queen Alexandra is pretty old, and Im searching fore more of these quint of images where Alexandra is old.
Does some one have some more I would be verry happy if you would send them.
Thank you verry much allready. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 06, 2006, 11:22:11 AM
I think she was charming to the end...I would love to see one of Queen Alexandra and Marina. I suspect a private photo might exist of the two... 8)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 06, 2006, 02:59:02 PM
Royal Netherlands, thanks again!

The image you posted of Alix and her girls, with Louise's Maud and Maud's Olav is wonderful -- I've never seen one of them together after Bertie's passing -- this looks to have been taken sometime during WWI, maybe?

I've said it before but Alix as an elderly lady is a poignant sight indeed -- she has a resigned but dignified look about her but is still so beautiful, in my opinion, and so carefully groomed as always.  :-*
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 06, 2006, 06:09:32 PM
It wasn't during WW1 as Maud and Olav weren't able to visit during the war. I would guess maybe right after WW1 as Maud was quite anxious to return to England.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 06, 2006, 08:27:50 PM
Maud was always eager to return to her dower house in Sandringham (Appleton House) and visit her mother and sister (giving poor Toria a break from "Motherdear").
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 07, 2006, 06:56:24 AM
Quote
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80801_128545.jpg)


(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/edcfr.jpg)
This picture is taken at the same time wenn Maud and Olav visited granny in London.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on March 07, 2006, 07:03:01 AM
Unfortunately Maud looked rather like a Granny herself! (Ooh, bad of me, I know.  ::)) The poor Wales girls didn't age well, did they?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 07, 2006, 07:07:09 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/hanoverpix011.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/ThyraAlixDagmarGeorge.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 07, 2006, 07:31:21 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/bc129.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/bg131.jpg)
Look white her favourit dog.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 07, 2006, 08:35:39 AM
Please, please don't put larger photos side-by-side. I can't even view this thread without using the side-to-side scrollbar.  :-/

This was reportedly the last photo taken of Queen Alexandra before Edward VII's death. She was on vacation in Venice when she was summoned home due to the King's illness.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/32826451w.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 07, 2006, 08:46:08 AM
Im sorry grandduchessella. :-[
But thank you fore the picture.  ;)

royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 07, 2006, 09:26:31 AM
Queen Alexandra's coffin leaving Sandringham

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4320QAsfunearlw.jpg)

I think in this group it's: Bertie, David and Henry; Queen Mary; Queen Maud & Toria; George V

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4320QAsfunear2lw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 07, 2006, 09:40:54 AM
Quote
Queen Alexandra's coffin leaving Sandringham

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4320QAsfunearlw.jpg)

I think in this group it's: Bertie, David and Henry; Queen Mary; Queen Maud & Toria; George V

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4320QAsfunear2lw.jpg)

Woooh thank you fore the picture s grandduchessella.
thank you allot, you always got picture I never saw before.

royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on March 08, 2006, 02:34:00 AM
Quote
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80801_128545.jpg)


What a fantastic picture :) Is this takan at Marlborough House??

I agree the Wales sisters did not age well and didn't live particularly long either  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 08, 2006, 03:10:14 AM
Quote
Queen Alexandra's coffin leaving Sandringham

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4320QAsfunear2lw.jpg)


I think George's sadness is palpable in this photograph.  :'(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 08, 2006, 07:19:51 AM
I think Alix looked stylish towards the end. It was a personal style that worked for her only... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 08, 2006, 08:53:05 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/00435.jpg)
Yes she really was stylish until the end.
One of my favourite pictures of her.  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 08, 2006, 10:34:36 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/CCI00006.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/img442w.jpg)
Queen Alexandra at the wedding of HRH princess Mary.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Picture4022yorkwedding2w.jpg )
At the york wedding.
(http://[IMG]http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AG26D1.jpg)http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/wedding.jpg[/IMG]
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/1922.jpg)
At the wedding of lord and lady mountbatten.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Picture3589a.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AG26D1.jpg)
With her sister Dagmar George and May.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/wedding.jpg)
I just one to say thank you to the people how send some of these pictures.
Because I was searching for a long time for pictures of Queen Alexandra at her grandchilderens weddings.
So thank you grandduchessella, Mrs Eddy,emeraldeyes and Eric lowe for the pictures.
One thing  that caugth my eye Queen Alexandra wore the sames clothes at some of the weddings.

Anyway   Thank you ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 08, 2006, 02:30:13 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Roto1_127.jpg)
Princess Mary wedding.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Picture4023maudfifewedw.jpg)
At the fife wedding
Thank you gradduchessella ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 08, 2006, 06:04:32 PM
Quote
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/00435.jpg)
Yes she really was stylish until the end.
One of my favourite pictures of her.  

It was taken to commemorate the royal visit to Ireland, 26 April - 5 May 1904. Among her simple jewelry she wears an Irish harp pendant.


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 08, 2006, 06:24:37 PM
You're welcome RN  :)

Here's a blow-up of a photo of the York wedding--it's as good as I could get it based on the old material. You can see (from the right):

Dagmar (in light hat directly to the side of Bertie, the groom), QA, GV and QM (in white)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4317yorkweddingw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 08, 2006, 06:42:36 PM
another of her funeral

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4328qafuneralw.jpg)

Poor Henry (listed on the caption) got cropped out when I scanned. Olav's on the curve.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 09, 2006, 09:16:53 AM
If some on has some more pictures of Queen Alexandra at weddings of her grandchilderen please post them.
I would be really happy. :D


Thank you
royal netherlands   :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: emeraldeyes on March 09, 2006, 09:10:15 PM
Re:  reply 136

My pleasure royal_netherlands!  ;)  It's nice to share pics and info with others who really 'get it' if you know what I mean...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: B5218 on March 09, 2006, 09:15:49 PM
REGARDING POST 132 from Eddieboy-UK

Who is the woman on the left?

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 09, 2006, 11:27:13 PM
Quote
REGARDING POST 132 from Eddieboy-UK

Who is the woman on the left?



That is Maud (b. 1893), younger daughter of Louise, Princess Royal and the Duke of Fife.  She married the 11th Earl of Southesk in 1923 and died rather young in 1945.  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on March 10, 2006, 02:10:07 AM
It was royal_netherlands who kindly posted it, i just quoted it :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 10, 2006, 10:15:44 AM
Quote
Re:  reply 136

My pleasure royal_netherlands!  ;)  It's nice to share pics and info with others who really 'get it' if you know what I mean...


I get it emeraldeyes I hope we can keep on sharing. ;)

royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 10, 2006, 10:16:44 AM
Quote
It was royal_netherlands who kindly posted it, i just quoted it :)


It was my pleasure great you all like the picture.

royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 11, 2006, 05:32:13 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/71506_117402.jpg)
Here is one more, and thank you Eric.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 11, 2006, 05:39:24 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/pwmarr.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 11, 2006, 08:50:25 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/DSCN0023a.jpg)

Queen Alexandra at elder age white one of her doges.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 11, 2006, 10:52:08 AM
It was a popular image for mourning & commemorative postcards after her death. The National Portrait Gallery (which has a print) states that it was taken in 1921 by vandyk and was 'one of the last official photographs of Queen Alexandra, probably taken at Sandringham'.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 11, 2006, 10:57:37 AM
Thank you fore the info grandduchessella, I wish thier was a bigger version of the that one.

   royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 11, 2006, 02:23:16 PM
RN, thank you again -- I think that photo of the older Alex would nearly be my number one favourite.

How beautiful she was (and I don't care how touched up it was) -- at every age during her life.  :o
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 10:31:37 AM
Quote
:'(A lovely photograph, but somewhat sad, with a far-off, distant look and a wandering eye.  Touched up or not, she is still lovely.


(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/rwerwer.jpg)
Yes I know what you mean, Ive got the same whit this picture.
Does any one know when it was taken ans maybe the reason?
And has any one a bigger version of this portrait?

 Thank you already :)

 royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 13, 2006, 10:38:35 AM
I think that was taken around the same time as the photo above.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 10:58:42 AM
''Sisterlove''
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/ru-TwoSisters1874-large.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/1887.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandraolgaminnie9bh.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/19wv.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 11:02:21 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/MinnieAlix.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/dagmaralex3alexGat4ina.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AlixandMinny.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/19082pe.jpg)
Thank you fore people how send some of these images.
The really had a unic band whit eatchoter.
''Dagmar and Alix'' :)

royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 11:37:03 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexdagmar.jpg)
''Minnie and Alix''
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 11:37:37 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alixdenmark1844-12.jpg)
Minie and Alix are there more of this quint of pictures
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 12:55:43 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/68561_115320.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/minniealix2rz.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 12:57:09 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/DagmarAlixThyra2.jpg)
''Dagmar Alix and Thyra
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/thyradenmark1880-2.jpg)
And many years later.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 13, 2006, 01:08:24 PM
Quote

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/rwerwer.jpg)
Yes I know what you mean, Ive got the same whit this picture.
Does any one know when it was taken ans maybe the reason?
And has any one a bigger version of this portrait?

  Thank you already :)

  royal netherlands


There were a few sittings taken in the early 1920s and widely circulated, probably because QA appeared less and less in public and at official functions. Many of the images were then used to illustrate or commemorate certain events as in this edition of a postcard (slightly different from the above but same sitting)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/bq176w.jpg)

It helped compensate for the lack of current images.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/R5ww.jpg)

with a little bit different tilt of the head
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4280qaaw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 13, 2006, 01:17:44 PM
Quote
I think that was taken around the same time as the photo above.  ;D


Two years later apparently.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 13, 2006, 01:38:36 PM
Thank you verry much grandduchessella, I was searching fore a bigger version a long time. :)

 thank you  :D
royal netherlands  

PS ( Sorry fore beeing such a loser the last time at the   danish thread. ) :-[
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 13, 2006, 09:56:58 PM
Don't worry about it.

By the way, there's a copy up for sale now for less than $8.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 14, 2006, 06:23:18 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/QueenconsortAlexandra.jpg)
Yes really Eric.
Doesnt she look beatifull. :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 14, 2006, 06:26:52 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Alexandra202620grandson20Prince20Ge.jpg )
With her grandson George.
( photo not retouched)
But she still looks beatifull like she always did.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: B5218 on March 14, 2006, 06:52:54 AM
Does anyone have information on this tiara?

(http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d4/B5218/Unknown25th.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 14, 2006, 07:09:58 AM
Well I dont know much about it actaully.
But here is a collage of Alix.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AlixCollage1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 14, 2006, 08:14:00 AM
Too beautiful for words ! The one who looks the most like her today is Lord Freddy Windsor (Prince Michael of Kent's son).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: otmafan on March 14, 2006, 08:40:14 AM
Another pose with grandson George.

(http://img51.imageshack.us/img51/2568/bf1322tl.th.jpg) (http://img51.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bf1322tl.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 14, 2006, 11:23:23 AM
Quote
Does anyone have information on this tiara?

(http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d4/B5218/Unknown25th.jpg)


It's not in The Queen's Jewels so I wonder if it's not in the family anymore? It very well could've been a wedding gift to QA.

By the way, this photo (and the larger one by RN) are from Princess Louise's wedding in 1889 to the Duke of Fife. I had posted a bunch on the previous thread.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 14, 2006, 11:27:20 AM
Yes I remember them grandduchessella the were great.

   royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 14, 2006, 11:40:48 AM
This was from the other thread--it's the only one not over here as well

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/File1638alixcw.jpg)

It's nice how the satin neckline of her dress compliments the neckline of the bridesmaids's dresses.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 14, 2006, 11:43:16 AM
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4279qaw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 14, 2006, 01:10:19 PM
Wooooh Im happy now!!!!!! ;D
Thank you grandduchessella what a great picture and look at the funny dog watching really sweet.
Thank you verry much I really happy whit this quint of pictures. :) :)

  thank you

 royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 14, 2006, 03:13:29 PM
Quote
Too beautiful for words ! The one who looks the most like her today is Lord Freddy Windsor (Prince Michael of Kent's son).


I can't say I've noticed a resemblance there, Eric, but who knows.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 14, 2006, 04:42:10 PM
Not unlikely though since Eddy was supposed to resemble QA and her family (according to QV) and Freddie looks a lot like him. I don't really see the QA resemblance though.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 15, 2006, 08:23:02 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/0330001548_5mb.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 15, 2006, 09:53:04 AM
It was Robert Golden that enlighten me on the resemblence between Freddy and QA. I guess it was the eyes that did it. I try comparing photos and found a likeness... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 16, 2006, 07:05:49 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/07.jpg)
Princess Alexandra looking beatifull.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 16, 2006, 07:09:26 AM
There were a series of poses from that sitting. I think it was done in Denmark because there is a picture of her, Minny and Queen Olga all dressed the same as well as several individual poses and QA & Minny together (these have been posted before). Polka dot overload.  :P Her face is so gorgeous in this photo but I can't stand that dress.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 16, 2006, 08:13:40 AM
Quote
There were a series of poses from that sitting. I think it was done in Denmark because there is a picture of her, Minny and Queen Olga all dressed the same as well as several individual poses and QA & Minny together (these have been posted before). Polka dot overload.  :P Her face is so gorgeous in this photo but I can't stand that dress.


I can not say it is my favorit to. ;)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra1-255802.jpg)
But this is one of my favorits does any one knows when it was taking an was there a speciall reason?

  royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 16, 2006, 12:18:04 PM
Opening of Parliament maybe?

That dress (and I wish we had Martyn here) always looked so heavy to me with the beading. Does anyone know anything about what it was made of?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 16, 2006, 08:56:53 PM
It was the goddess photo to me...She look up to the minute in art nouveau... :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on March 17, 2006, 10:52:22 AM
Quote
Opening of Parliament maybe?

That dress (and I wish we had Martyn here) always looked so heavy to me with the beading. Does anyone know anything about what it was made of?


It looks to me like it could be a form of lame by the way the folds hang; too light for beading I think, although I could be wrong.  That kind of metallic fabric was around by the early 20th century.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 17, 2006, 10:58:42 AM
Metallic fabric--that's what I was trying to describe. My poor brain couldn't think of the phrase. (This is why I need Martyn and others knowledgable on the subject  :) )
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 17, 2006, 01:53:46 PM
 (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Collierresille.jpg) (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/QA514.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Queen-alex.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/1844-alexandra-1925.gif )
She is just beatifull whit this pose doesany one have more pictures of this pose?

thank you already royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 17, 2006, 05:23:05 PM
Quote
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Collierresille.jpg)


The waterfall brooch she wears here was later worn quite frequently by the Queen Mother. I think the tiara went to Maud and the necklace to QM (who was only photographed in one sitting wearing it as far as I know).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 17, 2006, 07:41:09 PM
The hard thing to research on Alexandra was her well known tendency to mix the real with faux diamonds and gemstones. I wonder what happen to the faux jewelry collection ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 17, 2006, 11:16:22 PM
The last photo posted of Alix is hideously retouched - it looks like it was done just with a pencil and totally mars her beautiful face.  :(  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: jyrkiboy on March 18, 2006, 03:45:41 AM
Quote

I can not say it is my favorit to. ;)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandra1-255802.jpg)
But this is one of my favorits does any one knows when it was taking an was there a speciall reason?

   royal netherlands


I think the occasion was the wedding of one of her Fife granddaughters to a son of the Duke of Connaught in 1913. I have a book, "Queen Alexandra" by Sir George Arthur, wherein a picture from the same sitting was listed as "At the Duke of Connaught's wedding, 1879" ::)! The author has apparently confused the occasion with the first Connaught wedding which was in 1879.
The style of the dress is definitely post 1900. I imagine the colours might have been silver and black or perhaps dark lilac. It was the time of her half mourning out which she never came out. It is a lovely gown all the same. Thank you for the fantastic photos.

jyrkiboy
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 18, 2006, 04:02:53 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/10_1_b.jpg)
Yes I think you are right about the colours her is a picture of her not verry clear do.
But it look like dark lilac ore silver anyway it is one of my favorit pictures.

 royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on March 18, 2006, 07:25:38 AM
Quote
The last photo posted of Alix is hideously retouched - it looks like it was done just with a pencil and totally mars her beautiful face.  :(  



She is also wearing a wig!!!

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 18, 2006, 10:05:42 AM
What the surprise ? A lot of women wore wigs ! From Mary Queen of Scots to Dolly Parton did that.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Margarita Markovna on March 18, 2006, 10:20:12 AM
Which photo is retouched? My computer is squishing them all onto the same line.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 18, 2006, 10:29:19 AM
Quote
Which photo is retouched? My computer is squishing them all onto the same line.


It's reply 203, posted by Royal Netherlands.  Photo on the left.  Awful doctoring of a photo -- but I'm sure RN himself is not guilty!  :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 18, 2006, 12:48:24 PM
No, it was just like that. I have a portrait of QA that was done in a commemorative set after EVII's death and it has that same dreadful 'black eyeliner' look to it.  :P

The Connaught/Fife wedding makes sense. She didn't dress up too much after her widowhood (except for family weddings and a few public events) but this would've been one. I'll have to dig out my wedding issue. I don't think it had any solo QA photos in it though, lots of Arthur & Alexandra.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: gogm on March 18, 2006, 02:14:40 PM
Alexandra had her official portraits touched up to conceal the effects of age. She also wore a hair piece to give that "poodle fur" look over her forehead. I recall someone commented about the consistency of her hair in her portraits

The touch up work shows in the high resolution photos shown here and on other boards.

She was an elegant and beautiful woman – regardless of the touch up work!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 18, 2006, 09:04:24 PM
Quote
Alexandra had her official portraits touched up to conceal the effects of age. She also wore a hair piece to give that "poodle fur" look over her forehead. I recall someone commented about the consistency of her hair in her portraits

The touch up work shows in the high resolution photos shown here and on other boards.

She was an elegant and beautiful woman – regardless of the touch up work!


She did, Gogm, yes, but I can't see her giving the thumbs up to this touch up disaster, can you?  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 19, 2006, 05:25:07 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/19230426qmum036yc.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/U162414INP.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU005553.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/weddinfdg.jpg)
Yeeeeh!!!!!! I found  four more pictures of Queen Alexandra at wedding of her grandchilderen.
The first one is at the york wedding in 1923.
dagmar is next to her and Queen Mary at the other sieght.   Almost the same picture grandduchessella send but just a litlle bit clearer. But still thank you fore that grandduchessella.
The second one is at Princess mary.s wedding in 1922.
You just can see her sitting.
The third one is at I believe Alexandra Fife wedding next to Queen Mary she looks great with that sort of coat of fur.The last one I dont know Mary ore York?
She wiers almost all the time at the wedding a sort alike fur scarf.

Well that was it royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 19, 2006, 08:05:02 AM
Are these the ones from ebay ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Keith on March 19, 2006, 08:16:56 AM
Quote

I think the occasion was the wedding of one of her Fife granddaughters to a son of the Duke of Connaught in 1913. I have a book, "Queen Alexandra" by Sir George Arthur, wherein a picture from the same sitting was listed as "At the Duke of Connaught's wedding, 1879" ::)! The author has apparently confused the occasion with the first Connaught wedding which was in 1879.
The style of the dress is definitely post 1900. I imagine the colours might have been silver and black or perhaps dark lilac. It was the time of her half mourning out which she never came out. It is a lovely gown all the same. Thank you for the fantastic photos.

jyrkiboy


(http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c256/fajack/Alexandra1913.jpg)

From the London Illustrated News - a drawing of the dress Alexandra wore to the Connaught/Fife wedding. It looks like the same one to me.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 19, 2006, 09:13:03 AM
The dress has a "Russianess" about it... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 19, 2006, 09:40:50 AM
Quote
Are these the ones from ebay ?  ???


No thier not from ebay. ;D

 royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 19, 2006, 09:43:05 AM
Love the picture thank you Keith and yes youre right Eric thier is something russian about it but I dont know really what..Mmm. ;)

 royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 19, 2006, 09:58:40 AM
The draping reminds me somewhat of the mantle to the court dress.

I did find a magazine illustration that has a photo of QA in the dress and it's from Nov 1913 and says it's the 'latest photo'. The Connaught/Fife wedding was in Oct so the timing would definitely fit.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 19, 2006, 10:04:50 AM
If you have the time and if you want will you post that picture grandduchessella?? ;D Please!!!!!

 royal netherlands :)

Ps yes know you say it yes it looks like the mantle of a court dress.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: gogm on March 19, 2006, 07:56:06 PM
Quote

She did, Gogm, yes, but I can't see her giving the thumbs up to this touch up disaster, can you?  ;)


No![/i][/u]
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 20, 2006, 08:11:39 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU051597.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU005261.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU028508.jpg)
1 Love this picture of Alix also so elegant even as a older lady.
2 With her grandson George.
3 With her brother the King of Greece.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 20, 2006, 09:29:20 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU051596.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU042906.jpg)
The second one of Minny she walks next to Alexandra does some one has the hole picture with Alexandra??

Thank you already royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 20, 2006, 09:44:46 AM
In the first photo above, you can see Toria to the far right of the photo. It was taken during WW1 as QA visited wounded war veterans. Despite her increasing withdrawal from public life, WW1 rejuvenated her somewhat and, for her age, she spent a good amount of time visiting the wounded and lending her patronage to various hospitals and ambulance corps. Having been lame for so long herself, she had a special affinity with these groups. While she was limited by age, these duties were perfect for her temperament and personality.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 20, 2006, 09:48:12 AM
full photo

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/33326152.jpg)

and from the same visit

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/32826411.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 20, 2006, 09:49:51 AM
with Minny and Toria


(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/00284371.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 20, 2006, 10:31:43 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AG26D1.jpg)
I know this image is send before( by grandduchessella) but I have a question (agian ::))does some one has a larger version much bigger because Im planning to use it fore my school paper on Queen Alexandra,s life so it would be verry helpfull if some one has a bigger version
If not I just yuse a other image thank you already. :)

  royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 20, 2006, 05:15:39 PM
Companion to post #229

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/picturetoriaalixminnyw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on March 21, 2006, 07:45:06 AM
Royal_netherlands, again, thank you for sharng your lovely photos on one of my favourite Queens.  :)

You are doing a paper on Alix?? How cool! Wish I had been able to do papers on Queen Alexandra when I was at school! Rather than, in my opinion, the boring and depressing second world war.

Maybe I wouldn't of got a D then!!  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 21, 2006, 07:49:31 AM
Thank you fore that wonderfull imge grandduchessella.
Here are some more of getty images, Queen Alexandra wenn she was older such great images :)

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3282618.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3165878.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3166490.jpg)
The first one with her sister the Dowager Empress.
he second one in the car with Toria.
The last one she is wearing wite clothes.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 21, 2006, 07:51:48 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3436733.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3135391.jpg)
On visiteds.
The last one great exprecssion.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 21, 2006, 07:53:07 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3282669.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3304940.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3097589.jpg)
With Toria on Alexandra Rose day.
Walking with her son.
Standing outside BP.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 21, 2006, 07:56:30 AM
Quote
Royal_netherlands, again, thank you for sharng your lovely photos on one of my favourite Queens.  :)

You are doing a paper on Alix?? How cool! Wish I had been able to do papers on Queen Alexandra when I was at school! Rather than, in my opinion, the boring and depressing second world war.

Maybe I wouldn't of got a D then!!  ;D ;D



It is my pleasure Eddieboy uk there are never enough pictures of Alexandra.
Yes Im doing a paper on her, but hardly any one knows her ( Its a shame ;D).
Well I love history verry much, including the second world war, but it is youre opion ;)ahahha

royal netherlands

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 21, 2006, 10:16:59 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU026202.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/SF14517.jpg )
Sorry this is better :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 10:26:50 AM
Another request to please not post side-by-side photos unless they're small--it's completely distorting the screen.   :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: dp5486 on March 21, 2006, 06:11:25 PM
Is there any pictures of Alexandra with Charlotte Knollys in her later years?

Besides Minnie and Toria, was Charlotte Knollys one of her constant companions?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 06:30:03 PM
Charlotte was just as indispensible to her. She, along with Toria and Sir Dighton Probyn (who I believe was her Comptroller) formed the nucleus of the group around her. Sir Frances Knollys served as EVII's longtime Private Secretary.

She was the first woman private secretary to a Queen and served as her constant companion. Among her duties was taking charge of all QA's private correspondence and in addition she had a key to Alexandra's jewel safes. Charlotte was the only person not of royal blood who could enter the Queen's boudoir without invitation. One time she saved Alexandra's life after a fire broke out and, in gratitude, she received an inscribed gold medal. She was entrusted by Queen Alexandra with the task of destroying QA's personal papers--a task she scrupulously undertook. Fortunately Queen Alexandra's letters to George V and Queen Mary survived this.

There are several pictures already posted, I believe, where you can see Charlotte. I'll try and located them.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 06:32:45 PM


In this photo:

Quote
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3135391.jpg)

you can see Charlotte on the very far right.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: dp5486 on March 21, 2006, 06:54:50 PM
Thank you for the link and picture! I was reading her biography and I did note that it said that Miss Knollys as well as Sir Probyn were very close to her. Is Sir Probyn the elderly gentleman that can be seen in several of the photos on this thread?

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 06:55:51 PM
Yes, he's easily identifiable by his very long white beard.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: dp5486 on March 21, 2006, 06:59:20 PM
I will have to take a long back and see if I can see him.

I have been wondering, was Alexandra very fond of dogs (especially lap dogs, like her sister Minnie)? I really liked the photos of her with her Pekingese.

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 06:59:52 PM
One of the best-known biographies--probably the standard one--of Queen Alexandra was by Georgina Battiscombe. I discovered that she only died in February of this year, age 100.

Here's part of an obituary:

Georgina Battiscombe was drawn to the subject of Queen Alexandra because she suffered from the same form of deafness, otoscelerosis, which had afflicted the queen, and was very deaf from the age of about 20 until she was 50. Two operations and a modern hearing aid entirely overcame this disability but, as she said, it gave her "some understanding of Alexandra's predicament".

As a royal biographer, Georgina Battiscombe was appalled by the way in which members of the Royal Family were frequently treated, decrying the sensational and the scandalous, rightly considering many royal biographies ill-informed, and noting that "so often the unfortunate royalties do not even receive common politeness from those who write about them".

She was born Esther Georgina Harwood on November 21 1905, the elder daughter of George Harwood, a former clergyman who left his calling to become a Liberal MP; he was also a master cotton spinner in Bolton, Lancashire, and an author and barrister.

Georgina's family was steeped in politics: her maternal grandfather, Sir Alfred Hopkinson, KC (the first Vice-Chancellor of Manchester University), three uncles and her stepfather, John Murray (Principal of the University College of the South West of England, Exeter), all served as Members of Parliament.

Georgina was educated at St Michael's School, Oxford, and at Lady Margaret Hall. She considered a political career herself, but instead she married, in 1932, Christopher Battiscombe, a lieutenant-colonel in the Grenadier Guards. For a time they lived in Zanzibar, where Colonel Battiscombe was Secretary to the Sultan; they then lived at Durham before moving to the Henry III Tower at Windsor Castle on account of Lt-Col Battiscombe's role as honorary secretary of the Society of the Friends of St George's from 1958 to 1960.

Georgina Battiscombe had become an author in the last years of the Second World War. Her best known books were a life of the Victorian romantic novelist Charlotte M Yonge (published in 1943) and a well-received biography of Mrs Gladstone (1956), which Sir Philip Magnus described as "beautifully written" and "distinguished by a rare insight which makes it a delight to read" and John Keble (1963), which was praised by Raymond Mortimer as essential reading for any student of the Victorian age - "carefully researched, sagacious and well-written" - won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for best biography of the year.

Her other books included Two on Safari (1946); English Picnics (1949); Christina Rossetti (1965), in which she contrasted the poet's religious observance with her artistic rebellion; Shaftesbury (1974); Reluctant Pioneer: The Life of Elizabeth Wordsworth (1978); The Spencers of Althorp (1984) [wonder what she thought of some of the sensational biographies written about Lady Diana Spencer  :-/ ]; and Winter Song (1992). She became a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1964. Living in Windsor Castle, and then for many years at Queen's Acre, King's Road, in Windsor, Georgina Battiscombe was a much liked figure in the Royal Archives, where she carried out research for her biography of Queen Alexandra.

She soon discovered that there was a surprising shortage of material. All King Edward VII's letters to his wife had been destroyed, and Queen Alexandra likewise instructed that her personal papers be destroyed, a task scrupulously undertaken by her ancient lady-in-waiting, Charlotte Knollys. Fortunately Queen Alexandra's letters to George V and Queen Mary survived what Mrs Battiscombe described as "this holocaust".

She discovered that Queen Alexandra's letters between 1867 and 1917 to her sister, the Dowager Empress of Russia, were in Moscow in the Archives of the October Revolution. But they were not made available to her, not having been deciphered or catalogued. Nevertheless, she soldiered on, securing interviews with the Duke of Windsor, two granddaughters of Queen Victoria and Queen Alexandra's surviving niece, Princess René of Bourbon-Parma.

The Queen's sad story was told by Georgina Battiscombe with what Raymond Mortimer called "exemplary skill"; and Colin MacInnes praised her for portraying Queen Alexandra with sympathy, yet without sycophancy, guiding the reader through the maze of Anglo-European dynasties, and using her subject as "a legitimate pretext for a most imaginative sociological portrait of an almost vanished era".

Georgina Battiscombe retained her keen interest in politics. In 1982 she wrote a letter to The Sunday Telegraph objecting to a leader which had claimed that "a high degree of national unity" existed in support of Mrs Thatcher's refusal to discuss the issue of sovereignty during the negotiations with Argentina which preceded the Falklands War. She and her neighbours, Georgina Battiscombe maintained, were "all but unanimous in their condemnation of the Government's unyielding attitude and its apparent willingness to go to war over the issue".

Until she retreated to Henley-on-Thames, Georgina Battiscombe was a regular attender of Sung Eucharist at St George's Chapel, Windsor.

Her husband died in 1964. They had a daughter, who married George Morshead, son of Sir Owen Morshead, Librarian at Windsor, and died in 1997.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 07:01:41 PM
Quote
I will have to take a long back and see if I can see him.

I have been wondering, was Alexandra very fond of dogs (especially lap dogs, like her sister Minnie)? I really liked the photos of her with her Pekingese.

Thanks again!


She was extremely fond of dogs. She also had some Borzoi (sp) dogs. She, like EVII and GV, always had a continual supply of dogs (and other pets) around. Sentimentalist that she was, she also had several memorials erected to them when they died--much like QV did.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: dp5486 on March 21, 2006, 07:24:02 PM
The only mention of the Borzoi, with any connection to the IF, is to Grand Duke Nikolasha. I remember reading in many dog books about their popularity during the early 1900s and found it odd that they are hardly mentioned.

Anyway, thank you for sharing the article on Alexandra's biographer. I know there is a biography of Alexandra at my library and I will have to see if it is by her. If not, I will have to see if I can track it down.

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 21, 2006, 08:00:16 PM
I heard there will be a new book on Alexandra in the works... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: dp5486 on March 21, 2006, 08:09:15 PM
That sounds interesting. I will have to keep my eye open to see when it's going to come out.

I posted this question on a thread under the Imperial Family but I think the answer may be better known here.

Does anyone know how many pieces of jewelry Alexandra left her sister the Dowager Empress when she died, if any. I was trying to figure out how many pieces Minnie actually took with her out of Russia.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 10:23:58 PM
All I've ever read is that QA's 4 surviving children (GV, Louise, Toria and Maud) divided the jewelry. Since royal wills aren't made public (as witnessed by us always trying to figure out what Charles might've inherited from the Queen Mother) any particular bequests might not be known. The jewels that MF brought out of Russia were detailed, in full I believe, in Lost Fortune of the Tsars and possibly also Vicent Meylan's The Queen's Jewels but it's been awhile. I think they were all sealed up in the legendary 'box under the bed' and no pieces sold off separately. Whether there were any additional pieces given by QA, I don't know.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 10:45:27 PM
Quote
The only mention of the Borzoi, with any connection to the IF, is to Grand Duke Nikolasha. I remember reading in many dog books about their popularity during the early 1900s and found it odd that they are hardly mentioned.


Queen Alexandra made the breed popular in England, as she was an early owner of the breed in England, one of the first being the Duchess of Newcastle who imported some of the dogs from one of the Tsar's kennels and founded the Borzoi Club in 1892. Alexandra received a leash of them from either Aleander III or Tsar Nicholas II in the late 1890s/early 1900s. QA was devoted to her dogs called Alex, who was the most frequently shown and an undefeated champion, Ajax who also won many prizes as well as one named Vassilka.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/c1_1_bw.jpg)

Queen Victoria also had a Borzoi, perhaps even as early as their first showing in Britain, in the mid-1860s, possibly given to her by Tsar Nicholas I. Edward VII, when Prince of Wales, also had 2 of them--Molodetz and Oudalska.

Since they aren't a breed that's very safe with small dogs, as their instinct is to chase anything which runs, her Borzoi must've put quite the fear into many of her lapdogs. She was also particularly fond of Japanese chins and was frequently photographed holding one (or more) or with some small dogs at her feet.

If you go here

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?theme=ANIMALS&object=40030&row=67&detail=about

you can see a Faberge Borzoi given to QA by EVII c.1908.

From that site:

"The painting Queen Alexandra with her Grandchildren and Dogs by Frederick Morgan and Thomas Blinks, shows the Queen outside the kennels at Sandringham in 1902 surrounded by a variety of dogs including a borzoi and two collies." This is that painting:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/ws_collie_barsoi_1641w.jpg)

Various members of the Russian Imperial family and nobility kept extensive hunting kennels of the breed and organized large wolf-hunting parties with the dogs. The most famous of these legendary Russian kennels was that owned by the GD Nicholas (who purchased the the famous Perchina Borzoi in 1817) and founded a very renowned kennel at Perchina and the best of the early importations into England belonged to this strain. GD Nicholas Nikolaivitch purchased the famous Perchina Borzoi in 1817. The famous "Bransgore" strain  in England came from the original Russian stock.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 21, 2006, 11:21:27 PM
"Contemporary accounts of the kennels by Lady Dorothy Nevill and Lord Knutsford describe how Queen Alexandra fed the dogs with bread from a flat basket and knew each of the dogs’ names and characters well."

Here's a photo of QA that seems to illustrate this (I think that's Dighton Probyn with her):


(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/balogh81.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: dp5486 on March 22, 2006, 09:39:32 AM
I was just curious about whether or not any of Alexandra's jewelry ended up with Minnie. The only thing that made me wonder about this was a passing comment on another thread about Minnie's jewelry and Queen Mary's possible jealousy about some of Alexandra's jewelry ending up with Minnie. Just suggests I guess.

Also, thank you for the great pictures of Alexandra and her dogs. I have always liked the Borzois myself (or Russian wolfhounds as they were known back then?). I have seen them in many pictures and drawing of wealthy women in the 1920s.

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 22, 2006, 09:51:05 AM
Mmm...interesting question. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 22, 2006, 02:50:25 PM
Quote
I heard there will be a new book on Alexandra in the works... ;)



Any further details, Eric?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on March 22, 2006, 05:55:35 PM
Hey, here's a query - does anyone know how Alix's relationship with her nephew-by-marriage the Kaiser was? I know she loathed Prussians in general, but was her relationship with him as bad as Bertie's? In 'Edward VII', the 1975 drama, he is portrayed as gallant towards her, whereas she is tactful with him - is this accurate?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 22, 2006, 07:25:20 PM
She detested Wilhelm II. He admired her (and considered her one of the most beautiful women he'd ever met) and constantly tried to curry her favor but he struck out on almost all counts--being a Prussian, being bombastic, treating his parents & siblings badly, even 'invading' Denmark and Greece on vacation and trying to ingratiate himself. She tried to avoid him as much as possible and didn't step foot in Germany if she could help it. I think she went on one of Bertie's visits to a dying Vicky but it took that kind of dramatic circumstance to get her there. There was hardly any royal who rejoiced in his downfall more than she. She wrote really scathing things about him to GV, especially during WW1.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 23, 2006, 12:31:32 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/cnp_ustroops_london_01.jpg)
With her son George watching the soldiers walking by.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 23, 2006, 12:40:57 PM
Quote
She detested Wilhelm II. He admired her (and considered her one of the most beautiful women he'd ever met) and constantly tried to curry her favor but he struck out on almost all counts--being a Prussian, being bombastic, treating his parents & siblings badly, even 'invading' Denmark and Greece on vacation and trying to ingratiate himself. She tried to avoid him as much as possible and didn't step foot in Germany if she could help it. I think she went on one of Bertie's visits to a dying Vicky but it took that kind of dramatic circumstance to get her there. There was hardly any royal who rejoiced in his downfall more than she. She wrote really scathing things about him to GV, especially during WW1.


Yes she detesed him I earlier send a picture, whit her expresion on her face when she stands next to him her is the group picture and I can tell you she is not that happy in this picture( from lafayette)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/3665.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on March 23, 2006, 01:04:52 PM
Yes, Alix detested Wilhelm, as did Dagmar. One only has to read the letters between the two sisters. The names they called him!
Preussia was always the "robber"state to them, and Wilhelm was for them the living symbol of Preussia and all that they detested.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on March 23, 2006, 01:08:45 PM
Thanks guys, that answers my question. ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 23, 2006, 01:56:46 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/2460_07_80.jpg)
With toria verry old
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/1940_06_50.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/364_19_30.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/761_07_15.jpg)
the last one are wenn she became 80 years old.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on March 23, 2006, 01:57:27 PM
Quote
Yes, Alix detested Wilhelm, as did Dagmar. One only has to read the letters between the two sisters. The names they called him!
Preussia was always the "robber"state to them, and Wilhelm was for them the living symbol of Preussia and all that they detested.


Have the letters between Alexandra and Dagmar ever been published.  I know that many volumes are in an archive in Moscow but didn't know if they had been published or translated since Georgina Battiscombe's time.  Any ideas anyone?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on March 23, 2006, 02:00:45 PM
RN - those pictures are great - it is unusual to see such close public images.  It shows how slender she was; the piture of her with the gold looking brocade dress makes her shoulders look very narrow, her whole frame must have been slight.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 25, 2006, 11:44:30 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/23481.jpg)
A beatifull Princess of Wales. :)

  royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 25, 2006, 09:31:28 PM
You can see that's she's wearing mourning still for Eddy. I don't think she removed the black mourning until shortly before George's wedding that year.

Wearing mourning for Queen Victoria during the first Opening of Parliament in the reign of Edward VII

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/alexandra6-2636181w.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 25, 2006, 11:26:31 PM
'Although the Sovereign of a great Empire, we can only regard the King today as a child sitting by the side of the mother he loved.' Mr. T.P. O'Connor, MP, at a banquet during the vigil for Queen Alexandra

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/File2033alixgeorgew.jpg)

'Regret to inform you my beloved mother...passed away peacefully...' GRI in telegram to Lord mayor of London

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/alexandraandgeorgec1889w.jpg)

'King George paid a beautiful tribute to Queen Alexandra's religious influence over her children in the reply which he gave to a query regarding his reading of the Scriptures. 'when I was confirmed,' said the King, 'I promised my mother that I would read a portion from the Bible every day, and I have kept my word.' '

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture3589aaw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Cunarder on March 25, 2006, 11:44:16 PM
A California Yank views these pics with delight and awe, and wishes to thank those who posted them, for taking him back to a time, place, and people that he never knew, but ones he dreamt that he could have been a part of.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 05:43:15 AM
Thank you grandduchessella for the beatifull words of GV, and the nice pictures of them together I try also to find some more pictures of them together.

     royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 05:44:44 AM
Quote
A California Yank views these pics with delight and awe, and wishes to thank those who posted them, for taking him back to a time, place, and people that he never knew, but ones he dreamt that he could have been a part of.


Thank you for youre beatifull words thank you.

   royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 06:19:38 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/george-v-moeder.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/george5britain-20.jpg)
1With his mother the Princess of Wales.
2With his mother his daugther and grandson four generations.
If some one has more with his mother send them please.

   royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 06:23:19 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/VV2557.jpg)
In the middle that is Queen Alexandra but it is not verry clear ;) does any one has a a better version of this picture would love to see it thank you.

    royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 07:19:44 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/bertiealix3.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on March 26, 2006, 07:50:01 AM
The above is a great picture.  Who are the children?

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on March 26, 2006, 08:21:39 AM
They are George V's children.

Left to right: Toria is holding little Mary, little Bertie (later George VI) is below, Alix is holding baby Henry (Gloucester), then David (Edward VIII) with Bertie (Edward VII)


P.S. This is my new post since the 'up-grade' and am I the only one practically going BLIND with this small, very light text?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on March 26, 2006, 09:29:00 AM
Mrs E.

No you are not!

Also, I can receive PMs but can not send PMs.  I will try Monday and see if I can do it at the office.  If I am successful at the office then the problem must be my computer.

Would someone please try and send me a PM si I can check my ability to receive.

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 26, 2006, 09:56:53 AM
Quote
They are George V's children.

Left to right: Toria is holding little Mary, little Bertie (later George VI) is below, Alix is holding baby Henry (Gloucester), then David (Edward VIII) with Bertie (Edward VII)


P.S. This is my new post since the 'up-grade' and am I the only one practically going BLIND with this small, very light text?

No, it takes some getting used to.

The picture was taken when GV and QM were on the months-long tour of the Colonies above the Ophir. The children were left in the charge of their grandparents. They are wearing mourning for Queen Victoria.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 10:13:54 AM
 (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/al7.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/alexand.jpg)
She looks beatifull. :o

   royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 26, 2006, 10:16:54 AM
No, it takes some getting used to.

TB--I sent you a PM.

With the above photo, they are wearing mourning for Queen Victoria. GV and QM had left for the months-long cruise to the various colonies above the Orphir. The children were left with their indulgent grandparents.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Cunarder on March 26, 2006, 10:36:54 AM
Royal Netherlands,

I especially enjoyed seeing your pic of the Princess Royal, Mary, holding son Gerald.   I've seen images of Mary in her youth and around the time of her marriage to Lascelles, but few from her later life.   Is there another thread you could point me to that has some?    Thanks again!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 10:48:40 AM
Quote
Royal Netherlands,

I especially enjoyed seeing your pic of the Princess Royal, Mary, holding son Gerald.   I've seen images of Mary in her youth and around the time of her marriage to Lascelles, but few from her later life.   Is there another thread you could point me to that has some?    Thanks again!


Thank you Cunarder yes I believe thier is a thread special about princess mary princess royal but I can not find it that fast on this moment( the forum is going rather slow at the moment)
Ive got a few images of princess mary in her later life I will send them wenn all find the speciall thread ok :)

       royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 26, 2006, 11:53:04 AM
There is indeed a thread on Princess Mary and has quite a few photos from her married life.

A photo of Queen Alexandra--presumably the last one taken of her, just a few weeks before her death.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4366qalastphotow.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 12:03:11 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/georgebertie.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/Picture4023maudfifewedw.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/HU005553.jpg)
Queen Alexandra at the Fife wedding, is thier a clearer picture of her at this wedding?
The first two pictures I got from grandduchessella, thank you fore that gdella. :)
Always wondered why are the laughing, we will never know I think ::)

   royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Michael_II on March 26, 2006, 12:07:53 PM
Quote
There is indeed a thread on Princess Mary and has quite a few photos from her married life.

A photo of Queen Alexandra--presumably the last one taken of her, just a few weeks before her death.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4366qalastphotow.jpg)

May be my eyes are going and I read the caption:  BUT that certainly looks like Queen Mary to me. :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 12:10:29 PM
Quote
There is indeed a thread on Princess Mary and has quite a few photos from her married life.

A photo of Queen Alexandra--presumably the last one taken of her, just a few weeks before her death.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture4366qalastphotow.jpg)

An thank you agian grandduchessella you made me verry happy agian thank you.
Great picture she really looks old and weak in this picture but she was strong untill the end. ;)
 
royal netherlands :)
                                  

                    
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 26, 2006, 12:14:21 PM
Well that is Queen Alexandra for sure, there is no doubt about it. :)

              royal Netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 26, 2006, 05:10:54 PM
(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/milla007.jpg)

This is my favourite pic of Alix. She's so beautiful here. And is just me, or does she have a small resemblance to Diana in this one?

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/milla017.jpg)

Alix and Bertie on their weddingday in 1863.

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/milla009.jpg)

Alix as newlywed.

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/milla015.jpg)

And finally my favorite portrait of her. (And the first picture that I ever saw of her.) Painted by Edward Hughes in 1904.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 26, 2006, 09:45:37 PM
I think this from the same sitting

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture3650qa2w.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Svetabel on March 27, 2006, 12:00:37 AM
Just a note:

I've recently received a copy of F.Dimond book on Queen Alexandra "Developing a picture". Alexandra was really a talented photographer!! :o I like her black/white shots.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 27, 2006, 02:03:02 AM
Yes, it must be. That's a nice one, Ella. I've never seen that before.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alicky1872 on March 27, 2006, 02:21:20 AM
Quote
Just a note:

I've recently received a copy of F.Dimond book on Queen Alexandra "Developing a picture". Alexandra was really a talented photographer!! :o I like her black/white shots.

She cerlatinly was! It was a pleasure to see her paintings, too. However, if it had just been a book of family snapshots, I would have been VERY happy!  :) My only complaint---not enough EDDY!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Svetabel on March 27, 2006, 06:41:32 AM
Oh , a book of  family snapshots--greatest dream for any fan of royal's pictures :) ! At the end of the book I read a list of Alexandra's photoalbums - I would have been VIOLENTLY HAPPY if I could see them! ;D ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 27, 2006, 08:59:44 AM
(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/Alix.jpg)
The first official picture of Alix as the future queen of England.

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/milla020.jpg)
Bertie, Alix and Vilhelm in 1863.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 28, 2006, 06:41:18 AM
 (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/Insight_Feb2004_Focus_Alexandra_lar.jpg)
Princess Alexandra in the 1880ties.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/alexsmiling.jpg)
Queen Alexandra around 1900.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/griner.jpg)
With some of her relatives in around 1910 I suppouse.
 (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/76298_123068.jpg)
 And on Alexandra Rose day with Toria almost a little smile.( 1920ties I think)

This are four images of Queen Alexandra showing her gracious smile, I always thougt Queen Alexandra had some quint of sad expression in her eyes after the death of her son prince Albert Victor,and it became worser after more tracic in her life.
I almost never saw picture of her in later life wen she is smiling, the first one I posted was the first one of her I saw wenn she is smiling in her later life. She looks really beatifull wenn she smiles, too bad thier are not many images of  her in her smiling in later life.( at least I never saw them).
Wenn she became older her expresion became much more sadder, but she still was a beaty till the end.
But wenn she smiled a piece of her old beaty from insited showed up, and then she looked like the same woman she was as in her early life.

     royal netherlands :)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 28, 2006, 07:04:15 AM
Woooh Zanthia great images, the last one I never saw before thank you verry much.
  
                                  royal netherlands :)
                  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 28, 2006, 10:01:09 AM
Quote
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/Insight_Feb2004_Focus_Alexandra_lar.jpg)

This is the photo that was chosen, very appropriately, to be the cover for the above mentioned book of QA's photographs.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 28, 2006, 10:13:52 AM
You're welcome, royal netherlands. Glad you'd like them  :)

I think she smiled often. If not, I'm sure her relatives would have mentioned it in their diaries or letters. On most photos of those days, people does'nt always smile. Getting your picture taken was a serious thing. As the times changed, and the camera became a thing you could own, the smiles was easier to capture. On almost all the photos were Alix is smiling, it's a snapshot, taken from the time when it no longer was nescessary to stand still for a moment.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 28, 2006, 10:32:23 AM
And speaking of photos; I'm looking for a certain picture of Alix. She is wearing a white dress and white hat. She's looking over her shoulder to the photographer, and it's taken outdoors. I think it's from the same session where she's holding a donkey with two large basket, her two sons are sitting in, because the dress look the same. I saw it in "A Royal Family", but haven't seen it in any book. I would be very happy if someone would post it.

Meanwhile, here's another painting of her. It hung in the lounge in the hotel I stayed at, when I was in London two years ago. It's a little dark, but I'll hope you'll enjoy it anyway. :)

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/Alixhotel.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 28, 2006, 10:52:06 AM
Quote
And speaking of photos; I'm looking for a certain picture of Alix. She is wearing a white dress and white hat. She's looking over her shoulder to the photographer, and it's taken outdoors. I think it's from the same session where she's holding a donkey with two large basket, her two sons are sitting in, because the dress look the same. I saw it in "A Royal Family", but haven't seen it in any book. I would be very happy if someone would post it.


Is it this one?

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/09e.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 28, 2006, 10:53:26 AM
Here's the donkey photo

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/44.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 28, 2006, 11:05:00 AM
another donkey pose

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/alexandrawith2childrenc1866w.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 28, 2006, 11:10:24 AM
other poses from the sitting

Alexandra with Eddy & George, who by the 2nd pose looks really mad

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/29084w.jpg)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/alexeddygvw.jpg)



Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 28, 2006, 11:12:22 AM
Sorry about the double-post. That's why I need to be able to modify.  :-[ Here's the one I meant to post

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/alixeddyw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 28, 2006, 11:21:48 AM
Yes, that's the one, thank you ella. I had a feeling you knew which one I was talking about ;)
The one were she sits with the boys haven't I seen before, or the one just with her and Eddie. They're wonderful, thank you ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 28, 2006, 11:33:18 AM
Quote
You're welcome, royal netherlands. Glad you'd like them  :)

I think she smiled often. If not, I'm sure her relatives would have mentioned it in their diaries or letters. On most photos of those days, people does'nt always smile. Getting your picture taken was a serious thing. As the times changed, and the camera became a thing you could own, the smiles was easier to capture. On almost all the photos were Alix is smiling, it's a snapshot, taken from the time when it no longer was nescessary to stand still for a moment.

Yes I think youre right about that, I also think she smiled often but to bad I has not been captured by camera more often. Thank you Zanthia fore youre wonderfull and clear answer too my sort of story ;)

    royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 30, 2006, 08:46:26 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/sff.jpg)
The two grandparents with two of thier grandchilderen Alexandra and Maud Duff.
  

                royal netherlands :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on March 30, 2006, 10:00:46 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/thyraandalexandradrawingroom7b.jpg)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/queenlouisedagmaralexandra8as.jpg)
I know the been posted before but still my favorit, because the picture is taken in thier homes.
At the second picture thier is the picture of May grandduchessella posted before.
this one.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/img099.jpg)
But I see more familar pictures hanging and standing in the room. ;)

          royal netherlands
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 30, 2006, 10:23:28 AM
I don't know if these have been posted before, but I don't recall having seen them.

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/alix8.jpg)

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/Alix7.jpg)
Alexandra driving the grounds at Fredensborg with her mother and Dagmar(?) (according to my informations, it's Dagmar, but I don't think it look like her :-?)

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/Alix6.jpg)
Another painting of Alix at her coronation

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/Alixanddaughters.jpg)
Alix and her daughters at Georg and Mary's wedding.


This thread is starting to be a little long. Should we start a new one?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: imperial angel on November 03, 2006, 04:33:06 PM
Yes, it is a good characteristic to have. Was not Queen Victoria also rather in the line of waste not, want not? I thought I've read stories about her where she seems like she was, anyway. I always thought that was one of the values associated with the Windsors, as well, or at least for some members of the family, it was so.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 03, 2006, 10:21:43 PM
Yes...She remained very middle class unlike her sister Dagmar.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on November 05, 2006, 04:15:39 AM
Royal Netherlands you are a  marvel!  I have looked at British Pathe before but never come across that particular film.  I loved it so thank you for posting the details.  The pale dress is one that I have studied at Kensington Palace but the black one is a bit of a mystery.  More leads  to follow up!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 05, 2006, 04:29:37 AM
Yes...She remained very middle class unlike her sister Dagmar.

 ???

I don't think so, personally. She refused to make any cut backs during the war on flowers and horses etc.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Prince_Lieven on November 05, 2006, 07:06:33 AM
Yes, I agree with Eddieboy - didn't she say that if she ran into debt, 'they' would pay? And then it was pointed out to her that it was unfair, since George V or Princess Victoria would inevitably end up paying up out of their own pocket. Doesn't sound very middle class to me!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 05, 2006, 11:34:48 AM
Yes, I agree with Eddieboy - didn't she say that if she ran into debt, 'they' would pay? And then it was pointed out to her that it was unfair, since George V or Princess Victoria would inevitably end up paying up out of their own pocket. Doesn't sound very middle class to me!

That's exactly right Prince! And Queen Victoria did wonder why Alix had so many jewels, more than she could ever wear. I don't think Alix was middle class at all!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 05, 2006, 12:30:19 PM
Queen Alexandra's dress for Alexandra Fife's wedding

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/clothes/image955QAsdressforAlexswedding.jpg)

It was "white net heavily embroidered with jet and steel. The corsage is trimmed with black tulle caught in with a jet buckle at the waist; the angel sleeves in the embroidered net."
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on November 05, 2006, 12:54:56 PM
Wonderfull image gdella!!! :o
Where did you get the image from, the ILN or a book maybe ???
Kate is so going to like this picture. ;D

RN
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 05, 2006, 02:16:28 PM
It's from the ILN wedding supplment for Alexandra & Arthur. I thought Kate might like it.  :) It looks like the dresses might have been put on display afterwards, or at least photographed. There was an immense public interest in the wedding. They showed the dresses of Princess Louise (Duchess of Fife) and Princess Victoria as well. Also Princess Alexandra's wedding dress and many of her trousseau outfits.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on November 06, 2006, 04:15:21 AM
Thank you so much gdella!  All images relating to Alexandra's dress are very gratefully received and I do not have any copies of the ILN so have not seen that before.  It is another gown that is not recorded in any of the museum collections that I know of so far.  I am intrigued as to the whereabouts of objects such as these.  Anyway, great picture!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 06, 2006, 09:21:46 PM
Indeed a very beautiful photo of dress...I wonder if it was one still at Kensington palace ot sold to the Met ???

Also Queen Alexandra still made her maids darn her socks and save money. Another time she cried at her birthday "All this...Just for me ?" at the many presents she got (something that the imperial Dagmar would not have bet an eye). I also don't agree that she herself bought a lot of jewels, she was given quite a lot (during her marriage and later by foreign head of state). In order to look more versatile, she purchased quite a few fakes when she was in Paris. She wore them with her real jewels with such distinction that nobody suspected they could be outwise.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on November 07, 2006, 02:24:03 AM
I think you make it sounds like Dagmar was a terrible spender. I don't think she was in private. When appearing as Empress of all russians, she was always dressed in according to her position, but in the private chambers at Gatchina, she seemed to have remained somewhat modest. It was'nt filled with expensive and fancy furnitures, and the rooms were not decorated in a way so that you would expect to find an imperial family living there. She once wrote, that what on earth she should do with her 400 rooms in Gatchina, when she never had use for more than two? She also took her time to get use to her new wealth, and kept using her simple danish dresses for quite a while after her wedding. At the Crimea, she was knitting socks, scarves and gloves for everyone in the house. No doubt that she loved fancy clothes and jewels, but so did Alix. And most other women, for that matter ;)

But to get back to Alix, she certainly was given a lot of jewels. Has the Queen ever worn the tiara Bertie gave Alix for their wedding? I know that the whole parure was inherited by George and May, since they all agreed that her wedding present from their father should remain with the ruling family. So the tiara must belong to QEII today.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 07, 2006, 02:31:45 AM
No...I don't think Dagmar was a terrible spender. However one should bear in mind that the Romanovs with its fable riches was very different from a Princess of Wales that have a nice but limited income. Dagmar would not be human if her head was not turned by all those riches. It however dawned on her when she was in exile, what she was used to was great indeed ! In fact quite a big amount of her income was for charity and given away. However that changed when she was in Denmark, when her nephew had to remind her to cut costs.

That piece was last worn by the Queen Mother. It is now in store.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on November 07, 2006, 03:03:45 AM


But to get back to Alix, she certainly was given a lot of jewels. Has the Queen ever worn the tiara Bertie gave Alix for their wedding? I know that the whole parure was inherited by George and May, since they all agreed that her wedding present from their father should remain with the ruling family. So the tiara must belong to QEII today.
I think you are only partially right about the wedding jewels...The necklace (of swag design with pearl and diamond clusters & pearl drops) was very often worn by the late Queen mother. The brooch & earrings were  often worn by the current Queen long before her mothers death..so obviously those pieces are now reunited...The tiara is another matter. It has not been seen scince Alexandra's lifetime...The current Queen of Norway wears a very similar piece  with or without maltese crosses. Queen Maud (Alexandra's daughter, the current Norwegian monarchs grandmother) wore it at George VI's coronation in 1937. As Alexandra's tiara had various different ornaments to add to the bandeau including Maltese crosses ( & fleur de lys) it could be speculated that Maud inherited this from her mother....There is no evidence to say that the tiara  has been in store in the English Royal collection for 81 years...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on November 07, 2006, 03:08:05 AM
Yes, Christian X was a bit of cheapskate. Queen Alexandrine burst into tears more than once, because she was horrified of his behaviour towards his aunt. And in Denmark, Dagmar continued to give money to the russian fugitives, she could'nt say no to them. Fortunate for her that George in England had given her an annual income.

Hmm, maybe we'll see the tiara again when William is getting married. I really like that tiara. And the necklace. I also like the Dagmar cross necklace Alix got from Frederik VII, but the Queen have only worn that once or twice. It's a pity, but then again, she has so much jewellery to chose from. I guees Alix had it a little easier when she should decide what to wear; she was wearing as much as possible, not just a single necklace :D. Lucky that she was one of the few in that era who could wear that much, without looking vulgar.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 07, 2006, 02:06:46 PM
This isn't anything important, just a bit of trivia:

I was reading an old Court Circular from 1920-1922 and it mentioned that the royal family had joined Queen Alexandra & Toria up at Sandringham for Christmas and were joined by, among others, Empress Marie and Queen Olga of Greece. What a group photo that would've been.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 07, 2006, 07:42:42 PM
Yes...I don't think I ever saw Queen Olga photographed in England with Alexandra. I saw them mostly in Denmark, Greece or even Russia. I found it strange since they do photograph those shooting weekends in Sandringham quite a bit.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 08, 2006, 09:45:30 AM
They were photographed together (along with Princess Andrew of Greece) at Princess Nina's wedding in London.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on November 16, 2006, 10:44:31 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Royals%20past%20and%20present/31680v.jpg)
Back to ''Alix'' here she is agian in elder age, with one of her beloved dogs.

RN :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Taren on November 16, 2006, 08:31:08 PM
Is it known to what extent Queen Alexandra retained her Danish accent after decades of living in England?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 16, 2006, 10:21:53 PM
She was known to have a thick accent...I heard that her grand niece Marina had a similar speech.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on November 17, 2006, 02:45:46 AM
She kept her danish accent all life. I almost shiver at the thought. I think it sounds so horrible with a thick danish accent when you speak english. The danish prime minister is one of the worst. I can be so embaressed on Denmark's behalf when he's on international tv and speaks like that. But most people found Alix's manner of speaking charming when she arrived. I don't know how they found it after a few years.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Aliss_Kande on November 17, 2006, 06:58:51 PM
Wasn't she deaf?  I think it would be hard for her to have a nice souding accent because of that and switching languages.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 17, 2006, 09:36:16 PM
I believe she could lip read. Unlike her niece Alice of Battenberg, she wasn't born deaf.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 17, 2006, 09:39:27 PM
She lost her hearing as she got older. It seems to have been genetic--Queen Louise suffered the same hearing loss. It wouldn't have affected her voice since she didn't entirely lose her hearing until she was elderly--it was a gradual loss over time. In her earlier years of marriage, it was just hard for her to converse with people when there was background noise, she was still okay one-on-one.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: alixaannencova on November 18, 2006, 04:03:02 PM
Granduchessella!!!


I beg....no I implore.... and grovel too!! Whatever it takes!! You kindly share a photo of Alix's divine 'Ballet Russe' gown from Alix Connaught's wedding and mentioned that there are photos in the ILM (sic....thingy! whatever it is called!!) of Louise Fife's and Victoria's gowns. If you could, would you scan and share them with us, please? I should love to see what they wore, particularly Louise's panoply, as you know I am a Louise fiend!!

lol

Alix
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 18, 2006, 08:41:41 PM
No need to grovel.  :)

Here they are:

Toria's and Louise's:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/clothes/image956ToriasdressforAlexswedding.jpg) (http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/clothes/image954LouisesdressforAlexswedding.jpg)

All 3:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/clothes/image953gownsforfifeconnaughtweddin.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: alixaannencova on November 19, 2006, 01:06:22 AM
Thank you so much Granduchessella!!!

I assume the one without the corsage is Louise's?! Does the blurb say anything about the colour etc? I imagine it was grey, embroidered with silver thread and a little diamante about the sleeves. Perhaps we should transfer this to Louise's own thread!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 19, 2006, 04:58:27 AM
Where are these photos of those gowns coming from. Were they exhibited ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 19, 2006, 01:08:23 PM
Thank you so much Granduchessella!!!

I assume the one without the corsage is Louise's?! Does the blurb say anything about the colour etc? I imagine it was grey, embroidered with silver thread and a little diamante about the sleeves. Perhaps we should transfer this to Louise's own thread!


I had ID'd them as Toria's then Louise's, but when I went back to get the descriptions, it seems Louise's IS the one with the corsage.

Here's what the issue says of the dresses:

Louise's was made of 'grey charmeuse with grey tulle outlined in paillettes of steel and crystal and a cluster of shaded roses at the waist'.

Toria's was made of 'pale apricot charmeuse draped over fine raved embroiderery executed in topazes.'

I don't know if the dresses were exhibited, like the wedding presents were, or they were photographed in the dressmaker's, like Ena's wedding gown was, prior to the wedding.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 19, 2006, 07:39:02 PM
I should think Alix dress should still be in the royal dress collections ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on November 20, 2006, 04:38:28 AM
Interestingly it is not one that is held in Kensington Palace or the Museum of London so the whereabouts of that particular garment are unknown.  Perhaps it may be in some private collection, although I haven't come across any mention of private collections of royal dress.  I'd love to be proved wrong!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 22, 2006, 07:25:08 PM
Maybe Maud took it back to Norway ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on November 23, 2006, 03:29:02 AM
There's a thought.  I haven't tried that particular avenue yet but probably should.  I am also trying the Danish museums for any leads there.  Thanks Eric for the prompt!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 23, 2006, 04:04:51 AM
You are welcome. The fact that both Alix and her daughter Maud were interested in clothes made me thought about that connection. Both Toria and Louise were not.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on November 23, 2006, 04:57:45 AM
You are welcome. The fact that both Alix and her daughter Maud were interested in clothes made me thought about that connection. Both Toria and Louise were not.  ::)

They weren't?  I understood that all the members of that family kept up with the latest fashions and always appeared well turned out?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on November 23, 2006, 10:46:26 AM
Yes the where quit fashionable I thought ???, Princess Maud was the most fashionable in my opinion.
But the other two sisters looked quit stunning and fashionable in the many pictures I saw of them.   
Maybe Maud had a bigger interest in clothes than the other two did, but the surely weren't walking in old rags. ;)
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/ToriaLouiseandmaud.jpg)
Toria, Louise and her daughters, Queen Maud in some of their exclusive clothes.

RN
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 23, 2006, 12:07:10 PM
Louise lost interest in clothes after her husband's death and Toria became a dud by the time of her mother death. Maud put on an ankle length mouning dress and looked chic. It was fitting that her dresses were exhibited as she was deeply into that.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 23, 2006, 12:57:08 PM
Louise lost interest in clothes after her husband's death

<Yawns> Reference please.  ::)

Louise looks very chic in her mourning, such a tiny waist!! :o :o
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Keith on November 23, 2006, 06:16:54 PM
I would imagine Maud's clothes were exhibited mainly because she was a Queen. Had she died Princess Charles of Denmark, I doubt that exhibition would ever have taken place. Louise and Toria looked dressed quite nicely to me in their older age.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 23, 2006, 07:21:46 PM
Well...Louise was a country woman with a retiring nature, Toria's taste was simmilar to her elder sister. Only Maud continue to put great emphasis on her clothes ordering from Courtier Houses in Paris (The House of Worth among others). If you had seen the exhibition (I saw in at the V&A last year), you can see how much detailed each garment has (and not only the ceremonial ones). In this Maud was as clothes consisious as her mother was (her two sisters were nicely dressed but not to that extent...I don't think you can describe them as chic).  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 24, 2006, 03:19:30 PM
Well...Louise was a country woman with a retiring nature, Toria's taste was simmilar to her elder sister. Only Maud continue to put great emphasis on her clothes ordering from Courtier Houses in Paris (The House of Worth among others). If you had seen the exhibition (I saw in at the V&A last year), you can see how much detailed each garment has (and not only the ceremonial ones). In this Maud was as clothes consisious as her mother was (her two sisters were nicely dressed but not to that extent...I don't think you can describe them as chic).  ???

Of course, Maud was a Queen!!! I was referring to Louise in her mourning in the pic above, very chic IMO. I wish you wouldn't post unless you are certain that what you are posting is correct.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: alixaannencova on November 24, 2006, 03:29:24 PM
I agree with Eddieboy! Louise was understated in her elegance, Toria was, absolutely gorgeous, even in the twenties, when duty commanded! Both inherited a degree of their mother's interest in clothes surely?

Why does no one care/wish to discuss Alix's true relaionship with her daughters proper? It should not be a matter of clothes....!?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 24, 2006, 03:37:36 PM
Thank you alixaannencova and good point! Toria was lovely looking I think they all were.

I think Alixs relationship with her daughters was very complex. She adored them when they were younger and spoilt them rotten. Apparently she didn't have a particularly high opinion of Louise (but was very impressed by her behaviour following the ship wreck). Apparently, at times, Louise kept herself and daughters at a distant which Alix found hurtful.

I think her relationship with Toria is difficult, she loved having her around but was that more for selfish reasons? Although when QV wanted to find Toria and Maud husbands, Bertie wrote that Alix found them great company.

Obviously she would visit Maud in Norway but she was not very sympathetic to Mauds homesickness.

I think her eyes were fixed on Eddy and darling Georgie!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: imperial angel on November 24, 2006, 05:32:33 PM
No, it should not be all about clothes. I think Maud was most likely the prettiest of the daughters, so maybe she suited what she wore better than the others. Maud did indeed have lovely clothes, and I think that she looked nice in them, and I have never seen more beautiful dresses than hers in old photos. Her sisters were not such fashion plates, it seems. None of the sisters were thought of as beauties..

As for their relationships with their mother, Louise married the soonest, so it is quite likely she had more of an opportunity to distance herself than her sisters. Toria was said to have been basically her mother's servant, whatever the love between them, and many people thought she didn't know much fulfillment. It seems that she might have been happy, but frustrated at times. As for Maud, she liked coming back to England, when I'm sure she saw her mother. She may have achieved some distance as well though, most likely wisely.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 24, 2006, 09:13:36 PM
I think Louise was the weakest of the bunch. Reportedly the plainest looking (according to quite a few books) of Alix's trio of daughters. Her wedding dress was admired for her plain cutting (I read that Alix gave advice on that as well). On the line of Princesses Royal, she was often overlooked in comparison to Vicky and to her niece Mary Harewood. As a Royal Princess married into Scotland, her Aunt Louise of Argyll, was better known and reconized than her. I am not saying that she dressed badly, but she did not shine as Maud did (even before she became Queen). Toria looked nice in her youth, but as she grew old, she look glum, bitter and tired (all wriiten over her face in pics). Toria also dressed appropiately, but you don't see her in a worth creation or so to speak. Maud on the other hand was more lifely in sentiment and loved clothes. Being a Queen gave her more an excuse to indulge in that (like Marina & Diana after her). She was also Bertie's favourite daughter being more lifely (he cannot stand bores) and sensible than her two elder sisters. Alix however loved them less in comparison to her boys (Georgie & Eddy).  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 24, 2006, 11:18:01 PM
It was a matter of usage, in my opinion. Maud was more of a public figure--her clothes became noticeably more chic after she became Queen--and had more of a wardrobe than her sisters. Toria and Louise looked very well-dressed when they appeared at public events but in their private lives appeared more content (at least Louise was) in more comfortable country clothes. Who knows how Toria's dress sense would've evolved if she'd not been reduced to being her mother's handmaiden and been allowed to develop her own sense of self, much as Maud did later on. Louise was rarely (by royal standards) seen in public once she was widowed but when she was seen she was well-dressed and her daughter Alexandra was a very well-dressed princess. There's no doubt that the sisters seem to have, for the most part, picked up on their mother's dress sense, but only Maud (and to a lesser extent Louise) had the resources and opportunities to carry it out on a public stage.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 24, 2006, 11:33:36 PM
True...Maud alsio had a more lifely and outgoing nature than her two elder sisters (capturing quite a few hearts). When Prince Nicholas of Greece heard she was engaged to Karl of Denmark, he was so jealous to ask why him and not me ? Also as her mother (Queen Alexandra) had shown, you don't need a big budget (although it does help) to look striking in public. When she was just plain Princess Alix of Gluckburg, her use of jackets was very effective and commended upon even by QV.  ;).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on November 25, 2006, 03:14:08 PM
I think it is also important to remember the importance that dress will have played to all of them in some sense, so it is not really so flippant to discuss them in terms of what they wore.  I admit I am slightly biased as this is my chief interest, but the study of dress history, especially in relation to public figures, can reveal a great deal about relationships.  It goes beyond just talking about nice frocks.  Luckily as an academic subject it is far more highly rated now than say the 1960s, but for someone like Alexandra and her daughters it is an extremely interesting angle to take.  In many ways, during this period before the moving image and mass media as we know it, the reports of what somebody like Alexandra wore and the stills images, which were so avidly read, viewed and distributed offered her a chance to make some form of statement.  For example, I am sure that Alexandra's insistence on Indian fabric for her Coronation gown, as well as making an Imperial statement, was also her chance to remind Bertie that she really had wanted to go to India with him.  It offered her a method of asserting herself, albeit discreetly.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Keith on November 25, 2006, 03:40:27 PM
About Queen Alexandra's coronation dress, she made a comment about wearing exactly what she wanted, and she wanted Basta. Does anyone know what Basta is, a color or fabric?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 25, 2006, 06:02:05 PM
Basta was an exclaimation she made--it means 'enough' and Alexandra used it to express that she'd had enough of the discussion and would wear what she wished.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on November 26, 2006, 05:45:18 AM
Alexandra was correct in her choice!  Her coronation dress is my favorite.  Her sister-in-law Louise was one of the few people she would ask her advice of in wardrobe and decorating matters.


TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Keith on November 26, 2006, 06:03:46 AM
Basta was an exclaimation she made--it means 'enough' and Alexandra used it to express that she'd had enough of the discussion and would wear what she wished.


Thank you.  All these years since I've first read that, I've been thinking material or color. Don't I feel foolish, although glad to finally know what she meant.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 26, 2006, 07:31:22 PM
It also illustrated that Alexandra could be quite headstrong and insisted on what she wanted. In this her insinct was correct, her coronation dress was breathtaking. I also think that Maud took a leaf from her mother experience in her own coronation dress.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: imperial angel on November 27, 2006, 08:40:46 AM
I think Maud had more of a flare for clothes anyway. Even in early photos, when she was merely a princess of Denmark, she is quite well dressed, with something suggesting that it goes beyond just doing it for position. Of course, the other sisters played less public roles, but they don't seem to have been interested in this type of thing very much anyway. Maybe that's just my thoughts. Toria was the plainest of the sisters, old or young. She was a rather sad figure. The other one was okay looking, but it seems to me Maud was the beauty of the bunch. I think Maud had the most personality as well, although Toria might have been more had she been allowed to have more of a life. Does not Maud seem the most like Alexandra of her daughters?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 27, 2006, 12:29:30 PM
Of course, the other sisters played less public roles, but they don't seem to have been interested in this type of thing very much anyway.

Don't you think so? Just looking at any photos of them gives me the impression they liked clothes. Toria wore some lovely gowns and hats and they both appear to make that extra effort IMO.

With Bertie and Alix as parents I don't see how they couldn't be interested in clothes! :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: imperial angel on November 27, 2006, 12:39:34 PM
Well, maybe when they were younger. I think they were both well dressed as befitted princesses in their position, they weren't exctly dowdy or anything. But neither of them shine like Maud in her lovely gowns. In short, they weren't fashion plates. I guess I haven't seen many photos of them in their later years, so maybe I don't know that part.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on November 27, 2006, 06:37:53 PM
I think Maud had more of a flare for clothes anyway. Even in early photos, when she was merely a princess of Denmark, she is quite well dressed, with something suggesting that it goes beyond just doing it for position. Of course, the other sisters played less public roles, but they don't seem to have been interested in this type of thing very much anyway. Maybe that's just my thoughts. Toria was the plainest of the sisters, old or young. She was a rather sad figure. The other one was okay looking, but it seems to me Maud was the beauty of the bunch. I think Maud had the most personality as well, although Toria might have been more had she been allowed to have more of a life. Does not Maud seem the most like Alexandra of her daughters?

That Toria was the "plainest" of the sisters is an opinion not necessarily held by all, IA, nor do all think Maud was the prettiest  It is personal preference only. :)  Quite a few photos of Toria exist in which I think it would be difficult for anyone to describe her as less than elegant and attractive, if not exactly beautiful. 

I feel sorry that the Wales girls seem to be only known for their looks being inferior to those of dazzling Mama... :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 27, 2006, 08:17:47 PM
No...Toria was not the plainest of the trio. Louise was ! It was the greatest surprise she got married. However she did had spunk. She told her parents that she would put her head in the stove if she was refused permission to marry. Louise wore nice dresses as a young royal (hardly worth mentioning that the three usually dress alike since girlhood-another idea of 'Motherdear" perhaps ?). After her widowhood, she appeared less in public and dress with less flair (unlike her mother who still dress sequeins in daytime). Toria also mellowed in middle age. Only Maud wore up to the minute clothes and interest herself with material and designers. If you compare her clothes with her sister-in-law May (Both Queens), you can see the change in design as the turn of the century arrives. I think anyone doubts what I said should buy a copy of the exhibition catalogue on Maud's dresses. I think there should be one of her mother's dresses, more appropiately in Kensington Palace if possible.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on November 27, 2006, 08:46:50 PM
No...Toria was not the plainest of the trio. Louise was ! It was the greatest surprise she got married.

Come now, Eric, you're surely not suggesting Louise was so ugly that it was thought she'd never marry?!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 27, 2006, 08:52:09 PM
No...But she was not expected to marry first. Anyway her plainess was referred to in many books about her resemblance to her father, rather than to her beautiful mother. But as I said I repect her spunk and insistance (Had Toria had that she would have escaped her fate as an old maid).  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 27, 2006, 10:33:29 PM
Well, she was the eldest daughter of the future King of England (and eventual Princess Royal), still close in line to the throne as neither of her brothers were married and who was closely related to a large number of reigning monarchs. I think the real surprise (to the casual observer unaware of the personal undercurrents in the family) was that her father agreed to let her marry an Earl--Fife wasn't created a Duke until the wedding day. Even her aunt Louise, the 4th daughter of a monarch, was engaged to a Marquis. It wouldn't be unreasonable to think that even if she'd been missing some teeth and had a wart on her nose that she could've married pretty well. King Edward had to content himself with helping to push Charles Denmark forward as King and marrying his nieces off to monarchs and future monarchs.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on November 27, 2006, 10:37:04 PM
After her widowhood, she appeared less in public and dress with less flair (unlike her mother who still dress sequeins in daytime). Toria also mellowed in middle age.

All the photos I've seen of her post-widowhood, at least her public engagements (few though they were), she dressed very nicely and with style. (Of course it's hard to go wrong with the fabulous Fife tiara, my favorite) As she preferred to live in the country and content herself with fishing, it's not unusual that she would dress for comfort. Her daughter Alexandra would come to wear more and more 'comfy' country clothes as she got older as well.

Like Maud, she maintained a tiny figure throughout her life. However, her face was longer and more doleful than Maud's (enlivened by her expression) and the thinness eventually aged her, in my opinion. Also like Maud, she wasn't adverse to showing a little ankle as the styles changed.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 28, 2006, 01:49:04 AM
Indeed...As her health was not good she was not as active socially as her Aunt Louise of Argyll (who took more engagements than her even though she had the more important title of Princess Royal). There were less of her. I think Maud must be a little vain as it was even rumoured that she had plastic surgery (incidently the same charge as her mother Alexandra (alongside her sister Dagmar)). I think in the persuit of beauty and fashion, Maud was Alix true heiress.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: imperial angel on December 01, 2006, 09:14:41 AM
It seems so to me. Maud wasn't very much like her mother otherwise though, she seems she was less demure than her mother. She was more assertive of herself, unlike Alexandra who wasn't really that. Alexandra was more of a quiet person than Maud was. Although she was a queen consort of England, she wasn't most likely as happy as Maud was. Maud had a better marriage, for sure. It also seems Maud was a bit more astute, although not more intelligent perhaps.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 01, 2006, 08:51:08 PM
I think Alexandra was very assertive of herself in many ways. Her confidence increased with her charity work. Demure ?  ??? Hardly ! She once told her attendent when she reminded her of her being late and her husband's anger at that it will "do him good to wait." She could be headstrong too. Once Edward VII told her she was not to join him in a pocession, she seemed to relent and stayed back. However once his carriage left, she ordered her own carriage and followed him anyway. Maud was very accertive too...but her only weakness was her shyness in public.   ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on December 01, 2006, 09:06:06 PM
It may have been quietly assertive but I think it's really more passive-aggressive. She rarely took EVII on directly but did things like say something to the attendant or come down late when she knew it bothered him and so on. Inded two of the most common P/A traits are ones Alexandra exhibited--*procrastination and chronic lateness/forgetfulness. Acting out this way enables someone to make a point or express anger while avoiding direct confrontation.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 01, 2006, 09:11:08 PM
She did it once to him too...while Edward VII was fuming waiting for more than half an hour for his wife. Alexandra came down beautifully dressed and bedazzled with jewels and asked innocently "Am I late ?". Her husband was so pissed that he turned and stated walking. I think Alix did it to annoy him since she had to take in so much.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on December 01, 2006, 09:39:06 PM
That's still passive agressive though. She knew how to infuriate him (and then acting innocent about it) without coming out and confronting him about the underlying issue. This seems to have been the pattern--whether or not she ever directly confronted him about any of his behaviors isn't very clear given the lack of first-hand information (letters or diaries) left by either of them.

Anyway, here's one of Queen Alexandra's dresses:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/yaeger21QAsmourninggown.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 01, 2006, 11:06:38 PM
I think Maud might have preserved some of her mother's letters to her, so that could be a sourse to look. Indeed Alexandra usually tried to keep the peace in the family, but she could be headstrong too if she need be. During the Danish-Prussian War, she openly supported her country and refused to meet the Prussian Royal Family whenever she could. She even had a row with her pro-German relatives so much so that QV had to ban the discussion in her presence. No...Alix was no demure flower.

Lovely dress ! Where did you find that pic ? Thanks for sharing... :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Katherine The O.K. on December 02, 2006, 12:48:03 AM
Personally, I always found Toria to be the prettiest of the sisters. Maud just looks so extremely thin, it's kind of disconcerting. But she did have excellent fashion sense!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 03, 2006, 05:28:31 PM
Toria was not ugly...but she had this sad long face look about her.  :( While Maud looks a bit more cheery and upbeat.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Katherine The O.K. on December 03, 2006, 06:32:46 PM
That's true. And if Maud was more engaging in life than her sisters, she probably would have been called the prettiest (personality and smile can go a long ways to making someone attractive.) She did have very magnetic eyes.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 03, 2006, 08:43:09 PM
I think that is why she was her father's favourite daughter.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on December 04, 2006, 06:22:40 PM
Was she?  Where did you read this???

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 04, 2006, 07:54:47 PM
In a few books about Edward VII. He liked Georgie and Maud ( "nickamed "Harry") as his favourite children.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on December 05, 2006, 10:08:57 PM
Card placed on their wreath (for Queen Alexandra's funeral) by George and Mary:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/image905w.jpg)

I believe it says, in the King's handwriting (except for QM's signature):

For darling Motherdear
From her sorrowing and devoted Children
George and May

George's signature may actually say 'Georgie', I'll have to check the original.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: joye on December 06, 2006, 03:19:53 AM

Basta was an exclaimation she made--it means 'enough' and Alexandra used it to express that she'd had enough of the discussion and would wear what she wished.   

   Prince Michael of Kent used this word [ basta] while interviewed for the video Father in law of Europe [ in the British section on his  great  grandmother Q. Alexandra.  I always wondered what it meant, now I know.  Many thanks.

joye
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on December 11, 2006, 10:00:20 PM
Wenn would this picture been taken?
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/28293v0fy.jpg)

We had discussed this on one of the older threads and tried to guess the date. I just received a magazine page from 28 Dec 1918 documenting the arrival of Maud and Olav in England to visit. I think that the above picture was taken on that trip--Olav looks the same as in the magazine.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 12, 2006, 01:32:26 AM
Yes...The sisters all looked quite similar in this photo. However once it enter into the twenties, the style of clothing began to change and Queen Maud's trendy up-to-the-minute gowns began to contrast those of her other sisters and sister-in-law (Queen Mary).  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on December 14, 2006, 05:22:25 AM
Look at her coat with contrasting muff matching the hemline..  Hemlines were on their way up in 1918.  Coats should be 3-4 inches longer than the dress.

Maude was fashion forward in 1918.

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: imperial angel on December 14, 2006, 10:53:03 AM
Queen Alexandra could certainly be a bit more individual, but her essential nature was more meek, in my opinion.She was very shaped by her upbringing that she had as a child because she grew up in very straitened circumstances as a child, for a young royal. Her father later ruled Denmark, but as a child, she was a minor princess, and she knew what that was like. She always had an appreciation for society and that kind of stuff, which she may not have been raised around as a child. But, she never really had a haughty attitude, or anything. She, and her sister both had more straightened circumstances as their background then most consorts.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 14, 2006, 08:43:22 PM
True although she was royal to her finger tips. She like May but consious of the fact that she was a product of a morganetic marriage (that is why her daughters told guests about May and "her Wurttemburg hands"). Her sister Dagmar was even grander being an Empress... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on December 18, 2006, 01:27:15 AM
(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/Insight_jan03_focus_alexandra_large.jpg)
Alix playing the piano.

(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/Insight_jan03_focus_lake_large.jpg)
Alix and Bertie.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 18, 2006, 02:10:13 AM
I believe that was taken at Norfolk during their honeymoon I think ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on December 18, 2006, 06:13:21 AM
The place I found it, said it's at the lake at Sandringham, but it doesn't looks like Sandringham to me, so I did'nt wrote that. I thought it might was Osbourne House. Anyone know?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on December 18, 2006, 07:30:00 AM
I always thought it was Sandringham before many of the modifications or the fire.  On a completely separate subject, could anyone tell me a bit more about Alexandra's grandchildren/descendents from her daughter Louise's line?  I am pretty certain that the clothes of Alexandra's that were auctioned in 1937 came from Toria after her death, so I am wondering if the three daughters were able to choose items from their mother's wardrobe after Alexandra died.  If so, it is possible that they may still remain with that branch of the family. Who are the current direct descendents?  I am not too hot on modern royals and you guys are my font of all knowledge so can anyone help?  Thanks!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on December 18, 2006, 09:04:28 AM
It is certainly Sandringham but it is the House before it was rebuilt by the Prince and Princess of Wales.(King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra)
At least that is what is says on the site of the Royal collection.
http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page1921.asp

RN
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on December 18, 2006, 12:13:12 PM
Alexandra had few descendants from her daughter Louise and they come, in the present day, from her granddaughter Maud:

Alexandra m. Arthur of Connaught--one child, Alastair; never married, no issue
Maud m. Earl of Southesk :
1) James Carnegie, 3d Duke of Fife (b.1929); m.1956 (div 1966) Hon.Caroline Dewar   
a) David Charles Carnegie, Earl of Southesk m. Caroline Anne Bunting--3 children
b) Alexandra Clare m.  Mark Fleming Etherington--1 child
 
Alexandra Fife's nephew James inherited the Fife dukedom since Alastair predeceased his mother; his eldest son has his secondary title (which came down paternally) of Earl of Southesk.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 18, 2006, 02:44:40 PM
Yes it is Sandringham before it was rebuilt and modified. The first one is Alix in the Salon I believe. There are photos taken infront of the same fire place of the Queen during that film they made on the Royal Family in the 60s. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on December 18, 2006, 03:17:36 PM
Alexandra had few descendants from her daughter Louise and they come, in the present day, from her granddaughter Maud:

Alexandra m. Arthur of Connaught--one child, Alastair; never married, no issue
Maud m. Earl of Southesk :
1) James Carnegie, 3d Duke of Fife (b.1929); m.1956 (div 1966) Hon.Caroline Dewar   
a) David Charles Carnegie, Earl of Southesk m. Caroline Anne Bunting--3 children
b) Alexandra Clare m.  Mark Fleming Etherington--1 child
 
Alexandra Fife's nephew James inherited the Fife dukedom since Alastair predeceased his mother; his eldest son has his secondary title (which came down paternally) of Earl of Southesk.
Thanks GDElla, that is a great help.  I had no idea.   Now all I have to do is find a way of making contact about Alexandra. 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on December 19, 2006, 08:47:21 AM
NYT 1912:

June 10. -- There was an almost incredible occurrence early this morning at Marlborough House, Queen Alexandra's residence. A man named William Woodley, 40 years old, an escaped lunatic from Norwich, eluded the special guard of police and soldiers, broke into Marlborough House and roamed about many rooms.

Rather reminiscent of her great-granddaughters experience decades later, though Queen Alexandra wasn't in residence at the time. Princess Victoria was, however.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on January 01, 2007, 10:31:55 AM
Regarding the looks of Alix & Bertie's offspring:

I think Maud had more of a flare for clothes anyway. Even in early photos, when she was merely a princess of Denmark, she is quite well dressed, with something suggesting that it goes beyond just doing it for position. Of course, the other sisters played less public roles, but they don't seem to have been interested in this type of thing very much anyway. Maybe that's just my thoughts. Toria was the plainest of the sisters, old or young. She was a rather sad figure. The other one was okay looking, but it seems to me Maud was the beauty of the bunch. I think Maud had the most personality as well, although Toria might have been more had she been allowed to have more of a life. Does not Maud seem the most like Alexandra of her daughters?

That Toria was the "plainest" of the sisters is an opinion not necessarily held by all, IA, nor do all think Maud was the prettiest  It is personal preference only. :)  Quite a few photos of Toria exist in which I think it would be difficult for anyone to describe her as less than elegant and attractive, if not exactly beautiful. 

I feel sorry that the Wales girls seem to be only known for their looks being inferior to those of dazzling Mama... :(

Recently found this pic of their Dazzling Mama on Ebay:
(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q276/coker10/QAofUKa.jpg)

Sadly all the girls took after Daddy looking like him in various stages of growing up.
(IMO) George V looks mostly like one of Alix's Danish brothers (can't recall which right now)
However, out of all their children, Eddy (imo) looked the most like Alix

Regarding Alix's voice:

She was known to have a thick accent...I heard that her grand niece Marina had a similar speech.  ???
She kept her danish accent all life. I almost shiver at the thought. I think it sounds so horrible with a thick danish accent when you speak english. The danish prime minister is one of the worst. I can be so embaressed on Denmark's behalf when he's on international tv and speaks like that. But most people found Alix's manner of speaking charming when she arrived. I don't know how they found it after a few years.
Think only Alix can pull this off !  ;)

I fancy she must have had a charmingly toned voice, after the same manner of Princess Diana's first visit to wales speaking welsh at a public
gathering.  The sweetness of it surpassing the effort.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 01, 2007, 10:37:28 AM
Welcome to the forum! Lovely pic - Alixs hair style so suited her. What does your user name mean??

 :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on January 01, 2007, 10:58:56 AM
Thank you for the welcome, Eddieboy_uk.

The username sums up what I think of the character of Alix.  (I could have used Queen or Princess Alexandra but feel that may have been taken so used Alix of Wales)

panache from the second definition in the New World Dictionary of American English: "dashing elegance of manner; carefree, spirited self-confidence or style flamboyance."

"The dashing elegance of manner" and "style flamboyance"  Yes, yes and yes!  Can look at fashion books of her and Diana Princess of Wales  books all day.  Plus they were both women who had a difficult lot in their royal life in terms of their men.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on January 06, 2007, 07:25:29 PM
Very interesting Alix! Thank you, had not heard of panache before!! :):)
Eddie in the 1970's (i.e.Before your time) there was a inexpensive perfume marketed in the UK (& perhaps elsewhere) called Panache !!!

I first saw Panache in a book about a successor to Alexandra--Princess Diana.

Not too much off-subject but has anyone tried buying a Bio on QA?  I bidded recently on Ebay--and was outbid! :'(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 07, 2007, 07:21:10 AM
Alix, I think it's about time someone wrote a new bio on Alexandra!! :) I have the Georgina Battiscombe one which is nice. David Duff wrote one too which is ment to be good but it's quite rare I think and hard to come by. I saw it once in a patients home and was very envious!!! ;D Besides their must be new information come to light since those biographies of her were written surely.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on January 07, 2007, 08:13:56 AM
Alix, I think it's about time someone wrote a new bio on Alexandra!! :) I have the Georgina Battiscombe one which is nice. David Duff wrote one too which is ment to be good but it's quite rare I think and hard to come by. I saw it once in a patients home and was very envious!!! ;D Besides their must be new information come to light since those biographies of her were written surely.



Tell me about that, Eddieboy. The bio I was bidding on was published by Hodder & Stoughton, London. in 1902!  The name of the work: The Life of Queen Alexandra by Sarah A. Tooley.  I wanted it for the 110 illustrations mentioned in the item.  Ugh, oh well, no use crying over diamonds fallen down an abyss.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 07, 2007, 09:08:12 AM
I know how you feel! I got outbid on a lovely looking book on Marie Feodorovna. Sickening! Such is the nature of ebay I suppose!  ;D

I'm sure if you scoure the second hand bookshops u will find the Georgina Battiscombe one. I've come across it quite frequently.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on January 07, 2007, 09:42:16 AM
I know how you feel! I got outbid on a lovely looking book on Marie Feodorovna. Sickening! Such is the nature of ebay I suppose!  ;D

I'm sure if you scoure the second hand bookshops u will find the Georgina Battiscombe one. I've come across it quite frequently.

Oh I read the Battiscombe book I think back in the 80's, Eddieboy.  It's excellent in terms of depicting QA's enormous popularity as POW.  The poignant was when she contracted Rhuematic (sp) fever. 

BTW  I think the baby in the following pic (off Ebay--ahhgain) is one of her boys as she was wearing her hair that way at the time:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q276/coker10/PoWwithinfantpossiblyGV.jpg)

I gasped seeing this--What a gem!


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 07, 2007, 12:40:24 PM
That is a lovely pic Alix - thank you sharing it. Have never seen it before! It could also be Louise as I think there are pictures of her with the same hair style too.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on January 07, 2007, 04:36:08 PM
It's Eddy. It was a commonly reproduced image at the time.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/10083762a.jpg)

I've seen the Tooley book--was outbidded once on it myself, actually--and it's pretty good. Many of the illustrations aren't of royals but of other people of the time, palaces, etc...There are some good ones of Alexandra's Danish family but only a couple I was unfamiliar with prior. Many of the illustrations of Alexandra and her British family are pretty well-known. If you can get it at a good price I'd go for it but it's not special enough to shell out a lot of money for it. The text is pretty flowery.

A much better Tooley book with over 100 full-page illustrations (unlike the other book, many of which are tiny) is Royal Family by Pen and Camera which contains a huge number of unknown photos by Russell & Sons (a well-known royal photographer). Some of the sessions are known but there are a large number of rare poses from them. Now that one I paid a pretty penny for.  :P It is very fragile. The only place I've seen it online actually doesn't have it anymore. I got outbid on that one on ebay as well but found it later.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on February 15, 2007, 10:06:50 AM
(http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i201/Zanthia1982/princesswales2.jpg)
Can't remember if this have been posted before.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on February 16, 2007, 05:17:24 AM
(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/ROYALTY%20and%20more/th_191115a.jpg) (http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/ROYALTY%20and%20more/191115a.jpg)


(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/ROYALTY%20and%20more/th_royal9.jpg) (http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/ROYALTY%20and%20more/royal9.jpg)

I hadn't checked this thread in a while and I found the picture of George and May's tribute to Alexandra at her funeral to be very moving.  :'( And I love the portrait of 20 year old Alexandra and her baby Eddy.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on February 22, 2007, 03:38:28 AM
Perhaps this has been up before, I can't remember, but what happened to the stars Alix is wearing on the photo where she and Bertie stands on each side of Queen Victoria? And did she ever wore them in her hair like Sissi?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 22, 2007, 04:02:39 AM
No...The only time they share a similar hardo was when she put her long hair up in ringlets. After she discovered the fringe hairstyle, she never looked back. Alice Hesse did wore diamond stars in her hair (as did her daughter Ella).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on February 22, 2007, 10:16:23 AM
I wonder what happened to Alix's diamond stars as well, I hope they are still with the British Royal Family and will be worn again.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 22, 2007, 05:35:30 PM
I couldn't find a photo of her with the stars in her hair but it would be surprising if she wore them that way. She seemed to really enjoy being a fashion trend-setter and emulating a hairstyle so identified with the Empress of Austria probably wouldn't appeal. She did wear the stars on her dresses on other occasions--such as Louise's wedding. She did wear hair ornaments such as diamond crescents though.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 22, 2007, 06:55:40 PM
Lots of Royal ladies wore diamond crecents including Alicky and Alix of Greece.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 22, 2007, 10:21:13 PM
Yes I know--we discussed it somewhat in a thread on Ella. They were very popular but QA rarely wore them either once they seemed to become too popular.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 23, 2007, 01:23:16 AM
I don't think she wore a lot of jewels on her hair. A tiara was pretty much it for her.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on February 24, 2007, 05:37:44 PM
Coronation picture by Tuxen

(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/Alixcoronation.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Marc on February 24, 2007, 06:07:04 PM
Lovely painting.Do you know who is the lady standing?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on February 24, 2007, 06:28:28 PM
I can't remember her name but I think she is a Duchess.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on February 24, 2007, 10:02:51 PM
Coronation picture by Tuxen

(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/Alixcoronation.jpg)

Alexandra was attended to by the Duchess of Buccleuch, the Mistress of the Robes, so it could likely be her.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 25, 2007, 07:41:37 PM
Yes...I think so too. Is she Alice Gloucester's granny ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Taren on February 25, 2007, 10:34:59 PM
Yes...I think so too. Is she Alice Gloucester's granny ?  ???

Yes.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on February 27, 2007, 02:20:05 AM
So it is Lady Louisa Jane Hamilton, wife of the 6th Duke of Buccleuch and 8th Duke of Queensberry? She was born in 1836 and died the year after the Coronation.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on February 27, 2007, 06:03:16 PM
So it is Lady Louisa Jane Hamilton, wife of the 6th Duke of Buccleuch and 8th Duke of Queensberry? She was born in 1836 and died the year after the Coronation.

I think she died in 1912, and was Mistress of the Robes to Queen Alexandra until her death.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on February 27, 2007, 06:06:54 PM
The coronation of Edward VII by Tuxen.

(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/Edwardcoronation.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on February 28, 2007, 06:44:25 AM
So it is Lady Louisa Jane Hamilton, wife of the 6th Duke of Buccleuch and 8th Duke of Queensberry? She was born in 1836 and died the year after the Coronation.

I think she died in 1912, and was Mistress of the Robes to Queen Alexandra until her death.

Yes that's right. I was muddled and thinking of the next coronation.  :-[
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: damaskrose on February 28, 2007, 11:30:28 PM
Alexandra-The sea-king's daughter as Tennyson called her...So beloved and so very beautiful.The coronation portrait of her was lovely.Was it done by Tuxen ??????-DR ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 01, 2007, 01:42:17 AM
Yes, he also painted the famous "Glücksburg Family Portrait", and two copys of it, since both Alix and Minnie wanted a copy, with a few changes. Thanks to that painting, and Alix and Minnie, Tuxen gained access to the english and russian court.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: damaskrose on March 01, 2007, 08:29:56 AM
His work was exquisite.Did he do the wonderful coronation portraits of Nicholas and Alexandra?The style looks the same,just so vivid.-DR
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on March 01, 2007, 09:53:07 AM
Yes, Tuxen did both the wedding and coronation picture of Nicholas and Alexandra.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on March 01, 2007, 09:58:19 AM
Another Tuxen portrait. This was in connection to the Fredensborg group portrait.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/wales1884.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: damaskrose on March 01, 2007, 12:15:44 PM
His work is nothing short of phenomenal,Thank you for these lovely pictures what a treat.-DR
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 01, 2007, 07:11:51 PM
Yes ! I got a book in Denmark of his paintings. Tuxen was a very good painter and does lovely scenes of everyday life in Denmark as well as nudes.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on March 01, 2007, 07:14:23 PM
His work is nothing short of phenomenal,Thank you for these lovely pictures what a treat.-DR

You are very welcome. :)

On another note, I fond the article published in the Times in 1858, naming the seven Princesses (we have discussed this in a now defunct thread) the paper meant Bertie had to choose his wife from, if they were to be Protestant and not older than him.
As the list goes in the Times:
1. Princess Alexandrine, daughter of Prince Albert of Prussia
2. Princess Anne of Hesse-Darmstadt, niece of the (Grand) Duke of Hesse and the Empress of Russia.
3. Princess Augusta of Holstein-Glucksburg.
4. Duchess Wilhelmina of Württemberg.
5. Princess Alexandra (daughter of Prince Christian) of Denmark.
6. Princess Mary of Saxe-Altenburg
7. Princess Catherine of Oldenburg, sister of the Grand Duchess Nicholas of Russia.
"Without venturing upon prophecy we are disposed to think that No. 5 will be considered the most eligible lady, Prince Christian being Heir-presumptive to the throne of Denmark."

Strangely enough it dosn't mention Elisabeth of Wied who for a long time seems to have been a strong candiate, or the Hanover Princesses, but maybe they were considered to young at this time. And Alexandra was for sure not the favorite of Queen Victoria at this time.   
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 01, 2007, 07:20:52 PM
Yes they were too young.

Elisabeth of Wied was considered for Affie and the Hanoverian princesses (Frederica & Mary) were considered for Leo & Arthur. ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 01, 2007, 08:57:17 PM
Elizabeth Wied was first considered, very seriously, for Bertie. She, like #6 on the list, Princess Mary (Marie) of Saxe-Altenburg, was later considered for Alfred.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 02, 2007, 01:56:44 AM
Alexandra wasn't even on Prince Albert's list of possible daugthers-in-law, but the six others was. It was only when Vicky suggested her, she was considered.


BTW, we all know how Alix felt about Germany, and Preussia in particular all her life, but how was her relationship to Vicky? I don't think it's been mentioned in any bio about her, at least not in the ones I've read. I know neither Alix nor Bertie was fond of Wilhelm, but what about his siblings, and Vicky's husband?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on March 02, 2007, 02:44:40 AM
Zanthia, I believe they enjoyed a good relationship which is hardly suprising as Bertie adored Vicky. Alexandra was disgusted at Willys treatment of his mother. When Bertie and Alix went to visit Vicky in August 1900 Alix wrote to Georgie "Aunt Vicky is always now suffering terrible agonies"  :'(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 02, 2007, 03:55:23 AM
Alix's realtionship with Vicky had its ups and downs. However she really was grateful that it was through Vicky that she was able to marry Bertie.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 02, 2007, 04:15:07 AM
Yes, poor Vicky, Willy treated her terribly. And from Vicky's letters to her parents during the search for a bride to Bertie, it's clear that she quickly became very fond of Alix, and her parents for that matter. Allthough Alix maybe was happy to visit her relatives in Germany, she was never happy to visit Germany itself. She must have felt a little torn. At one occasion, she refused to leave the royal yacht until the captain took down the preussian flag. And for once she lost her temper, when she saw one of the preussian princes (I can't remember who it was) wearing a medal he was given for his achievement in the war against Denmark in 1864. I think that happend during her and Bertie's first visit to Germany, and they only went because Victoria insisted on that they also visited Germany after they'd been in Denmark.
I can imagine her relationship to Vicky was good, as long as she didn't mentioned Sleswig-Holstein. But I can also imagine she may have felt it was a shame Vicky was married in Germany.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 02, 2007, 04:26:33 AM
Indeed ! However I think that Alix was more fond of Alice than Vicky. When Alice died, Alix said " I wish I was the one who died instead of her !".  :'(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 02, 2007, 06:54:30 AM
Another Tuxen portrait. This was in connection to the Fredensborg group portrait.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/wales1884.jpg)

Thank you so much for posting this. I have never seen it before without all the others attached who are in the bigger portrait.

It is just phenomenally beautiful. Such a great likeness of the Prince and Princess of Wales and their oldest son and heir. Tuxen has captured Prince Eddy's expression and his big bright blue eyes very well.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 02, 2007, 07:26:50 AM
Here is a big picture of Alexandra in her diamond stars that were discussed earlier. She was just so amazingly beautiful.  :-*

Click:

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/more%20ROYALTY%20etc/th_alexandra10.jpg) (http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/more%20ROYALTY%20etc/alexandra10.jpg)

Is it possible that these stars were passed to her son George, and then to his son George and then to Pss Alexandra of Kent, and they are the same ones she was pictured with???????

Did Her Majesty just have seven stars, or are there more she is not pictured with?

Also, can anyone give a definitive answer as to where this Tiara is now?

Alix is so breathtaking in this picture. Look at the brooches pinned on the lower half of the dress. She must have glittered so much.. She looks so youthful but she already had grown up children.  :o
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 02, 2007, 07:39:29 AM
And for once she lost her temper, when she saw one of the preussian princes (I can't remember who it was) wearing a medal he was given for his achievement in the war against Denmark in 1864. I think that happend during her and Bertie's first visit to Germany, and they only went because Victoria insisted on that they also visited Germany after they'd been in Denmark.


It was actually Fritz, Vicky's husband, who made one of his few less-than-tactful moves on that occasion. Overall, Alix was very fond of Vicky and Fritz--writing to her son George to never forget his uncle and what a good man he was, upon Fritz's death in 1888. Alix extended great kindnesses to Vicky in her last years and she attended either Fritz or Vicky's funerals, or both, I can't remember, despite her dislike of going to Germany and Prussia in particular. Vicky never lost her affection and admiration for Alix and the relationship, overall, was a good one despite the very difficult period around the Schleswig-Holstein war.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Michael II on March 02, 2007, 06:04:18 PM
Queen Alexandra attended both the funerals of Emperor Friedrich III and Empress Friedrich.  If you have access to the London Times archives there is an indepth descriptions of both events.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 03, 2007, 03:00:39 AM

Is it possible that these stars were passed to her son George, and then to his son George and then to Pss Alexandra of Kent, and they are the same ones she was pictured with???????


The stars are not mentioned in the book "The Queen's Jewels" (and neither are the tiara, unfortunately), but do you have a picture of Pss A of Kent wearing those stars? Stars like that were very popular in the last half of 19th century, not least thanks to Empress Elisabeth. Alix's sister-in-law, crownpss Lovisa of Denmark also had some similar stars.

I love that pic of Alix. She was one of the few in that era who could wear huge amounts of jewels, without looking vulgar. I've always thought that even though she looked like a million on her coronation day, it was a little too much with all those jewels. At that picture she's very elegant and royal, and not wearing too many or to few jewels.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 03, 2007, 03:08:52 AM


It was actually Fritz, Vicky's husband, who made one of his few less-than-tactful moves on that occasion. [/quote]

Yes, I belived it was him, but I wasn't sure. It was very thougtless of him, but I don't think he did it to insult Alix. He probably wore the medal often, and just did'nt thought about it.

She bore them no personal grudges unlike Wilhelm I, Bismark or rven Willy...
It wasn't in her nature to hold a grudge against someone. That's one of the things I love about her. She was more the "forgive and forget"-type of person.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 03, 2007, 04:17:01 AM

Is it possible that these stars were passed to her son George, and then to his son George and then to Pss Alexandra of Kent, and they are the same ones she was pictured with???????


The stars are not mentioned in the book "The Queen's Jewels" (and neither are the tiara, unfortunately), but do you have a picture of Pss A of Kent wearing those stars? Stars like that were very popular in the last half of 19th century, not least thanks to Empress Elisabeth. Alix's sister-in-law, crownpss Lovisa of Denmark also had some similar stars.

I love that pic of Alix. She was one of the few in that era who could wear huge amounts of jewels, without looking vulgar. I've always thought that even though she looked like a million on her coronation day, it was a little too much with all those jewels. At that picture she's very elegant and royal, and not wearing too many or to few jewels.

Alexandra's parure that Bertie gave her upon marriage including the tiara is an important one, so I don't think the Royal Family would have let it pass out to another branch or sold it. Hopefully it will just appear again soon.

The stars ... I posted a small photo of Alexandra of Kent wearing them, but I can't remember where so here it is again - (http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/more%20ROYALTY%20etc/alexandrah.jpg?t=1172916888)

Oh no, I can see they are not the same - Princess Alexandra's are five pointed and Queen Alexandra's are eight pointed. So the mystery of Alexandra's stars continues.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 04, 2007, 07:40:55 PM
I think Princess Alexandra's stars came from Queen Olga of Greece's collection. I saw a Cabinet card of her wearing them. It could have been left to Marina in her will.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 05, 2007, 02:44:55 AM
Definitely maybe. But what of Q. Alix's stars. Where are they now?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 05, 2007, 04:09:24 AM
From what I read, they could well been fakes. As QV (like Diana after her) liked to wear real jewels with fakes for effect. The only fashion consious daughter of Alix appeared to be Maud, she could have taken them and kept them as a momentoes. It would make sense as Queen Mary usually kept jewels with historical significance. QA's fakes from Paris would not suit her at all.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 05, 2007, 06:15:39 AM
I don't think the Diamond Stars were fakes. No way. QA wore them at too important occasions for them to be fakes I think. They were too beautiful!  ;) I think they are probably still in the Royal Collection, in the vault. Stars are not really the current Queen's style, so maybe they are just there languishing.   :-\
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 05, 2007, 07:54:41 PM
Well...I think QM might have wore them if they were real or given them away to her various daughter-in-laws (Marina for one would have loved to wear them if she were given that). I think that QA would have loved a joke that she wore fakes to important events and nobody found out ! It would have been in tune with QA's sense of riducle. I think that most likely that they would have been taken by Maud to Norway.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 06, 2007, 06:25:25 AM
If they were taken to Norway, did we ever see Queen Maud of Norway or any Norweigan royal lady wear them?

Not that I can recall. I don't think they went to Norway.

Maybe the Fifes have them? Probably not. Maybe they were sold. I hope not!  >:(

If they were fake, it is a bit odd that she wore as her most important ornament something fake to Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee, which is the occasion the photos I posted of her in the stars is from.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on March 06, 2007, 06:35:46 AM
! It would have been in tune with QA's sense of riducle. I think that most likely that they would have been taken by Maud to Norway.  :P

What do you base that on please Eric? They could be a million places. In the vaults, sold by Toria, owned by one of the fife girls, given as a personal bequest to a friend....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 06, 2007, 06:46:18 AM
That's right. Maybe they were inherited by Toria and she left them to someone we don't easily think of? Just another suggestion.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on March 06, 2007, 08:23:45 AM
Queen Alexandra was known in her later years for just giving away various items to servants and friends, even people she hardly knew.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 06, 2007, 10:00:01 AM
Maybe Alix gave away each star to a different person? We are just speculating though, we don't know where they are.. ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 06, 2007, 07:39:49 PM
Ladies and gentleman. We are indeed ALL speculating and yours is a as good as a guess than mine.  ;)

Fact: They were not seen again (maybe in vault or maybe dispersed to her daughters).

Fact: Both QM and her daughters-in-law and her granddaughters did not wear them in public (QM only catalogued Royal and Historical Jewels, so there is a chance that the stars could be fakes).

Fact: QA was known to buy fakes from Paris and mixed in with real gems. (so the stars could well be those fakes from Paris).

Fact: Queen Maud was known to be the most fashionable one in her family. (If those stars were fakes (or dress jewels), there is a good probility that she would have taken them to Norway as keepsakes).

Fact: QA was known to give away stuff to strangers or friends. (If the stars were fakes, it is possible that she gave them away, however none surfaced at auction houses yet).

I think that can explain my way of think about this issue. ;)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: damaskrose on March 06, 2007, 10:05:17 PM
Well,I can understand the passion about them they are spectacular and timeless.It is a mystery as to where they might have ended up.Very recently some lovely pieces owned by the late Duchess of Windsor have resurfaced and on E-bay of all places.-DR
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 07, 2007, 02:44:51 AM
Wallis would have loved Ebay !  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 07, 2007, 06:00:30 AM
No doubt she would, Eric ;)

But as for QA's tiara; I found this webpage http://www.etoile.co.uk/Columns/RoyalScribe/050214.html , and I quote: Like Alexandra's wedding parure, many of the jewels given to the two women are still in the presents Queen's collection today, although precious few of them are seen in public.
Alexandra's wedding gifts from Bertie was inheirited by George and Mary, that's for sure. Perhaps Mary, Elizabeth and Lillibeth simply didn't/don't like the tiara.  ???

Maybe we should suggest Prince Michael of Greece to write about QA's jewels for his next project. That would be something ;D. He loves jewels, he's a historian and a member of the family. He, of all people, should be able to find out what happened to the tiara and the stars.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 07, 2007, 06:27:06 AM
That is where I am thinking they are - in the vault.

Thanks for the link, it was helpful.

I am puzzled by this tiara/s. They look similiar, but they are different.
Are they the same?

(http://www.etoile.co.uk/Gifs/0502145.gif) (http://www.etoile.co.uk/Gifs/0502143.jpg)

What is the name of each tiara?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on March 07, 2007, 11:11:34 AM
I don't think the Diamond Stars were fakes. No way. QA wore them at too important occasions for them to be fakes I think. They were too beautiful!  ;) I think they are probably still in the Royal Collection, in the vault. Stars are not really the current Queen's style, so maybe they are just there languishing.   :-\
Actually The Queen very often wears a large diamond star brooch...It was a bequest from a friend & has nothing to to do with Queen Alexandra's set..
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on March 07, 2007, 11:17:25 AM
That is where I am thinking they are - in the vault.

Thanks for the link, it was helpful.

I am puzzled by this tiara/s. They look similiar, but they are different.
Are they the same?

(http://www.etoile.co.uk/Gifs/0502145.gif) (http://www.etoile.co.uk/Gifs/0502143.jpg)

What is the name of each tiara?
Its the same tiara but with additional ornaments/motifs attached to the bandeau/base.There is one very similar( could be the same) in the Norwegaian Royal collection which can be worn as a very simple band ow with maltese crosses along the top..This subject has been discussed before several times but perhaps erased...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 07, 2007, 03:07:10 PM
Sorry to bring it up again, but I haven't discussed it.

It can't be the same one as the one in Norway can it, because it is known that George and May received the whole wedding parure? The necklace and earrings and brooch from the parure are in the British Royal Family, so the tiara must be too, right? And if the Norweigans had it, then surely they would have the same things to put on it, that Alexandra had? And not just some crosses?  ??? ???

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 13, 2007, 10:13:53 AM
That is where I am thinking they are - in the vault.

Thanks for the link, it was helpful.

I am puzzled by this tiara/s. They look similiar, but they are different.
Are they the same?

(http://www.etoile.co.uk/Gifs/0502145.gif) (http://www.etoile.co.uk/Gifs/0502143.jpg)

What is the name of each tiara?
Its the same tiara but with additional ornaments/motifs attached to the bandeau/base.There is one very similar( could be the same) in the Norwegaian Royal collection which can be worn as a very simple band ow with maltese crosses along the top..This subject has been discussed before several times but perhaps erased...

The Norweigan Maltese Cross Tiara and Alexandra's Wedding Parure Tiara are definitely not the same. See the bases are different:

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/The%20WHITE%20album/maud4.jpg?t=1173798414)

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/The%20WHITE%20album/Alixsparure.jpg?t=1173798704)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on March 13, 2007, 08:02:03 PM
Was not the necklace and brooch above one of Cookie's favorites?

Tampabay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 13, 2007, 08:09:08 PM
Yes they were !  ;)

I think Maud's circulet came from the base of her own crown (remember she was crowned too).  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 14, 2007, 12:54:04 AM
Yes the Queen Mother wore Alix's parure necklace a lot. I am quite convinced the entire parure is still with the British Royal Family. ;D Also, Eric maybe you would be interested to know I found out that Alix's stars were a gift from Bertie as well. So they must have been real, as he wouldn't give his wife fakes! So they probably weren't given away flippantly!  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 14, 2007, 02:25:06 AM
I don't think he would give her fakes either. I wonder what Alix thought the first time she saw the beautiful parure.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 14, 2007, 03:30:15 AM
Well I don't know, but the fact that they were not shown again maybe an indication that it might had gone to her daughters (As both Maud & Louise had decendents it might went that way too...).  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 14, 2007, 07:15:50 AM
No they didn't go to Maud/Norway or else we would know I think. The Fifes could have them? The Fifes don't publicly acknowledge what they have, if you see in Munn's Tiara book A History of Splendour, the Tiaras they have are credited to (private collection) not (courtesy of His Grace The Duke of Fife) so it is not surprising if they have them or did have them, and they just never publicly acknowledged it.  :-\
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on March 14, 2007, 07:36:41 AM
Since the stars have not been seen since QA wore them, I think the Fifes are a good bid on current owners. But couldn't it also be possible that she in her later years gave them to someone she was very fond of. Her ever faithfull lady of the bedchamber, (was it Lady Knolleys or something like that, can't remember her name right now), or another close friend perhaps. After all, she was very generous.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on March 14, 2007, 04:58:03 PM
My theory is the stars were given to someone or separately to a group of people.

The settings were dismantled and the stones set into new jjewelry.

Queen Mary did this all the time.

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 14, 2007, 07:50:58 PM
I think it is also possible that Both Maud & Louise's decendents locked the stars up in bank vaults too.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on March 15, 2007, 03:41:55 AM
Was not the necklace and brooch above one of Cookie's favorites?

Tampabay
The necklace certainly was..the brooch was not but was worn by Queen Mary and by our current Queen (with & without the drop pearl pendants ).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on March 15, 2007, 03:45:02 AM
Since the stars have not been seen since QA wore them, I think the Fifes are a good bid on current owners. But couldn't it also be possible that she in her later years gave them to someone she was very fond of. Her ever faithfull lady of the bedchamber, (was it Lady Knolleys or something like that, can't remember her name right now), or another close friend perhaps. After all, she was very generous.  ???
After death of princess Arthur of Connaught in 1959..Sothebys sold a prtion of her jewel collection.they  (or at least some of them)could have been among the items sold...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 15, 2007, 07:53:17 AM
I think it is also possible that Both Maud & Louise's decendents locked the stars up in bank vaults too.  ::)

Yes Louise's descencents have probably locked them in the bank vaults.

Giving away or dismantling them so they are no longer stars seems like a stupid thing to do since they were so beautiful and an important gift from Bertie to his wife, while she was still in the height of her beauty. To just give them out willy-nilly is wrong in my opinion. 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 15, 2007, 07:57:59 AM
Was not the necklace and brooch above one of Cookie's favorites?

Tampabay
The necklace certainly was..the brooch was not but was worn by Queen Mary and by our current Queen (with & without the drop pearl pendants ).

I've seen QETQM wear the necklace heaps of times, and here is QM with the brooch:
(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/The%20WHITE%20album/2QueenMary4.jpg?t=1173963357)

And what about the earrings? Doesn't the current Queen wear them?

And the tiara is in the vault.  ;) Parure mystery solved.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on March 15, 2007, 10:19:08 AM
Was not the necklace and brooch above one of Cookie's favorites?

Tampabay
The necklace certainly was..the brooch was not but was worn by Queen Mary and by our current Queen (with & without the drop pearl pendants ).

I've seen QETQM wear the necklace heaps of times, and here is QM with the brooch:
(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/The%20WHITE%20album/2QueenMary4.jpg?t=1173963357)

And what about the earrings? Doesn't the current Queen wear them?

And the tiara is in the vault.  ;) Parure mystery solved.

we can only wonder if the tiara is still intact or in the vault.//
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 15, 2007, 11:06:51 AM
I think it's still intact, in the vault. At least I showed it isn't the Norewegian maltese Cross tiara. :) Do you know, if the current Queen wears the earrings ashdean?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on March 22, 2007, 06:05:22 PM
(I hope this belongs in this thread!)

This may sound like a stupid question but who is in charge of all the historial jewels of the Royal Family?  They must have a dedicated position to the jewels since there were/are so many.  I guess we will never be able to account for all the jewels because some were probably lost or given away with it being recorded. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 22, 2007, 08:03:32 PM
Yes...Especially we didn't know about Alexandra's will and how her loot was divided. I think much of her private jewels went to her daughters (Maud, Victoria & Louise) while May would claim the historical ones for the "Royal Collection".  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 23, 2007, 05:09:07 AM
(I hope this belongs in this thread!)

This may sound like a stupid question but who is in charge of all the historial jewels of the Royal Family?  They must have a dedicated position to the jewels since there were/are so many.  I guess we will never be able to account for all the jewels because some were probably lost or given away with it being recorded. 

-Duke of NJ

The Queen is in charge of all the historical jewels fo the Royal Family, and all of the ones which are not so historical as well, I am pretty sure this is the case. When we have the next Queen, Camilla, I think she will be the one in charge of them.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 23, 2007, 05:16:28 PM
Guardianship of the royal collection, whether it be jewellery, art etc. usually is the responsibility of the reigning sovereign, which will be Charles after his mother, rather than Camilla who will be his consort (in some form or other!).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 23, 2007, 08:07:50 PM
Well..safely to say. what Camilla wants...Camilla gets by that time.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on March 24, 2007, 12:11:58 PM
Well..safely to say. what Camilla wants...Camilla gets by that time.  ;D
I do not think Camilla will attempt to purloin any royal jewels..
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on March 24, 2007, 12:40:04 PM
No I don't think she'd purloin any either.  But what I was trying to say originally is that the Queen, whoever she is at the time, is the one in control over the Royal Family's Jewel Collection (not the crown jewels I mean) so Camilla will be in charge over lending things out and so on when she is the Queen, right?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: emeraldeyes on March 24, 2007, 01:05:40 PM
Do you know, if the current Queen wears the earrings ashdean?

I'm not ashdean, but yes, she most certainly does wear the earrings.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 25, 2007, 08:17:29 PM
Yes. Camilla will have her choice over ALL the jewels just like Queen Mary.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on March 25, 2007, 10:03:45 PM
Well, Queen Mary was a bit of an exception to the rule for a queen consort, wasn't she?  She had an extremely well developed eye for the organization, cataloguing etc. of the royal collections, a talent which I doubt Camilla shares.  No doubt, she will wear what she wants of the jewellery when her time comes though.  :-\
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 01, 2007, 07:22:46 AM
Who were Queen Alexandra's bridesmaids? I found this portrait of them, and I was wondering if anyone could tell me who they are.  :)


(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/E1958m.jpg?t=1175425314)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 01, 2007, 05:23:36 PM
They were daughters of British nobility, no royals, and between the ages of 15 and 20.

They were Lady Victoria Alexandria Montagu Douglas Scott, daughter of the Duke of Buccleuch; Lady Theodora Grosvenor, daughter of the Marquis of Westminster; Lady Diana Beauclerk, daughter of the Duke of St. Albans; Lady Elma Bruce, daughter of the Earl of Elgin; Lady Victoria Hare, sister of the Earl of Listowel; Lady Agneta Yorke, daughter of the Earl of Hardwicke; Lady Victoria Alexandrina Elizabeth Campbell, daughter of the Earl of Cawdor; Lady Constance Villiers, daughter of the Earl of Clarendon; Lady Ernestine Emma Horatia Mount Edgecumbe, daughter of the Earl of Mount Edgecumbe; and Lady Feodorowna Cecilia Wellesley, daughter of Earl Cowley.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on April 01, 2007, 06:59:32 PM
The wedding was conducted in St. George's Chapel at Windsor and there wasn't much room for guests.  Many people critiszed criticized Queen Victoria for her choice of a venue.  People thought she wanted a smaller scale wedding because she didn't want to invite the "rowdy" Hesse-Kesselans whom she most throughly hated and King Fredrick VII whom she thought scandalalous. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 01, 2007, 09:33:02 PM
Yes...although the Hesse-Kassels were "her" cousins too.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 02, 2007, 07:33:37 AM
Excuse me for not knowing, but how were the Hesse-Cassels Queen Victoria's cousins? I know they were QA's cousins through her mother.

I wonder how those 10 Aristocrat young ladies were chosen to be the bridesmaids? Obviously they didn't know Alix personally as she just got there. It seems not all the bridesmaids were in the portrait?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Michael II on April 02, 2007, 10:19:08 AM
Excuse me for not knowing, but how were the Hesse-Cassels Queen Victoria's cousins? I know they were QA's cousins through her mother.

I wonder how those 10 Aristocrat young ladies were chosen to be the bridesmaids? Obviously they didn't know Alix personally as she just got there. It seems not all the bridesmaids were in the portrait?  ???

They all descended through King George II of Great Britain.  His daughter Mary married Frederick II landgrave of Hesse Kassel.  Another daughter Louise was the first wife of Frederick V of Denmark.  Queen Victoria descended through George II's son Frederick Prince of Wales.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Booklady on April 02, 2007, 03:01:29 PM
Mayall photographed Alexandra and Bertie in several poses following the ceremony (at Windsor Castle, I presume).  Could  someone please show some of the wedding (or engagement) poses again?  Thank you.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 02, 2007, 08:54:11 PM
Queen Louise of Denmark and the Cambridge family (George, Augusta and Mary, mother of the future Queen Mary) were first cousins. Apparently, Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, once harbored a tendre for his cousin Louise when the families met up at family gatherings at Rumpenheim--the forerunner of the infamous Danish royal gatherings. Queen Alexandra, being closer in age to Mary Cambridge than her mother was (11 years difference), was very close to her and this probably helped grease the wheels for a marriage between first Eddy, then George, and Princess May.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 02, 2007, 10:05:32 PM
Yes...Fat Mary (as she was called in the family) met Alix as childhood friends and once pushed Dagmar in her pram during the gatherings in Rumpenheim. However Mary's flirtacious behavior towards men was not condoned by Princess Christian (Alix's mother) who once told her that she would box her ears if she (Alix) dared to copy her cousin in that aspect. QV was also relieved that Mary was able to get married to Franz of Teck, even though the groom was a morganetic prince (of the house of Wurttemberg) and had no money nor position.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 03, 2007, 09:28:01 AM
Quote
Mayall photographed Alexandra and Bertie in several poses following the ceremony (at Windsor Castle, I presume).  Could  someone please show some of the wedding (or engagement) poses again?  Thank you. 

Here's one of the beautiful teenage bride:

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/Portraits%20of%20Her%20Majesty%20Queen%20Alexandra/2457596520094285158qxlTZT_ph.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Taren on April 03, 2007, 09:48:24 AM
Is Alexandra's dress still in existence, does anyone know? Is it on display anywhere?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 03, 2007, 10:25:41 AM
The dress was apparently cut down shortly after the wedding--the lace, etc, I believe. The base of the dress is intact and was on display at Kensington Palace at one point, along with the wedding dresses of Queen Mary, QE the Queen Mother and others.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: ashdean on April 03, 2007, 11:31:44 AM
The dress was apparently cut down shortly after the wedding--the lace, etc, I believe. The base of the dress is intact and was on display at Kensington Palace at one point, along with the wedding dresses of Queen Mary, QE the Queen Mother and others.
Altering a wedding dress so it could be worn afterward was a common practice in those days.It was not only for economic reasons either ....as the great heiress Consuelo Vanderbilt mentions her high necked gown being "Cut low"  to use as her presentation gown when being introduced to Queen Victoria as a married woman...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 03, 2007, 01:42:06 PM
Alexandra's wedding dress on display:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/spotlight22para13im11.jpg)


(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/380842a2uf1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 03, 2007, 01:42:41 PM
The bridesmaids:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/06_31.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Booklady on April 03, 2007, 04:57:02 PM
Does anyone know if she wore a tiara underneath the flowered headpiece?  It doesn't really show in any of the photographs.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 03, 2007, 09:43:58 PM
I couldn't find a record of her wearing one in the wedding coverage.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 04, 2007, 01:52:10 AM
Does anyone know if she wore a tiara underneath the flowered headpiece?  It doesn't really show in any of the photographs.

I think that's doubtful. What with all that foliage - you wouldn't see it anyway.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: aussiechick12 on April 04, 2007, 03:12:54 AM
I found a few things:

1. These are from a Majesty Magazine:
(http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/th_QueenAlexandrasWeddingDress.jpg) (http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/QueenAlexandrasWeddingDress.jpg)
(http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/th_QueenAlexandrasWeddingDress1.jpg) (http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/QueenAlexandrasWeddingDress1.jpg)

2. These two are ones that have cut out the other people in the photo:
(http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/th_Alix14.jpg) (http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/Alix14.jpg)

(http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/th_Alix23.jpg) (http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/Alix23.jpg)

3. Taken after the wedding (this was the one I was talking about!)
(http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/th_EdwardandAlexandraaftertheirwedding.jpg) (http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e182/aussiechick12/Windsors/Queen%20Alexandra/EdwardandAlexandraaftertheirwedding.jpg)



Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 12, 2007, 07:06:44 AM
(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/The%20Last%20Album/HeleneWales.jpg?t=1176379220)

Queen Alexandra with her daughter Princess Victoria and her nearly-daughter-in-law, Eddy's one-time betrothed, Princess Helene.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on April 12, 2007, 03:03:25 PM
I always thought that the Helene thing was without the approval of the family?

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 12, 2007, 03:47:26 PM
It had the strong approval of Eddy's family, although Bertie was sensible enough to have concerns about Helene being a Catholic. You can read about it in the Helene thread more.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 12, 2007, 03:57:08 PM
The Orleans family had strong connections to the British royals, being in exile in England, and Bertie & Alexandra were very close friends with many members of the family--including Helene's sister Queen Amelie of Portgual. Even after the aborted engagement, these ties remained strong. The famous group photo of 1907 showing so many royals, including Helene, visiting Windsor (?) was because many of them had come over for the wedding of Princess Louise of Orleans to Prince Carlos of Bourbon. Many of them stayed on during the Kaiser's visit shortly thereafter when the photo was taken.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: aussiechick12 on April 12, 2007, 06:53:25 PM
Was this also the Helene that was suggested to marry Nicholas II?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 12, 2007, 06:56:17 PM
Yes, the same.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on April 12, 2007, 10:21:09 PM
From what I know about Helene, I think she probably would have made a very good Tsarina.  She had a strong personality and seemed quite a determined woman.  Any opinions? 

I am just considering the role here - I know that Nicholas was not interested in her though.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 13, 2007, 12:06:18 AM
She certainly would've enjoyed the position--or that of Queen of England. There was quite a lot of turmoil in the Italian royal house because for years, until Queen Elena produced a son (after a series of daughters, shades of AF), the Aostas were next in line for the throne. Helene had 2 healthy sons and was apparently anxious to become Queen and the 2 branches were rather at odds--especially since Helene apparently felt superior to 'the Shepherdess' (as Kaiser Wilhelm once called her) as a French princess. Much like Miechen in Russia, she was a woman who was clever, cultured, enjoyed society and the duties of her position and had to watch a shyer, stiffer woman assume the role of consort. Unlike Miechen, she didn't have the comfort of a happy marriage. It must've been very frustrating to make a dynastic marriage only to achieve neither personal happiness nor the throne. At least if she'd married Nicholas, loveless or not, she would've been Empress. After she was widowed in 1931, she remarried a commoner. But not to get too off-topic.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 13, 2007, 06:44:27 AM
To get back on topic, I'm not sure if any of you have noticed, but Queen Alexandra (I think only after Prince Eddy's death) often wore a brooch in the shape of the letter ''E".

You can see it clearly in these pictures:

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/one%20more%20album/2d85_1.jpg)

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/one%20more%20album/Alix12.jpg)

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/one%20more%20album/Alix13.jpg)

Mirrored image so it's back to front

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/one%20more%20album/QAlexandra.jpg)

It was an E with a crown on top.

Did HM wear this in honour/memory of Eddy or for Edward VII? I think it is for Eddy as why would she wear this for her unfaithful husband who she called Bertie anyway?

I wonder where this special piece is now. 8)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 13, 2007, 10:06:02 AM
Well spotted Felicia dear!!! The chair she is sitting on can still be seen at Sandringham!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on April 13, 2007, 02:23:58 PM
Quote
think it is for Eddy as why would she wear this for her unfaithful husband who she called Bertie anyway

Did you forget that Eddy's real name was Albert Victor?

She probably wore it for Edward VII because he was the reigning monarch, faithful or not. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 13, 2007, 02:52:44 PM
No of course I didn't forget that his real name was Albert Victor, that would be impossible! In case you can't tell, Eddy is my chiefest of interests.  ;)

QA always called him Eddy. As did the rest of the family, even in time QV.

I don't think she'd wear an E brooch for Bertie. This could have been before his accession to the throne anyway. Much more likely it's a token of rememberance for her darling Eddy. What do others think?

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 13, 2007, 03:18:32 PM
It was in the one set of photos, I don't know if that's really 'often'. Good catch, though. I would think it's more likely for Eddy than Bertie--she always called him Bertie--and Eddy was always called that rather than Albert Victor. (George even had to explain the naming of his first son, though he was called David, 'Edward' after 'dear Eddy'. Queen Victoria reminded him that Eddy's name was Albert Victor but George said that's not what he was called within the family.) I can't think of what else the brooch might symbolize but we'll never really know--it could be something completely insignificant that we'd have no way of guessing. Too bad she wasn't more like Queen Mary who cataloged everything.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 13, 2007, 04:09:31 PM
Quote
I can't think of what else the brooch might symbolize but we'll never really know--it could be something completely insignificant that we'd have no way of guessing.

Personally I don't think that's the case at all. Because it is a letter, I think it must symbolize somebody. Remember that Alix never wanted him to be called Albert Victor, neither really did Bertie. It was forced upon them. So I think she would never commemorate her Eddy with an AV brooch as well. The more I read about Alix and Eddy the more I feel she adored him much more than is normal for a mother. But that is a good thing. It was Queen Alexandra who commissioned that big stained glass portrait of Eddy as a saint. I found a big version of that, I'll put it into the Eddy thread later. As well as all her other mourning rituals, visiting his room, etc. Wearing a lot of amethysts rather than bright jewels, wearing mauve and ''mourning colours'' for years. Carrying on at George's coronation, supposedly acting depressed at his wedding. It seems she couldn't get Eddy out of her head. So it makes sense to me she wore this brooch for him. But you are right, I haven't seen her wear it other than in this photo shoot, however often it is hard to tell what she is wearing (jewellery that is) because it is blurry, or she had SO much of it on.

I found a high quality picture of Alix wearing the brooch:

(http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/The%20Last%20Album/th_Queen20Alexandra-1.jpg) (http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j265/feliciavictoria_2006/The%20Last%20Album/Queen20Alexandra-1.jpg)
 
Please click.

You can see it is made up of stones of a dark colour - rubies or amethysts maybe. With a crown on it symbolizing Eddy's role as future King, or just his Royal status. I wonder if it is still in the Royal Collection. I like it a lot.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Keith on April 13, 2007, 06:12:08 PM
Does anyone know what year the picture was taken? With a crown on top, it may have been of gift of Bertie after becoming King and hence the E initial.

As to why she would wear an initial for an unfaithful husband, because as she herself said he loved her best of all. I would imagine Alexandra realised that Bertie's unfaithfulness was the norm rather than the exception among their set.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 13, 2007, 06:19:00 PM
The crown is interesting--if it commemorates Bertie becoming King, it could've been a gift of someone's--a coronation gift or something along those lines. Lafayette's website has a copy of the photo and it says it was taken in 1902 to commemorate the Kaiser's visit to Sandringham. Perhaps he presented it as a gift of Bertie becoming King? (The site often tells about jewelry worn but only notes it's a crown-crested brooch in an E shape. It does point out the Prince of Wales feather motif of the chair, though.) If an older gift, could it have been a gift to commemorate her first grandson, Prince Edward?

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Keith on April 13, 2007, 06:28:51 PM
I hadn't thought of it being for Prince Edward. Does anyone know about any other type of initial jewelry worn by the Royal Family. Were they done by proper name or nicknames? My guess would be the initial would be by proper name as opposed to nickname.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 13, 2007, 06:32:55 PM
Bertie gave Alexandra a ring at their wedding of  whose first letters spelled out BERTIE--I can't remember them all but it was like beryl, tourmaline, etc...

Thinking more along the lines of the crown and the date of the photo, just weeks after the coronation, it could be commemorating Edward VII.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 13, 2007, 06:38:22 PM
Commemorative brooches:

(http://www.armoury.co.uk/royalmem1/rmbigpics/rm52big.gif)

Gold & Enamel Queen Alexandra Presentation Brooch: The obverse with Queen Alexandra's crowned double A monogram in gold on green guilloche enamel ground with white enamel border, the reverse gold locket photograph frame engraved 'from Queen Alexandra to Nurse Fletcher 1902'. Annie Fletcher assisted royal surgeon Sir Frederick Treves when he operated on Edward VII for appendicitis shortly before his Coronation. Nurse Fletcher, who was awarded the Royal Red Cross in 1909, nursed the King in his final illness in 1910 and afterwards attended Queen Alexandra and the Princess Royal.

This one is George V's cipher:

(http://www.armoury.co.uk/royalmem1/rmbigpics/rm55big.gif)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 14, 2007, 01:41:12 AM
Bertie gave Alexandra a ring at their wedding of semi-precious stones whose first letters spelled out BERTIE--I can't remember them all but it was like beryl, tourmaline, etc...

Thinking more along the lines of the crown and the date of the photo, just weeks after the coronation, it could be commemorating Edward VII.

I think most personal jewellery given between family members would start with the initial of the nickname if they were constantly used - such as Eddy, Bertie. Alexandra and George jewellery isn't really examples to prove that, as they were called by nicknames starting with those letters A and G anyway.. But still very nice to see those pieces though.

It could well be for Edward VII I have to admit, given the date after he had become King, close to the coronation, or it could have been something Alix had made after Eddy's death and she just happened to feel like wearing it for this photo shoot.  :-\
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on April 14, 2007, 10:04:13 AM
Alexandra's wedding dress on display:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/spotlight22para13im11.jpg)


(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/380842a2uf1.jpg)


After the Queen's, this is my favorite royal wedding dress dress both this and the original version.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 14, 2007, 10:21:40 AM

I think most personal jewellery given between family members would start with the initial of the nickname if they were constantly used - such as Eddy, Bertie. Alexandra and George jewellery isn't really examples to prove that, as they were called by nicknames starting with those letters A and G anyway.. But still very nice to see those pieces though.


I only posted them because I thought people might find them interesting. They weren't meant to illustrate anything in particular. When I was spending a good deal of time searching around for potential answers to the 'E' brooch, I came across them.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Taren on April 14, 2007, 12:31:25 PM
Bertie gave Alexandra a ring at their wedding of semi-precious stones whose first letters spelled out BERTIE--I can't remember them all but it was like beryl, tourmaline, etc...

Really? I had only ever read that in a Jean Plaidy book and thought it was fictional. According to the book it's beryl, emerald, ruby, turqoise, jacynth (because "there's no i in stones") and emerald.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 14, 2007, 12:36:18 PM
Two emerald letters? Are there any pictures of this Bertie ring?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Taren on April 14, 2007, 12:59:32 PM
Two emerald letters?

There are two e's in Bertie. This could be wrong...I just put down what Jean Plaidy's book said.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 14, 2007, 04:31:54 PM
Bertie gave Alexandra a ring at their wedding of semi-precious stones whose first letters spelled out BERTIE--I can't remember them all but it was like beryl, tourmaline, etc...

Really? I had only ever read that in a Jean Plaidy book and thought it was fictional. According to the book it's beryl, emerald, ruby, turqoise, jacynth (because "there's no i in stones") and emerald.

No, it was actually in the coverage of the wedding at the time. A sweet gesture.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 14, 2007, 04:33:52 PM
Two emerald letters? Are there any pictures of this Bertie ring?

I've never seen one--and I like to hunt 'ring photos'--but it can be difficult because I've noticed that the hands of various female royals are often obscured by placement in the lap, holding an object, etc...I tried to find a photo of QM's engagement ring, for instance, and I could only get a very blurry look after blowing up a single photo of her that actually showed the hand--and I have a LOT of QM photos.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 14, 2007, 04:37:58 PM
What about the engagement ring May got from Eddy? I read a description of it once that was written in Majesty magazine I think, but I forget what it was like. Do you know Grandduchessella what it was like? I suppose there is no photo of it. I tried looking at the official engagment photo - and she is wearing gloves! I wonder what was done with it....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 14, 2007, 04:44:28 PM
I can't remember anything about it, sorry.  :(

Here's what The Times said about QA's ring:

'The wedding ring...is of plain gold, is remarkably massive, and its accompanying keeper is set with six precious stones, selected and arranged so that the initial letters of their names shall form the word 'bertie', an affectionate variation of 'Albert'. The stones of which this happy combination is effected are a beryl, an emerald, a ruby, a turquoise, a jacynth, and another emerald.'
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 14, 2007, 04:55:39 PM
So that was her actual wedding ring - fascinating. I will look out for it in photos.  8)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on April 15, 2007, 02:04:25 AM
Yes, most interesting.  What colour is jacynth?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kimberly on April 15, 2007, 02:16:39 AM
I think it can be any colour from clear to dark blue, I'm not too sure. I know you can get yellow and also dark red ones.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 16, 2007, 12:28:07 PM
I wonder what happen to King Leopold I's present of a lovely dress in Brussells lace... ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on April 16, 2007, 01:14:35 PM
I don't think he gave her a whole dress, just a veil of Belgain and lace trimmings.  Queen Victoria only changed the veil. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 16, 2007, 04:43:58 PM
Here's what the Times said in their coverage of the wedding:

"From the King of the Belgians: A dress of beautiful and costly Brussels lace, with scarf and handkerchief to match."

As regards her actual wedding dress, it was altered soon after the wedding. When Wililam Frith was trying to paint his large-size portrait of the wedding, he not only had trouble pinning Bertie & Alix down for sittings but found that the dress had been 'cut up & altered' but Lady Augusta Bruce arranged for the Dresser to send to Frith all that was left of it.

Incidentally, he was supplied with photographs (in addition to the more traditional sketches) of the actual ceremony. Wouldn't they be wonderful to see. 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on April 16, 2007, 05:30:09 PM
Sorry.  I must have misunderstood what I was reading, I thought he only gave her the lace which Queen Victoria changed to a more "patriotic" British lace.  I wrongly assumed that the lace was used to accent the dress.  Sorry again. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: gogm on April 16, 2007, 09:25:39 PM
Was the dress with Brussels lace the wedding gown or a piece of the trousseau?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 16, 2007, 10:15:07 PM
It was a bridal gift.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 17, 2007, 01:28:54 AM
Indeed ! The locally made dress with Honiton lace was used instead. I am quite sure Prince Charles might have kept part of the Honiton and Brussells lace from QA's collection as he was said to be a collector of lace. (He was rumoured to own some lace that once belonged to Catherine of Aragon).  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 17, 2007, 03:01:34 AM
I wonder if that was the same lace that Princess Beatrice owned. She loved lace and was the only daughter to wear QVs own wedding veil. Quite a treat!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on April 17, 2007, 10:26:41 AM
There are a number of close up images of Alexandra's wedding lace and other examples of royal lace in the book Royal Honiton Lace if anyone is interested
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 17, 2007, 10:28:35 AM
I wonder if QV's veil is still in the Royal Collection and still intact. It's a pity the British royals don't have a tradition of mostly wearing the same veil like the Danish Royals do.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Keith on April 17, 2007, 12:19:44 PM
I think her veil was placed over her at the time of burial.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 17, 2007, 12:21:59 PM
Oh, like her snake engagement ring was buried with her. I would love to see that ring.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Taren on April 17, 2007, 12:49:52 PM
Oh, like her snake engagement ring was buried with her. I would love to see that ring.

Ditto. Sometimes I wonder what the point of even having rings was when, thanks to the gloves, they couldn't have been seen that often.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Booklady on April 18, 2007, 07:21:05 AM
Isn't it amazing the continuing new poses we discover for Alexandra, particularly on e-bay?  There have been some recently that I have never seen before, and some from other photo sessions that I recognize.  There must have been at least 5-10 pictures taken at a session.  Does anyone know how the royals did this--did they make an appointment for their photograph to Mayall, etc., or were they commissioned by a photographer to come?  Alexandra in the 1860's was apparently photographed hundreds of times, possibly due to the demand for her photograph from the general public as Princess of Wales. :o
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 18, 2007, 03:36:01 PM
They did both, it seems. On occasion a royal group might go to the photographer's studio but usually a photographer (such as Russell or Mayall) might come to a particular location--Cowes, Sandringham, etc...to photograph the subject(s). Usually there were many poses taken--I've seen over a dozen from some sessions and I think there's about 2 dozen from George and May's wedding. The photographer could bring a variety of backgrounds and props with him and even set up outdoors and make it look like an inside photo.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on April 19, 2007, 07:46:20 AM
A garden party portrait with Queen Victoria.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/gardenpartytux.jpg)

Larger version
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/gardenpartytux.jpg (http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/gardenpartytux.jpg)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: kmerov on April 19, 2007, 07:49:18 AM
Two close ups.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/closeupgartenparty.jpg)

Larger version
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/closeupgartenparty.jpg (http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/closeupgartenparty.jpg)

(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Tuxen/closercloseup.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: aussiechick12 on April 19, 2007, 07:16:43 PM
Are there any other royals apart from Alexandra and QV in the picture?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on April 20, 2007, 04:34:43 PM
Seem like they are the only ones in this one
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on April 25, 2007, 01:27:30 AM
The old one is getting a little long...again ;), so let's start a new one.

Does there exist any photos from Alix and Bertie's visit in Vienna (can't remember the year) where they met Franz Joseph and Elisabeth?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alexander1917 on April 25, 2007, 07:16:30 AM
Alix and Berti payed an "unofficial" visit to Vienna via a tour of Egypt in 1869.
"Queen Alexandra" Georgina Battiscombe page 97, 102-103

"After a family Christmas spent at Fredensborg came a tearful parting from the three children, who were to travel back to England from Hamburg whilst their parents went on to Berlin. Here the Princess met Bismarck for the first time and here too, not altogether surprinsingly, she suffered some rudeness from the Prussian Queen. King William, however, admitted to finding her charming.
After a journey of twenty-four hours with the thermometer registering twelve degrees of frost, the Princess stepped out of the train at Vienna looking exquisitely fresh, to be greeted by the Emperor Francis Joseph and a galaxy of princes, archdukes and ambassadors. This was not at all the quiet welcome wich the Prince and Princess had expected but they soon discovered how impossible it was for any royal personages to pay an "unofficial" visit to Vienna. Court mourning had caused the abandonment of some functions but even so formal dinners and parties followed each other in an endless stream. By custom a visit had to be paid to every memeber of the Imperial Family resident in Vienna; as there were at that time twenty-seven archdukes living in or near the city, not to mention smaller fry, this in itself was a considerable undertaking. More to the Princess's taste were the skating parties, the ballet perfomances, a concert at which Johann Strauss conducted his own waltzes and a tour of Imperial stables housing the five hundred horses which were the special interest of the Empress Elisabeth. On this journey the Princess met for the first time the two Empresses, Eugénie and Elisabeth, who were her friendly rivals for the palm of beauty. With the intellectual and melancholic Elizabeth she had very little in common beyond a love of horsfor beautiful clothes; on one occasion the Empress was heard to remark that of all European royalties only the Princess and herself really knew how to dress. As far as looks were concerned only one fault could be found with these two beautiful women; both Empress and Princess were too thin for nineteenth-century taste.
During this Austrian visit the grace and gaiety of the English royal couple stood out in favourable contrast to the stiffness of the Imperial Court.
They were not sorry to escape from this formality to the freedom of life on board the frigate H.M.S. ARIADNE, which took them from Trieste to Alexandria."


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on April 25, 2007, 05:04:52 PM
Quote
I wish there was a photo of Alix and Sisi together

Yes, I always think of that.  I would love to see a picture of the "two most beautiful princesses in Europe." 

I always like to see pictures of [British] royals with other/foreign royals.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Zanthia on April 26, 2007, 02:26:42 AM
Yeah, you should think that every photographer in Austria would love to take a picture of Europe's two most beautiful women side by side.
I thought it was a custom to take a picture when the royals met, even if the visit was supposed to be unofficial.
But maybe Elisabeth simply refused to have her picture taken together with Alix. Wasn't there something with that she didn't wanted anyone to take photos of her or paint her portrait after she had reached 30?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on April 26, 2007, 04:46:45 AM
Empress Eugenie didn't want to be photographed ageing either.  Alas, the penalty of great beauty... :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 26, 2007, 08:18:02 AM
Elisabeth went to great lengths (hiding behind fans, etc) to prevent her photograph being taken. Eugenie might have regretted the ageing process but there are many photographs of her as an elderly woman (she was active during WW1 despite her advanced age) that were published. You can still see the traces of her looks but sadness had definitely taken its toll.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on April 26, 2007, 04:37:36 PM
There is that one of Eugenie with her namesake (right word???) Victoria Eugenia Ena, that one seems to be right up there in the 1910's.  I believe it was taken in Spain??

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 27, 2007, 10:22:19 PM
As part of the 60th wedding anniversary celebrations, there's a wedding exhibit at Windsor. There's memorabilia from several prior weddings, including Alexandra's:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/microsites/royalweddings/section.asp?exhibs=WedEVIIQA

Some of what's shown:

Princess Alexandra’s badge of the Order of Victoria and Albert which she wore on the left shoulder of her wedding dress.
(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/441446.jpg)

A miniature of Alexandra
(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/420284.jpg)

Bracelet that was presented to Alexandra by her bridesmaids
(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/13872.jpg)
This bracelet was a wedding present to Princess Alexandra from her eight bridesmaids, who were all daughters of Peers of the Realm. Each link contains a photograph of a bridesmaid and their initials set in diamonds on the enamelled cover. One of the bridesmaids, Georgina Hamilton, was indisposed on the day of the wedding and her place was taken by Emily Villiers. From left to right: Diana Beauclerk, Victoria Scott, Georgina Hamilton, Victoria Howard, Elma Bruce, Agneta Yorke, Eleanor Hare and Feodore Wellesley.

There's also a wedding page of photos that QV put together. The pictures are familiar, I think. I didn't realize that a familiar photo of Arthur & Leo in their kilts was from the wedding sitting.

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/2905621.jpg)

Too bad the BERTIE ring isn't there---I wonder if it's not buried with her? Otherwise it would've been perfect for this display.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 29, 2007, 06:21:21 AM
Since the Bertie ring was her wedding ring, probably she was buried wearing it.

Why was bridesmaid Lady Georgina Hamilton indisposed? What was wrong with her?

I wish they had included some objects connecting to Queen Mary's betrothal to Prince Eddy, they must have some.

George proposed to May at East Sheen Lodge, Louise Fife's home. Didn't Eddy propose to May there was well? Or am I thinking of were he proposed to Princess Helene?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 29, 2007, 10:20:25 AM
The BERTIE ring wasn't her wedding ring.  Here's what I wrote on the other thread (info from the Times):

'The wedding ring...is of plain gold, is remarkably massive, and its accompanying keeper is set with six precious stones, selected and arranged so that the initial letters of their names shall form the word 'bertie', an affectionate variation of 'Albert'. The stones of which this happy combination is effected are a beryl, an emerald, a ruby, a turquoise, a jacynth, and another emerald.'

The BERTIE ring was a present from Bertie but it wasn't her actual wedding ring but an additional ring that Bertie, unlike other grooms I've read of, chose to give to her. Still, it seems that it was probably sentimental enough that it could be buried with her.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 29, 2007, 10:26:16 AM
I wish they had included some objects connecting to Queen Mary's betrothal to Prince Eddy, they must have some.

George proposed to May at East Sheen Lodge, Louise Fife's home. Didn't Eddy propose to May there was well? Or am I thinking of were he proposed to Princess Helene?

She didn't marry Eddy, the exhibition is a celebration of the weddings. I don't know what happened to her engagement ring but it doesn't seem that she held on to too many mementoes of the time. Since she and Eddy weren't a love match, though they were fond enough of each other, there really wasn't a reason to. Perhaps she gave the ring to his mother?

Eddy didn't propose to May at Sheen Lodge, he proposed at Luton Hoo.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 29, 2007, 10:39:06 AM
The BERTIE ring wasn't her wedding ring.  Here's what I wrote on the other thread (info from the Times):

'The wedding ring...is of plain gold, is remarkably massive, and its accompanying keeper is set with six precious stones, selected and arranged so that the initial letters of their names shall form the word 'bertie', an affectionate variation of 'Albert'. The stones of which this happy combination is effected are a beryl, an emerald, a ruby, a turquoise, a jacynth, and another emerald.'

The BERTIE ring was a present from Bertie but it wasn't her actual wedding ring but an additional ring that Bertie, unlike other grooms I've read of, chose to give to her. Still, it seems that it was probably sentimental enough that it could be buried with her.

Oh yes, that's right. It wasn't the wedding ring, it was the keeper ring, but I suppose she wore them both together most of the time.

Quote
She didn't marry Eddy, the exhibition is a celebration of the weddings. I don't know what happened to her engagement ring but it doesn't seem that she held on to too many mementoes of the time. Since she and Eddy weren't a love match, though they were fond enough of each other, there really wasn't a reason to. Perhaps she gave the ring to his mother?

Eddy didn't propose to May at Sheen Lodge, he proposed at Luton Hoo.

Yes, I know it is just about weddings. But to kind of include some details about May's betrothal to Eddy would have been extra special and interesting. Still, maybe we will see something like that in another exhibition. :) Her engagement ring and other mementoes of that time, would have been held on to by May I'm sure. She probably put them away somewhere..
Because May was quite fond of Eddy, and she felt sadness at his tragic death, I'm sure that was reason enough to hold on to those things, as well as there precious value of course. That's right they became engaged at Luton Hoo, I temporarily forgot!  :-[
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: TampaBay on April 29, 2007, 11:04:41 AM
Who owns Luton Hoo now?  The Duke of Abercrombie?

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kimberly on April 29, 2007, 11:32:21 AM
Its now an up-market hotel (well, almost. It is scheduled to open in the Autumn).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: basilforever on April 30, 2007, 01:04:44 AM
Luton Hoo has a very interesting history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luton_Hoo#19th_century
Yet another grand house once owned by the Butes.

I saw it on ''Antiques Roadshow" and it was very beautiful.

I don't quite understand what the Royals were doing there, I must have read it, but I forgot.  ??? If I went there, it would indeed be a special place for me, because I would be thinking about Eddy's marriage proposal to May. :-*

WHO is the Duke of Abercrombie? ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 30, 2007, 08:10:03 AM
There was a shooting party at Luton Hoo in early December 1891. Mr de Falbe, the resident (owner?) was the Danish Minister to Britain and thus had contacts with the Princess of Wales and other members of the royal family. May and her family had visited there many times before and it was a popular destination in the summer for tennis parties and casual get-togethers. In the Dec 1891 party, Eddy was part of the gathering--most likely to facillitate the proposal since it was heavily gossiped-about in the family. The day following their arrival, Eddy proposed after dinner. They next day they telegraphed relatives and Eddy went shooting and played cards together that night. The day after that, they were photographed and Eddy left for London to notify his parents in person (though they'd been telegraphed and responded) as well as receive the sanction from QV. Once it had all seemed 'in the bag', Eddy seems to have jumped the gun a bit since some relatives apparently didn't expect the news quite so quickly and the news had begun to leak out.

The Falbes took a photo of the boudoir that Eddy proposed in and sent it to QM who pasted it in her photo albums--I really wish there was another publication of her albums, the one published had so few early photos. In 1918, QM, GV and some others visited Lady Wernher's convalescent home for officers which was located at Luton Hoo. QM noted that it was the first time she'd been there since her engagement 27 years prior. She noted that the house was so altered that it was 'difficult to make out where the former rooms were'.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: royal_netherlands on April 30, 2007, 12:13:29 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Royals%20past%20and%20present/98.jpg)
I think it's time (agian ;D) fore some good old fashion picture of Alix, Bertie and Minnie.
A beatifull portrait of the three together, just wonderful!!!!!

RN :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 30, 2007, 05:36:15 PM
Queen Alexandra driving through London and suffering a flat tire in the early 1920s:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/lastscanQAflattire.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on April 30, 2007, 05:56:52 PM
I absolutely love this photo - thanks GDE for posting - the way Alix is peering over the side to see what's going on!  :D  I really can't imagine many other royal ladies of the time doing this, can you?  No security risk in those days, but a great opportunity for those who happened to be in the street at the time to see royalty close up.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on April 30, 2007, 06:04:37 PM
You're welcome Grace. I love looking through the old magazines of the period--you get so many great candid photos in addition to the regular posed ones. I just grabbed about 300 photos over the last month so I'm going to be a busy scanner--I figured people would like this addition though.  :) I wonder if anyone dared go up or they were just in awe or stayed at a respectful distance--the accompanying blurb said it took about an hour to repair the flat.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Grace on April 30, 2007, 06:15:58 PM
I wonder if anyone dared go up or they were just in awe or stayed at a respectful distance--the accompanying blurb said it took about an hour to repair the flat.

They seem to be at a respectable distance in this photo, but I wonder if Alix stayed in the car during the whole repair job?  If so, I think she would have smiled and waved at the people and possibly that would have encouraged them to come over to her.  Of course, she was pretty much stone deaf by this time and her eyesight was not good either.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alexander1917 on May 10, 2007, 05:19:57 AM
I don't think he gave her a whole dress, just a veil of Belgain and lace trimmings.  Queen Victoria only changed the veil. 

-Duke of NJ

in "FIVE GOLD RINGS" (book going with the exhibit. at windsor) say that the lace from King Leopold could not be used because it was not British.
I think it was enough material to make the dress design she wore, but the dress she finely wore was trimmed with Honiton lace instead.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on May 21, 2007, 10:13:06 PM
We've discussed this dress and jewelry before but I just got an ID on the occasion. It was from the Drawing Room held in June 1896. The royal women were in black because of the recent death of Prince Henry of Battenberg.

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/britain/86.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on May 22, 2007, 02:18:34 PM
That is my all time favorite picture of Queen Alexandra, the whole series looks nice.

I always thought and read that the photo was taken in 1887 for the Silver Jubilee, that series of Alexandra pictures and the one with the Queen in the middle and Bertie and Alexandra on either side of her. 

I could be very, very wrong but Alexandra (and Bertie and Queen Victoria) look too young in the photo to be taken in 1896. 

The often mistaken,
-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on May 22, 2007, 03:16:48 PM
I went back to the issue and the occasion could be different. The illustration doesn't match what was written. I had always thought the photo was from the Golden Jubilee--is this what you were referring to, there wasn't a Silver Jubilee--but wondered about the mourning colors.

As to the Drawing Room, it was a big deal since they weren't very frequent. This one was held by Alexandra in place of QV but she had a large group of royals to help her out, including the Duke of Coburg, the GD of Meckleburg-Stretliz, the Duchess of Albany, Prince & Princess Christian and Princess Helena Victoria.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on May 22, 2007, 04:46:02 PM
Quote
I had always thought the photo was from the Golden Jubilee--is this what you were referring to, there wasn't a Silver Jubilee--but wondered about the mourning colors.


Thank you GDE, I meant Golden Jubilee.  See how wrong I always am!!



In my opinion they all look too young for it to be 1896, but I could be wrong.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on May 24, 2007, 01:44:45 PM
Some books say the picture was taken in 1887 for the Golden Jubilee, and in another book I saw the picture said "At the time this picture was taken the Queen was on the throne for 46 years" so that would make in 1883. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on May 25, 2007, 06:00:56 PM
So what is the verdict from the experts on the picture?  It would be interesting to know when it was taken.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: gogm on May 26, 2007, 01:59:38 PM
Alexandra's dress has a bustle, suggesting 1870s or 1880s. The 1870s bustle dresses were full-skirted, a vestige of the crinoline era, while the 1880s weren't. This looks 1880s. 1870s dresses often have square necklines, this has a vee more like the 1880s. However, Queen Victoria also has a vestige of youth in her appearance that would say 1870s. Alexandra stayed youthful and also made sure her photos were touched up to further enhance the impression. Maybe this is a photo taken in the 1880s with some pre-release retouching of the ladies.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on May 26, 2007, 02:29:56 PM
Another thing we have to note is that Bertie's beard has not grayed yet and it seems as the Queen's is hair is not fully white so it would seem that 1896 seems to late because by then the Queen Victoria's hair was totally white. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on May 26, 2007, 03:55:07 PM
Back in post #379 I wrote the occasions could be different because the description of her dress doesn't match what photo they used. That would seem to rule out the 1896 drawing room--I should've made that clearer. Perhaps it was from another such occasion earlier and they used it to illustrate? Either way, they definitely seem to be wearing mourning, including a black veil on Alexandra's part--seen in other photos, but not really showing up in this particular one, it being too dark. The grouping of the 3 seems almost definitely to be a composite photo, though since the poses of all 3 seem directly lifted from other photos--QV's being from the Golden Jubilee in 1887.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on May 26, 2007, 05:07:55 PM
Thanks for clearing that up GDE!

It was interesting to try to figure these things out and then to figure it out, but as you see in my case it was only a try!!

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Kate_S on May 29, 2007, 07:14:49 AM
I would say that from the style of dress ie very tight fitted bodice, drapery across the top of the skirt etc that it is certainly mid to late 1880s so the Golden Jubilee would seem the most likely from the clothing point of view
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on May 29, 2007, 09:44:44 PM
FYI on Youtube, there's a slideshow also providing a brief bio of Alix

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruTEW1EuFpE

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on June 01, 2007, 07:09:40 AM
I like that pic very, very much Royal Netherlands.  Looks like someone in the family came in and, "Can I snap one?"

btw, new picture I found on ebay of Alix and Bertie together.  If someone else has posted it, I'm sorry.  It appears to be shortly after they had married.

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q276/coker10/photobucketimage.jpg)

Alix looks kinda shy, doesn't she?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 04, 2007, 04:06:23 PM
Another one (thumbnail):

(http://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa20/DukeofNewJersey/Queen%20Alexandra/th_QueenAlexandraI-1.jpg) (http://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa20/DukeofNewJersey/Queen%20Alexandra/QueenAlexandraI-1.jpg)

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 04, 2007, 07:51:05 PM
Saw another one holding her dog...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on June 04, 2007, 08:25:50 PM
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/26w.jpg)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/7d_1_b1w.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Mary R. on June 06, 2007, 02:14:14 PM
When was this photo taken?

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on June 06, 2007, 03:17:37 PM
About 1903-05 I think.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 06, 2007, 07:41:19 PM
Queen for a few years...  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Mary R. on June 06, 2007, 08:05:51 PM
Just a few...
I always wonder what would have happened had Edward lived for several more years and she was consort during World War I. Any thoughts? ???

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: gogm on June 06, 2007, 09:12:27 PM
I don't think it would have made much difference. By that time, the crown's power was largely eroded and the only one who could have moderated Wilhelm II was Edward's mother, not Edward and not George!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 06, 2007, 09:42:31 PM
Not really...I read somewhere that said if Edward VII lived at that time, there will be no war. Since Willy was absolutely afraid of his uncle (who was the mind behind the Entente blockade against Germany, and also no love lost between him and his nephew). Had both him & his brother-in-law Alexander III was still on the throne. The possibility of war would be dimmer still. Willy viewed both Nicky & Georgie as light weights compared to their fathers.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Mary R. on June 07, 2007, 02:49:06 PM
I agree. The Kaiser did have an almost natural fear of his uncle. However, I was thinking more long the lines of war effort/nursing. In Pope-Hennessy's biography of Queen Mary, it cites that Queen Alexandra lacked organizational skills.  For example, during the Boer War it said her charity work was disjointed and her daughter in law was appalled at the lack of productivity. Has anyone else read anything similar?

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 07, 2007, 02:55:26 PM
Quote
Since Willy was absolutely afraid of his uncle


That seems like an overstatement... Willy did not really respect any foreign monarch.  There were may times Wilhem tried to foil Edward's travels and his plans, he was definatley not afraid of Edward.     

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: grandduchessella on June 07, 2007, 04:10:24 PM
I agree it seems rather an overstatement. There were so many forces, many having nothing to do with royal personalities or relationships, that I don't think Edward VII living a while longer could've prevented WW1. I don't even know how much Wilhelm II 'feared' his uncle--while he was Prince of Wales, Wilhelm often went out of his way to 'tweak' his uncle and cause him public embarassment--even knowing that he'd hear about it from his grandmother.

As for Queen Alexandra, she was great at the personal interaction with the wounded, etc...but, yes, organizational efforts weren't her forte.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 07, 2007, 04:26:00 PM
Quote
Wilhelm often went out of his way to 'tweak' his uncle and cause him public embarassment

When Edward was King:
-Running to Italy after Edward
-Running to Paris after Edward
-Running to Algeris
-Beating Edward at Cowes

Just to name a few...Afraid of Edward, no.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 07, 2007, 04:33:38 PM
I read about this in "The Edwardian Age":

Paraphrase:
Dagmar had come to England and Christopher of Greece was also there.  Dagmar was feeling sad about something so Alexandra dressed Christopher of Greece in one of Queen Victoria's dresses from when she met Nap. III and Empress Eugenie (this was the 1850's, the huge multi-layered skirts with bonnets, bows, ribbons and the like!) and walked him into Dagmar's room at Buckingham Palace announced as HM Queen Victoria and all of them had a good chuckle.  The servants were shocked. 

This seems like something Alexandra would do!  What fun!

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 07, 2007, 08:30:44 PM
I think Willy was really afraid of his Uncle Bertie since he was lacked his posh in politics. Also he knew that after he became king, his anti-German stance would have more of an outing. The fact Edawrd VII pushed Britian into the arms of France by his many trips and efforts with potlicians was to sent shivers down Willy's back. Another fact is that King Edward VII waited until the last years of his reign to make a state visit to Germany was not lost on the Kaiser. Another fact that his Queen, Alexandra was also ant-German was also known to Willy (even though he was an ardent admirer of his beautiful aunt). However once George V came to the throne it was different. Georgie was not an "international intriguer" like his father and remained more at home. With a pro-German queen (Queen Mary relished her German roots and kept up contact with her Aunt Augusta of Mecklenburg-Strelitz even during WWI) this time, Willy seemed less stressed that they would go on the offensive. However by that time, Bertiie's grandwork had already taken effect (despite who is on the throne).  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Mary R. on June 07, 2007, 09:21:14 PM
I don't think Queen Mary was necessarily pro-German. She certainly relished her German roots but was deeply patriotic when it came to Britain.

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 07, 2007, 11:06:07 PM
I think she had a harder time cutting her German past than Queen Alexandra, who saw it as revenge for Denmark loses of the Duchies. However, it is not to say that she was unpatrotic to GB, but she it is just not easy. Also her love of her Germanic roots was passed to her eldest son Edward VIII, who enjoyed speaking German (her brother Bertie did not share that love).  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 08, 2007, 01:34:39 AM
What evidence is there to suggest May loved her German roots? She was certainly very pro english as several quotes in JPHs biography show.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 08, 2007, 01:40:51 AM
The fact that she corresponded with her German Aunt Augusta during the war was enough prove. Adter WWI, she did later renewed her ties with her German relatives. In contrast, Queen Elisabeth of Belgium said of her German (Bavarian) family during the war" It is finished between me and them. Now there will be an iron curtain that divides us that cannot be lifted." She used the word "iron curtain" years before Chuchill coined it.  :-\