Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => The Tudors => Topic started by: lexi4 on July 17, 2005, 08:30:04 PM

Title: Elizabeth I.
Post by: lexi4 on July 17, 2005, 08:30:04 PM
I thought it was time to start a thread for Elizabeth.

Here are some of her facts.
She was born September 7, in 1533 in Greenwich Palace. The daughter of King Henry VII and Anne Boleyn.
The reign of Elizabeth began in November 1558 and lasted until her death in 1603. Her reign is referred to as The Golden Age.
She spoke several different languages. She loved hunting, horseback riding, music and dancing.
Maybe this will get us started.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Finelly on July 17, 2005, 10:45:31 PM
Of all of Henry's children, Elizabeth was the least dysfunctional.  She overcame, for the most part, the traumas of her childhood and teen years and made the most of the opportunities that faced her.

Edward and Mary were intelligent, but Elizabeth, I think, was close to brilliant.   Not only did she have the required "book learning", but she was a critical thinker with excellent strategic skills.

I admire her a lot.  One of the first feminists.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: bluetoria on July 18, 2005, 06:50:49 AM
I found the last episode of the David Starkie TV series about her very sad. It was pitiful to see so great a Queen going into such a decline and losing her mind. Of all the kings & queens of Britain, I think she still remains the greatest symbol of monarchy and the nation. The myth she created about herself - the almost mystical Virgin Queen married only to her country & 'Gloriana' - fit perfectly into the age of the Renaissance, Shakespeare, the begins of 'Britannia ruling the waves' etc.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: lexi4 on July 18, 2005, 03:56:26 PM
I agree Blue.
In some ways, she was Anne's best revenge. She ruled well. I like the story about the Spanish Armada, she refused to sit safely tucked away in her castle, but joined her troops. What a woman.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: ilyala on July 19, 2005, 12:25:37 PM
she was indeed amazing. and i think she was a lot like her mother but a little bit more caucious because of the way she grew up...
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Helen_Azar on July 19, 2005, 12:52:47 PM
Quote
Of all of Henry's children, Elizabeth was the least dysfunctional.  She overcame, for the most part, the traumas of her childhood and teen years and made the most of the opportunities that faced her.

Edward and Mary were intelligent, but Elizabeth, I think, was close to brilliant.   Not only did she have the required "book learning", but she was a critical thinker with excellent strategic skills.

I admire her a lot.  One of the first feminists.


Absolutely! Elizabeth was able to, single handedly, turn something that was a liability (her being a woman monarch) into a tremendous asset. I don't think any king has ever been able to use himself this way! Most likely all along Elizabeth had no intention of ever marrying, but she milked her single status for as long as she could, while very few realized whether she "meant it" this time or not... Her courting strategies were targeted to politically benefit her country first and foremost, not her personal life. I think that this is an excellent trait for a ruler. She was a brilliant ruler and what a stark contast to other reigning queens, Mary Stuart for one, who seemed to have been the antithesis of Elizabeth.... After Elizabeth's reign, no one can say that women are not fit to rule...

Clear evidence of the fact that Elizabeth was indeed brilliant is that at the age of 15 or 16 she was able to outwit seasoned politicians three times her age during the Thomas Seymour fiasco. Most adults would not have gotten out of that one, but she did and came out almost unscathed...
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: rskkiya on July 19, 2005, 01:04:04 PM
   While I have little love for 'Thin Lizzie' nevertheless here is a fine example of a woman who used her neurosies (sp) to her atvantage!
   Her fear of intimacy and her love/hate relationship with her parents made her focus on her brain rather than her body. Rather than risk the humiliation and suffering she witnessed with her half sister Mary's attempt to have a child - she opted to marry "England' and keep all the power in her own hands rather than give them to a man who might betray her.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: lexi4 on July 19, 2005, 03:40:24 PM
She was indeed brilliant in every way
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Sunny on July 20, 2005, 06:28:47 AM
Some favorite:)quotes:

"Though God hath raised me high, yet this I count the glory of my crown: That I have reigned with your loves."

Answer on being asked her opinion of Christ's presence in the Sacrament. " 'Twas God the word that spake it, He took the Bread and brake it; And what the word did make it That I believe, and take it."

"The use of the sea and air is common to all; neither can a title to the ocean belong to any people or private persons, forasmuch as neither nature nor public use and custom permit any possession thereof."

"I am your anointed Queen. I will never be by violence constrained to do anything. I thank God I am endued with such qualities that if I were turned out of the Realm in my petticoat I were able to live in any place in Christendom."

"I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too; and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm."

"I am no lover of pompous title, but only desire that my name may be recorded in a line or two, which shall briefly express my name, my virginity, the years of my reign, the reformation of religion under it, and my preservation of peace."

"As for me, I see no such great cause why I should either be fond to live or fear to die. I have had good experience of this world, and I know what it is to be a subject and what to be a sovereign. Good neighbours I have had, and I have met with bad: and in trust I have found treason."


Sunny
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: bluetoria on July 20, 2005, 09:34:10 AM
Thank you, Sunny, :)  for these brilliant quotations!  :D

They seem to show that she had inherited much of her father's showmanship and flair for creating the right impression of a monarch. I imagine in her own time, the myth she created about herself had a far greater impact on the majority of people than the reality of who she was (even though she was brilliant anyway).

Whatever did not fit her image, had to be disposed of. When for example, this rather unflattering miniature of her was created:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v289/bluetoria/ei.jpg)

she (unsurprisingly) disliked it and had other, far more flattering ones made.
Her ability to keep all the foreign suitors waiting, only added to her mystique. Her speeches remind me of Marie of Roumania who, I think, is the only other Queen who could have come near to Elizabeth's ability to create that image.

I do not see any similarities between Elizabeth and her mother, and I wonder what Elizabeth - intelligent as she was - thought of Anne, who imo, was really very much to blame for the cruel treatment of Queen Katherine to whom she owed a debt of loyalty. (But that's another thread!  ;D)



Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Finelly on July 20, 2005, 09:50:08 AM
Elizabeth apparently had the same build, the same figure, the same eyes, and the same long, slender fingers as her mother.  She inherited her father's chin, mouth, and red hair!

There is evidence that she treasured memory of her mother, keeping a locket or a ring that had her mother's portrait in it.  She was very private about her mother, but since she kept her cousins and other relatives around her (Carey cousins, mostly) we can assume that she felt the family ties.

Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Helen_Azar on July 20, 2005, 10:15:16 AM
IMO, Elizabeth looks amazingly like her mother, and only inherited her father's coloring.


(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/boleynmainjpg.jpg)(http://img259.imageshack.us/img259/2508/elizabethi1em.jpg)(http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/3453/elizabethi21ue.jpg)

Her personality, I think was a combination of both her parents, with lots of "hindsite 20/20" thrown in!  ;)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Helen_Azar on July 20, 2005, 10:20:18 AM
Quote
Whatever did not fit her image, had to be disposed of.


I don't blame her  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: bluetoria on July 20, 2005, 10:25:14 AM
Myabe she should have disposed of her teeth as well - weren't they all rotten?  ;D

In saying she didn't resemble her mother, I meant in her characteristics, not so much her appearance. I cannot see any character trait which she shared with Anne. Can anyone else?  
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: ChristineM on July 20, 2005, 10:59:55 AM
She was an absolutely incredible character and an amazing monarch.

In a recent television programme there was a nationwide opinion poll to find Britain's most popular monarch (and why).

Elizabeth I was a hands-down winner.   Deservedsly so in my opinon.

tsaria
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Helen_Azar on July 20, 2005, 11:13:55 AM
Quote
In saying she didn't resemble her mother, I meant in her characteristics, not so much her appearance.
 

Oh yes, I knew what you meant, BlueT. I was responding to Finelly's post.

Quote
I cannot see any character trait which she shared with Anne. Can anyone else?  


I can see many traits the mother and the daughter had in common. Both Anne and Elizabeth liked reading books and learning, both had musical talents and loved dancing, both wrote poetry, both were witty and flirtatious, and both had hot tempers and sharp tongues!   :P  ;D

Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: rskkiya on July 20, 2005, 11:28:51 AM
Quote
Myabe she should have disposed of her teeth as well - weren't they all rotten?  ;D
In saying she didn't resemble her mother, I meant in her characteristics, not so much her appearance. I cannot see any character trait which she shared with Anne. Can anyone else?  

Eating sugar was a sign of wealth - so in that respect having bad teeth was a status symbol... also considering her age - this sort of thing was not unusual... (Mary had very few real teeth when she was crowned.)

I think that both Anne B and Henry were terribly proud and willful people so she got her nature from both of them, she was a flirt (both) and witty (both) but her political turn on faith - "I won't ask so you (catholics) wont rebel" ;)  :-X well sort of... :-X
I think that Anne was religiously more pragmatic, while Henry was really down deep very Catholic in his attitude if not in his declaration.
Lizzie kept everyone guessing and would have declaired herself a hindu if it were politically expedient!
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: lexi4 on July 20, 2005, 02:04:54 PM
One of her poems
Written on a Wall at Woodstock


             1 Oh Fortune, thy wresting wavering state
             2 Hath fraught with cares my troubled wit,
             3 Whose witness this present prison late
             4 Could bear, where once was joy's loan quit.
             5 Thou causedst the guilty to be loosed
             6 From bands where innocents were inclosed,
             7 And caused the guiltless to be reserved,
             8  And freed those that death had well deserved.
             9 But all herein can be nothing wrought,
           10 So God send to my foes all they have thought.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Mgmstl on July 20, 2005, 07:49:52 PM
Quote
IMO, Elizabeth looks amazingly like her mother, and only inherited her father's coloring.


(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/boleynmainjpg.jpg)(http://img259.imageshack.us/img259/2508/elizabethi1em.jpg)(http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/3453/elizabethi21ue.jpg)

Her personality, I think was a combination of both her parents, with lots of "hindsite 20/20" thrown in!  ;)




Helen if I can find the death mask of Elizabeth of York there is also a resemblance between the two.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: PssMarieAmelie on July 20, 2005, 08:22:16 PM
I am not a big fan of Elizabeth I, but I think she demands respect(rightly) from most people. Me for one.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: bluetoria on July 21, 2005, 06:33:15 AM
Quote
Lizzie kept everyone guessing and would have declaired herself a hindu if it were politically expedient!


;D Yes, I agree. I think she was probably the most religiously tolerant monarch of the age and it is, as I wrote on another thread, a great pity that the Pope decided to excommunicate her. Had he not done so, there would have been far greater freedom of religion in England...and fewer martyrs.

I am still intrigued about her real thoughts about her mother. I do not know that she did anything to try to restore her 'image' - perhaps she felt that would have been disloyal to her father.
It would be interesting too to know her real views of Mary. It sometimes seems that they were both so wary of one another that it prevented them from being close, but I always feel that they did care about one another & each recognized the raw deal that the other had had through their father's frequent dropping of wives!
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: ilyala on July 21, 2005, 07:21:07 AM
i think henry 4th of france was also a very tolerant monarch, but he lived in a lot less tolerant country so he couldn't exercise his tolerance as much...

i also think that no matter her personal opinion, elizabeth had to cherish her mother's memory publicly, because she was her mother :). hurting her mother's memory would have led to hurting her own image.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Tsarfan on July 23, 2005, 01:03:38 PM
I often think of Elizabeth I and Abraham Lincoln as similar in a key regard -- both were complex mixes of strengths and weaknesses who arrived on the scene at a time of crisis when their particular strengths were desperately needed and their particular weaknesses were not fatal.

Both assumed power surrounded by considerable doubts about their rights and abilities to rule.  Many Englishmen and most continental Europeans viewed Elizabeth as illegitimate.  Lincoln took the presidency with less than 40% of the popular vote and amid widespread conviction that he had neither the experience nor the political capital to be effective.

Elizabeth played her initial hand brilliantly by defying expectations and holding off on forming a government until she had a clear read of the political lay of the land as the dust settled around Mary's death.  When she finally did, it was an assemblage that did not tip observers off to her true views of contentious issues.  Lincoln employed the equally-brilliant tactic of forming his first Cabinet largely of people who had run against him for the nomination.  It gave him access to their talent and experience, it gave them a stake in the game he was about to play, and it allowed him to keep his eye on them.

In times when factional strife had reached extremes of violence, both Elizabeth and Lincoln displayed in heroic proportions what we today call "emotional intelligence".  They were deeply anchored in their personal convictions, but they displayed clear understanding of the viewpoints of all adversaries.  Consequently, they both avoided moral absolutes in choosing their positions.  Elizabeth, while a committed Protestant, famously said that she did not desire a window into her subjects' souls and that the choice of religion should be a matter of personal conscience -- almost unheard of in an age of state religions.  Lincoln, while something short of a racial egalitarian, personally abhorred slavery, but he was extremely flexible in his political handling of it.  As with Elizabeth, his goal was to restore peace to a splintered nation, and he was willing to keep slavery intact, to abolish it altogether, or to land in between in order to keep his country intact.

Both were notoriously indecisive.  Elizabeth drove her councillors to distraction by chronic delays on key matters, preferring instead that they first attempted to settle issues among themselves.  In fact, she generally preferred not to make a decision until it became unavoidable.  Lincoln likewise procrastinated on taking authority away from his designates, giving them all possible berth before stepping in.  His procrastination in removing McClellan probably prolonged the Civil War considerably.  But they both happened to live in times when passions were so overheated and issues so intractable that no one person -- even a monarch or a president -- had any chance of prevailing through his or her own will alone.  Their instincts to "empower" their subordinates had the effect of encouraging talented people of different persuasions both to employ their talents and to develop personal loyalty to them, thereby extending their reach far beyond their own abilities.

Elizabeth was not a flawless monarch.  But I cannot imagine one better suited to the throne for England's launch into the modern age.  

Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: lexi4 on July 23, 2005, 10:55:37 PM
Tsarfan,
I had never made that comparison. But you are right. Your points are well written and the comparisons you draw are factual. It shed a different light on the two for me. Thank you for your efforts. It is for posts like this that I am here. You made me think.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Louis_Charles on July 24, 2005, 12:16:08 PM
Tsarfan,

What an interesting post, and a comparison that had never occured to me. But it is right on the money.

Simon a/k/a Louis_Charles
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: emeraldeyes on July 27, 2005, 03:21:47 PM
I have always admired Elizabeth's 'guts'.  She acted so decisively, and although she may have had private doubts about some of her actions, she never let herself appear vulnerable.  She knew that any weakness she showed to the men around her would be exploited to her detriment.  
I also love the way she always referred to herself as a 'prince'.  And what is that quote about being her 'father's daughter'?

Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: palimpsest on December 17, 2005, 11:42:19 AM
(http://img393.imageshack.us/img393/5546/34101141nf.jpg)

This is a undated photo of an oil painting of British monarch Queen Elizabeth I by painter John Bettes. (AP Photo)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: palimpsest on December 17, 2005, 11:44:11 AM
(http://img393.imageshack.us/img393/5432/47023602wu.jpg)

Portrait of England's Queen Elizabeth I, part of an exhibit "A Decade of Collecting - Celebrating 10 Years of Acquisitions 1990-1999" that is on display at Washington's Folger Shakespeare Library through Nov. 25, 2000. (AP Photo/Folger Shakespeare Library)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: palimpsest on December 17, 2005, 11:45:48 AM
(http://img393.imageshack.us/img393/9839/60172769ae.jpg)

Virginia first lady Roxane Gilmore stands in front of the newly renovated portrait of Queen Elizabeth I in the Governor's Mansion, Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2001, in Richmond, Va. When curators began cleaning the painting during a 2 1/2-year restoration, they found that profound, often harmful, alterations had been made to the painting through the centuries. A new background had been added, a chair had been added, a cross had been added, and the queen's right hand was repositioned. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Alexa Welch Edlund)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: palimpsest on December 17, 2005, 11:49:18 AM
(http://img406.imageshack.us/img406/5664/69901024ql.jpg)

A letter by Britain's Queen Elizabeth I expressing her outrage at the imprisonment of Mary Queen of Scots, at a pre-sale photocall in London, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2003, the letter is estimated to fetch 60,000-90,000 pounds, US$ 93,600-140,400 when it is auctioned as part of the Harry and Brigitte Spiro collection of English Historical Documents sale on Dec. 3, 2003. (AP Photo/Richard Lewis)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: imperial angel on March 23, 2006, 11:43:59 AM
Elizabeth I was one of the most brilliant rulers of all time, not just England. She knew how to create a image like her father did, but one that not only was of splendor, and magnificence, but one of real substance. She was what she purported to be, and thus she wins respect for what she really was not just the glitter that fades with time as in the case of her father. She was very tolerant, pragmatic, and non emotional about things in an age when people were all the above and who often put their own good represented as the people's good in front of the people's actual good. She is to be admired, and many things she said are great quotes even now, and very modern as well. I can think of some other things she said, among them '' There is only one God, and the rest is a dispute about trifles'', that show how enlightened she was for the age she lived in.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: LORENZO on May 27, 2006, 12:16:16 PM
I'm writing my degree thesis about Queen Elizabeth I and I found many usefull books about her and her time, but I'm looking for the oath and the speeches of the Queen and a description of Elizabeth's ceremony of Coronation; may anyone help me? Thank you!
PS: read the books wrote by Frances A. Yates, in particular Astrea. The Imperial theme in the Sixteenth Century, it's a great book!!!!  ;)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: bell_the_cat on May 28, 2006, 08:49:08 AM
Quote
I'm writing my degree thesis about Queen Elizabeth I and I found many usefull books about her and her time, but I'm looking for the oath and the speeches of the Queen and a description of Elizabeth's ceremony of Coronation; may anyone help me? Thank you!
PS: read the books wrote by Frances A. Yates, in particular Astrea. The Imperial theme in the Sixteenth Century, it's a great book!!!!  ;)

I haven't read it, but

Coronation: A History of Kingship and the British Monarchy
by Roy Strong

ought to have an account of Elizabeth's crowning (and refer to sources)!

Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Silja on May 31, 2006, 05:35:29 AM
Quote
I'm writing my degree thesis about Queen Elizabeth I and I found many usefull books about her and her time, but I'm looking for the oath and the speeches of the Queen and a description of Elizabeth's ceremony of Coronation; may anyone help me? Thank you!
PS: read the books wrote by Frances A. Yates, in particular Astrea. The Imperial theme in the Sixteenth Century, it's a great book!!!!  ;)


For the speeches have a look at Elizabeth I: Collected Works by Leah S. Markus, et al.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: palimpsest on June 12, 2006, 12:21:30 PM
(http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e321/palimpsest/royal/30478579.jpg)

In this photo released by Historical Portraits, in London on Monday June 12, 2006 a centuries-old portrait of England's Queen Elizabeth I as a gangly teen is seen. The portrait will go up for sale Thursday for 800,000 pounds (US $1.5 million, euro 1.2 million). London art dealer Philip Mould discovered the work, attributing it as authentically Elizabethan rather than a contemporary copy, as was originally though. "Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I when a Princess" is one of only two contemporaneous portraits of the queen as a young woman. The other hangs in the private collection of the royal family. Mould's London art gallery acquired the piece at the end of last year, after it had been in a private collection in Spain for 50 years. (AP Photo/HO Historicalportraits.com)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: bell_the_cat on June 13, 2006, 01:09:47 AM
It looks to my (non art-historian) eyes like a poor copy of the other one.  :)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Kimberly on June 13, 2006, 03:36:22 PM
So, I take it you won't be the mysterious telephone bidder then Bell. ;D
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: bell_the_cat on June 14, 2006, 01:07:34 AM
Quote
So, I take it you won't be the mysterious telephone bidder then Bell. ;D


Just making sure the other bidders don't go too high!  ;)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: PrincessIncarnate on September 11, 2006, 09:23:15 PM
It makes me mad that people would buy historical documents and paintings: unless they plan on loaning them to museums...I think they should be publically displayed and not harbored away in private homes by collectors...reminds me of pirates or something...

Also, I am curious about Elizabeth keeping a portrait of her mother in a ring...in the movie with Anne-Marie Duff the last scene shows a latch on the royal ring to contain a mini portrait of Anne...was this accurate or a fabrication of the director?

Also, in the very beginning of this blog someone wrote she was the daughter of Henry VII, wasn't her father Henry VIII? Confused..  ???

Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Kimberly on September 12, 2006, 02:14:44 AM
It was a typo I think ;)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: PrincessIncarnate on September 12, 2006, 03:21:46 AM
Ah, I thought so! Just wanted to check because I'm surrounded by such educated folks I just want to make sure I'm on the same page  ;)
Title: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Lucien on February 27, 2009, 08:15:51 AM
Elizabeth´s superguns:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7899831.stm
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on May 04, 2009, 08:01:45 PM
Some pics of that fantastic lady.

(http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/namerica/usstates/aaposter/vaqueenelizabeth.jpg)
(http://www.geocities.com/anoria_j/Medieval_images/1600_Elizabeth_I_Rainbow_Portrait.jpg)
(http://www.history.com/encyclopedia/wa/images/WHistQueenElizabethI.gif)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Rani on June 02, 2010, 02:55:16 PM
(http://i49.tinypic.com/fk5wuv.jpg)

Elizabeth (left on the picture) with Mary, Eduard VI., Heinrich VIII. and Thomas Morus.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on June 15, 2010, 02:47:53 PM
The Queen
(http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt94/KaiserinCharlotte/RoyalLadies/ET.jpg)
(http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt94/KaiserinCharlotte/RoyalLadies/ET2.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Kimberly on June 16, 2010, 03:19:46 AM
I have seen the coronation portrait in real life...it is truely stunning and my favourite portrait of her.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on June 16, 2010, 03:23:56 PM
I agree with you Kimberly, in my opinion the coronation portrait is one of E I's best portraits :-0
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Empresses/ElizabethEng.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on June 30, 2010, 03:20:33 PM
With father and half siblings
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Palace/Children.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: toscany on July 01, 2010, 08:35:58 AM
With father and half siblings
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Palace/Children.jpg)

It is interesting how the artist paints Mary and Elizabeth with so much likeness!  There were as different as night and day...
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on July 16, 2010, 07:25:49 PM
The Queen
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Queens/Isabel.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Rani on July 17, 2010, 06:38:43 PM
(http://i947.photobucket.com/albums/ad313/Isana1988/1591.jpg)

(http://i947.photobucket.com/albums/ad313/Isana1988/0872.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on July 17, 2010, 11:38:57 PM
Don't you think Elizabeth looks a lot like her mother? Or it's just me who thinks that?
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on July 18, 2010, 02:30:30 PM
Wonderful pics Rani!
I think that she resembles her mother very much, although the color of her hair reminds me more her father
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on July 18, 2010, 02:57:26 PM
Yes, her father was red-haired and she got it from him. But her eyes, her mouth... I really think it's all Anne Boleyn! She was undoubtely a Boleyn and a Tudor. And Henry had the nerves to say she wasn't his daughter!
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Silja on July 25, 2010, 02:32:40 PM
And Henry had the nerves to say she wasn't his daughter!

Where does he say this? As far as I know he never doubted his paternity.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on July 25, 2010, 02:58:00 PM
Only when he wanted to get rid of Anne Boleyn and wanted to find her guilty of treason. I've heard that... I might be wrong, of course
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Vecchiolarry on July 25, 2010, 09:33:44 PM
Hi,

I cannot believe that Henry didn't think Elizabeth was his daughter.  She, of all his children, looked the most like him and can readily be seen to be Henry VIII's issue more than Mary or Edward or even Henry Richmond...

Larry
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on July 27, 2010, 10:17:46 AM
Are you saying that Henry VIII said that Elizabeth wasn't her daughter to have a reason for condemn Anne Boleyn to death? I haven't heard nothing like this before... quite interesting.
But what after Anne's death? He still kept that attitude to her daughter?
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on July 27, 2010, 12:46:13 PM
Well, after Anne's death, Elizabeth spent sometime away of the court, but later she returned, and she got close to Katherine Parr. I think he always knew she was his daughter. What I've read about Henry doubting of Elizabeth's paternity was only to promote Anne Boleyn's fall.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Kimberly on July 27, 2010, 01:29:57 PM
Can I ask where you read this?
At her trial, there was no mention of Elizabeth being a bastard, even though Anne had (supposedly) "cohabited with her brother and other accomplices".
According to Alison Weir, it was Mary who had convinced herself that Elizabeth looked like Smeaton.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on July 27, 2010, 01:36:26 PM
I found this information in a Brazilian website, two or three years ago, I think. Sure, as most of times, I might be completely mistaken  :-[   But I also know Princess Mary though she wasn't her father's daughter. She had her reasons. Am I correct to say Mary grew to love Elizabeth? Or at  least, maybe some affection?
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on August 02, 2010, 03:42:46 PM
Henry VIII called Mary ilegitimate when he knew that Catherine of Aragon wouldn't be able to gave him a son (before that I read that he loved his daughter very much) perhaps a similar situation happened with young Elizabeth, but really I'm not sure
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Silja on August 03, 2010, 11:50:22 AM
Henry VIII called Mary ilegitimate when he knew that Catherine of Aragon wouldn't be able to gave him a son (before that I read that he loved his daughter very much) perhaps a similar situation happened with young Elizabeth, but really I'm not sure

When his marriage to Anne was annulled Elizabeth naturally became illegitimate, but Henry VIII never disputed his paternity. He continued to love both his daughters (or what he would consider love) but became furious with Mary when she wouldn't submit to his will.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on August 03, 2010, 03:29:32 PM
Some portraits
With her favourite
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Queens/ElI.png)
From a procession
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Queens/Procession_portrait.jpg)
Her funeral
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Queens/Funeral_Elisabeth.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Lady Nikolaievna on August 03, 2010, 03:46:22 PM
Is it just me or her hand on the sencond one is not there?
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on August 04, 2010, 02:44:12 PM
It must be there, but this is only a close up of the paiting XD
What dress!!
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Queens/Elizabeth.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Royal Bulgaria on September 01, 2010, 04:13:28 PM
You guys posted rare portraits of Elizabeth ,but not my favourite one:

Young Elizabeth,about 1546, by an unknown artist (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3d/El_bieta_I_lat_13.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Royal Bulgaria on September 01, 2010, 04:15:14 PM
(http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e321/palimpsest/royal/30478579.jpg)

In this photo released by Historical Portraits, in London on Monday June 12, 2006 a centuries-old portrait of England's Queen Elizabeth I as a gangly teen is seen. The portrait will go up for sale Thursday for 800,000 pounds (US $1.5 million, euro 1.2 million). London art dealer Philip Mould discovered the work, attributing it as authentically Elizabethan rather than a contemporary copy, as was originally though. "Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I when a Princess" is one of only two contemporaneous portraits of the queen as a young woman. The other hangs in the private collection of the royal family. Mould's London art gallery acquired the piece at the end of last year, after it had been in a private collection in Spain for 50 years. (AP Photo/HO Historicalportraits.com)

I believe this one was the image, but it's deleted..
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: katmaxoz on September 06, 2010, 02:54:56 AM

In this photo released by Historical Portraits, in London on Monday June 12, 2006 a centuries-old portrait of England's Queen Elizabeth I as a gangly teen is seen. The portrait will go up for sale Thursday for 800,000 pounds (US $1.5 million, euro 1.2 million). London art dealer Philip Mould discovered the work, attributing it as authentically Elizabethan rather than a contemporary copy, as was originally though. "Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I when a Princess" is one of only two contemporaneous portraits of the queen as a young woman. The other hangs in the private collection of the royal family. Mould's London art gallery acquired the piece at the end of last year, after it had been in a private collection in Spain for 50 years. (AP Photo/HO Historicalportraits.com)

I believe this one was the image, but it's deleted..

this is the picture
(http://inlinethumb38.webshots.com/12069/2075690370102753164S600x600Q85.jpg) (http://entertainment.webshots.com/photo/2075690370102753164DxiGUa)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Royal Bulgaria on September 06, 2010, 04:20:22 AM
Then i'm not re posting :)))
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on September 06, 2010, 02:52:40 PM
Posted a detail of this portrait posts below, now the full verssion. Queen Elizabeth I on a procession
(http://i686.photobucket.com/albums/vv226/KaiserinAlzbeta/Royals/ProcessionPortrait.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Yelena Aleksandrovna on July 07, 2011, 12:12:03 PM
Print showing the Queen printed on the ILN
(http://i601.photobucket.com/albums/tt94/KaiserinCharlotte/Vintage%20Dreams/elisabeth1.jpg)
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Suzanne on September 20, 2012, 10:10:56 AM
Fascinating new book about Elizabeth I's correspondence with her fellow monarchs - everyone from Mary, Queen of Scots to Philip II of Spain to Ivan the Terrible of Russia

http://www.royalhistorian.com/the-tudor-book-reviews-8-a-monarchy-of-letters-royal-correspondence-and-english-diplomacy-in-the-reign-of-elizabeth-i-by-rayne-allinson/
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Suzanne on September 29, 2012, 10:54:49 AM
Another interesting recent book about Elizabeth I

Heretic Queen: Queen Elizabeth I and the Wars of Religion

http://www.royalhistorian.com/the-tudor-book-reviews-9-heretic-queen-queen-elizabeth-i-and-the-wars-of-religion-by-susan-ronald/
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Suzanne on August 06, 2013, 12:09:07 PM
My review of Elizabeth's Bedfellows by Anna Whitelock - interesting social history of the Elizabethan court

http://www.royalhistorian.com/elizabeths-bedfellows-an-intimate-history-of-the-queens-court-by-anna-whitelock-review/
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on March 27, 2014, 06:22:16 PM
I have some books on Elizabeth I and the other Tudors:
Before the Armada R.B.Wernham
After the Armada     '
The Return of the Armada " all heavy duty historical reading on Elizabeth Is foreign policy and wars
The Armada G Mattingly a excellent history of the Armada
Treason in Tudor England lacy Baldwin Smith a good book on the subject
The Dukes of Norfolk D.G. D.G. Robinson deals with the leading noble family in England during the Tudors
Elizabeth's Irish wars Cyril Falls a older but still good book on the subject
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on April 10, 2014, 06:20:28 PM
a couple more on EI
Elizabeth's spymaster: Francis Walsingham and the secret war that saved England Robert Hutchinson a bio of Walsingham EI 1500 secret policeman/spy chief
The Queens Bed Anna Whitelock a new book on QEIs ladies in waiting
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Laura Mabee on August 13, 2015, 06:46:42 PM
I'm looking to purchase a beautifully illustrated coffee table book on Elizabeth I, but don't know what to buy. Can I get any suggestions from the lovely members of the AP?
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Kimberly on August 14, 2015, 01:21:50 PM
Hi Laura. Not going to be much help but I only have a few ( rather tatty and old ) paperbacks on Elizabeth 1st.....she is not my most favourite historical figure, ( Treason). I think there is a rather nice book written by Anne Somerset out there you might want to have a look at though. Maybe a Liz fan will come to your aid although these boards are painfully quiet recently.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: Laura Mabee on August 14, 2015, 04:47:07 PM
Thank you so much Kimberly for the suggestion. I will take a look into Anne Somerset's book. The book is for a girlfriend who doesn't have anything on Elizabeth I yet. I was hoping to get her something visually impressive to start.
Title: Re: Elizabeth I.
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on August 21, 2016, 07:08:14 PM
The miniseries Elizabeth R is on youtube.