Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => The Windsors => Topic started by: Amani on August 16, 2005, 03:49:55 AM

Title: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Amani on August 16, 2005, 03:49:55 AM
A place to post pics and info. about Alix. Share your favorite photos of her.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on August 19, 2005, 08:09:17 AM
There were a series of photographs from that sitting. Some she's seated in the chair, others she's standing. It was first published in the ILN in 1905 'The Latest Picture of Her Majesty'. It was widely reproduced on postcards.

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/3661b.jpg)

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/2171411656.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Richard_Maybery on August 19, 2005, 08:25:53 AM
As Princess of Wales, date unknown.

(http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a214/Richard1961/RF_87_edited.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on August 19, 2005, 09:05:33 AM
Quote
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/3661b.jpg)

First, it's a pet.

Quote

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/2171411656.jpg)


Now, it's a stole!

Sorry for quoting photos :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: LenelorMiksi on August 19, 2005, 08:38:03 PM
Whenever I see photos of QA with her daughters grown-up I'm always amazed at how young A looks.  If I didn't know, I would think all four were sisters.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Richard_Maybery on August 20, 2005, 04:04:56 AM
Very nice pics, blanche. I suspect many of the photos of Alexandra as queen were retouched. No-one could look as unlined as that at 62 (the 1906 photo).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on August 20, 2005, 04:20:33 AM
Yes Richard, we know that was the case.  The famous photograph from the time of Coronation that has not been retouched gives us an idea of what she actually looked like a mere five years later........

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v404/SMROD/scan0003.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Donielle on August 24, 2005, 08:31:20 AM
She was lovely.Certainly loved animals,tiny spaniels,The Borzoi and even a tiny kitten.Although her marriage was difficult.She was a good mother?-D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 24, 2005, 08:37:38 AM
A good mother . . .? It depends on your point of view, Donielle. Certainly absolutely adored her children - they were the centre of her world, and she gave them all her attention. At the same time, their education was not particularly taxing, and she had a tendency (like most of her family) to stop them growing up. She was so childlike herself - she both looked and thought like a young woman well into old age - she always wanted her children to stay as young as possible. She suffocated Toria with her possessivness, and when someone would suggest a marriage for Toria, Alix would appear amiable and agreeable, but later she would protest that she had not heard a word of the conversation. So whether or not she was a good mother depends on your definition of a good mother . . .
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Donielle on August 24, 2005, 08:49:24 AM
She did indeed have a hearing problem ,correct ,that she was  partially or fully deaf?A good mother in my estimation is one who genuinely wants children,nurtures and devotes considerable time and effort into their upbringing and disciplines them appropriately when necessary.Oh,one more requirement.A good mother is one who does not devour her children when pre-menstrual.-D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 24, 2005, 08:58:23 AM
She inherited hereditary deafness from her mother, Queen Louise. It atarted out not too bad but the older she got the worse it got, and it was always aggravted in stressful situations. Her bout of rheumatic fever in 1867 excerberated it, and by the time she died she was both blind and deaf. 'How very sad,' her daughter-in-law Queen Mary wrote 'For this beautiful woman to have come to this.'
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 24, 2005, 09:47:03 AM
As is well known, Queen Alexandra started the fashionable 'Alexandra Limp' after her bout with rheumatic fever. however, she also started another fashion craze. She was very self-conscious about a scar on her neck, and as a result wore dresses with high necks and plenty of neck jewelry. Immediately, society ladies began emulating her. The origin of the scar is not clearly known - it was apparently the result of a childhood accident, but some people suspected a suicide attempt . . .
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on August 24, 2005, 10:25:01 AM
Suicide attempt?  What??  You can't just leave us all hanging like that!  More details s'il vous plait.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 24, 2005, 11:29:20 AM
Quote
Suicide attempt?  What??  You can't just leave us all hanging like that!  More details s'il vous plait.



I wish I could give you more details, emeraldeyes, but that's all I know . . .  :-/

The scar was rumoured to be the result of a suicide attempt, but it was surely just a rumour . . .
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 24, 2005, 11:59:42 AM
Quote
Prince_Lieven where did you hear this? :o


That most reliable of sources, wikipedia! I had read it somewhere before too, but I don't know where (head like a sieve!)  :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on August 24, 2005, 12:26:54 PM
From David Duff's 'Alexandra, Princess and Queen'.....

"Fever, 'white leg' and rheumatism in the knee joint were not the sum of Alexandra's troubles.  Her preganancy [with Louise] and illness had brought out in her the otosclerosis inherited from her mother.  With each passing week she became more deaf.  She was adult now, had endured long agony and been near to death.  The deafness came down as a curtain between her and those who did not know her well.  No longer could she keep pace with the smart chatter at social gatherings.  She retreated into the small world which she knew best and loved the most, the world of her children and family, of her home and animals.  Her interest also turned to the care of those who had suffered as she had done, to the help of those in trouble, to a love which covered all in need.  She fought to stop the curtain falling between herself and Bertie, but she was hard pressed."

I haven't managed to ascertain what caused the scar on her neck; it was alleged, at the time of the negotiations for the marriage, when various people were attempting to discredit the Glucksburgs and so prevent the match, that it had been caused by scrofula, which was a complaint that, at that time, was synonymous with poverty and negligence.  Apparently this information originated from a source close to Ernst of Coburg and Baron Stockmar; I think however it was , along with all the other falsehoods being perpetrated about Alexandra and her family, ultimately disproved.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 24, 2005, 12:59:12 PM
Poor Alix . . . she was not physically robust, unlike QV and family, and she passed this on to her children - of them all, only George reached 70 and all were outlived by three of QV's children!

Martyn, is Alexandra, Princess and Queen a good book? Would you recommend it? (my birthday is tomorrow, you see, so I will soon be a man of means!  :))
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on August 24, 2005, 01:10:59 PM
PL, it isn't a bad book at all, and I think that David Duff is a good writer.  His work, 'Hessian Tapestry', which deals with Alice and her family is superb.

I think that there is another on Alix by Georgina Battiscombe, but I don't know how the two compare.

Please allow me to wish you all the very best for your birthday and to hope that you receive all that wish for.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on August 25, 2005, 12:52:51 PM
In another thread, it was noted that Prince Philip's mother Alice who also suffered from deafness, had a slightly perturbed (or what you call 'guarded') look on her face in pictures. As Alix's deafness was more advanced by 1894, she would have been doing her best to follow the photographer's instructions with her eyes, as his voice would have been been a muffled hum in the distance, at best. Although Grace is right...she lost that certain something in her eyes after her darling Eddy died... :'(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on August 25, 2005, 06:11:04 PM
Prince_L happy belated birthday. I would get the Duff, Battiscombe and Pope-Hennessey books. They are all really inexpensive if you look at the online stores.

Pope-Hennessey is the best bio on QM though, as Martyn says, is a bit reverential. Still the access to the archives was great. Matriarch by Anne Edwards has a lot of errors. I'd love a new bio. I like the P-H so much because he gives a comprehensive look at her life not just the 'good part' when she had jewels and was Queen.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on August 27, 2005, 08:28:07 PM
I can't get enough photographs of my royal favorite, Queen Alexandra.  I always wanted to do a photo-book about her, and would love to get into the royal archives!Can anyone post a few of the early photos of her shortly before and after her engagement to Bertie?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 28, 2005, 07:04:12 AM
I found this while looking around. It's listed as Alix, but I don't know if it is . . . perhaps someone else knows?

(http://www.antiquemapsandprints.com/scansj/j-20887.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on August 28, 2005, 09:11:51 AM
Well it does look like her.......

Do you have any idea of the name of the artist?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 28, 2005, 09:17:06 AM
I wish I could tell you, Martyn but I was pottering around on google images, and I put in 'Queen Alexandra' and this showed up on page 5. It is from a website called antiquemapsandprints.com or something like that.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 28, 2005, 09:37:28 AM
Sorry.  :( There was also this pic of George V on the site:

(http://www.antiquemapsandprints.com/scansj/j-20890.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on August 28, 2005, 09:38:32 AM
A piece of text above the pics reads:  VANITY FAIR CARTOONS 1906-1912
Very collectible coloured lithographs by Spy, Ape and others.
Becoming increasingly hard to find. These years include :-

I don't know if this helps at all . . .
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on August 28, 2005, 09:49:38 AM
Is it the hardback edition?  

Because it doesn't feature anywhere in my paperback edition of this book.....

Would you have a look Blanche and see if there is an attribution, please? [I hate mysteries like this.....lol]
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on September 01, 2005, 03:30:19 AM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/8e_1_b.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/powf.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on September 01, 2005, 03:47:49 AM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/59_3.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/cdv92-05.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on September 01, 2005, 08:17:42 AM
Thank you so much dear Grace, for posting those beautiful pictures of Alix! I espcially love the second one, of her looking through the "window." I love those old studio props! What a unique hairstyle! Suits her very well, don't you think? I prefer that look to the "fringe" of the 1880's. Such beauty, elegance and refinement...there will never be another like Alix...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on September 01, 2005, 09:06:15 AM
Thank you Grace for these beautiful photos, most of which I had not seen before.  I love the early photos of her at the time of her marriage--thin, frail, lovely.  She's my favorite royal, perhaps because I feel sorry for her that her marriage faded  as well as her own personal health.  She was such a figure of beauty and style for her time, perhaps the most photographed woman of the Victorian age. It is so wonderful that hundreds of her photographs survive.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on September 01, 2005, 10:30:10 AM
That severe hairstyle looks wonderful on Alix, though on others it could make them look gaunt and hollow-cheeked (like Princess Alice did sometimes) . . .
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on September 02, 2005, 07:41:51 AM
Thank you all - I'm pleased you like these photos.  :D  

Prince Lieven - yes, Alix, with her beautiful features could wear any hairstyle.  I think it was Vicky who criticised some of the newer hairstyles at the time saying "that would only look good on Aunt Alix...".

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/alex.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on September 02, 2005, 07:43:35 AM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/59_1_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on September 02, 2005, 09:53:34 AM
When Alix and Bertie visited Berlin in 1909, Dona, who was, I think, about 15 years Alix's junior, apprently looked more like Alix's mother!  ;D

When she was 50, Bertie's friend Lord Carrington remarked - 'yes, quite beautiful. About 35, apprently'!  :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mandie, the Gothic Empress on September 02, 2005, 08:26:29 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v477/MMPC/Alexandra.jpg)

Queen Alexandra colored by me.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Jackswife on September 11, 2005, 03:32:42 PM
 It's amazing how little Alexandra's looks changed as she aged. Even pictures of her in her 50s showed that she still had a stunning complexion and great posture. Very much one of the great beauties of her day, even I think surpassing Lillie Langtry herself. ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on September 11, 2005, 03:52:39 PM
Alix's appearence as she aged was certainly remarkable. At 50 she still looked 30.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Speedycat on September 11, 2005, 04:48:47 PM
With her sister Thyra.  Left this image a bit larger so you can appreciate the scope of this amazing room.  The caption is in Greek so I have no idea where this is, perhaps Sandringham?

(http://img310.imageshack.us/img310/8211/thyraandalexandradrawingroom7b.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Speedycat on September 11, 2005, 07:40:10 PM
With her mother and sister Dagmar.

(http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/1540/queenlouisedagmaralexandra8as.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on September 12, 2005, 08:23:57 AM
Thank you, Speedycat! I especially love the second one you posted of Queen Louise and her daughters. I love looking at all the framed pictures in the background, figuring out who they all are! So far I've picked out George and May on the left (engagement photo), Sophie and Tino's engagement photo, a painting of Thyra, and on the table beside them, May & George! Does anyone else do this too?  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on September 12, 2005, 09:03:56 AM
I love looking at the background of photos to see what is there, but I can rarely identify anything/anyone that may be present.  I just find it interesting to look beyond the dominant image.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Speedycat on September 12, 2005, 09:13:30 AM
Quote
Thank you, Speedycat! I especially love the second one you posted of Queen Louise and her daughters. I love looking at all the framed pictures in the background, figuring out who they all are! So far I've picked out George and May on the left (engagement photo), Sophie and Tino's engagement photo, a painting of Thyra, and on the table beside them, May & George! Does anyone else do this too?  ;D

Glad you like them.  Too bad my scanner is just not as good as I want it to be.  The orginals are perfectly clear and sharp and no nasty yellow and blue lines running through them.  I am on a 'scanning spree' lately as I have a new book "Hellinniki Dynazteia" from Greece.  All captions are in Greece, but since the entire book is mostly extremely high quality photos I can't complain.  90% are of the Greek Royal Family(see some of my new posts in the Greek Forum), but they do have some other relatives in there too.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Caleb on November 16, 2005, 04:30:06 PM
Yes Alexandra was a beautiful woman, who aged better than many of the other royals. But I must say Queen Louise didn't necessarily age well but she did seem to have that kindly, grandmotherly expression.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Tania+ on November 16, 2005, 05:16:16 PM
Michael G.,

Could it be the shape of her head, her profile, the lower part of her face below her nose to her chin? That's what strikes me as being similar to Princess Margaret. Other than that I cannot see resemblance.

Tatiana


Quote


In the first picture I notice quite a resemblance to Princess Margaret when she was younger, and I can't explain exactly what it is, but it is there in my view.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 17, 2005, 02:02:18 AM
Hi speedycat, don't quote me on this but I don't think that photo is at Sandringham, more likely Marlborough House. I like the decor!! :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Svetabel on November 18, 2005, 03:19:22 AM
Back to Queen Alexandra :)

One of my favourite pics of her.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/feomarie/alexa.jpg)

Lovely dress! :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on November 18, 2005, 03:53:13 AM
That dress is stunning.....

Presumably from the mid 1860's, it really is a fine example of this fashion.  I love the large watermark pattern of the moiré silk, which is best displayed on the large scale of the flat-fronted crinoline.  The contrast of the lighter coloured lace trimming is a nice touch.  My only regret is that we can never know the colour of this costume ( I would love to think that it is purple though.....)

This is quite a sophisticated day toilette and shows us that Alix's good taste and sense of style was already fully developed in the first years of her marriage; how she must have enjoyed being able to indulge her passion for dress after the relatively impoverished days in Denmark, when she and Dagmar helped to make their own clothes......
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Svetabel on November 18, 2005, 04:02:37 AM
Quote
That dress is stunning.....

 My only regret is that we can never know the colour of this costume ( I would love to think that it is purple though.....)



Purple? Possibly dark-blue? Actually I regret too that the photo is black and white  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 18, 2005, 06:51:59 AM
I recall reading that after the death of Eddy she wore suttle mourning for the rest of her life, greys etc.


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on November 18, 2005, 07:51:30 AM
Purple, maroon and lilac were all popular shades in the 1860's, suitable for young married women and matrons (purple and liac also being permissible for half-mourning)

I have seen a few garments from this period that are made of moiré and which have been in these particular shades.....

I suppose that it could have been dark green or brown, or perhaps royal blue.....?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grand Duke on November 20, 2005, 01:21:31 PM

Queen Alexandra

(http://www.fabergetheperfectgift.com/images/queen_alexandra.jpg)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/46/200px-Alexandra_of_Denmark.JPG) in her coronation robes
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: isabel on November 20, 2005, 02:44:29 PM
She was the only who visited her grand child, Jhon, when he was living out of his family.

Poor little Jhon¡

She was much better as grand mother than her sister Dagmar.

In my opinion of course.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 20, 2005, 07:06:30 PM
John's family visited him as well--it's a myth they didn't. The visits became scarce only because the older children were at school (and later battle) and his parents were occupied with WW1.

No doubt though that QA was a much better grandmother than MF.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on November 21, 2005, 01:46:02 AM
Quote
Wonderful site!!!! Thanks!!!!

We know that Joseph Merrick the popular "Elephant Man" loved much the beautiful Alix!


Yes, Veu, there is a very, very touching story about Merrick and Alexandra which is in "Alexandra" by E.E.P. Tisdall, a book I just came upon in a second hand bookstore recently!

Merrick was shown as a sideshow "attraction" and when he ceased to pay, was sent to Sir Frederick Treves, then the eminent name in medicine in London.  Having travelled on his own, he was incoherent with stress and terror at the reactions he had provoked and was even too frightened to buy himself anything to eat.

He was put up at the London Hospital in the East End where Alexandra insisted upon meeting him, even after being told of his terrifying appearance.

"She shook hands with Merrick, she sat by his bed and her smile was as sweet for him as it was for everybody else..."

She visited him regularly thereafter and at Christmas, he received a card, gift and a signed photo of her.

"He clutched the photograph and wept, rocking himself to and fro on his bed in his emotion.  When they came to clean his room he would have nobody touch the photograph.  It was sacred.  It was, in fact, the only thing of golden happiness in a life of bitter sadness.  The brief and clumsy note of thanks written to the Princess, beginning "My dear Princess" and finishing with "Yours sincerely, John Merrick", may still exist".

My eyes were swimming after I finished reading this!  :'(

I love this book as it gives quite a number of anecdotes of the kindness Alex showed to the less fortunate which are perhaps not widely known...  :)


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 21, 2005, 02:04:20 AM
Thank you Grace! Apparently Joseph always kept her photo and cards etc. Alexandra was very kind to him. Very touching. :)

The myth about Queen Mary not visiting John is just that, a myth.  :) Queen Alexandra didn't live far from Park Farm and she would often send a car to fetch him, and they would sit and do jig sawes togther, I think because she lost her "Johnnie" she had a special place for him.

When GV and QM heard the news that John  had died they immediately drove down to Park Farm. I remember reading that the Duke of Windsor wrote to his mother about it, very unsympathetically, and she demanded an apology.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on November 21, 2005, 02:09:21 AM
Quote

I remember reading that the Duke of Windsor wrote to his mother about it, very unsympathetically, and she demanded an apology.


Eddieboy, while I did know that the stories about George and Mary totally neglecting John were untrue, I didn't know about the Duke of Windsor's letter.  

Do you have any further details?  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: isabel on November 21, 2005, 02:17:44 AM
I don´t know a lot about Jhon, ....i thought, that it was true that he was not usually visited by his parents. Also, that GV got nervous in his presence.

Why, was he sended to Park Farm ?,

Can i find here an specific discussion place about him?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 21, 2005, 02:18:52 AM
Hi Grace, as usual i dont have my books with me so i can't find what happened exactly. All I remember was that QM replyed saying she was hurt and upset and demanded an apology. Perhaps someone could type it for us?  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 21, 2005, 02:22:07 AM
Hi Isabel - he was sent to Park Farm i think partly to get him out of the way and partly due to his needs perhaps being met better away from the lime light and that of royal life. Fortunatly he was accompanied by the devoted Lalla Bill, a nanny who really took care of him.

I think GV and QM were probably embarrased by Johns condition but they loved him nether the less.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on November 21, 2005, 03:49:26 AM
Quote
Hi Grace, as usual i dont have my books with me so i can't find what happened exactly. All I remember was that QM replyed saying she was hurt and upset and demanded an apology. Perhaps someone could type it for us?  :)


In the book 'Letters from a Prince' which contains letters David wrote to his mistress Frieda Dudley Ward, there is a letter quoted which he wrote after Johh's death, which was extremely uncaring and cold. Since I don't have the book to hand, I'm afraid I cannot quote it, but maybe someone else would be so kind? All I can say is that if this letter is in any way like the letter he wrote to Queen Mary, it's understandable why she was upset!

Incase anyone is interested, there is a review of the book here: ftp://http://www.etoile.co.uk/Columns/RoyalScribe/050124.html where you can read David's...unique take on things for yourself... :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 21, 2005, 07:00:55 AM
Thats right, i have that book too and it includes a letter he wrote about Jonnies death. I think he mentions that he hardly knew the boy or something.

I can't recall where I read about the letter he wrote to QM which she understandably found upsetting. I don't get the impression that the Duke of Windsor was the most tactful or selfless of people. Sorry.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 21, 2005, 10:10:57 AM
Queen Alexandra was all heart and care for people who need it, although she could also be selfish.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 21, 2005, 10:20:15 AM
Thats very true Eric. George V said she was one of the most selfish people he knew!

But she was very kind, especially to children and animals. A very typical Sagittarius! just like my Nanny  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 21, 2005, 10:26:54 AM
Not only that but to the elephant man (John Merrick), who was rejected by society. Alexandra visted him every year and when he died, he was still holding her picture...A very moving story.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on November 21, 2005, 11:14:09 AM
Quote
Thats very true Eric. George V said she was one of the most selfish people he knew!

But she was very kind, especially to children and animals. A very typical Sagittarius! just like my Nanny  :)


I think that 'selfish' is the wrong word to describe her.

I think that she was perhaps more self-obsessed, in as far as her world revolved around her.  Kindness and goodness were not alien to her, but it was not always apparent to her that the needs of others must sometimes come before her own......
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 21, 2005, 03:21:09 PM
The letter was mentioned by Stephen Poliakoff when he was researching the Lost Prince.

When Johnnie died, he wrote an absolutely horrible letter to Freda Dudley Ward, saying, in effect, "It's really too much that we've got to go into mourning for this brother, who if he was a normal brother, I wouldn't complain. But because he was no more than an animal, this is really too much." When Mary heard about this, she made him come and apologize to her in person.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on November 21, 2005, 03:26:34 PM
 :o :o :oOh, Lord, did he really and truly say that?  About him being an "animal"?  I just can't believe it!!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on November 21, 2005, 04:49:14 PM
How absolutely dreadful.  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on November 21, 2005, 05:12:39 PM
Yes, appalling.

I know this is off topic, but does anyone own the book about the correspondence of the Prince of Wales and Frieda Dudley Ward?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 21, 2005, 09:55:59 PM
I think eddieboy and MrsE indicated they have it. The threads on John within the Windsor section mention it as well as more about QA's relationship with John.

He was an especial favorite of hers, especially during those years during WW1. She was cut off from Minny and Maud as well as going to Denmark or Greece, George and Mary were occupied, David and Bertie were in the service, Henry and George were at school and she was getting too old to be as involved in war work (though she was somewhat) as she probably would've liked. Having John nearby must've been a great comfort.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on November 22, 2005, 02:02:09 AM
Yes i do have the book, but seeing as I am quite unable to tolerate the Duke of Windsors moaning about his unfair life and such like, for too long it has been a while since i have picked it up!!!

Thank you for posting the letter Ella! awful isn't it? I'm pretty sure I read the letter he wrote to Queen Mary too, not sure where, perhaps i am confusing it with that one though.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on November 23, 2005, 07:04:47 PM
 :-*Hello Grace!

Just curious, even though this thread is supposed to be about Alexandra--how was Prince John's death reported in the news and how did the royal family respond?  Was the funeral hushed and extremely private?  Where is he buried?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Caleb on November 23, 2005, 09:40:19 PM
I think as far as the relationship between Prince John & his grandmother go, I think it has to do with the fact that I think that Queen Alexandra (besides Charlotte Bill) & perhaps King Edward VII, was one of the few people that understood him, as a child who was slower than this siblings. As much as I disagree with some of the parenting skills of George & Mary, I think with Prince John, I think it was the issue of understanding each other. I think with Queen Alexandra, I think it was her way of holding on to the youth of her own children. I also wonder how Queen Alexandra got along with the other of George's children.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 24, 2005, 12:30:51 AM
QA was apparently a great grandmother all around and was close to all her grandchildren. When GV&QM took the Orphir cruise in 1901, which lasted several months, the children stayed with EVII and QA and were apparently spoiled rotten.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 24, 2005, 12:32:31 AM
Quote
:-*Hello Grace!

Just curious, even though this thread is supposed to be about Alexandra--how was Prince John's death reported in the news and how did the royal family respond?  Was the funeral hushed and extremely private?  Where is he buried?


I'm not sure how it was worded but the news went out the way any death would. The royal family was understandably upset--QM and GV were awakened in the early hours and told the news. Despite what The Lost Prince showed, both parents left immediately to go to him and QM wrote movingly about it in her diary. The funeral was quiet but was reported in the news.

Here's the headline from the New York Times
KING GEORGE LOSES HIS YOUNGEST SON; Prince John, 13 Years Old, Dies at Sandringham Palace After Epileptic Seizure.

I've quoted this and added onto it in a 'bumped up' Prince John thread.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: veu on November 25, 2005, 11:29:43 AM
Quote

Yes, Veu, there is a very, very touching story about Merrick and Alexandra which is in "Alexandra" by E.E.P. Tisdall, a book I just came upon in a second hand bookstore recently!

Merrick was shown as a sideshow "attraction" and when he ceased to pay, was sent to Sir Frederick Treves, then the eminent name in medicine in London.  Having travelled on his own, he was incoherent with stress and terror at the reactions he had provoked and was even too frightened to buy himself anything to eat.

He was put up at the London Hospital in the East End where Alexandra insisted upon meeting him, even after being told of his terrifying appearance.

"She shook hands with Merrick, she sat by his bed and her smile was as sweet for him as it was for everybody else..."

She visited him regularly thereafter and at Christmas, he received a card, gift and a signed photo of her.

"He clutched the photograph and wept, rocking himself to and fro on his bed in his emotion.  When they came to clean his room he would have nobody touch the photograph.  It was sacred.  It was, in fact, the only thing of golden happiness in a life of bitter sadness.  The brief and clumsy note of thanks written to the Princess, beginning "My dear Princess" and finishing with "Yours sincerely, John Merrick", may still exist".

My eyes were swimming after I finished reading this!  :'(

I love this book as it gives quite a number of anecdotes of the kindness Alex showed to the less fortunate which are perhaps not widely known...  :)





This story was the basis of Gaston Leroux's novel "The Phantom of the opera"!!!!!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 25, 2005, 02:37:18 PM
Was this shown in the movie The Elephant Man? I've never seen the whole thing--too sad.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: etonexile on November 25, 2005, 02:48:40 PM
Yes...QA visiting a wounded soldier in WWI who was depressed because he now had a stiff leg from a wound...The Queen lifted het skirts and swung her stiff leg over the top of a chair..."Young man,I've had this game leg for years..."...I was told this story years ago....I hope it's true....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kimberly on November 25, 2005, 03:47:47 PM
Quote
Was this shown in the movie The Elephant Man? I've never seen the whole thing--too sad.  :(

Yep, Alexandra visits John Merrick in the film "The Elephant Man"...it is an extremely poignant scene.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on November 25, 2005, 05:43:20 PM
Quote
Yep, Alexandra visits John Merrick in the film "The Elephant Man"...it is an extremely poignant scene.


Yes, the wonderful Helen Ryan reprising her role as Alexandra, in a very beautifully played scene in the film.....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on November 27, 2005, 08:05:03 PM
I would love to see her featured in a film--there could be so many angles to cover--her beauty, her romance with Edward, her deafness, her character, her years as a mother and being a beloved Queen.  

I think the Batiscombe book is the only major biography written about her, but I may be wrong.  Has anyone written a major bio of her in the last ten years?  I shall keep hoping for a new one.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on November 27, 2005, 08:16:46 PM
Quote
I would love to see her featured in a film--there could be so many angles to cover--her beauty, her romance with Edward, her deafness, her character, her years as a mother and being a beloved Queen.  

I think the Batiscombe book is the only major biography written about her, but I may be wrong.  Has anyone written a major bio of her in the last ten years?  I shall keep hoping for a new one.


I agree, a movie about Alexandra would be fascinating, and I think it would do well, with the proper director and cast. Of course if anyone out there is reading this--I could do a good 'Vicky'!  :D I've got her nose and I'm...'cuddly' like her!  ;D

The most recent biography to focus on Alexandra alone was David Duff's 'Alexandra: Princess and Queen' published in 1980. Georgina Battiscombe's was better by far, though. Of course there is always 'Edward and Alexandra' by Richard Hough, published in 1992...which I still have yet to read all the way through.  :-/ Maybe someone who's actually read it all can comment on it. Some older biographies of her which I really enjoyed (they are quite reverential, but full of charming little anecdotes) are:

Queen Alexandra by David Williamson published between 1918 and Alexandra's death in 1925.

Queen Alexandra by WRH Trowbridge 1921

Unpredictable Queen by EEP Tisdall 1953

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on November 27, 2005, 08:22:00 PM
Quote
I would love to see her featured in a film--there could be so many angles to cover--her beauty, her romance with Edward, her deafness, her character, her years as a mother and being a beloved Queen.  

I think the Batiscombe book is the only major biography written about her, but I may be wrong.  Has anyone written a major bio of her in the last ten years?  I shall keep hoping for a new one.


There is also Alexandra, Princess and Queen by David Duff (1980), Alexandra, Edward VII's Unpredictable Queen by E.E.P. Tisdall (1953) and Queen Alexandra A Study of Royalty by ? Trowbridge (unsure of date). It would be hard to beat the Battiscombe one, though I know at least the first two are good.

If you want to see a "live" Alix, Helen Ryan (who has portrayed Alix many times on film and stage) is marvellous in the miniseries Edward VII (I think it's called Edward the King in the US).  She really brings Alix to life!  I am no Edward VII fan but Alix is in this series continually and it is very well made, in my opinion.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 27, 2005, 10:41:05 PM
The Hough book was just okay. Not as good as his The Mountbattens. I don't remember much about it (interesting anecdotes, etc) which might tell you something.

The QA portrayal in The Lost Prince--eek! About as bad as the Empress Alexandra and her German accent. The QA character wasn't even beautiful--you'd think you could at least get that part right.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on November 27, 2005, 11:58:25 PM
Yes horrible performance ! QA was slim anf frail and remained elegant while the actress played her was fat !!!! >:( >:( >:(

The girl who played Alix in Mrs, Bown was plain and wooden ! Another disapointment.

I think someone like Winnola Ryder can play Alix as a young woman, she does have the delicate look of QA.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on November 28, 2005, 06:41:39 PM
 :-/I have the Hough book but wasn't that impressed with it.  Too much repitition.  I wish Hannah Pakula would write one on her....or anyone else for that matter.  I just love her books, and keep hoping I'll see an announcement for a new one.  It has been much too long since her book on Vicky.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on November 28, 2005, 07:41:24 PM
I don't know if she's writing anymore. she hasn't since her husband, famed director Alan J Pakula, died in a car crash. I wish she'd write more but we'll see--she was one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 01, 2005, 04:57:20 PM
Queen Alexandra

1860s         1870s        
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/7d_1_b1.jpg)  (http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/10083770a.jpg)

1880s

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/7062.jpg)

1890s  1900s  
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/File1386alix.jpg) (http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/99_31.jpg)

1910s  1920s

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/alixdenmark1844-16.jpg)(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/R5.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on December 02, 2005, 05:07:16 AM
She's my all-time favorite.  I love to discover new photos of  her.  She amazes me with her fashion and beauty, and I assume must have been extremely popular in Europe in the 1860-80's, even on into her elderly years.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 02, 2005, 11:22:24 AM
After Bertie died, Alix sort of withdrew herself eventually (escept the Danish holiday and her charity work). Her health took a downturn in the 1930's.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 02, 2005, 11:23:16 AM
She died in 1925!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 02, 2005, 11:31:01 AM
About 5 years before her death. Her decline was gradual.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 02, 2005, 10:27:26 PM
Quote
She's my all-time favorite.  I love to discover new photos of  her.  She amazes me with her fashion and beauty, and I assume must have been extremely popular in Europe in the 1860-80's, even on into her elderly years.


She was indeed. Even through periods when the Royal Family was out of favor (in QV's early widowhood) and when her husband was being hissed at in public (during 1870-1 when he was involved in some scandals) her popularity remained unshakeable. She was probably one of the few royals of the modern age who never went through a period of unpopularity or controversy.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 02, 2005, 10:30:26 PM
Quote
After Bertie died, Alix sort of withdrew herself eventually (escept the Danish holiday and her charity work). Her health took a downturn in the 1930's.  :(


One event she always came out for was the annual Alexandra Rose Day (which, ironically, she detested!) for charity. She'd ride out in a carriage, usually with Toria, for the event.

She was also a standard at every family wedding in Britain.

As her deafness grew even worse and she didn't have Queen Consort obligations, it was easier for her to retreat to Sandringham but it was apparently wretched for Toria who had to be at her side and was surrounded by none of her contemporaries but rather such old retainers as Charlotte Knollys and Dighton Probyn.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 02, 2005, 10:43:58 PM
Quote
I think she lost her looks too...In the last decade she looked terrible. Her sister Thyra looked more serene than her.  :-/


I think Thyra aged the best--she never tried to fight it as Alix and Minny did. She went gray very early on. The tragedies Thyra went through--two sons dying and WW1 among them--didn't take their toll on her gentle demeanor. I think not having been considered a great beauty like her sisters, especially Alix, she aged more gracefully. This is often the case of women who are considered plainer compared to more lovely sisters or contemporaries--and having 2 really lovely older sisters I am banking on it  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on December 03, 2005, 03:01:09 AM
Quote
I think she lost her looks too...In the last decade she looked terrible. Her sister Thyra looked more serene than her.  :-/


How very harsh...

In the "last decade", lovely Alix was in her seventies, Eric.  I think she looked beautiful as an older lady but she would not appear as she did at 25, would she?

"Lost her looks" - no way!  Aged gracefully - yes!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 03, 2005, 07:21:49 AM
It's a tricky thing--there were many accounts of how in the last years, Alix tried to hard to preserve her looks to the point of looking almost enameled. She certainly had most royal women of a comparable age beat and shouldn't be judged on how she looked as a young woman but she didn't age gracefully. Most of the photos that were seen of her in the last decade of her life were heavily retouched. Nothing can take away her reputation as a legendary beauty though and despite the heavy makeup and wigs of those late years, the loveliness of her expression was still remarked on.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 03, 2005, 10:34:55 AM
According to David Duff's bio of Queen Alexandra. She broke a blood vessel and her expression became more pained. Queen Mary also commented that it was sad to her once lovely mother-in-law reduce to that. Thyra aged more naturally and her expression was always sweet. unlike Minnie who became hard and Alix more pathetic.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on December 03, 2005, 08:13:49 PM
Alexandra never enjoyed growing older and losing any of her famed beauty, true, but I still think that she aged "gracefully".  

I have never seen pictures of her dressed inappropriately for her years or trying to look as if she were 30 at 70 etc.  

She may have used too much makeup when older but she never looked like "mutton dressed as lamb".

She was always exquisitely turned out but also in a tasteful way for her years, in my opinion.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 04, 2005, 12:19:07 PM
True, but if you look at photos of her last public appearences. She was hardly flashing her winning smile as she used to...a frail creature beside "battleship" Queen Mary. Although I am a fan of hers, I still believed Thyra aged the best of all...of the three sisters.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on December 04, 2005, 01:43:48 PM
Quote
True, but if you look at photos of her last public appearences. She was hardly flashing her winning smile as she used to...a frail creature beside "battleship" Queen Mary. Although I am a fan of hers, I still believed Thyra aged the best of all...of the three sisters.


I beg to differ Eric. The film footage of the family on the balcony in 1922 after Princess Mary's wedding shows Alix smiling and bowing and waving in her unique way. I also remember seeing her picture taken at Lord Mountbatten's wedding in the same year (I believe) and numerous pictures of her near the end of her life, bravely putting on a happy face for the crowds, when she must have been in increasing pain and feeling almost completely cut off from the world due to her now complete hearing loss. Compare those last pictures of Alix 'on duty' with the last ones of May--where she's wearing a stony, slightly confused stare and being pushed in a wheelchair--I wouldn't call her (to use your phrase) such a 'battleship' then.... :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 04, 2005, 01:44:26 PM
I don't think she aged gracefully because to me that implies accepting it rather than trying to hide it or fight it--but that's my definition and others might not share it. She certainly aged gracefully when compared to another legendary beauty of her day--Empress Elisabeth of Austria--who refused to be photographed or painted for a couple decades before her death and it was left to pictures to be slightly aged to represent her. Even in public, Sisi hid behind heavy veils and fans and maintained a fanatical diet and exercise program. Alexandra never hid herself away from the public and if photos were taken in soft focus or slightly retouched, it couldn't hide her intrinsic loveliness of features and expression.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 04, 2005, 08:36:04 PM
Yes that is exactly what I meant ! Alix was not accepting her age and fight it when she should accept it gracefully.  Queen Alexandra did looked tired when compared to Queen Mary, who attended the wedding of Louis Mountbatten. She looked like a tank then. There also stories of Alexandra did a facelift in Paris, which contibuted to her problems when she got older.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on December 05, 2005, 12:04:27 AM
Quote
Yes that is exactly what I meant ! Alix was not accepting her age and fight it when she should accept it gracefully.  Queen Alexandra did looked tired when compared to Queen Mary, who attended the wedding of Louis Mountbatten. She looked like a tank then. There also stories of Alexandra did a facelift in Paris, which contibuted to her problems when she got older.


She should accept it gracefully?  Could you please post a photograph of Alix when she did not dress or appear age-appropriate, Eric?  Because I have never seen one personally.  It is not a crime to take great care of one's appearance, especially if one is A QUEEN!

As for appearing "tired" next to Queen Mary at the Mountbatten wedding -- Alix was in her seventies then and over 20 years older than her daughter-in-law, May.  Given this, I think she was entitled to appear a little "tired".

What do you mean "she looked like a tank"?  The only times I ever heard anyone referred to as a "tank" is when they are as wide as they are high and usually impervious to the opinions of others and this certainly didn't apply to Alix.

Eric, I have to say, you do make some "unusual" observations...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 05, 2005, 02:11:08 AM
Very well said Grace!! I couldn't agree more. Alix was a Queen and it was her duty to always look her best and I think she always achieved that!  :)

Quote

ICompare those last pictures of Alix 'on duty' with the last ones of May--where she's wearing a stony, slightly confused stare and being pushed in a wheelchair--I wouldn't call her (to use your phrase) such a 'battleship' then.... :-/


Mrs Eddy do you have any of these pics of May? Ive never seen them before & would be interested to see them!  :-*
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on December 05, 2005, 05:27:41 AM
Quote
Mrs Eddy do you have any of these pics of May? Ive never seen them before & would be interested to see them!  :-*



(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/gurutiek/CCF05122005_00000.jpg)
With her grandsons, William of Gloucester and Michael of Kent
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on December 05, 2005, 05:35:33 AM
Quote
True, but if you look at photos of her last public appearences. She was hardly flashing her winning smile as she used to...a frail creature beside "battleship" Queen Mary.



Quote
 Queen Alexandra did looked tired when compared to Queen Mary, who attended the wedding of Louis Mountbatten. She looked like a tank then.



Yes, you're so right Eric!  ::) Here are some pictures of Alexandra looking SO miserable, old and tired--and cerainly not smiling!!  ::) ::) ::)


(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/gurutiek/CCI00006.jpg)
With the family after Princess Mary's wedding, 1922


(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/gurutiek/1922.jpg)
After Mountbatten's wedding. Now, when I first started getting really into Royalty, this was one of the first images I saw, and I could not believe the caption: 'Queen Alexandra and her daughter in law Queen Mary attend the wedding of Louis Mountbatten...' I thought surely they had got it the wrong way around! How could that woman on the right be younger than the one one on the left!!  ;D When it comes to ageing gracefully, you know who gets my vote.  ;)


(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/gurutiek/mayalix.jpg)
Another absolutely miserable shot of Alix and The Tank.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 05, 2005, 06:41:13 AM
Thank you so much Mrs Eddy! I has no idea Queen Mary was in a wheelchair at the end. Was she very immobile?

Alexandra looks great in those photos. As stylish as ever!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on December 05, 2005, 06:53:43 AM
...and there is still real beauty in her face too -- beauty of expression as well as her lovely features... :)

As regards May, as an elderly lady, she made the remark -- I think it may have been to Lady Airlie but I'm not sure -- "I suppose one must just go on till the end"?  

Perhaps an unusually poignant comment from her...?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 05, 2005, 07:03:20 AM
I believe she said that after George VI's death Grace.

It does strike me as rather a negative comment coming from Queen Mary but it's understandable. She did age rapidly after that , it was the final blow....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 05, 2005, 07:26:48 AM
Yes the comment came after the death of GVI at which point she'd lost 3 sons--with John and George Kent being especially young to die--and basically lost her eldest son through the Abdication.

As for the QM wheelchair photo, that was after surgery or an accident, I believe. Until the very end she was pretty mobile.

Back to QA, she was often in a carriage when in public in a later years--not just due to age, but the fact that she'd had such a painful leg for so many years after her rheumatic fever--which led to the famed Alexandra Limp.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 05, 2005, 09:40:00 AM
Yes...QA still looked lovely, but don't you think that the massive Queen Mary looked like a battleship beside the frail older women ?

She looked certainly terrible in that photo with her son George and grandaughter Mary and her son.

As for QV's expression pathetic. That was according to artist Gertude Massey, who wrote beside her sketch of QV "pathetic expression even when smiling..." :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 05, 2005, 12:14:49 PM
Quote
Yes...QA still looked lovely, but don't you think that the massive Queen Mary looked like a battleship beside the frail older women ?

She looked certainly terrible in that photo with her son George and grandaughter Mary and her son.

As for QV's expression pathetic. That was according to artist Gertude Massey, who wrote beside her sketch of QV "pathetic expression even when smiling..." :)


Hi Eric, I wouldn't say Queen Mary was massive or resembled a battleship (?). She was a lot taller compared to Alexandra and always bolt upright.

Queen Alexandra was rather small and more petite so perhaps she did look more dainty compared to Queen Mary. Having been such a celebrated beauty I think getting old did hit her hard. Rather like Princess Margaret.  :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 06, 2005, 05:55:53 AM
I think Queen Mary was magnificant, stately and majestic like a battleship while Queen Alexandra looked more like a lovely ship.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on December 06, 2005, 12:53:02 PM
 >:(One has to remember that a photograph is such a split-second in time that doesn't accurately portray how the person was feeling at that moment.  One can't constantly be smiling or laughing for photographers.  Alexandra (to me) always kept her figure and beauty and was far from a tank.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 08, 2005, 10:16:22 AM
Noooo...Alexandra was always a slim waif. Queen Mary was the tank...in all her majestic wonders.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on December 08, 2005, 08:01:10 PM
Mary was or seemed somewhat plumpish in her later years (compared to Alex's slim waist, I guess), but it is cruel to call her a tank.  Queen V. was more like a tank, don't you think?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 08, 2005, 08:26:42 PM
Yes...I think she looked more like a battleship. If you see Queen Mary in her official robes and clad in magnificent jewels (usually non-smiling) you will understand what I mean. She was majestic and stately like a battleship going into battle.

Queen Victoria had the majestic quality too, but she was short and dumpy. While Queen Mary was tall and stately.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 08, 2005, 08:48:33 PM
Speaking of which, I was getting a photo ready of QM in her Garter robes, and I was wondering--was Queen Alexandra invested with the Garter and if so, are there photos of her in her robes?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 08, 2005, 09:04:54 PM
That would be great ! I know there is one of Queen Mary in the robes in a portrait (owned by the Duke of Windsor for a while).  Yes no photo of Queen Alexandra in Garter robes.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 17, 2005, 12:40:25 PM
Hey, just bumping up this thread to ask something. Today, I was looking at a book written by a friend of my Gran's. It was about Irish photography in Victorian times.

There was one pic of 'Alexandra, Princess of Wales, in academic dress 1885' showing Alix wearing the whole cap and gown affair. Does anynone know this pic? Can anynone find it? It's really nice.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: PssMarieAmelie on December 17, 2005, 06:40:11 PM
(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/Alixofwales.jpg)


This one?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 17, 2005, 10:27:54 PM
It was a popular image at the time. It was reproduced on a double-page spread of the Illustrated London News, on a cabinet cards and postcards--even a music sheet.

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/1559.jpg)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 18, 2005, 07:13:49 AM
Thanks guys. There was another pic in the book, of Bertie, from his visit to Dublin in 1865. It was a really interesting book.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 18, 2005, 10:50:28 AM
I think it was rather ironic that Queen Alexandra was awarded a doctorate in music when she was going deaf... :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on December 18, 2005, 11:37:41 AM
Apparently she had the first few bars of her favorite song printed on all her bookplates. Does anyone know what song this was?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 18, 2005, 11:43:07 AM
That I am interested to know... ;D

Also there is talk of how deaf she really was, as I read somewhere that said someone saw Alexandra tapping her foot, while dancing is going on... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on December 18, 2005, 11:48:40 AM
Quote

Also there is talk of how deaf she really was, as I read somewhere that said someone saw Alexandra tapping her foot, while dancing is going on... ;)


Ok professional wind-up merchant Eric--are you implying that Alix could hear what she wanted to hear? (Why do so many people make this small minded judgement about partially deaf or sighted people?  :-/) Alix could probably just make out enough of the beat to tap her foot along to. Often deaf people can still make out the bass and basic rhythm of a tune if they place their hand on the speakers.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 18, 2005, 11:56:37 AM
Perhaps... ;) I know that Alix did made good use of her hearing problem when it suited her. My favourite story was that after the death of her husband, Bertie, she stayed on at Buckingham Palace and took her time in moving out. Her nephew Willy (The German Kaiser) took it upon himself to lecture his aunt for at least an hour on the ugency for her to move. By the end of the audience, Alix flashed out her brightest smile and said "Willy Dear, I couldn't hear a word you were saying." The Kaiser's response was not recorded.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: bell_the_cat on December 18, 2005, 12:03:00 PM
Quote
Apparently she had the first few bars of her favorite song printed on all her bookplates. Does anyone know what song this was?


Got it!

A Royal Book-plate.-Queen Alexandra's is oblong in shape, it has two divisions, and is bordered by oakleaves and roses. In the lower division you see " Thy wild and stormy steep, Elsinore," the first home of the " Sea-king's daughter from over the sea " ; in the upper panel you see pictured the towers of Royal Windsor. On a row of books, at the base of the design, you read the names of Shakespeare, Byron, Shelley, and " John Inglesant " ; and, upon music-folios, the names of Brahms, Schumann, Wagner, and Gade-a Danish composer. Across the top of the book-plate runs the score of the opening bars of Gounod's Romeo and Juliet. Her Majesty's favourite dogs also figure in the design-Alix, a beautiful borzoi, and the spaniels Billie and Punchie. The motto is " Faithful unto death," and the name on the label is " Alexandra."


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Rosamund on December 18, 2005, 12:33:48 PM
Quote
Perhaps... ;) I know that Alix did made good use of her hearing problem when it suited her. My favourite story was that after the death of her husband, Bertie, she stayed on at Buckingham Palace and took her time in moving out. Her nephew Willy (The German Kaiser) took it upon himself to lecture his aunt for at least an hour on the ugency for her to move. By the end of the audience, Alix flashed out her brightest smile and said "Willy Dear, I couldn't hear a word you were saying." The Kaiser's response was not recorded.  ;D


A quick search of the Internet would give you explanations related to deafness and the ability to 'hear' music.  Also Beethoven continued to compose for another 10 years after he became completely deaf.
As I was born with a hearing loss I have always felt for Alix.  How could she be expected to make intelligent conversation when she couldn't make out what people were saying to her?

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on December 18, 2005, 04:20:11 PM
Alix's deafness was a terrible penance to her, an unseen handicap not to be looked at lightly.  She may have on occasion used it to her advantage under difficult situations but I'm sure she would have given anything to have normal hearing.  

Most people don't realise how very deaf she was.

As far back as the 1890's, when Alix was only in her fifties, Queen Victoria was described after a visit with Alix as "exhausted" at trying to converse with her.

Sympathies to you, Rosamund, hopefully your hearing loss has not affected you as severely as this.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 18, 2005, 06:55:14 PM
Yes I know...It was hard on her, not only that but to live with a limp leg as well. Remember the "Alexandra limp" ? No I have full symapthy for Alexandra's handicap, however to her credit, she never never became a person who felt sorry for herself but to use it as inspiration to others. It is one of the reason I admired her profoundly... :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 18, 2005, 06:59:17 PM
Also as she was not born deaf and only losing it by bits as time went on. She learn to lip read (although she made mistakes that became funny memories to her nieces and nephews).

Rosmund, another inspiration for you is Princess Alice of Battenberg, Prince Philip's mother. Who like you was born deaf. But manage to lip read in at least 3 languages. Another admirable royal !  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: PssMarieAmelie on December 19, 2005, 04:15:30 AM
(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/Alixdenmark.jpg)



(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/Alixdenmark2.jpg)




Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: PssMarieAmelie on December 19, 2005, 06:57:45 PM
Taa-daa!! Maybe not as long as I thought.


(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/18681.jpg)


(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/AlixofWales.jpg)


(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y215/pssmarieamelie/Alexandra-of-denmark-02.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 19, 2005, 07:19:51 PM
The last one I think was the one Bertie fell in love with.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on December 20, 2005, 07:52:33 PM
Weren't there several photographs she sent to Bertie so he could have a better idea of what she looked like?  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 21, 2005, 05:51:36 AM
Thank you GDK! She looks stunning in the first two! Not to keen onnher hair in the last one! & also am not used to seeing her neck uncovered!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 21, 2005, 05:59:07 AM
I heard she always covered her neck because of a scar there, either from a childhood acciedent or a suicide attempt  :o. Needless to say, she started the 'high collar' fashion.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on December 21, 2005, 06:25:02 AM
Quote
I heard she always covered her neck because of a scar there, either from a childhood acciedent or a suicide attempt  :o. Needless to say, she started the 'high collar' fashion.  ;)


Well, Lievy, I think we can safely discount the suicide attempt rumour, though I have heard it myself.  Alix had an idyllic, happy childhood and youth, didn't she, and certainly wasn't a depressed person at this time.

The "scrofula" story wouldn't be right either, in my book.  As it's a form of tuberculosis, incurable in those days, highly unlikely...

Probably an accident or similar?  That's if there really was a scar.  As shown here, in her early days, her neck wasn't covered.  Maybe she just didn't like her neck bare?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 21, 2005, 07:15:17 AM
I agree with you Grace.  ;)

As for her neck, it sounds silly, but maybe she had a mole or something there that she became self conscious about. I know it sounds stupid but it's possible surely . . .
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 21, 2005, 07:34:57 AM
I think it was most likely a scar from a childhood accident. I remember a guide at Sandringham saying that too!  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on December 21, 2005, 07:58:09 AM
I believe the story about Alexandra's scar to be true. It could be that the shadows in the picture were placed there deliberately to cover it up? That area of the picture does look a bit touched up. Anyway, I once read that Eddy wore high collars 'due to a scar caused by the same childhood illness which caused his mother's' but I have a hard time believeing that one... :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 21, 2005, 08:01:47 AM
You might be right, Mrs E, but, like you, I don't seriously believe the 'co-incidence' about Eddy's scar. :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on December 21, 2005, 12:39:57 PM
It has been written so often that Alix had a scar that I suppose it has become accepted as truth.

I have read that the scar was covered by the high necklines of daytime fashions in the 1860's and that when formal toilettes required décolletâge, she employed ringlets in her coiffure to cover it (you can see an example of this style in the famous Winterhalter portrait of her.)  When this style went out of fashion, she adopted the choker, a piece of jewellery that subsequently featured amongst her jewellery for the rest of her life.

I wonder if we will ever know what really caused the scar?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 22, 2005, 10:34:50 AM
It was a scar, not a bite mark !  >:(

Yes she was consious about it. First she tried to cover it by having long ringlets, and later using jewelled dog collars (i think she look beautiful in those !).  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 23, 2005, 10:53:19 AM
Yes, she wasn't exactly boring, but the older she got and the worse her hearing got she tended to draw closer to her particular inner circle.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 23, 2005, 11:04:15 AM
Whose circle Bertie found boring. Their holidays to Denmark was trying to him.  >:(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 23, 2005, 11:04:29 AM
Quote

 Even Queen Mary credited her with that. :)


Yep, and Queen Mary wasn't exactly her best friend in the world!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 23, 2005, 11:07:21 AM
Quote
Whose circle Bertie found boring. Their holidays to Denmark was trying to him.  >:(


And so were his affairs as well as his partying when she was ill! Still she handled it very well  :)

Your right Prince, I think Mary found her a little trying perhaps...?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 23, 2005, 11:10:10 AM
May and Alix were always polite to each other, but they were total opposites really. May was exasperated by the hold Alix still held on George, whereas Alix (as most mothers would) slightly resented having her 'Georgie' taken away from her. May especially found Alix's scattiness trying - like when it took her so long to move out of Marlborough House and then 9 years later Buckingham Palace. Alix was charming, personable and a complete feather-head; May was somewhat shy in company, reserved in her opinions, and an expert organiser.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 23, 2005, 11:20:33 AM
Well summed up Prince. I can se why Mary might have found Alexandra trying.  And of course Mary was so intelligent!! I think i read that Alexandra very rarely read a book!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on December 23, 2005, 11:37:34 AM
Thanks. ;) QV checked up on Alix's reading material when she was 'on appro' in Balmoral. The only books she had were well worn religious works with highlighted passages.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on January 03, 2006, 07:14:29 PM
 :(In all of the discussion about Prince John (May's son), I got to thinking about Alexander John, the baby son of Alexandra and Edward who died.    I know they are buried next to each other.  Was AJ premature?  I can't remember how long he lived--only a few hours or a couple of days--does anyone know why?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on January 04, 2006, 06:18:53 AM
Alexandra told Mary when John (as in the Lost Prince John) died 'now are two Johnnies rest side by side' or something. Most people were quite surprised by Bertie's emotion at the funeral of Alexander John. He cried a lot.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grand_Duke_Paul on January 04, 2006, 03:41:52 PM
Quote
I like the vampire theory......



I have read other sources that state she suffered from an attack of scrofula.  I believe that is from the biography by Battiscombe.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on January 04, 2006, 04:29:32 PM
The Battiscombe bio also discredits the scrofula theory.  QA wouldn't have lived to see her 80th birthday if she had suffered lymphatic tuberculosis...

It says that both Wally Paget and Grand Duchess Augusta "assured" Vicky (who, of course, was doing the bride-scouting for QV) that the scar was the result of a "neglected cold".  How a cold would cause a scar, I am not sure.  ???

It was probably the result of a childhood accident.

Regarding Bertie and the death of one day old baby Alexander John Charles Albert - yes, Bertie grieved deeply at the loss of this last little child, insisting on lifting the tiny body into the coffin himself and carefully arranging the white satin pall and piles of white flowers, tears running freely down his face.  :(

For his many faults, Bertie did have a big heart and he seemed to genuinely love his family, even if he was not always the husband and father he should have been.  ::)



Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 04, 2006, 05:13:24 PM
Quote
Regarding Bertie and the death of one day old baby Alexander John Charles Albert - yes, Bertie grieved deeply at the loss of this last little child, insisting on lifting the tiny body into the coffin himself and carefully arranging the white satin pall and piles of white flowers, tears running freely down his face.  :(



I think there was also a passage in one bio that related how young Eddy and George accompanied him to the burial and Alexandra watched her three men go bury the fourth.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 04, 2006, 05:16:08 PM
Quote


That is because in King Edwards will he left Sandringham to Alexandra to use for her lifetime. The property was the private property of Edward & Alexandra.  It only passed to King George V after his mother died.


Which QM very well knew ahead of time and understood. She may have hated being cramped up at York Cottage--and I don't blame her--but I don't buy that she called QA a 'selfish old woman'. She was much too respectful of her position and her relationship with GV. If she was irritated at anyone it was probably GV who refused the whole time, even when his father was living, to consider buying a place of their own better able to accomodate their large family. He enjoyed the 'cosiness' of it and the closeness to his Motherdear--two attributes I doubt QM shared with fondness for!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on January 04, 2006, 05:44:33 PM
Yes, and to be fair to QM and GV, they could reasonably have expected that whether it belonged to her or not, QA might have had the tact to realise that it would be much easier for everyone if the reigning monarch and his queen lived in the Big House. Sadly, that wasn't Alix's way, as we all know.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 04, 2006, 08:18:44 PM
I think GV was perfectly content to stay at York Cottage. He hated entertaining and this gave him an excuse not to--no space.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 04, 2006, 08:39:32 PM
I do believe that QM said that "Selfish old woman" thing behind QA's back. She is human too and was very frustrated by the situation in York Cottage. Also as a keen observer od royal duty (she moved out of Buckingham Palace asap after being widowed and without fuss), it must be jarring to see her mother-in-law not obeying what should be done. Yet, her sense of duty and regard (later pity) for QA stopped her from vosing her discontentment publically. However saying it to her ladies & aides seemed safe. QM is a good queen, but not a saint.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 05, 2006, 07:42:24 AM
Quote
I do believe that QM said that "Selfish old woman" thing behind QA's back. She is human too and was very frustrated by the situation in York Cottage. ::)


Do we have any proof of this? Of course Mary was no saint but I really don't think thats her style. She was very respectful towards Alexandra and by all accounts very understanding.  Im not saying she didn't say it but I really can't see it.

It was George V who said that his mother was one of the most selfish people he knew. Sandringham was Alexandras home and she was fully entitled to live their until the end of her life.  :) Plus George loved York Cottage. It was his eldest son who said to understand his father you have to see York Cottage!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on January 05, 2006, 07:46:47 AM
Quote

 Plus George loved York Cottage. It was his eldest son who said to understand his father you have to see York Cottage!


QM hated York Cottage.  :P Unfortunately George wasn't exactly the kind of man to be sensitive to such wishes, and May was far too much of a dutiful wife - and daughter in law! - to ever suggest anything otherwise!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grand_Duke_Paul on January 05, 2006, 08:35:08 AM
Quote

Do we have any proof of this? Of course Mary was no saint but I really don't think thats her style. She was very respectful towards Alexandra and by all accounts very understanding.  Im not saying she didn't say it but I really can't see it.

It was George V who said that his mother was one of the most selfish people he knew. Sandringham was Alexandras home and she was fully entitled to live their until the end of her life.  :) Plus George loved York Cottage. It was his eldest son who said to understand his father you have to see York Cottage!



I remember reading where Sandringham was Alexandra's to use for life, and the property didn't pass to George V until after she died.  When E VIII abdicated I remember reading that part of the issue of settlement was that Sandringham had been left to him and not the crown.  So it may have been considered "private property" vs. property of the crown until that point, or perhaps it is still private property today.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 05, 2006, 06:17:29 PM
As far as I understand, Sandringham (purchased by EVII) and Balmoral (purchased by QV) are both personal property of the monarch.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: B5218 on January 05, 2006, 08:47:27 PM
As I recall, since Sandringham was the personal property of Edward VIII, his brother George VI had to borrow money to purchase it from Edward.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Caleb on January 05, 2006, 10:04:53 PM
I don't know about you, but I have to admit that Queen Alexandra's probably my favorite of the British royals. I'm sure it was hard for her to take her husband's unfaithfulness. What I find even more admirable was that she allowed one of her husband's former mistresses to his deathbed. She seems to be someone that would be fun to know!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 05, 2006, 11:11:38 PM
I think she would've been fun and no doubt was a great grandmother. I don't know if I would've enjoyed her company on a longterm basis though. I don't know the exact word--boring isn't it--but maybe unstimulating? I think she was a wonderful person though.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on January 06, 2006, 06:34:37 AM
Quote
I don't know if I would've enjoyed her company on a longterm basis though. I don't know the exact word--boring isn't it--but maybe unstimulating? I think she was a wonderful person though.


I agree totally. I like Alix - I like her a lot, and would have loved to have her as a granny  ;D but not as a mother, I think. In the same way the Marie of Romania would have been great dinner party company, but not the sort of woman I'd want as my mother.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on January 06, 2006, 12:16:16 PM
Perhaps it was the letdown in her marriage that caused her to smother her own children with love--since she wasn't getting enough herself.  I would love to have known her.

Did she ever complain to others about Bertie's absences and being unattentive?  I believe one of her pregnancies was a difficult one and he was not there for the birth.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on January 06, 2006, 12:21:57 PM
That was Louise's birth in 1867.  ;) Alix had rheumatic fever at the time. QV later took Bertie to task for not being there for her. It was that fever that left Alix with her limp.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 06, 2006, 03:17:48 PM
If she confided in anyone, it was probably Minny.

She was known to get fed up with his behavior and take off for Greece or Russia or Denmark without him.

Probably one of the lowest points came when she was pointedly absent from his 50th birthday celebrations. She chose to go to Russia and be with MF & AIII for their silver wedding anniversary instead. It was noticed and remarked upon. She didn't even return when a portion of Sandringham caught fire and suffered some serious damage. She only returned when George contracted typhoid fever and was near death.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on January 06, 2006, 04:01:32 PM
It would be interesting to know how long Alix intended to stay away, had it not been for events at home which forced her return.

Alix was essentially a countrywoman at heart, happiest at Sandringham with her children and her pets.  But I do think her deafness and Bertie's philandering greatly contributed to this lifestyle, plus her possessiveness of those closest to her - the children, Charlotte Knollys and Dighton Probyn - the people she could be herself with.

I don't think many could, or would want to, keep up with Bertie's frenetic lifestyle.

Of the two, I know who I'd prefer to spend a Saturday afternoon with...I'd have to shout a lot but, oh well...  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 06, 2006, 10:21:01 PM
It would probably be wrist or old maid !  :(

I think Alix would have been fun to be with in Dernmark more than in England, where she could let her hair down. Of the three sisters, I think Dagmar would make the most interesting conversation, while Thyra would made you the most welcome.  :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on January 31, 2006, 11:42:11 AM
Hello Im mark from the netherlands im 15 years old.
Ant Im searching fore pictures of queen alexandra wen she is older. Ant also whit her sister dagmar and with her family in brittian. Thanks allot already I think the discussionboard is great. :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on January 31, 2006, 02:05:08 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/R5.jpg)
About 1923
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/QueenAlexandraDagmar.jpg)
? 1905-10
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/alixdenmark1844-14.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Caleb on January 31, 2006, 09:19:45 PM
Some royals have aged better than others. Queen Mary & Czarina Alexandra seem to have aged well considering the circumstances. I think that both Czarina Alexandra & Queen Mary were still attractive even by the end of their lives. Perhaps with Czarina Alexandra, she looks a bit like my Aunt Carrie (my mom's brother's wife), so I'm kind of used to the round face, but I think that Queen Alexandra probably aged the best.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 01, 2006, 07:00:50 AM
She was indeed lovely. I especially love the photos of her before she adopted the 'fringe'. She was about the only one who could carry it off but I prefer her hair otherways. The brief period she wore it long was lovely.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Faberge on February 01, 2006, 07:42:08 AM
Quote
I don't know about you, but I have to admit that Queen Alexandra's probably my favorite of the British royals. I'm sure it was hard for her to take her husband's unfaithfulness. What I find even more admirable was that she allowed one of her husband's former mistresses to his deathbed. She seems to be someone that would be fun to know!


She had an enduring beauty that indifference to her by her husband couldn't diminish. She has to have been one of the best and warmest of all the royal mothers.

She didn't "allow" the mistress in her home. She had no  choice while Bertie was still alive. He gave orders for the mistress to be brought to his bedside and he as king had the last word even on his death bed. The second he was dead, Queen Alexandra had her tossed out of her home.  :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 01, 2006, 08:05:31 AM
I'm liking it, Faberge, I'm liking it...you're about as jack blunt as I am!  Hehehe!

Someone spoke of the famous photos of Bertie, Alix and the five kids taken in 1889 on the steps of Marlborough House, saying that Alix and the kids (all grown by this time) together would make about one Bertie!  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 01, 2006, 08:12:31 AM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/Obesemia/091.jpg)
;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Faberge on February 01, 2006, 08:16:00 AM
Quote
I'm liking it, Faberge, I'm liking it...you're about as jack blunt as I am!  Hehehe!

Someone spoke of the famous photos of Bertie, Alix and the five kids taken in 1889 on the steps of Marlborough House, saying that Alix and the kids (all grown by this time) together would make about one Bertie!  ;D


;D :P A fitting observation. Thanks for telling me about it!

You know it galls me to think how self-indulgent he was . The term "moderation" certainly didn't apply to any of his appetites.

I thought I would faint would I read how he railed against his mother the queen when it came to her admiration and affection for John Brown. He needed a good thrashing. It's no wonder he vexed his parents so much. Self-righteous little upstart that he was.  >:(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Faberge on February 01, 2006, 10:11:38 AM
 

(http://wholesale-prints.net/MBB1912/MBB1912001.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 01, 2006, 11:58:03 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Alexandra_Marie_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 01, 2006, 12:08:58 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/hanoverpix011.jpg) the three sisters and valdemar :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on February 01, 2006, 01:10:25 PM
Thank you three times over for these wonderful photos which are rare indeed.  My favorite period for Alexandra  photographs is at the time of her marriage and early years as P of W.  So lovely and so fashionable!  And always posing in adorable fashion with her babies.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 01, 2006, 01:33:33 PM
Thank you  :)my favourite periode of queen alexandra is wen she comes queen and after when she comes older.
She looks so beatiull as queen and  so elegant as a older woman. (sorry fore the english im not that good at it) :-[
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ChristineM on February 02, 2006, 08:28:12 AM
Queen Alexandra's Rose Day still exists.   It was first held to mark the 50th anniversary of Alexandra's arrival in the UK - 26th June 1912.  

I have not seen any visible sign of it for years, but recall when I was a child, small pink roses were given in response to a donation to the funds.   In that sense it was similar to the poppies of Remembrance Day.

The donations are given to charities which do not usually receive national recognition.   According to Wikipedia, the prime minister launches the day and is the first person to purchase a rose.

Queen Alexandra's great granddaughter, Princess Alexandra is the President of Queen Alexandra's Rose Day.

tsaria
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 02, 2006, 09:37:50 AM
First Opening of Parliament, wearing mourning for Queen Victoria

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/1615b.jpg)

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/alexandraincrown.jpg)

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/alexandra6-2636181.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 02, 2006, 09:40:16 AM
2 birds with one stone (mourning and Alexandra Rose Day)

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/2175516165.jpg)

One the caption it says about being Queen of Roses and Queen of Hearts (long before Princess Diana).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 02, 2006, 09:42:40 AM
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/76676_1243881.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 02, 2006, 09:44:24 AM
 Great pix grandduchessella thanks. :)
How long did the were those speicall mourning close.
My grandmother told me that the wore ther mourning close one year ( when her father died). And that was in 1933.
Did the royals also wore it that long? ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 02, 2006, 09:47:12 AM
Queen Victoria and her daughter Empress Friedrich never came out of it.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 02, 2006, 09:55:46 AM
Yes youre right eric thats true.
Empress Zita of Austria also never came out of here black close. She wore them till here own dead . :o
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 02, 2006, 10:18:13 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/File0722a.jpg)
Just like this picture queen Maud and Mary where a black veil. And the other women also king George is dressed in black. At the funeral from his mother Queen Alexandra
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 02, 2006, 10:26:05 AM
You see Maud's short dress was much more up-to-date than Queen Mary's.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 02, 2006, 10:29:13 AM
Yes no you can see Maud was always fashionable even at funerals.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 02, 2006, 11:04:13 AM
Yeah maud was really a fashion icon those days.
Mabye she  inheredit it from her mother because Ithink alexndra was re(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/1929-05-0020Queen20Maud2001.jpg)ally fashionable.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Keith on February 02, 2006, 02:21:34 PM
Quote
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/File0722a.jpg)
Just like this picture queen Maud and Mary where a black veil. And the other women also king George is dressed in black. At the funeral from his mother Queen Alexandra


Is that Queen Maud to the left of King George(his left)? I think it looks like Princess Mary.

Thanks for the pic, I've never seen any from her funeral.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on February 02, 2006, 02:30:12 PM
hmmm looks like Maud to me and something very typical she would wear! & possibly Louise and Toria behind her?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Keith on February 02, 2006, 06:14:23 PM
It does look like Maud's nose, but I thought otherwise it looked more like Mary facially, and also the face looked a little younger than Maud would have been. The consensus does seem that it is Maud though.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 02, 2006, 07:07:14 PM
No...it was definitely Maud. The face, the fashion. Remember Princess Mary looked very much like Queen Mary.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on February 02, 2006, 08:17:02 PM
It's been a long time since I've read about the circumstances surrounding Edward VII's final illness and death, and how Alexandra dealt with it.  Was he ill for weeks or just several days so that Alex had time to "prepare for the worst"?  Who was with Edward when he died?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 02, 2006, 11:31:38 PM
No, it's Maud. No doubt.

His death came rather quickly. Alexandra was actually on holiday in Corfu and had to be quickly summoned back. He had caught a cold but was still dining out on 2 May. She arrived back in England on 5 May. GV sent Toria, who was with QA, a telegram saying it was bad and to prepare their mother for when their father didn't meet them at the station as he was wont to do. EVII finally consented to allow a bulletin to be posted saying his condition posed some alarm that eveing. He still smoked half a cigar on 6 May--the day he died.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 02, 2006, 11:42:21 PM
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/18a.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 03, 2006, 11:05:47 AM
Was Victoria Alexandras favourite daughter because Victoria was always white here?
Ore didnt she had favourits at ale? ???
Are there any more pictures of Alexandra on Alexandra rose day.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on February 03, 2006, 11:07:01 AM
I think Eddie was Alix's favourite child, but I don't know who was her favourite of the girls.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 03, 2006, 12:24:21 PM
I think Alix liked her boys better than the lot of them. Bertie however like Maud the best of all.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Caleb on February 03, 2006, 10:04:18 PM
Here's one of King Edward VII, Queen Alexandra & great American author Samuel Longhorn Clemmens, better known as Mark Twain. (http://www.twainquotes.com/king2.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 04, 2006, 09:28:28 AM
Not sure if Alix or Bertie read any of his books... ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 04, 2006, 12:13:03 PM
That image made the cover of either the Illustrated London News or The Graphic, I can't remember which.

I wonder if his opinions of royalty had changed by the time he met them.  :)

There never was a throne which did not represent a crime.
- Mark Twain, a Biography

The institution of royalty in any form is an insult to the human race.
- Notebook, 1888

Let us take the present male sovereigns of the earth--and strip them naked. Mix them with 500 naked mechanics, and then march the whole around a circus ring, charging suitable admission of course--and desire the audience to pick out the sovereigns. They couldn't. You would have to paint them blue. You can't tell a king from a copper except you differentiate their exteriority.
- Notebook, 1888

Why, dear me, any kind of royalty, howsoever modified, any kind of aristocracy, howsoever pruned, is rightly an insult; but if you are born and brought up under that sort of arrangement you probably never find it out for yourself, and don't believe it when somebody else tells you.
- A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Bonaparte instituted the setting of merit above birth, and also so completely stripped the divinity from royalty that, whereas crowned heads in Europe were gods before, they are only men since, and can never be gods again, but only figure-heads, and answerable for their acts like common clay. Such benefactions as these compensate the temporary harm which Bonaparte and the Revolution did, and leave the world in debt to them for these great and permanent services to liberty, humanity, and progress.
- Life on the Mississippi

I urged that kings were dangerous. He said, then have cats. He was sure that a royal family of cats would answer every purpose. They would be as useful as any other royal family, they would know as much, they would have the same virtues and the same treacheries, the same disposition to get up shindies with other royal cats, they would be laughable vain and absurd and never know it, they would be wholly inexpensive, finally, they would have as sound a divine right as any other royal house...The worship of royalty being founded in unreason, these graceful and harmless cats would easily become as sacred as any other royalties, and indeed more so, because it would presently be noticed that they hanged nobody, beheaded nobody, imprisoned nobody, inflicted no cruelties or injustices of any sort, and so must be worthy of a deeper love and reverence than the customary human king, and would certainly get it.
- A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

This autobiography of mine is a mirror, and I am looking at myself in it all the time. Incidentally I notice the people that pass along at my back--I get glimpses of them in the mirror- and whenever they say or do anything that can help advertise me and flatter me and raise me in my own estimation, I set these things down in my autobiography. I rejoice when a king or a duke comes my way and makes himself useful to this autobiography, but they are rare customers, with wide intervals between. I can use them with good effect as lighthouses and monuments along my way, but for real business I depend upon the common herd.
- Mark Twain's Autobiography

Unquestionably the person that can get lowest down in cringing before royalty and nobility, and can get most satisfaction out of crawling on his belly before them, is an American. Not all Americans, but when an American does it he makes competition impossible.
- Mark Twain's Notebook

A Prince picks up grandeur, power, and a permanent holiday and gratis support by a pure accident, the accident of birth, and he stands always before the grieved eye of poverty and obscurity a monumental representative of luck. And then--supremest value of all--his is the only high fortune on the earth which is secure. The commercial millionaire may become a beggar; the illustrious statesman can make a vital mistake and be dropped and forgotten; the illustrious general can lose a decisive battle and with it the consideration of men; but once a Prince always a Prince--that is to say, an imitation god, and neither hard fortune nor an infamous character nor an addled brain nor the speech of an ass can undeify him. By common consent of all the nations and all the ages the most valuable thing in this world is the homage of men, whether deserved or undeserved. It follows without doubt or question, then, that the most desirable position possible is that of a Prince. And I think it also follows that the so-called usurpations with which history is littered are the most excusable misdemeanors which men have committed. To usurp a usurpation--that is all it amounts to, isn't it?
- "At the Shrine of St. Wagner"


He did, however, like Bertie's sister Louise and her husband Lorne. He met them when they were in Canada and asked to meet him. Louise and Lorne kept him with them almost continually, and were loath to let him go. Once they took him tobogganing—an exciting experience.

It happened that during his stay with them the opening of the Canadian Parliament took place. Lord Lorne and the principal dignitaries of state entered one carriage, and in a carriage behind them followed Princess Louise with Mark Twain. As they approached the Parliament House the customary salute was fired. Clemens pretended to the Princess considerable gratification. The temptation was too strong to resist:

“Your Highness,” he said, “I have had other compliments paid to me, but none equal to this one. I have never before had a salute fired in my honor.”

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 04, 2006, 05:24:58 PM
After Dagmar got herself out of russia see first went to her sister Alexandra. But why didnt she stay in Brittian with her sister?And why did she went so fast to Denmark her daugther Xenia stayed in England.
Are there any pictures of Dagmar with Alexandra in Great Brittian after see flew from Russia?I only have one of then in a book. Also with queen Mary but on the internet I can not find it. Did queen Mary liked Dagmar and did Dagmar like Mary? So manny questions ;D ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 04, 2006, 06:33:38 PM
1. Dagmar and Alix found out that they cannot stand each other for long period of time togather. The Dowager Empress needed her own establishment, so she went back to Denmark.

2. Xenia stayed on because she like it more in England.

3. Noooo...Queen Mary cannot stand Dagmar, who tried to force Alix to adopt the russian ule of the dowager comes first in England. Mary complained to her Aunt Augusta who was angry to Dagmar who making trouble between the in-laws.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on February 05, 2006, 06:04:29 AM
I think Mary found Dagmar very trying. I don't think she "couldn't stand her".  ???

Their is a photo in the Georgina Battiscombe (sp?) book on Alexandra. With Alexandra, Dagmar and Toria at some flying event I think. Rather a sad picture I thought!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 05, 2006, 07:28:58 AM
Thanks fore the info great :).
Did Dagmar after see went to Denmark still visid her sister in England?Are did Alexandra often go to Denmark fore a visid. Does anywan have a picture of them in Brittian are Denmark after the revolution.
And there is another question how did Dagmar react at the dead of her beloved sister Alexandra in 1925.
Was she at the funeral, are the any pictures ::) ??? ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Prince_Lieven on February 05, 2006, 07:30:48 AM
I might be very wrong here but I doubt Alix went to Denmark after Minnie went to live there. At that stage Alix was quite infirm and probably not up to the travelling.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 05, 2006, 08:30:48 AM
Yes...it was very tiring for Queen Mary to bear, who could only write to her Augusta to complain. She told Mary "May that pernicious influence soon depart !" after the mess Dagmar made, egging Alix to take precedence over Mary.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 05, 2006, 09:18:01 AM
Woow :o great info!!!
Well Im searching fore a picture agian on the picture are king christian XI and his three daughters thyra,alexandra and dagmar playing cards .
Please can some one post that picture Im searching it fore o long long time I only have one verry verry smale.
If you cot it please post it  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Angie_H on February 05, 2006, 09:56:16 AM
Quote
I think Eddie was Alix's favourite child, but I don't know who was her favourite of the girls.

Didn't Alexandra walk arouind on George V's coronation mumbling to herself that it should have been Eddy getting crowned today?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 05, 2006, 10:00:09 AM
Really :o :o :o!!!!!!!
How sad fore George and Mary.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 05, 2006, 10:03:12 AM
I believe so, yes.

I don't think it would've bothered GV though--he kept his brother's memory well and nothing 'Motherdear' could say or do probably upset him unduly.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on February 05, 2006, 11:50:31 AM
Quote
Didn't Alexandra walk arouind on George V's coronation mumbling to herself that it should have been Eddy getting crowned today?


Maybe that was QA's way of dealing with it? She was now a widow and now a Queen Dowager and that day of all days would have reminded her of  darling Eddy. I think it's understandable. It should have been Eddys day but wasn't ment to be :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 05, 2006, 02:45:30 PM
Quote

Maybe that was QA's way of dealing with it? She was now a widow and now a Queen Dowager and that day of all days would have reminded her of  darling Eddy. I think it's understandable. It should have been Eddys day but wasn't ment to be :(


It's said that Alexandra paced around Sandringham on the day of George's coronation repeating "Eddy should have been king, not Georgie, Eddy should have been king, not Georgie" over and over.

I've also read several times that Alix (although she adored George) regarded him as a sort of stand-in king for Eddy.  :(

Dowager Queens do not traditionally attend the coronations of their late husband's successor though I believe Queen Mary broke with this and was at the coronation of her son George VI.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 05, 2006, 03:02:08 PM
No, they don't. QM breaking with royal tradition--shocking!  :)  She felt after the abdication though it was important to make a unified stand at the Coronation. Then the Queen Mother was at EII's coronation.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 06, 2006, 11:10:13 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/bc129.jpg)
A verry old and tired Queen Alexandra.
I always think she has a quit of sad look in her eyes.Werry different from her other sisters Dagmar ore Thyra. Dagmar is watching like she is a little bit sad and angry. Thyra looks like a sweet old granny wit her white hair  and Alexandra verry sad.
But she still looks great fore on old woman of her age.
How old would see be on this photo? ???
Are there any more of this great pictures.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 06, 2006, 05:06:30 PM
Quote
Woow :o great info!!!
Well Im searching fore a picture agian on the picture are king christian XI and his three daughters thyra,alexandra and dagmar playing cards .
Please can some one post that picture Im searching it fore o long long time I only have one verry verry smale.
If you cot it please post it  ::)


I have the photo but kmerov saved me time and photobucket space by posting this already.  :)

Quote
King Christian IX playing cards with his daughters.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/cads.jpg)


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 07, 2006, 11:34:53 AM
Hello Im (agian I know  :P) searching fore a picture of Queen Alexandra her sister Dagmar King George and his wife Queen Mary in London in 1923. Its a great picture I only have it in a book called the History of the Europian royal families. I hoped mabye someone has it. ;D Thanks already :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 07, 2006, 04:33:00 PM
This one?

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/Picture3589a.jpg)

It was either at Maud Fife's wedding or Earl Mountbatten's. I think the former but I can never remember.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Michael_II on February 07, 2006, 04:41:51 PM
The picture above is from the wedding of Louis and Edwina Mountbatten.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 08, 2006, 02:28:04 PM
Quote
This one?

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/Picture3589a.jpg)

It was either at Maud Fife's wedding or Earl Mountbatten's. I think the former but I can never remember.


Is that Minny next to Alix?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 08, 2006, 06:23:23 PM
Yes it is.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 08, 2006, 07:54:20 PM
Yes...and not Queen Mary's favourite people. I guess it would have been better to have Thyra around. She was so much easier to get along.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 08, 2006, 08:08:53 PM
You're probably right, Eric.

May did really try to get along with Motherdear and Co., though...

Lordy, I can't get over this photo - May looks like a veritable Amazon next to everyone else here!  :o :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 08, 2006, 09:21:03 PM
May liked Thyra--they knew each other from May's childhood days at Rumpenheim (Mary Adelaide being a Hesse-Cassel like Queen Louise). She also knew Queen Olga from this period and it paid off when GV was debating about the marriage--Queen Olga advised him that they would do well together.

Anyway, I think part of the problem with the photo, even allowing for the high toque, is the angle. QM and GV were actually the same height though she always seems taller than him (good posture and all).
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 09, 2006, 06:26:56 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/dagmaralex3alexGat4ina.jpg)
One with her sister Dagmar.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/mayandalix.jpg)
And one with her daughterinlaw Queen Mary.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 09, 2006, 10:02:21 AM
Someone once asked me if I had a picture of QA with the future Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and I knew I did and I couldn't find it. I finally rescanned some old magazines and so here's the photo. It's from QE's wedding day in 1923. Nice photo of 3 Queens.  :) They're even in the order in which they reigned.

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/Picture4022yorkwedding2w.jpg)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 09, 2006, 01:11:23 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Empress20Alexandra202620Queen20Alex.jpg)
Queen Alexandra with Empress Alexandra on a ship.
Did Queen Alexandra often got to Russia to visit her sister Dagmar, and her cousins?
And did Alexandra visited Thyra ore didnt she do that?
Did thyra visited Alexandra in England? I know Dagmar did. ore did she saw Thyra back in Denmark wen the family was there on thier holiday.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 09, 2006, 09:36:53 PM
Cookie did remember Queen Alexandra. Read Hugo Vicker's new book on the Queen Mum and you can find it out. She told Prince Michael about it for his research.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 10, 2006, 05:12:52 AM

Are there any more pictures of Queen Alexandra at weddings of her childeren and grandchilderen? ???
Love to see them thank you already.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 10, 2006, 09:28:47 AM
Quote
Are there any more pictures of Queen Alexandra at weddings of her childeren and grandchilderen? ???
Love to see them thank you already.


at Louise's wedding in 1889

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/File1638alixcw.jpg)

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/Princess-of-Wales1w.jpg)
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/File0400aw.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 10, 2006, 09:33:40 AM
at George's wedding in 1893 (I think at the peak of her beauty)

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/File1386alixww.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 10, 2006, 09:34:50 AM
Someone told me that the color stones in Alix's tiara were rubies... 8)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 10, 2006, 10:02:17 AM
Great pictures see really looks beatiful .
I agree see was at her peak of beaty.
Thank you ( Do you mabye have pictures at weddings of her grandchilderen) :-/
If you not it doesnt matter  ;)
Im also happy with this pictures you send. :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 10, 2006, 10:32:47 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/rf_32_edited.jpg)
This is also a verry beatiful picture of Alexandra she looks absolutly royal.
Even without her tiaras ore other great jewels.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 10, 2006, 10:46:02 AM
The ones she would've been at were:

Alexandra and Maud Fife
Duke and Duchess of York
Princess Mary

I think there are some of her at Maud's. I have Alex Fife's wedding issue but I can't remember if she's in there. The one I posted is the only clear one of her at Bertie's. Here is Princess Mary's:

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/britain/img442w.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 10, 2006, 10:46:30 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Russian20Kokoshnik20Tiara2C20Queen2.jpg)
A close up of her jewelery.

And with a choker see wore alot.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 10, 2006, 01:25:17 PM
Thank you fore the picture grandduchessella.
She really looks old if you compare that picture whit the one from George and May s wedding. :o
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 10, 2006, 05:04:13 PM
Quote
She really looks old if you compare that picture whit the one from George and May s wedding. :o



Well you have to remember that 29 years had passed between the two weddings!! She still managed to look more fashionable than her daughter in law if you ask me! (Sorry Grandduchessella... ;)) However, I do agree the fashions of the 1880's/1890's particularly suited Alexandra.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on February 10, 2006, 09:31:25 PM
The Russian Fringe tiara is a favorite of mine, but in that photo it somehow seems out of line--uneven.  I didn't notice it that way when the current Queen wears it.  Perhaps it has been totally dismantled over the years.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 11, 2006, 05:50:29 AM
No...When Queen Mary inheited it, it was as the Queen now wore it.  >:(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 11, 2006, 10:37:13 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Alexandra_Marie_0.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/19082pe.jpg)
With Dagmar.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 11, 2006, 10:39:28 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80798_128542.jpg)
Are there more of this quint of pictures with Dagmar ore with Victoria?
Visiting places in the country? ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Keith on February 11, 2006, 11:46:17 AM
I was just on the QV grandaughter page, and there was some mention of Alexandra about face-lifts and peels. I've also read that people thought she had her face enamled, but Daisy of Pless said she didn't believe it as she saw Alexandra out in the rain.

Does anyone know exactly what face enamling is? I'm assuming from the Daisy comment it is something that would run off your face, if water touched it.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 12, 2006, 09:35:39 AM

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/QUEEN20ALEXANDRA27S20TIARA.jpg)
Enameling is that the put varnish ore something like that,on youre face.
Ant after its becomes hard , it is just like a mask on youre face. Thats why you must aviod contact with water ore it will melt of.
And then youre normal face will come out agian.
I think that is wat the mean with enameling.
But I do not believe Alexandra did that, ore that she had any facelifts.
I did not even knew the did that in those days( was face lifting possibel ???).I hope it will answer youre question.Even if she did she still looked stunning.   Here are two potraits of her agian  ::)
Looking ferry beatifull. ;D ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 12, 2006, 09:37:20 AM
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/princessalexandracourtdress.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 12, 2006, 09:38:39 AM
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/QUEEN20ALEXANDRA27S20TIARA.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 12, 2006, 09:50:22 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/bc129.jpg)
In this picture where she is pretty old.
You can see the wrinkles benauth her eyes and around her mouth. ::)( sorry)
So she wears not some mask I think, only fore officail portraits she wears alot of make up.
But I dont think she had her face enameled.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Keith on February 12, 2006, 11:53:44 AM
Thanks royal_netherlands. That's what I had been thinking, but I think if someone had done that it would be quite obvious as I would imagine facial movement would have been very limited, and talking virtually impossible. I would go with she didn't do that.

As for face lifts, I don't think they were until sometime around WWI.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 12, 2006, 12:47:56 PM

Alexandra was a really great photographer , and took a lot of pictures in her time.
The photo next to her was taken during a  cruise on board of the royal yacht.
In the year 1902 in the title of this picture is Off the irish Coast.  Beatifull sky and boats I think, Woudend  mine having it :P.
The sky looks really fantastic with the sun behind the clouthes.  8)
Are there more pictures ore info about Queen Alexandrathe photographer.
Would love to read and see it. :)
Thanks already

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 12, 2006, 06:28:14 PM

There was Queen Alexandra's Christmas Book published in 1908 which was a bunch of her photographs. It's still available cheaply. There was also the recent book Developing The Picture: Queen Alexandra And The Art Of Photography by Frances Dimond  which deals with QA and her photographs. ISBN: 1902163796
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 13, 2006, 01:04:55 PM
Hello Im searching fore pictures of Queen Alexandra( after she became queen mother)  with Dagmar,Victoria,Mary etc etc.
When she is visiting places in the country ore something like that.( ore at Alexandra Rose Day)
I some one has that quint of pictures please post them.
I really like those pictures and Im searching fore them.
Thank you already

royal netherlands :)    
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Keith on February 14, 2006, 06:11:35 PM
(http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c256/fajack/AlixandMinny.jpg)

I don't think this one of Alix and Minny has been posted before.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Caleb on February 14, 2006, 08:13:49 PM
I think that photo shows the softer side of Marie Feodorovna in her older days. Because when I see photos of her in her older days, she has the appearance of this cranky, formiddable old woman, which I know she was not (to a certain extent), but this does show the smile that so frequented the photos of her days when she was married to Sasha.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on February 14, 2006, 08:36:16 PM
Great photo Keith.  Do you know what year that might have been?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 15, 2006, 10:50:49 AM
I don't think Alexandra was "Queen Mother" . She was Dowager Queen. Queen Elisabeth ( "Cookie") was the first Queen Mother.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 15, 2006, 12:00:38 PM
What a great picture that was what I was searching fore. :) :) :)
Thank you ferry much Keith. :D
I never saw it before, Im verry happy wit this picture.
And Eric Im verry sorry I will never call her Queen Mother agian. ;) :-X
From now on al cal her Dowager queen, yes you are right Queen Elizabeth ( cookie ) was the first Queen mother.   :) :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Keith on February 15, 2006, 12:07:03 PM
Quote
Great photo Keith.  Do you know what year that might have been?


I've had this on my desktop so long, I'm not even sure where it comes from. I'm thinking though it is prior to WWI, as Minnie doesn't look as aged to me, as she did after the toll the war took on her.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 15, 2006, 02:46:45 PM
I think Queen Alexandra was the last to be styled "Queen Dowager".

In my books, particularly one written in the late 1940's on Queen Mary by Louis Wulf, she is referred to throughout as "Queen Mother", so I don't think Elizabeth was the first to have the title.

Probably "Queen Mother" sounds a little more flattering anyway, though both are really the same thing.

"Queen Dowager" tends to remind me of some hideous fairytale schemer with watery eyes, a long nose and a humped back... ;D ::)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kmerov on February 15, 2006, 03:24:02 PM
I seem to recall a picture of Alexandra where the text says the Queen Mother, but I'm not shure.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kmerov on February 15, 2006, 03:29:29 PM
Alexandra arriving in Denmark. ( I have always liked the more informal, nonarranged snap shot pictures!)
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Alexandra/receievbd.jpg)

And a more arranged one.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Alexandra/alixhone.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 15, 2006, 04:03:00 PM
Fantastic pictures, Kmerov, thanks, I have not seen either before, I don't think.  :D

Re: Queen Dowager/Mother - you are right - I've seen Alexandra referred to as the Queen Mother also.  As it's not an official title, I suppose either could have been used then, however, I can't see that Elizabeth (Cookie) would have liked being called Queen Dowager, though, particularly as she was so young at the time.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 15, 2006, 06:18:26 PM
In most of the postcards I have from the period after she was widowed, they say 'Queen Mother' when they don't refer to just Queen Alexandra. Since there wasn't the confusion with names that occured when EII became Queen, she was mostly still just called by her name.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on February 15, 2006, 07:36:35 PM
Quote

All right, then, back to Motherdear now...


Here goes Common sense - Florida Train Wreck Style?????   ;D ;D ;D

Alix was always referred to as Queen Alexandra!  May was always referred to as Queen Mary!!!

When George VI died Elizabth Sr. could not be referred to as Queen Elizabeth because she would be confused with QEII, THE Soverign so..........some one came up with the official title Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother to differentiate the two Queen Elizabeths????  

Makes sense to me.  What do you think?  ;) ;) ;)


TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 15, 2006, 08:56:37 PM
They were all called Queen Mother when their royal husbands died.

Elizabeth, consort of George VI, however, has been the only one to be called the "Queen Mother" as a general term without use of her name as well.




Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 05:56:00 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Queen20Alexandra20Signed20Photo.jpg)
Alexandra with a choker.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 05:56:33 AM
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Queen20Alexandra20Signed20Photo.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 06:10:20 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/MinnieAlix.jpg)
Just the two of them.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 06:27:12 AM
 
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Alexandra20as20Princess20of20Wales.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 06:27:45 AM
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Alexandra20as20Princess20of20Wales.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 08:33:47 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/00434_detail.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 09:11:50 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/70383_116279.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 16, 2006, 09:35:30 AM
Quote
 
Does anyone know if she often wore hairpieces?  Sometimes her hair looks a bit high to me...


Yes, it's quite well known that Alix started wearing a hair piece in the 1870's and did so until her death. She actually started a trend amongst certain members of the family--Vicky's daughter Sophie being one of them. Vicky wasn't a fan however and said the look only worked for 'Aunt Alix.'
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on February 16, 2006, 11:36:00 AM
My thoughts exactly, you really have got some great images Royal-netherlands which I am really enjoying.  

On the subject of hairpieces, where did you find the references to Alexandra's use of them?  I would be really inteested to know.  I work with an historic dress collection and we have a box of them!  They are the most bizarre things to look at as they take a variety of shapes and sizes, for example those dating from the 1890s are a crescent shape for the hair to be partially rolled over the top whereas the 1880s ones take on the more frizzed look which is so characteristic of Alexandra
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 01:16:14 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.jpg)(http://    [IMG]http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/Insight_jan03_focus_alexandra_large.jpg)
Thank you Kate.
how funny you work with old hairpieces, cant imagine how that looks. ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 16, 2006, 01:27:50 PM
 (http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/queen-358959.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on February 16, 2006, 03:10:59 PM
They are some of the more unusual items in the collection.  It is a fantastic dress collection with over 15,000 items of dress and accessories from the 17th century to the 20th century, I love it!

Actually, recently I came across a box in a draw of objects that had not been catalogued.  It was a green leather box and inside was a note.  I could hardly believe it when I read it - it was written to a local bishop and read as follows; 'This belonged to my dear husband, Alexandra'.  Her signature is so distinctive and there it was.  The bishop left it to the museum on his death but it was nenver properly recorded so I stumbled across it by mistake.  I don't know what the box may have contained but it was obviously a gift following Bertie's death.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on February 16, 2006, 06:27:05 PM
I don't know about the hairpieces for Alex.  It is also possible that as she grew into her '70s her hair might have been cut shorter, thus making less hair to pile on top.  Plus her hair might have been much thinner.  Her hair was certainly long enough in her 20's that she wouldn't need a hair piece.  It might have helped her keep her tiaras on better also.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 16, 2006, 06:38:08 PM
Quote
I don't know about the hairpieces for Alex.


Photographed at the right angle, it's obvious she's wearing a hair piece:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/gurutiek/dagmaralex3alexGat4ina.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: etonexile on February 16, 2006, 08:08:12 PM

The Victorian and Edwardian ladies were an odd lot as to hair...It seemed they could never have enough hair....Even if their real hair was pushed nearly flat and solid.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 17, 2006, 07:22:31 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/AlexandraHunting.jpg)(http:// -11.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 17, 2006, 08:18:25 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/64.jpg)
Queen Alexandra with her sister the Dowager Empress on the funeral of her beloved husband King Edward
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on February 17, 2006, 12:18:16 PM
Yes it was a real surprise.  We do have a couple of other items of Alexandra's including a leather notebook which she decorated herself as leatherwork was one of her hobbies.  We also hve the programme that went with the wedding which belonged to one of the guests (I do not know which one).

It is odd to think that these things belonged to Alexandra.  On a recent study visit to the Royal Photgraph Collection, I looked at a number of images that she gave as gifts to her children as many of them were signed 'Your Old Motherdear'.  

By the way, thank you again for all of the pictures royal-netherlands, I don't know where you find them all - they are really lovely.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 18, 2006, 08:31:09 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/80800_128544.jpg)
With her daugther Victoria.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on February 18, 2006, 10:52:18 AM
You know I love Queen Alexandra just as much as the next person, but holy moly that checkered/gingham dress is just terrible!   :o  
She looks like she wrapped herself up in a tablecloth for heaven's sake.  Someone please tell me it wasn't a red and white dress!!!  
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 18, 2006, 11:43:46 AM
I think the photo dates to shortly before her marriage when she was just a poor Danish princess. We should probably cut her some slack.  :) Poor Dagmar probably got it as a hand-me-down.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on February 18, 2006, 02:57:15 PM
Quote
You know I love Queen Alexandra just as much as the next person, but holy moly that checkered/gingham dress is just terrible!   :o  
She looks like she wrapped herself up in a tablecloth for heaven's sake.  Someone please tell me it wasn't a red and white dress!!!  


Well, she was not the only one at the time to wear loud patterns.  It was the fashion.

What do you think her opinion would be of our current styles - not much, I would think.  :-/
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on February 18, 2006, 04:33:08 PM
 :oThat engagement photo of Bertie and Alex smiling almost knocked me off my royal chair.  I had seen the companion to it, but not this pose.  Great!!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alicky1872 on February 18, 2006, 04:38:37 PM
Re the photo of Alix in the gingham dress (which I like by the way!  ;)) apprently Prince Albert was a fan since Queen Victoria wrote on the back of that photo that it had been 'so much admired by my angel.'

Alix's cheeky smile in the engagement photo always reminded me of Diana's. In fact Bertie looks strikingly like Charles too in that photo!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on February 18, 2006, 06:04:57 PM
Quote
I think the photo dates to shortly before her marriage when she was just a poor Danish princess.


Doesn't it vaguely remind you of the scene in Gone With the Wind when Scarlett makes the dress out of the curtains at Tara? ;D  Was she trying to marry the Prince of Wales in order to pay the taxes on the Yellow Palace? ;)
Okay, I'm done now...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 19, 2006, 06:55:34 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/bertisandalex18644jc.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 20, 2006, 05:15:09 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexandrawal.jpg)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: boffer on February 20, 2006, 12:46:19 PM
In some respects i believe she looked even younger (or at least more graceful) in the late 19th century, around the 1890's, or maybe it was just the fashions that suited her better.
I notice she is wearing the star brooches in their tiara fittings, a rare sight.
(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e367/Bofferding/QueenAlexandra-StarBroochTiara.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on February 20, 2006, 02:17:23 PM

Quote
Re the photo of Alix in the gingham dress (which I like by the way!  ;)) apprently Prince Albert was a fan since Queen Victoria wrote on the back of that photo that it had been 'so much admired by my angel.'

Alix's cheeky smile in the engagement photo always reminded me of Diana's. In fact Bertie looks strikingly like Charles too in that photo!

Is it certain that this picture is the one that Bertie first saw?  It would be interesting to know if it is as it is certainly a distinctive image.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 20, 2006, 02:24:30 PM
Luckily, Queen Alexandra, like Queen Mary and Missy, enjoyed having her photo taken and many were published--she was the Diana of her day for newspapers and illustrated magazines. I've picked up a good number, even though I was just outbidded for 2 really nice ones the other day.  :(

Here's one of my favorites--I like the longer hair though, like Diana, it didn't last long and she went back to her signature style. I think this one was in Royal Cabinet Cards. Plus, I know it was posted on here by someone else but I can't remember who or where--I usually try to 'quote' an image. My apologies to the original poster.

(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b259/queenena/powalexandra18636zm1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on February 20, 2006, 03:54:34 PM
 :-/I seem to recall seeing a photo of Alexandra that was said to be one of the first that Bertie saw of her.  She was in a very low v-cut dress, in a light color.  I forget how her hair was styled.  I'm not sure if Vicky had seen it or not also.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 21, 2006, 10:59:12 AM
Ringlets ! She did her hair in that manner to hide the sacr on her neck... :-[
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on February 23, 2006, 04:47:59 AM
The first image was taken after Alexandra's illness when she was seriously ill with rheumatic  fever.  This picture was one of a series taken during her convalescence which is why her hair is down - it makes her look so young although I guess she was really.  It makes you realise how young she was.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 23, 2006, 05:40:52 AM

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/alexsmiling.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on February 23, 2006, 03:34:52 PM
royal_netherlands, I never tire of that picture.  That rope of pearls with the tassels is one of my all-time faves, even if there is a chance however slight that they are fake.  Dazzling array of diamonds down the front of the skirt- I wish I could have seen that spectacle in person...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 23, 2006, 04:35:47 PM
Quote
The first image was taken after Alexandra's illness when she was seriously ill with rheumatic  fever.  This picture was one of a series taken during her convalescence which is why her hair is down - it makes her look so young although I guess she was really.  It makes you realise how young she was.


apparently some images were quickly rushed out to show that the princess had indeed recovered. You can still see the effects of the illness on her--she looks much thinner and more drawn than usual. The later series, with and without Louise (including the famous one of her with Louise on her back), was also put out for the reason to much better effect as she was back to looking in blooming health.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Aliss_Kande on February 23, 2006, 04:39:37 PM
Quote

The later series, with and without Louise (including the famous one of her with Louise on her back),


What famous Picture?  Could you please post it or direct me to it?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 23, 2006, 04:48:40 PM
Here's a link--my photobucket account is filling up.  :)

http://www.koshka-the-cat.com/photos/alix1.jpg

It's sometimes mis-ID'd as one of the other children, often George. Louise would later replicate the photo with her daughter Alexandra Fife.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: boffer on February 24, 2006, 07:41:28 AM
I think the second picture is actually Queen Mary. judging by the jewels: Ladies of England Tiara and the Pearl and Diamond Dog-collar.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on February 24, 2006, 12:10:13 PM
These kinds of skirts are ingenious - they have a series of cords inside that pass through brass rings and meet at the waistband so that if the wearer was walking and wished to raise her skirt to avoid muddy conditions etc, a pull of the cord secured the hem in this roman blind style!

The other way which QV favoured was to have a series of covered buttons on the outside of the skirt and loopholes further down so that the skirt could be raised that way.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 24, 2006, 12:39:36 PM
Thank you fore the info Kate.
was this the dress you were talking about in the thread of Alexandras clothes?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Booklady on February 25, 2006, 03:38:23 PM
Yes--I think we can draw several comparisons between her and Diana, beauty and fashion-wise.

Can someone post a photo or two of Alex and Affie together?  I know they were photographed together, particularly at the time when he had a crush on her, and they made a charming couple themselves.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 08, 2007, 05:07:07 AM
The fact that she corresponded with her German Aunt Augusta during the war was enough prove. Adter WWI, she did later renewed her ties with her German relatives. In contrast, Queen Elisabeth of Belgium said of her German (Bavarian) family during the war" It is finished between me and them. Now there will be an iron curtain that divides us that cannot be lifted." She used the word "iron curtain" years before Chuchill coined it.  :-\

Mary visited also her aunt before 1900 and for example at the Berlin wedding 1913. I think its also a remembernace of her own childhood. Her mother died before she became PoW and later Queen.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 08, 2007, 05:09:37 AM
I think she had a harder time cutting her German past than Queen Alexandra, who saw it as revenge for Denmark loses of the Duchies. However, it is not to say that she was unpatrotic to GB, but she it is just not easy. Also her love of her Germanic roots was passed to her eldest son Edward VIII, who enjoyed speaking German (her brother Bertie did not share that love).  ???

Queen Alexandra was also at the gatherings at Rumpenheim. I think she was accepted Germany but was anti-prussian (prussian-danish war)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 08, 2007, 06:48:52 AM
The fact that she corresponded with her German Aunt Augusta during the war was enough prove.

Huh ???

The fact she corresponded with dear Aunt Augusta means nothing. From her patriotism and writings it's clear May was more English than anyone!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 08, 2007, 02:06:36 PM
Quote
With a pro-German queen (Queen Mary relished her German roots and kept up contact with her Aunt Augusta of Mecklenburg-Strelitz even during WWI)

Quote
The fact that she corresponded with her German Aunt Augusta during the war was enough prove.

That is totally unfair. Augusta was a British princess and Mary herself was very British.  Mary herself grew up in London (in Kensington Palace) and lived her whole life in England.  I think Mary was not very pleased with Germany because the way her father was treated and I think it very false to say that Mary was pro-German during WWI. 

On Augusta again, even George V said something to the effect of "a stout, old English heart ceasing to beat." 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 08, 2007, 02:10:50 PM
Mary's letters to Augusta were passed through the Swedish Embassy or Crown Princess Margaret (as many other letters were).  Just because they were writing letters does not make them treasonous.  They were family and even Wilhem sent a telegram (via Margaret of Sweden) to his aunt Helena in England during the War.  The family realtions were not totally abandoned just toned down a lot after and during the War. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 08, 2007, 08:12:39 PM
Indeed ! I am not saying that Queen Mary was for Germany against British interests. However she was torn in her loyalities. She cannot do a Queen Elisabeth of Belgium and cut herself off from her German relaties completely. Some in Britian would argue that was treason enough. The name change from Saxe-Coburg -Gotha to Windsor was done to appeaise those who question why they wetre reigned over by "these Germans." Not to mention the fact that Prince Louis of Battenberg was booted off the office of First Sea Lord of Great Britian just because of his German name ! In the contect of this, Queen Mary's corresponence with "the enemy" was very close to teason if viewed this those times and in that context. Queen Sophie of Greece, who hadn't had much contect with her boorish brother was accused of settiing a wire to Berlin inside the palace in Athens. That is all rubbish, but it made her an easy target.  :(

Queen Alexandra (on the other hand) was all for war. She told George " I have always told you that he (Kaiser Wilhelm II) was a bad man, now I think you would believe me." She also pasterd her son to take down those Garter Standards in St George Chapel of "the enemy."
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 09, 2007, 04:50:44 PM
Mary's letters to Augusta were passed through the Swedish Embassy or Crown Princess Margaret (as many other letters were).  Just because they were writing letters does not make them treasonous.  They were family and even Wilhem sent a telegram (via Margaret of Sweden) to his aunt Helena in England during the War.  The family realtions were not totally abandoned just toned down a lot after and during the War. 

-Duke of NJ

I read somewear that not only Mary wrote via Sweden, also the Russian Empress Alexandra (Sunny), and others use this way for correspondence with "enemies".....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 09, 2007, 04:56:54 PM
Quote
read somewear that not only Mary wrote via Sweden, also the Russian Empress Alexandra (Sunny), and others use this way for correspondence with "enemies".....
Yes, most letters passed through Princess Margaret of Connaught, Crown Princess of Sweden (daughter of Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Louise Margaret of Prussia).  She was realted to all of them either by marriage or blood, or both.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 09, 2007, 05:02:28 PM
Quote
read somewear that not only Mary wrote via Sweden, also the Russian Empress Alexandra (Sunny), and others use this way for correspondence with "enemies".....
Yes, most letters passed through Princess Margaret of Connaught, Crown Princess of Sweden (daughter of Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Louise Margaret of Prussia).  She was realted to all of them either by marriage or blood, or both.

-Duke of NJ


Its the same today. Like Queen Margrethe II said in A ROYAL FAMILY "...people see us as the Royal Family of this or that country, but in real we are one family."
goes back the the Grandmother of Europe (Victoria) and the Father-in-law of Europe (Christian IX)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 10, 2007, 08:07:45 PM
Not really...The Queen did not know much of her German/European cousins (other than state visits) well. It was well known that her mother did not flavour much of those "Germans". After Queen Mary's death, Marina was the only one who kept up attending European/continental events. After the present Queen married Prince Philip, his extended family was accepted. However not much the others. When King Boudwin of Belgium died, the Queen did not want to attend his funeral (since she did not know him well), but was persuaded by her cousin and close friend (also a close friend to the Queen Mother) King Olav of Norway to attend.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 10, 2007, 09:59:07 PM
Well, it is the same if you're Queen Margarethe or another Scandinavian royal--their links are much tighter than with that of the British royals. Queen Margarethe is first cousin to the King of Sweden (their mother and father respectively being siblings) and King Harold of Norway's mother (Martha) was a Swedish princess as well. The Swedish link (through Princess Astrid, sister of Crown Princess Martha) ties together the families of Belgium and Luxemburg as well since those rulers are grandchildren of Astrid. These royals attend each other's events (weddings, baptisms, funerals, etc) much more frequently than the British royals do it seems. The British royals often seem to send a token royal (often Edward & Sophie) whereas it seems much warmer with the other houses. Plus, the heirs & their wives of thsoe countries seem to be more of an age than either Charles or William--they fall in between generally.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 10, 2007, 10:09:20 PM
I agree, Her Majesty rarely does attend other royal events unlike her counterparts. The Queen does not have anyone relatively close to her age at these events; she is now part of the "older" generation of royals.
Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 10, 2007, 11:04:02 PM
Indeed ! HM is always more of a British country woman than a continental royal.

True although in the middle years, Queen Ingrid was a close friend of the British Royal Family (her mother being Princess Margaret of Connaught) and visited her grandfather as a teenager. King Olav was another close friend of the British Royal Family (his mother being Princess Maud of Great Britian). It was rumoured that after the death of his wife , Matha, he courted both the Queen Mother & Marina, Duchess of Kent to no avail. Nonetheless he made regular trips to England and remained friendly to both the Queen Mother & HM.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 11, 2007, 07:30:04 AM
Well, it is the same if you're Queen Margarethe or another Scandinavian royal--their links are much tighter than with that of the British royals. Queen Margarethe is first cousin to the King of Sweden (their mother and father respectively being siblings) and King Harold of Norway's mother (Martha) was a Swedish princess as well. The Swedish link (through Princess Astrid, sister of Crown Princess Martha) ties together the families of Belgium and Luxemburg as well since those rulers are grandchildren of Astrid. These royals attend each other's events (weddings, baptisms, funerals, etc) much more frequently than the British royals do it seems. The British royals often seem to send a token royal (often Edward & Sophie) whereas it seems much warmer with the other houses. Plus, the heirs & their wives of thsoe countries seem to be more of an age than either Charles or William--they fall in between generally.



Of course the liks between Britain and Danmark is a bit long ago (via Alexandra and Maud) but its there....sure, its only 3rd, 4th or more grad cousins

I remember that ER II only once attend a funeral outside from Britain.....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 11, 2007, 02:48:53 PM
Quote
he courted both the Queen Mother & Marina,


Didn't he also court Alice of Althone or was that Gustav Adolf of Sweden?

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 11, 2007, 02:57:07 PM
Quote
Quote
he courted both the Queen Mother & Marina,


Didn't he also court Alice of Althone or was that Gustav Adolf of Sweden?

-Duke of NJ

I just realized that Alice was born in 1883 and Olav was born in 1903 so I doubt that Olav courted Alice so it must have been Gustav VI Adolf after Louise of Battenberg died.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 11, 2007, 04:33:37 PM
It was Gustav Adolf, not Olav. Alice frequently visited Sweden and they'd been friends for decades. I don't think GA liked being alone.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 11, 2007, 07:38:05 PM
Although I heard the match between Marina & Olav was discussed at some point. Wonder what Queen Alexandra would have thought of it if she were alive ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on June 12, 2007, 08:59:51 AM
Has anyone any idea what became of the wonderful coller de chien Alix wore with the 'Ballet Russe' inspired gown of c.1913? I vaguely recall a later photo of QM wearing a very similar/same collar, but no evidence thereafter has ever come to light!

I think the ensemble was probably worn to Alix Fife and Arthur Connaught's wedding, though am not certain!

Also, what about the superb 'huge' brooch/sautoir thingy Alix wore for the Francois Flameng portrait! It looks like a moonstone to me, but then again, maybe it is a cabochon white sapphire! I love the protrait as it conjurs up all the glory of the Edwardian age for me and Alix looks real in it, rather than airbrushed (particularly Fildes) as she so often does in other portraits! I wonder what happened to the saitoir thingy?



 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on June 12, 2007, 09:49:40 AM
This is the Francois Flameng, isn't it?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v404/SMROD/Royalty%202/Alix.jpg)

The necklace in question is Alexandra's famous Cartier collier resille, which we know that May subsequently wore (not looking quite so resplendent wearing it in this photo).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v404/SMROD/Royalty%202/Mayinresille.jpg)

We have talked about the fate of this piece; it would be lovely to think that it still languishes amongst the present Queen's jewels, just waiting to be brought into use again by a beautiful young princess.  However the possibility exists that, considered an outmoded and perhaps very large piece, it was broken up and its diamonds used to furnish new pieces of jewellery


As for the huge brooch, my memory escapes me and my books are at home.......alas......such is old age.....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 12, 2007, 10:04:08 AM
I believe they are different necklaces? There is a good picture of Alexandras one in the Menkes book I believe.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on June 12, 2007, 10:20:34 AM
They are one and the same necklace.

The Collier Resille necklace is misidentified in the Menkes book; the one depicted is by Cartier but it is not Alix's.

Flameng has taken some artistic liberties in his depiction of this piece, but there is a photo of Alix weaing the collier which clearly shows that it is the necklace that May is wearing in the above photo.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 12, 2007, 02:15:11 PM
Very interesting - thank you Martyn! I really thought they were different necklaces and Alexandras looks longer and higher. Perhaps May had it altered? One would have thought it would have reappeared, since QM's time, on one of the royal ladies by now. Are there many incidents of any jewels being broken up and remodelled in recent years?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 12, 2007, 04:17:55 PM
The most recent "break up" I can think of is Princess Alice of Greece's tiara which lent diamonds to Queen Elizabeth's engagement ring. I'm certainly no expert... I'm sure someone else has more current and relative examples. ???

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 12, 2007, 04:23:34 PM
I think a number of pieces have been broken up/remodelled in recent years by royals from the Queen Mother to the 'lesser' royals like the Duchess of Kent (the Cambridge sapphires coming to mind). Some are just really too large to wear--EII, for example, only wears a portion of Queen Mary's diamond stomacher. I think she's worn the full stomacher just once in recent years.

Here's one of QA wearing the necklace at the wedding of her granddaughter Alexandra Fife in 1913:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/jewels/10.jpg)

and a color of the Flaeming portrait:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/jewels/r765a.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 12, 2007, 07:40:28 PM
The break up of Princess Alice tiara...is it the big one she wore all the time ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 12, 2007, 08:20:52 PM
In the very retouched picture that GDE posted it looks like Queen Alexandra's dress has Russian court style sleeves.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 12, 2007, 08:48:23 PM
Here's the full length dress courtesy of Grandduchessella from the Queen Alexandra Part V thread:
(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/clothes/image955QAsdressforAlexswedding.jpg)

The sleeves do seem to pull elements from the Russian or even Medieval style.

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 12, 2007, 09:10:08 PM
Yes...very art novellue ! The Russian influence clearly seen. I guess this is as close as Alix got to a Russian court dress.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 12, 2007, 10:15:29 PM
In the very retouched picture that GDE posted it looks like Queen Alexandra's dress has Russian court style sleeves.

-Duke of NJ

Maybe she should've chosen her kokoshnik tiara then.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 12, 2007, 10:34:17 PM
I think she got one of those as well.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 12, 2007, 11:31:18 PM
I know--that's why I said she should've worn it.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 13, 2007, 12:06:28 AM
Maybe she wore it in some private function ? Cannot believe she wore it only once ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 13, 2007, 07:48:00 AM
The kokoshnik? She wore it many times. If you read the post I quoted, I was responding specifically to the mention that the 1913 dress was of Russian style--thus, the kokoshnik tiara would have been appropriate.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 13, 2007, 10:10:43 AM
They are one and the same necklace.

The Collier Resille necklace is misidentified in the Menkes book; the one depicted is by Cartier but it is not Alix's.

Flameng has taken some artistic liberties in his depiction of this piece, but there is a photo of Alix weaing the collier which clearly shows that it is the necklace that May is wearing in the above photo.

(http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w245/alexander1917/alixscollar.jpg)
(http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w245/alexander1917/AlexandraCollar002.jpg)

from a book about CARTIER telling, it was made for Queen Alexandra of Great Britain in 1905
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on June 13, 2007, 11:24:57 AM
Thank you GDElla for posting the photo of Alix wearing the Cartier resille necklace.  As you can see, it is the necklace that May is wearing in the photo that I posted earlier and is the necklace that Alix wears in the portrait by Flaemeng.

Eddieboy, May may have altered it for her own use.  In the photo of Alix it does look higher and longer but the design is quite clearly the same.

As for the photo in the Nadelhoffer Cartier book, I think that this is where the confusion arises and is repeated in Menkes' book.  The collier resille in the Cartier book attributed to Alix is not the one that was made for her and must be the source of the mistake.  If memory serves me correctly, Alix's collier is illustrated also, either on the same page or opposite but is misidentified......

As for jewellery that has been broken up and re-used, there is a long tradition in the RF of this happening.  QV, as we know, recycled old pieces for her own use; Alix reset the Oriental circlet with rubies to suit her own taste; May created new pieces and altered her own jewellery as taste and fashions changed and thw present Queen has followed in this tradition.  Her modern ruby and diamond tiara was created in part from other jewels.

The collier resille is very much a fin de siecle piece and would have been out of fashion by the twenties (even though May continued to wear chokers and other such outmoded jewels for years).  The choker itself made a bit of a come back in the 1970's onwards; thus we have seen Pcss Anne, Pcss Diana and other royals wearing historic pieces (such as MF's pearl sapphire and diamond choker and May's Cambridge emerald choker) plus their own modern pieces in this style.  I suspect that either the collier resillie is too big for anyone to carry off successfully or it has been broken up; if anyone had had the style and guts to wear it, I imagine that Diana would have been the obvious candidate (and to the best of my knowledge she never did so.....)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 13, 2007, 04:38:59 PM
Extremely impressive!  I suppose it's too large for common use and is in the Buckingham vault. Anyone know of its whereabouts?

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 13, 2007, 07:41:19 PM
The upper one looks like the piece from "Moulan Rouge" ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexander1917 on June 14, 2007, 02:02:02 AM
The upper one looks like the piece from "Moulan Rouge" ?  ???


The bootom one is the original set, later it was sent to Cartier and altered..so the book....It doesn't say if Cartier sold it, or its still in the RF...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 14, 2007, 04:21:44 AM
I don't think anyone other than QA can wear that. It requires the grace of a swan to carried it off.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 14, 2007, 05:48:52 PM
Queen Mary could pull it off... maybe.

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 14, 2007, 07:36:58 PM
Not really...She looked like a battleship, without the grace. Like Queen Alexandra's snake bracelet, Missy said it becames a part of her as times go on. The big necklace is very huggingly close to the neck.  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on June 17, 2007, 12:40:21 PM
I'm still of the opinion that the necklace that Alexander1917 illustrated is not the collier resille that belonged to Alix.  We have had this discussion before and no one has been able to come up with a photo of her wearing that large necklace; there are however photos of both Alix and May wearing a piece that Field insists is the collier resille by Cartier.

I doubt if even Alix could have worn that other necklace; it would have required such a low decolletage to display all those jewels that it might only have been a piece that a courtesan like la belle Otero could have worn (Cartier actually made the latter a collier resille with stones taken from a diamond bolero - the finished result was a cross between Alix's collier and the infamous Boehmer and Bassange necklace that brought such grief to Marie Antoinette!).

I have to agree that on May the collier looks less successful.......
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 17, 2007, 08:05:52 PM
Glad we agree on that. I guess May is more majestic while Alix is more fashionable.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ashdean on June 18, 2007, 11:46:30 AM
Yes and May was more sensible while Alexandra was more selfish !!! ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 18, 2007, 11:50:38 AM
I disagree. Personally I think May could have worn ANYTHING and still looked good. She held herself so well and knew it! ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on June 19, 2007, 07:59:34 AM
Yes and May was more sensible while Alexandra was more selfish !!! ;)

I think that's a bit harsh but......

Alix and May had very different styles.  It must be mentioned as well that May laboured for years in Alix's shadow; the latter's reputation as a well-dressed and elegant woman meant that May could never compete.  Her own style was developed as a mature woman, and especially when Queen, and was iconic and impressive, in marked contrast to Alix's occasionally eccentric and possibly egocentric notion of style.  May's style was tied in to her sense of duty to the public image of the monarchy........
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 19, 2007, 08:19:44 PM
I could not agree more...too harsh ! I think Alix is more expressive in her feelings than May. She wore her heart on her sleeve, while May was more restrait in her feelings.  :(

I also think that Alix's style is more fashionable and charming, while May's was more institutional and proper.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 19, 2007, 08:33:04 PM
Mary's style was, in a sense, a representation of the monarchy to which she was devoted to. The look worked for her making her an icon in changing times, something appreciated by Britons. Alexandra was more fashionable, not selfish at all, she just had a little more "pizazz."

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 19, 2007, 08:40:33 PM
Quote
not selfish at all

I believe even George called her selfish.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 19, 2007, 09:05:57 PM
She was selfish when it came to the attention and affection of her children, but I doubt she was extremely selfish when it came to material possessions.
Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on June 19, 2007, 09:17:22 PM
Yes and May was more sensible while Alexandra was more selfish !!! ;)

I think that's a bit harsh but......

Alix and May had very different styles.  It must be mentioned as well that May laboured for years in Alix's shadow; the latter's reputation as a well-dressed and elegant woman meant that May could never compete.  Her own style was developed as a mature woman, and especially when Queen, and was iconic and impressive, in marked contrast to Alix's occasionally eccentric and possibly egocentric notion of style.  May's style was tied in to her sense of duty to the public image of the monarchy........

Martyn,

IMO Alexandra's style had an element of sexuality that Old Diamond and Emeralds Drawers' style did not. 

This may be due to the lack of any real fashionable style in Quenn Victoria  in the same way that  Diana looked "sensual", even when dowdied out to the max, compared to QEII or Princess Ann .

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 19, 2007, 09:21:12 PM
Well...With Bertie disapearing more and more from her life, Alix only grip was to cling on to her children. Can anybody blame her.  :( Alix was very giving as far as relatives and even strangers are concerned. One story totally illustated their different styles. Once one worker from the Sandingham estate died, Queen mary came to visit the widow. After inquiring some information about the dead man, May went out soon. An hour later, Queen Alexandra (late again) rushed into the cottage and clapsed the widow in the hug crying "My Dear...My poor dear." and started to really confort the widow.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 19, 2007, 10:00:33 PM
Where was that story from? I haven't heard it before.

Despite Bertie's cheating, I don't think you can ask 'can anybody blame her'. I'm sure plenty of people could. Unfaithfulness on the part of a spouse may be an explanation but not an excuse. There was some damage done there through the possessiveness, especially to Toria who (and Alexandra wasn't alone here) was denied a life of her own. Even QV, no paragon of unselfishness, gave Beatrice at least a limited shot at marriage and family.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 20, 2007, 02:38:44 AM
The story was featured in a few of bios about QA (I got them all...so I forgot which one, maybe the David Duff one).

Nope...QV would be just as happy to keep Beatrice unmarried, however her daughter was dertermined to fight for it. QV later relented and allowed them to marry, but only if they stayed with her. Henry was bored with such a life and went on the Ashanti Expedition that utimately took his life. Poor Toria had no such fighting spirit. At least Louise threaten to put her head in the oven if she cannot marry Fife. So she instead of Toria got married.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on June 20, 2007, 03:38:36 AM
I don't think that there ia any doubt that a strong bond existed between Alix and her children; whether this bond was entirely healthy and beneficial is open to discussion.......

We have talked previously about the attitudes of QV and Alix towards their daughters in relation to their marital expectations, and I think that we agreed that, in expecting at least one daughter to remain unmarried, this was a notion shared by both, and perhaps not unique to the British RF but perhaps more of a reflection on family values of that era.

Alix and May were really so different in temperament and attitudes; this perhaps is reflected in their respective styles.  Tampa, I take your point about Alix's style being more sensual but would be grateful if you could explain this in more detail.  Would you mind?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 20, 2007, 03:57:12 AM
Well...With QV and her children, there is awe and fear. With QA there is a kind of smothering love. While with QM, there is an absence of tenderness. Choose and pick !  ::)

Yes both women had that in common. However Beatrice had more of a fight than her niece Toria, who just gave up.

Well...The sensual style starts with the snake bracelet and goes on... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on June 20, 2007, 06:10:43 AM
I don't think that there ia any doubt that a strong bond existed between Alix and her children; whether this bond was entirely healthy and beneficial is open to discussion.......

We have talked previously about the attitudes of QV and Alix towards their daughters in relation to their marital expectations, and I think that we agreed that, in expecting at least one daughter to remain unmarried, this was a notion shared by both, and perhaps not unique to the British RF but perhaps more of a reflection on family values of that era.

Alix and May were really so different in temperament and attitudes; this perhaps is reflected in their respective styles.  Tampa, I take your point about Alix's style being more sensual but would be grateful if you could explain this in more detail.  Would you mind?

Alix has an element of sensaul style that I would call "earthy",  Liz Taylor has it, Jackie Kennedy had it, Missy had it, Diana had it and "Fat" May Aldelaide had it too.  You can visualize these women being touched and you automatically extend your hand.  You can also visualize (or I have) these ladies at a picnic in jeans, a white T-shirt and a big fat diamond necklace with a diamond snake bracelet playing with the children, dogs and whatever looking normal with all eyes on them.  They are real to me as women in their own skin well as icons.

Queen Mary, Cookie, QEII, Ducky and QV did not have this trait,  They are pure majestic icons and are visualized in my mind as famous photographs in books to be treated as rare procleain,  one would be afraid to touch.

Wallis was somewhere in between the two groups I describe above.

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 20, 2007, 11:27:33 AM
At least Louise threaten to put her head in the oven if she cannot marry Fife. So she instead of Toria got married.  :(

Which we still have not had a reference for? :) Unless GD Ella knows the reference for this particular story?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: jyrkiboy on June 20, 2007, 04:02:24 PM
I think is was the David Duff bio on QA. It's been ages since I read that one ... last time, that is.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 20, 2007, 07:49:36 PM
Thanks...One of the better bios on QA.  :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 20, 2007, 08:08:08 PM
Where could I find that?

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 20, 2007, 08:33:56 PM
Out of print book searches...It is not a hard book to find...I think ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 20, 2007, 08:38:36 PM
No, it's not too hard. I don't think it was one of the better bios though. (DD's Hessian Tapestry is his best book, in my opinion) For QA bios, Battiscombe's is probably still the best.

Duff also wrote bios on Princess Louise (Argyll) and Queen Mary.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 20, 2007, 09:06:00 PM
Well...Battiscombe's work is bit dry for my taste and a bit outdated (as far as her relationship with Dagmar goes). I think someone can do a new one on her (I heard someone already started).  ;)

I also got Duff's books on QM, The Hesse Family (I agree his best work) and Napoleon III & Eugenie... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 20, 2007, 11:34:13 PM
Well, we can only deal with published biographies and they're all pretty outdated (except for maybe the ones in Danish) since the Danish archives weren't very open with their material when most of the bios, including the Duff one, were written. Battiscome noted that much of Alexandra's correspondence was burned by Charlotte Knollys per Alexandra's wishes. I don't find her writing dry at all but to each his own.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 21, 2007, 03:42:00 AM
Well everybody had their own tastes. I like Duff's stle better.  :)

Based on the published Danish books, a new book could be written to update everything. Not counting the info coming from Russia... ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 21, 2007, 08:27:30 AM
I don't mean to go off topic but are any books planned to come out soon (in the next 6 months or so) about [Victorian era]royals.  If so which ones? 

(I looked in the Books/Movies thread but that seems to concentrate on Romanovs)
-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 21, 2007, 02:10:21 PM
Thanks for the recommendations! I managed to find some of the books via Amazon.com! Do you recommend Duff's biography of Queen Mary or does it not match up to Pope-Hennessy's?

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 21, 2007, 03:04:12 PM
Nowhere near Pope-Hennessey's in my opinion but few books are.  :) There's not really anything new in the Duff, that I can remember, and it's rather slight in comparison to the PH bio, but it's been a long time. It's way better than the Edwards bio though. Yuck. Queen Mary's another one who needs a more modern bio, I think.

Personally, I'd go PH (even though it's on the genteel side, it's one of the best-written royal bios ever) for Queen Mary and Battiscombe for Queen Alexandra.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 21, 2007, 07:56:10 PM
Agree on PH but disagree on Battiscombe. I think the Duff ones on QM and QA are really a pleasure to read and flows, unlike Battiscombe.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 21, 2007, 08:34:32 PM
The Duff one on Queen Mary kind of lost me when she gave a description of how George & May's lovemaking probably went. (Basically with QM probably reading/embroidering in bed and George's 'bearded face' peeking around the doorframe in inquiry.) I mean, that's just not credible biography in my book. It seems too much like guessing and writing 'fictional biography'. Again, his Hessian Tapestry is a must-read (even though it's really out-dated) for royal lovers. The Princess Louise one was rather blah as well and, again, very slight considering the amount of information out there and the personality of the subject.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 21, 2007, 10:41:13 PM
The Duff book on Queen Mary one did goes into the detail about the tiff between QA and QM. I found that quite interesting. And yes Hessien Tavesty is a must read.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on June 22, 2007, 08:56:17 AM
The Duff one on Queen Mary kind of lost me when she gave a description of how George & May's lovemaking probably went.

After that sentence I wasn't sure if I should read any further.   :o

I keep looking on Alibris for Hessian Tapestry but OMG it is expensive!  I'm hoping to get really really lucky one of these days!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on June 22, 2007, 12:05:27 PM
The Duff one on Queen Mary kind of lost me when she gave a description of how George & May's lovemaking probably went.

After that sentence I wasn't sure if I should read any further.   :o

I keep looking on Alibris for Hessian Tapestry but OMG it is expensive!  I'm hoping to get really really lucky one of these days!


It is worth getting.  The book is beautifully written and will be one that you read more than once.  Well worth an investment IMO.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 22, 2007, 12:55:02 PM
Definitely--I searched for it for over 10 years before I found it (via the Internet!) and never regretted the purchase. For now though, there's always interlibrary loan.

I thought the PH did a good job on the Alexandra/May relationship. What is the specific 'tiff' you're mentioning?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 22, 2007, 05:24:59 PM
I was also wondering that! I scanned through my PH biography and couldn't find any major tiffs.

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 22, 2007, 08:36:58 PM
It was in Duff's QM book. The real spark came after QM felt that they should move into Sandringham intead of York Cottage. King George V stood by his mother on this one, much to the resentment of May.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 22, 2007, 08:49:12 PM
Oh, that 'argument'. Has that only been covered in the Duff book? If so, it's at least been widely discussed elsewhere. It was just one of a series of issues that came up after EVII's death--some of which Empress Marie exacerbated with her trying to convince Alexandra to keep her precedence over May, ala the Russian system and which May gave way on. I think it was much to May's credit that the relationship didn't deteriorate seriously--living with 6 young children in the cramped York Cottage when the much larger Sandringham was being occupied by a lone woman and her entourage (especially when they occupied just a few rooms of the house and the rest started to fall into disrepair) would've seriously rubbed me the wrong way--especially when they had so many extra duties and obligations as monarchs that York Cottage just couldn't support. (And George V often sided with his mother, when called to take sides that is, May usually just let things go. The bottom line was, Edward VII directly left Sandringham to QA for her lifetime--I don't see there was much George could've done nor why it would've been worth fighting.) The more complex issue revolved around her leaving Buckingham Palace and moving to Marlborough House. THAT she was supposed to do and Minny apparently encouraged her not to do--along with keeping some of the jewels of the Queen Consort which May didn't get until Alexandra's death in 1925--also encouraged by Minny. As Queen Mary wrote, 'the odd part is that the person causing the delay & trouble remains supremely unconscious as to the inconvenience it is causing, such a funny state of things & everyone seems afraid to speak.' The issue was covered in PH (and I think Battiscombe but it's been awhile) and I don't think it warrants putting the Duff book up over them.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on June 22, 2007, 09:02:57 PM
GD Ella,

I have to take sides with George and "Mother Dearest" on this one.  Sandringham was purcahsed with "private money" for the the Prince and Princess of Wales (Alix & Bertie).  It is not a crown property.  If Albert had out lived QV, do you think it would have been correct to throw him out of Osborne House?  George as King and in a private capacity had plenty of money.  Why not add on to York Cottage or build a new home with all the modern conveniences somewhere else on the property??? George did not like change and would have been happy to stay in York cottage forever or so I have read.

Do you know if York cottage was used by George as private retreat after the death of QA when Diamond Drawers and the retainers moved up to the big house?

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 22, 2007, 09:05:31 PM
That was my point, TB--it was a moot point since it was left to Alexandra for her lifetime in EVII's will, as I noted. I think there was an element of selfishness in it though on Alexandra's part and George's. He hated entertaining and living at York Cottage gave him an excuse not to as there was NO room to put up guests. They did have it enlarged, several times, to the point that it apparently become very difficult to navigate around the hallways as there weren't always direct paths to various parts of the house. No one would've 'tossed her out' but the move could've been made voluntarily--they could've switched houses even. Somehow I don't see Prince Albert insisting on his children (and grandchildren) being squeezed into a neighboring house and trying to conduct the business of kingship while he resided in Osborne whether it was his right or not. I don't think it was horrible of QA, and can understand the sentimental attachment, but I can understand being frustrated if I was QM with all those children as well. I still don't think that was the main problem but the other issues, which QA was in the wrong over, were much more serious and caused a lot of unneeded tension. I think QM was to be commended--Minny's enacting them in Russia, where she was entitled to many prerogatives unlike QA, caused problems enough with her own daughter-in-law.

I don't know about York Cottage after 1925.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 22, 2007, 09:06:26 PM
I agree with you 100%. That was Duff's argument too but it did not stop the disgrunted May from muttering "Selfish old woman !" about her mother-in-law, hardling endearing to Motherdear.  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 22, 2007, 09:10:29 PM
What did Duff use as the source for the 'selfish old woman', do you remember? I find it hard to believe, given the fact that Queen Mary was a very good daughter-in-law to Queen Alexandra for over 30 years that she said it within earshot. Duff doesn't mention it in his Alexandra bio and has less of the 1910 troubles than Pope-Hennessey.

I think the real sticking point (having given way on funeral precedence, consort jewels, etc) was the refusal to vacate Buckingham Palace not Sandringham. BP was needed for a variety of reasons and it caused a good deal of difficulty. It was awkward enough for George to return to London to attend various council & cabinet meetings, sometimes several times a month, because there wasn't room to hold them at York Cottage but then he had to run between Marlborough House (where QA should've been residing) and Buckingham Palace to conduct business. The new King didn't even visit Sandringham/York Cottage until October 1910, and QM not until November, so I don't think it was an immediate issue.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 22, 2007, 10:28:38 PM
Somewhere, a while back, we discussed Alexandra giving away (or not) pieces of jewelry. This was from about 1917 to raise money for charity:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture130QAcharityw.jpg)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture131QAChildrensFund.jpg)

and from Toria:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture131ToriaChildrensFund.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on June 22, 2007, 10:33:55 PM
That was my point, TB--it was a moot point since it was left to Alexandra for her lifetime in EVII's will, as I noted. I think there was an element of selfishness in it though on Alexandra's part and George's. He hated entertaining and living at York Cottage gave him an excuse not to as there was NO room to put up guests. They did have it enlarged, several times, to the point that it apparently become very difficult to navigate around the hallways as there weren't always direct paths to various parts of the house. No one would've 'tossed her out' but the move could've been made voluntarily--they could've switched houses even. Somehow I don't see Prince Albert insisting on his children (and grandchildren) being squeezed into a neighboring house and trying to conduct the business of kingship while he resided in Osborne whether it was his right or not. I don't think it was horrible of QA, and can understand the sentimental attachment, but I can understand being frustrated if I was QM with all those children as well. I still don't think that was the main problem but the other issues, which QA was in the wrong over, were much more serious and caused a lot of unneeded tension. I think QM was to be commended--Minny's enacting them in Russia, where she was entitled to many prerogatives unlike QA, caused problems enough with her own daughter-in-law.

I don't know about York Cottage after 1925.

GD Ella,

I meant no offense to you.  Please Pardon!

I went back and re-read your post with no domestic interruptions (difficult if not impossible in my house on most nights) and see now where my point of view is the same as yours!

I am glad we agree!

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 22, 2007, 10:39:42 PM
We're always in harmony, TB.  :) I had done some modifications to clarify things and probably through you off anyway.  :P
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 22, 2007, 11:02:36 PM
Ah yes the living quarters issue! This was mentioned in the Lost Prince.  Prince John says, "..And Grandmama silly old thing lives all alone in the Big House when she ought to know better!.." :)

Mary became frustrated at the amount of time it took for Alexandra to vacate Buckingham Palace. She also was agitated at the amount of resistance Alexandra showed about moving out of Marlborough House before finally being convinced by Augusta.

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 23, 2007, 12:22:48 AM
I was looking through some of the coverage of Alexandra Fife's wedding and, as a side note, this sitting of Queen Alexandra (one pose from a previous page) was the first studio sitting that she'd given since she was widowed 3 1/2 years prior:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/jewels/10.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 23, 2007, 07:24:30 AM
Quote
Mary became frustrated at the amount of time it took for Alexandra to vacate Buckingham Palace

How long did Alexandra remain at Buckingham after Edward died?  And, why didn't George and Mary just move into Windsor and hold court there?  I know they didn't really like Windsor but that seems like the only place large enough for the monarch and his 6 children. 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on June 23, 2007, 12:00:13 PM

Mary became frustrated at the amount of time it took for Alexandra to vacate Buckingham Palace. She also was agitated at the amount of resistance Alexandra showed about moving out of Marlborough House before finally being convinced by Augusta.

Mary R.

Augusta who?  Why did Alexandra need to move out of Marlborough House.

Seems to me Buck House (at least when I visted in 2000) would be large enough for Georgie Boy, Diamond Drawers, the six kids AND Mother Dear.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 23, 2007, 12:48:39 PM
Quote
Augusta who?

Augusta of Cambridge, Grand Duchess of Mecklinberg-Strelitz.  Queen Mary's aunt and Queen Alexandra's first cousin. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 23, 2007, 12:51:49 PM
Augusta who?  Why did Alexandra need to move out of Marlborough House.

Sorry, I should have been clearer! I was referring to when Edward ascended the throne and they had to vacate Marlborough House in favor of Buckingham Palace. Sorry for the confusion! :P

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 23, 2007, 12:56:10 PM
Quote
Seems to me Buck House (at least when I visted in 2000) would be large enough for Georgie Boy, Diamond Drawers, the six kids AND Mother Dear.

Of course it's big enough for the whole family, it's not space it's just principle.  The reigning king and queen get the large palace and the dowagers and heirs move into the smaller palaces.  Bertie and Alexandra could have lived at empty Buckingham since Queen Victoria lived at Windsor, but they lived at Marlborough House. 

Don't you think all the Romanovs could have lived in the Winter Palace or the Catherine Palace, but did they?  Nope.  They each had their own residences. 

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on June 23, 2007, 01:12:48 PM
 I do not see QV and Bertie living under the same roof!  ;) ;) ;)

However, I understand what you are saying.  I meant to imply that if Alix really wanted say in Buck House when in London the place is big enough.

When Charles inherits the throne, Will Eddie & Sofa and Andrew be expected to move out of Buck House or do they grt to keep their apartmemts for visits to London?

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 23, 2007, 01:19:29 PM
Well after Princess Alice was born I believe QV described BP as "cramped"

Correct me if i'm wrong, it's in "Victorias Daughters" which I don't have to hand.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 23, 2007, 01:41:37 PM
Do you recommend that book? I've been contemplating whether to order it for ages!

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on June 23, 2007, 01:45:31 PM
Hi Mary R.

I really enjoyed Victoria's Daughters and I would suggest that you purchase it.  It gave me a nice overview on the Princesses when I didn't know very much about them (not that I am terribly knowledgeable now), and it's a good starting point to decide who you want to know more about.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on June 23, 2007, 01:48:15 PM
Quote
Well after Princess Alice was born I believe QV described BP as "cramped"

I believe that is why she added the fourth wing to make a courtyard.  I could be wrong though.

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 23, 2007, 01:48:48 PM
Thanks emeraldeyes! I'm ordering it was we speak!

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 23, 2007, 02:29:49 PM
You will love it Mary R!! It's a must have and really well written. He writes so nicely when describing the last months of QVs and Vickys lives I felt.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 23, 2007, 02:33:33 PM
I recently read Born to Rule (loved it) and wanted to learn more about the mothers! I have complete confidence in your recommendation!  :)

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on June 23, 2007, 02:39:30 PM
Ah, Born to Rule - another of my favourites. If I was stuck on a desert island, they would be two books I would choose. Along with a multigym of course.  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 23, 2007, 04:37:40 PM

Mary became frustrated at the amount of time it took for Alexandra to vacate Buckingham Palace. She also was agitated at the amount of resistance Alexandra showed about moving out of Marlborough House before finally being convinced by Augusta.

Mary R.

Augusta who?  Why did Alexandra need to move out of Marlborough House.

Seems to me Buck House (at least when I visted in 2000) would be large enough for Georgie Boy, Diamond Drawers, the six kids AND Mother Dear.

She needed to move INTO Marlborough House. Augusta was May's Aunt Augusta of Meckleburg-Stretliz nee Cambridge.

It's always a matter of actual living space, I think. Much of the rooms in various palaces have rooms for official functions, offices, staff rooms, etc...and then there are the 'living rooms'. I don't know how much space in each residence is actually given over to these rooms. I mean, reading some books, it seems there were a lot of live-in employees.  :P

Plus, it did come down to the orderly transfer of things. Minny was there to seriously 'gunk up' the works, otherwise I don't think the BP issue would've been a problem. Alexandra hadn't even wanted to leave Marlborough House (her London residence for 40 years) to move to BP in the first place! She was being asked to move back to her much-loved old home and leave a place she didn't even much care for but MF was telling 'oh in Russia, I wouldn't have to and you shouldn't either'. Once MF left, the issue was resolved pretty quickly.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on June 26, 2007, 02:57:07 PM
Somewhere, a while back, we discussed Alexandra giving away (or not) pieces of jewelry. This was from about 1917 to raise money for charity:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture130QAcharityw.jpg)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture131QAChildrensFund.jpg)

and from Toria:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/queen%20alexandra/Picture131ToriaChildrensFund.jpg)
G D Ella, can yotell me the source of these images?  I find the whole subject of royalty auctioning/selling off possessions fascinating.  I have been reading about the auction of George IV's clothes after his death, which fetched very little, and of course thre is the auction of Alexandra's clohes in th 1930s.  Where were these sold do you know?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on June 26, 2007, 03:01:53 PM
Just a postscript.  Having, just read back my post above, I realised that as well as feeling slightly shell shocked, it being the end of the day with a small boy and a baby, the battery on my keyboard was fading hence the bad spelling and jumbled question.  I meant to ask where the jewellery was sold, not the clothes!  Sorry!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on June 26, 2007, 03:38:41 PM
It was a sale, held by Christie's, of various donated items to benefit various children's charities in June 1918. It was called the Children's Jewel Fund Sale and, in addition to Queen Alexandra and Victoria, many other women donated including the Duchesses of Marlborough & Roxburgh, the Countess of Essex and Lady Randolph Churchill. The illustration page didn't have further information since it was printed beforehand and thus there wasn't any information on prices or monies raised. I did go to the Times archive, however, and found that there was a catalog printed of the items, though 'several important lots' were donated after it had gone to print. The grand total raised was GBP 26,149 15s but, while it listed some prices fetched for specific items, none of those were of royal provenance.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 26, 2007, 07:54:44 PM
Thanks for info... :D  I think it spared QA some spring cleaning costs. She had so many items (both real gems and (I heard) paste & artist jewels as well).  ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on June 27, 2007, 02:35:47 PM
Thanks for the info G D Ella. Just as an update if anyone is interested, I am gradually tracking down more of Alexandra's clothes worldwide in various museums for my PhD.  Trying to locate the forty or so lots that were not bought by the Met in NYC from the 1937 auction is a challenge, but is proving fascinating.  Although the jewellery aspect is not my priority as I am a dress historian, it is still naturally such a part of the whole look that any info is great!  Actually, I am currently working on two of Alexandra's fancy dress costumes that are here in the UK.  If anyone knows of any references to either the Waverley Ball in 1871, the Marlborough House Ball of 1874 and the most famous Devonshire House Ball of 1897, I would be really grateful.

I already know about some of the texts such as Sophia Murphy's book on the DHB but any other suggestions would be very welcome.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 27, 2007, 08:29:07 PM
Would love to see Alexandra's famous early dresses with jackets , which she made popular.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on June 27, 2007, 10:07:44 PM
...Trying to locate the forty or so lots that were not bought by the Met in NYC from the 1937 auction is a challenge, but is proving fascinating...

Were the dresses ever part of an exhibition by the Met?

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on June 28, 2007, 01:17:45 AM
Yes, some of them featured in the exhibition about the origins of the Costume Institute a few years back.  I am not sure if there was a catalogue that accompanied the exhibition or if so, if any of Alexandra's dresses were illustrated.  They all date to the early 1900s. 

There were a few items from the 1860s in the auction but I have yet to find these anywhere.  I haven' found any other early pieces - the earliest well known dress is of course the wedding dress
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 28, 2007, 02:26:12 AM
Maybe some in Denmark ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on June 28, 2007, 07:52:22 AM
Maybe some in Denmark ?  ???

I haven't got around to contacting Danish museums yet, but I think you could be right.  I don't speak Danish and although I realise a lot of Europeans speak very good English, I always feel such a cop out by writing in my own language.  Must bite the bullet and get on with it though.  I have seen a very gorgeously illustrated catalogue of some of the other Danish royalty's dresses, including some of Alexandra's mother, from a Danish exhibition so it is entirely feasible that there may be some early garments there.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 28, 2007, 07:58:25 PM
Indeed ! I got a catalogue of Royal Danish dresses shown in an exhibition (included some from "Aunt Swan" and Alexandrine). The Danes were very proud of QA and checking up on their collection may yield some results. I just went to the Danish Royal Library 2 months ago and they have gorgours pics of the dresses woen in various functions. Good for me who likes to trace jewels and dresses.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on June 29, 2007, 05:03:03 AM
Indeed ! I got a catalogue of Royal Danish dresses shown in an exhibition (included some from "Aunt Swan" and Alexandrine). The Danes were very proud of QA and checking up on their collection may yield some results. I just went to the Danish Royal Library 2 months ago and they have gorgours pics of the dresses woen in various functions. Good for me who likes to trace jewels and dresses.  ;)

Where is the Danish Royal Library Eric?  Sounds like somewhere I shold go sometime!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 02, 2007, 08:30:18 PM
It is in Copenhagen and housed in a new complex (ajasoned to the old building) called "the black diamond". I am thinking of moving to Denmark and do extensive research there.  :D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on July 03, 2007, 08:15:54 PM
Indeed ! I got a catalogue of Royal Danish dresses shown in an exhibition (included some from "Aunt Swan" and Alexandrine). The Danes were very proud of QA and checking up on their collection may yield some results. I just went to the Danish Royal Library 2 months ago and they have gorgours pics of the dresses woen in various functions. Good for me who likes to trace jewels and dresses.  ;)

Were the any pictures of Alexandra's dresses from the catalog and if so could you scan them?

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 03, 2007, 09:22:13 PM
Not very good with scanners... :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on July 04, 2007, 03:03:34 PM
It is in Copenhagen and housed in a new complex (ajasoned to the old building) called "the black diamond". I am thinking of moving to Denmark and do extensive research there.  :D
Thanks for the info Eric, I will certainly check it out
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on July 12, 2007, 03:19:39 PM
Photos of some of Queen Alexandra's fans:

(http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/graphics/slideshows/unfoldingpictures/f10.jpg) (http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/25279.jpg)

ostrich-feather fan on tortoiseshell sticks encrusted with diamonds that is believed to have been made at the time of the coronation in 1902

(http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/graphics/slideshows/unfoldingpictures/f7.jpg)

This one incorporated a stuffed hummingbird that she carried to a fancy dress ball in 1871.

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/25193.jpg)

QA's fan with portraits of her children

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/25219.jpg)

A Faberge Fan given to Alexandra by her sister Dagmar in 1904

QA had between 300 and 400 fans, and introduced Fabergé fans to the collection. "The Fabergé fans have guards decorated with gold, silver and diamonds," said the spokesman. Queen Mary was an even bigger collector and helped institute the cataloguing of the huge collection.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 12, 2007, 08:07:23 PM
Is it on display now ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on July 12, 2007, 08:54:43 PM
I don't think any longer.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 12, 2007, 09:21:34 PM
Maybe can be found in a catalogue.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on July 12, 2007, 10:29:42 PM
Yes, there was an exhibition book put out.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 13, 2007, 03:19:55 AM
Where can one find it ?  :o
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on July 20, 2007, 06:36:43 AM
Where can one find it ?  :o

The book is called Unfolding Pictures and is a catalogue of the exhibition.  It is very good - lots of nice photos and info about them.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on July 20, 2007, 06:48:03 AM
Talking of exhibitions, that reminds me that I am off to Windsor next week for a day in the archives, and will be abe to have a look at the wedding exhibition that GDElla mnetoned earlier in the thread.  Hoping there will be a catalogue or perhaps a ew postcards to go with it, especially of Alexandra and Edward's wedding day.  No doubt the castle wll be absolutely heaving in August but my three year old can't wait!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on July 20, 2007, 04:28:07 PM
Good training with your three year old, Kate S!  Mine at that age would be pulling me off to Legoland, not Windsor Castle!  I'm sure we're all looking forward to hearing about what you find there.   
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on July 20, 2007, 04:59:44 PM
Good luck with your findings! The exhibition looks wonderful, I can't wait to hear your reports!  :)

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on August 03, 2007, 07:17:22 AM
Having spent a few heavenly hours in the Royal Archive yesterday, I thought I would share the day with you guys!  Great day, looking at Alexandra's wardrobe accounts which exist from 1898 to her death.  So interesting to see just who she was using in terms of couture houses, outfitters, drapers, silk mercers, umbrella makers and even who made her corsets.  There were so many names of different companies, but sadly few details about what their trades were so I have a bit of Googling to do!  Anyway, it was a fabulous day.  I did have chance t look around the Five Gold Rings wedding exhibit.. Busy, so difficult to get a really long look at it all, but I'm glad I managed to get in. There is an accompanying book which doesn't have a great deal of text but lots of images, including those that GDElla included at the beginning of the thread.  Alexandra's wedding lace was so fine and the mind boggled at the four tiers of the same which it took to cover the dress.  Bearing in mind that it takes a modern Honiton lacemaker about ten hours to make a decent couple of square inches of lace, the workmanship involved is breathtaking.

Sorry I can't write more for now (I could go on and on!) but baby duties await.  I took both my three and a half year old and my five month old to the castle.  My parents took them to see the sights whilst I studied but consequently the length of the day is catching up with us all a little today
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Mary R. on August 03, 2007, 10:02:43 AM
Thanks for the report! The exhibition sounds divine!  :)

Mary R.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 03, 2007, 09:23:44 PM
Guess Queen Victoria was right....Honiton Lace is better !  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on August 08, 2007, 08:01:10 AM
Guess Queen Victoria was right....Honiton Lace is better !  ::)

Perhaps in her opinion.

I have read that the dress of Brussells lace that was given by Leopold was a dress that was much admired for its elegance and the superb quality of the lace with which it was decorated, but that the final choice of an English dress and the use of Honiton lace was considered to be a political and patriotic statement.

I am not an expert on lace, but I am sure that I have read that the quality of Brussells lace is considered to be superior to that of Honiton, despite the undoubted loveliness of the lace used on the dresses of QV and QA, all of which was re-used and treasured as heirlooms. 

Many aristocratic families had collections of hand-made lace that was considered to be valuable, and passed down through the generations, in much the same manner as the family jewels...............
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on August 10, 2007, 06:29:44 AM
Guess Queen Victoria was right....Honiton Lace is better !  ::)

Perhaps in her opinion.

I have read that the dress of Brussells lace that was given by Leopold was a dress that was much admired for its elegance and the superb quality of the lace with which it was decorated, but that the final choice of an English dress and the use of Honiton lace was considered to be a political and patriotic statement.

I am not an expert on lace, but I am sure that I have read that the quality of Brussells lace is considered to be superior to that of Honiton, despite the undoubted loveliness of the lace used on the dresses of QV and QA, all of which was re-used and treasured as heirlooms. 

Many aristocratic families had collections of hand-made lace that was considered to be valuable, and passed down through the generations, in much the same manner as the family jewels...............

No Martyn, you are right, Brussells lace is considered to be of superior quality to Honiton.  However, Honiton is the most similar in terms of quality out of all the various British laces to Brussells bobbin lace.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on August 10, 2007, 04:14:39 PM
Some pictures of the coronation day: (I hope these haven't been posted while I've been away, if they have then sorry)

(http://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa20/DukeofNewJersey/Queen%20Alexandra/QueenAlexandra2-3.jpg)

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on August 11, 2007, 03:32:57 AM
I vaguely remember reading somewhere that QA chose Pages rather than young ladies to be her train bearers at the coronation. Can anyone confirm that this was in fact the case and if so, were the Pages all the sons of Earls as I seem to believe? If this was indeed the case, does anyone know who the Pages were?

By the way, as an extra query, in 1911 Louise Fife made a fuss about her girls not being entitled to wear robes of 'de facto' Princesses. I have seen a photo of Princess Marie Louise, also a Princess 'by courtesy' of no where after 1917, wearing robes without miniver/ermine trim for the coronation of 1953. Would it be correct to assume that Alexandra and Maud of Fife would have worn similar robes for the coronation of 1911? I have never seen photos of the girls in their 1911 robes, only Alexandra in her robes as a real HRH as was, for 1937. I also wonder what robes Maud wore in 1937, as she had stopped being known as Princess Maud after her marriage, and her father in law was still alive, thus she was not entitled to wear the robes of a Countess? I guess the Lord Chamberlain must have issued a directive on the issue of the Fife girls, Thora and Louie and their entitlement to robes and coronets! Any piccies would be wonderful too!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on August 11, 2007, 08:57:35 AM
Here is a picture of Queen Alexandra and her pages:

(http://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa20/DukeofNewJersey/Queen%20Alexandra/QueenAlexandra5-1.jpg)

-Duke of NJ
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on August 11, 2007, 06:06:58 PM
Thank you Duke of NJ for the piccie!! Very kind...now all I would like to do is identify the pages!!

I have found that QA' mistress of the Robes had eight pages to assist QA during the coronation....so I wonder which six are the ones trainbearing?

Right they were not all the sons of Earls though four of them probably were as per the details below....

According to the Times, those 'assisting' were -

J N Bigge esq - Only son of the future 1st Lord Stamfordham, who was PS to QV and later GV.

The 9th Viscount Torrington.,

The 7th Earl of Macclesfield - Grandson of one of Queen Alexandra's Ladies in waiting.   

The Marquis of Stafford - Heir of the 4th Duke of Sutherland

Honourable Edward Lascelles - Youger son of the 5th Earl of Harewood and brother in law of Mary, Princess Royal.

Lord Claud Hamilton - Youngest son of the 2nd Duke Abercorn

Honourable Robert Palmer - Not certain, but possibly the younger son of the 2nd Earl of Selborne!

Honourable Arthur Anson - 2nd son of the 3rd Earl of Lichfield

Can any one confirm who was who?

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on August 19, 2007, 07:48:04 AM
I have trawled through all the QA threads and am really suprised that there does not appear to be a single piccie of QA with Alastair Connaught! And I can only see one piccie of QA and her girls dating from after the Great War! Extraordinary! Does anyone know of have access to any other photos of QA with her girls and or Alastair? Considering Maud came to England every autumn after the armistice, there must be more piccies out there!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Duke of New Jersey on August 19, 2007, 09:23:27 AM
Are you looking for pictures of Alastair or Olav?

There were some pictures of Olav, Maud, Queen Alexandra and Toria on another thread.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on August 19, 2007, 10:01:05 AM
I am really looking for pictures of QA 'with' Alastair and maybe even with Louise F and  Alix C. The 'Four Generations' photograph must surely have occurred? After all Alastair was QA's first great grand child, a family event certainly worth commemorating!

As to other piccies.....I find it extraordinary that there are no others of QA and her daughters (all four together) after the 1918 one with Olav and Maud Southesk taken at Marlborough House! I know I have mentioned this before, but I am suprised that Louise F does not feature in any 'family' pictures of the 1920s! Tres Bizarre! None either of her, Louise F with her grandsons either, though increasing ill health after her 1929 haemorrhage may have prevented her from being able to attend sittings! But what about Alastair?? He was fifteen in 1929!

Also, I know it may sound ghoulish, but does any one know when the last photographs of QA and her children were taken respectively?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 19, 2007, 08:23:16 PM
Well...Not a lot of them taken publicly as we know of, but there may be private snapshots. Frances Dimond is working on a book on QA, maybe some may turn up.  :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: LenelorMiksi on August 25, 2007, 10:46:17 AM
Wasn't her name Princess Alix of Denmark before she became Princess Alexandra of Wales upon marrying Bertie?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on August 25, 2007, 11:02:48 AM
Wasn't her name Princess Alix of Denmark before she became Princess Alexandra of Wales upon marrying Bertie?

I have no idea!!! I did not know if Alix was nickname or given name.

Julie
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Aliss_Kande on August 25, 2007, 01:44:32 PM
According to some very quick research on the web, I found out that Alix was born with the name of Alexandra.  Alix was simply a nickname she went by in family circles, like King Edward VII went by Bertie and King Edward VIII was known as David, etc.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on August 25, 2007, 05:45:15 PM
Wasn't her name Princess Alix of Denmark before she became Princess Alexandra of Wales upon marrying Bertie?

Her full name was Alexandra Caroline Marie Charlotte Louise Julia, shortened to 'Alix' by her family.  Her niece by marriage, Alix of Hesse, was usually called 'Alicky' within the family to avoid confusion. 

The Alix we are talking about was born on December 1, 1844, in the Yellow Palace, Copenhagen.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on August 26, 2007, 07:02:16 AM

The Alix we are talking about was born on December 1, 1844, in the Yellow Palace, Copenhagen.


I read somehwere that the "Yellow Palace" was not really a true palace at all but more of a very very large townhouse in the most excellent part of town. 

Can someone please post a picture of the Yellow Palace.

Thanks!

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kity on August 26, 2007, 09:22:16 AM
i think i found this somewhere in this forum.

(http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd216/kity82/christianfamily.jpg)

(http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd216/kity82/2fors.jpg)

does anybody have bigger version of these??


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on August 27, 2007, 05:57:18 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/SR4560.jpg)(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/SR2564.jpg)
HM Queen Alexandra in mourning fore her husband. I think she really looks elegant and royal in mourning.

RN
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Olishka~ Pincess on September 01, 2007, 05:07:44 PM
Wait a second, she was talking about Queen Alexandra. To my knowledge I never heard of Queen Alexandra being nickname or called Alix for short. The only person I know of that was Alix was Alix of Hesse fourth daughter of Alice and Louis. Anyway those photos are new to me thanks for sharing them Kity. Queen Alexandra.

(http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6/alixdenmark1844-22.jpg)
(http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6/alixdenmark1844-3.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kmerov on September 02, 2007, 01:05:11 PM
Queen Alexandra was always called Alix by her family. She was named after her aunt by marriage, Grand Duchess Alexandra Nicholaievna, daughter of Nicholos I.
I think you can find many many pictures of a young Alix on the Windsor and Danish RF threads.

The Yellow Mansion (as it's called in Denmark) where Alexandra grew up.

(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/slotte/Dscn8716-transf-vary-u2-h405-u0.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kmerov on September 02, 2007, 01:10:47 PM
Two pictures.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Alexandra/ungalexandra.jpg)

With her mother.
(http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y69/kmerov/Alexandra/louisealix.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kity on September 03, 2007, 08:39:30 AM
thank you for sharing them guys!!

now i have some. :)

(http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd216/kity82/alexbeauty2.jpg)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kity on September 03, 2007, 08:45:46 AM
here's another one.

captured by bbc documentary
(http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd216/kity82/princeeddy-thekingweneverhad.avi_000361920.jpg)
i think the baby centered is prince eddy by appearance of alexandra.



Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on September 03, 2007, 04:04:13 PM
It is Eddy. There are other photos in the series with baby George.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kity on September 04, 2007, 02:20:57 AM


(http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd216/kity82/denishroyals.jpg)
Denish family photo.
Dagmar was very pretty girl when she was young.



(http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd216/kity82/Dagmar-QueenAlex.jpg)
i found this gorgeous photo from another thread in the forum.





Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Olishka~ Pincess on September 05, 2007, 07:16:14 PM
Yes, Maria and Alexandra look very beautiful in the picture I realy like those pictures you all posted of Alexandra they are wonderful I am happy to see them that picture was taken while they were on a boat right or the standart wasn't Alexander III with them? I seen some photos of them taken on the boat.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kity on September 05, 2007, 10:30:39 PM
hi Elizabeth~Princess
i would appreciate if you post those photos of Alexandra and Dagmar that you said were taken same day on the boat as the photo i phosted.




Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Olishka~ Pincess on September 06, 2007, 02:25:43 PM
Hey Kity I am sorry I do not know where the photos are or have them if i see them anywhere i will post them right here. I have seen them over a year ago so I have to find them. It may not have been taken on the same year but I remeber reading it was sometime around the early 1880's. I think the photo you posted Kity may have been taken during the time of when Alexander III and their children were there. I am sorry I do not have the photos or know where they are. :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ashanti01 on October 01, 2007, 02:37:05 PM
(http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a388/ashanti01/3070144.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchess_42 on November 04, 2007, 10:21:31 AM
(http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a388/ashanti01/3070144.jpg)

what year was this?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on November 04, 2007, 02:48:41 PM
1866.  There were some other photographs taken that day with little Eddy and George as well.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: XJaseyRaeX on November 05, 2007, 05:12:11 AM
(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e386/mashka1899/the%20wales%20children/alixeddy.jpg)

(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e386/mashka1899/the%20wales%20children/HU005538.jpg)

(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e386/mashka1899/the%20wales%20children/ghfg.jpg)

here are a few i had in my photobucket
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on November 06, 2007, 10:50:46 AM
Yeppers, reading the thread I'd hop into it like white on rice.

(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e386/mashka1899/the%20wales%20children/alixeddy.jpg)

(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e386/mashka1899/the%20wales%20children/HU005538.jpg)

(http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e386/mashka1899/the%20wales%20children/ghfg.jpg)

here are a few i had in my photobucket

I have never seen the last one before Cambria Coheed.  It's so cool! 

Contributing some faves. 

The 1st one is shortly after she & Bertie got engaged.  Correct me if I'm wrong but she was almost 18 at the time. The smile on her face reminds me of Diana, Princess of Wales:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q276/coker10/1862engagementphoto3.jpg)

The next is a few years after she was married.  I just found this one on Ebay:

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q276/coker10/alixmid1860s.jpg)

If these have already been posted excuse me.



Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on November 06, 2007, 10:58:38 AM
A new video on Queen Alexandra has been uploaded on Youtube.  It's called "An Aquired Danish Rose".
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on November 15, 2007, 01:59:56 PM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/24070.jpg)

Here is a picture of the ‘Danish Rose’ in all here beauty!

Greetings from RN
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on November 15, 2007, 04:07:17 PM
Royal Netherlands, where did you get that picture????  It's too cool and it's my favorite photographer for her--Downey!!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ashdean on November 17, 2007, 11:31:55 AM
In Sothebys jewel sale to be held next month in New York city as well as the pearls formerly owned by the Duchess of Windsor...there is a amythest and diamond necklace (originally purchased by the vendor from Wartski in 1958) said have belonged to Queen Alexandra
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on November 30, 2007, 09:11:27 PM
In celebration of the 163rd Anniversary of Alix's birth, I'm posting one of my favorite photos of her.  I'm sure it's one of those that were touched up but still...

(http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q276/coker10/purpleprofileshot.jpg)

And it's purple tinted (I look up at that necklace and wants a fake one.);  btw, does anyone know if Alix's favorite color for clothes was purple too?

Will be celebrating the anniversary with an apple danish for breakfast.  Wish I had flags for Denmark and or the U.K. to wave.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on November 30, 2007, 09:29:41 PM
Thanks AOWHP.  I'm remembering her on her special day also.  She was just 'the best'!

P.S.  I know Alix loved purple and mauve, but I'm not sure whether they were her favourite colours or not.   
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on December 03, 2007, 06:55:46 AM
That is a great image!

It also gives us another view of what seems to be Alix's Cartier diamond collier résille............
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 03, 2007, 12:30:33 PM
Was what purple-tinted? This particular dress (for the wedding of her granddaughter Alexandra Fife in 1913) was done in black with some white netting. All the adornments were also in black. I don't think she wore any other colors after 1910.

Alexandra was fond of amethysts and, I believe, after the death of Albert Victor in 1892 she often wore purple and mauve as the colors of half-mourning, though not always.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 03, 2007, 08:26:22 PM
I think she looked good in that color...quite romantic.  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on December 23, 2007, 05:55:02 AM
This is charming!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMTaKLCiM7c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMTaKLCiM7c)

The rose-sellers appear unsure of what to do and then have to run after Queen Alexandra!!!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on December 26, 2007, 11:08:51 PM
Indeed ! However did not see her face too clearly.  :(
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 15, 2008, 08:41:29 PM
From Janet on the BRMB, there's apparently was an exhibit on Queen Alexandra at the National Portrait Gallery (28 September 2007 - 13 January 2008). 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on January 20, 2008, 07:02:48 PM
This is charming!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMTaKLCiM7c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMTaKLCiM7c)

The rose-sellers appear unsure of what to do and then have to run after Queen Alexandra!!!!


Just saw the video.  It was too cute; that poor rose seller; was afraid she'd fall.  Are there any other newsreels with Alix in them?

Recently saw another silent video (not about Queen Alexandra); what I am trying to say is the speed is not accellerated as I remember old
films.  Agree the rose seller was trying to keep up.   
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: dmitri on January 20, 2008, 07:25:13 PM
There's a portrait of Alexandra by Luke Fildes. The really stunning one is in the White Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 24, 2008, 10:08:53 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/PssofWalesingaladresscrown.jpg)
http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/royalty/PssofWalesingaladresscrown.jpg

A well-known 'dazzling' picture of Alexandra Princess of Wales at the time. Look at the elegance and splendour, a great contribution in Victorian times. Must have been a real 'glittering situation' seeing the Princess of Wales walking by sparkling with diamonds reflecting in the candle light. Keep the pictures coming people, I miss them. 

Wishing al the best from the Netherlands,

RN
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 08, 2008, 06:47:38 PM
Hello Everyone !  :)

A Beautiful Queen
(http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/3614/beautifulalixym5.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on April 09, 2008, 12:00:34 AM
Welcome, Archduchess. If I'm not mistaken, I think the photo was taken about 1903. She's also shown on that occasion with Bertie and, I think, Victoria.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Svetabel on April 09, 2008, 12:44:38 AM
I think the photo was taken about 1903. She's also shown on that occasion with Bertie and, I think, Victoria.

Yes, there were more photos from the occasion, with her husband and daughter Victoria.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 09, 2008, 09:04:27 AM
Thanks !  GrandDuchessElla  :) ... I wasn't sure of the exact date it was taken  :-[   Does anyone know the date of this one ?  :D

Lovely Alix
(http://img239.imageshack.us/img239/7453/replaceog5.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: kity on April 09, 2008, 11:15:00 AM
This photo was taken in 1887, that is to say, when she was 43 years of age. She looks in her 20s though..


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 10, 2008, 02:51:49 PM
Thank you kity for the info. !  :D   Here's one of Queen Alix and Toria onboard the Victoria & Albert royal yacht

(http://img256.imageshack.us/img256/2167/alextoriayv4.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on April 10, 2008, 03:08:12 PM
Lovely photo thank you ArchDss! Do we know what became of the Victroria & Albert royal yacht?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on April 10, 2008, 03:54:49 PM
There were actually 3 versions of the Victoria and Albert. QA and Victoria are probably on the V&A III which dated from about 1901 (QV had wanted a larger yacht and one with more modern equipment like steam engines). Victoria and Albert III served four sovereigns but was decommissioned in 1939. She served as a depot ship during World War II, as an accommodation ship to HMS Excellent, and was sold in 1954 for breaking at Faslane, Scotland. Her place was taken by the Britannia, not to be confused with EVII's and GV's famous racing cutter.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 11, 2008, 09:27:11 AM
There were actually 3 versions of the Victoria and Albert. QA and Victoria are probably on the V&A III which dated from about 1901 (QV had wanted a larger yacht and one with more modern equipment like steam engines). Victoria and Albert III served four sovereigns but was decommissioned in 1939. She served as a depot ship during World War II, as an accommodation ship to HMS Excellent, and was sold in 1954 for breaking at Faslane, Scotland. Her place was taken by the Britannia, not to be confused with EVII's and GV's famous racing cutter.



Your knowledge about "All things royal" is very impressive !!!  :D   ... I'm shocked   ;D

* how do you stay so well informed * ?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: emeraldeyes on April 11, 2008, 09:40:22 AM
You will find as you become more acquainted with the forum and its members that GDElla is truly a gem.  She has many admirers around here and the forum would be a far poorer place without her.



Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 21, 2008, 02:49:18 PM
Alix wearing a lovely fichu
(http://img508.imageshack.us/img508/1478/alexfichush7.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 21, 2008, 02:52:46 PM
Alexandra Rose Day c1911
(http://img507.imageshack.us/img507/9075/2ndalexandrarosedaywf1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 21, 2008, 02:56:39 PM
How Cute !!   :)
(http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/7267/acutepupmq8.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on April 21, 2008, 03:51:17 PM
You will find as you become more acquainted with the forum and its members that GDElla is truly a gem.  She has many admirers around here and the forum would be a far poorer place without her.





Thank you very much EE.  :-* I could, and will, say the same about you. Also, thank you for your kind words Archduchess--I've read about royals since I was an early teen, about 20 years now--and British royalty is a favorite.

Queen Alexandra was very fond of her little dogs, wasn't she? It looks like, in the last photo, she's in mourning for someone but I'm not sure of the year on that one.

This was a miniature painted in 1861 and given to Queen Victoria, probably either when she was evaluating Alexandra as a prospective DIL or upon the engagement:

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/402482.jpg)

By Frith, it was later acquired by Queen Mary

(http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/404567.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 21, 2008, 08:19:30 PM
Thanks for posting ! GrandDuchessElla  ... I never have seen the first painting  * very interesting *   Do you know who painted it ?  :)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on April 21, 2008, 08:56:02 PM
It was by Elisabeth Maria Anna Jerichau Baumann.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 27, 2008, 01:02:09 PM
http://img113.imageshack.us/img113/6872/1900salixji6.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on April 27, 2008, 01:41:10 PM
For YouTube subscribers, the Royal Channel has some rare footage of Queen Alexandra and other past royals - mind you, they're taking their time releasing videos !  ::)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on May 10, 2008, 08:19:25 PM
These are for gogm  :)  - I know what a Queen Alexandra fan you are ... and yes, you may NOW add these to your album !  ;)

http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/7038/acloseupvb7.jpg

http://img146.imageshack.us/img146/792/checkalixxy2.jpg

http://img49.imageshack.us/img49/2646/extremelyrarealixtr7.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: B5218 on May 10, 2008, 09:08:55 PM
Thank you for posting these pictures.  I had not seen them before.

This makes the digital retouching of QEII's official Canadian portrait look tame.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: gogm on May 11, 2008, 12:05:53 AM
For YouTube subscribers, the Royal Channel has some rare footage of Queen Alexandra and other past royals - mind you, they're taking their time releasing videos !  ::)

Thank you!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Yseult on May 11, 2008, 04:53:42 AM
For all of you... ;)
I suppose this has been posted yet, but...if not, a wonderful portrait of Alix by William Blake Richmond:

(http://i298.photobucket.com/albums/mm243/Gallaeciafulget/AlexandrabyWilliamBlakeRichmond.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on May 11, 2008, 07:11:01 AM
When I think of Alix and Bertie I always think "turn-of-the-century".  I forget that they actually married during the US Civil War.

As strange as this sounds I think Alix looks younger the older she got or at least in her pictures.

TampaBay
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: gogm on May 11, 2008, 11:47:31 AM
For all of you... ;)
I suppose this has been posted yet, but...if not, a wonderful portrait of Alix by William Blake Richmond:

(http://i298.photobucket.com/albums/mm243/Gallaeciafulget/AlexandrabyWilliamBlakeRichmond.jpg)

To my awareness, this hasn't been posted before and its a great picture. She really was a red head!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on May 11, 2008, 02:02:19 PM
When I think of Alix and Bertie I always think "turn-od-the-century".  I forget that tey actually married during the US Civil War.

As strange as this sounds I think Alix looks younger the older she got or at lesat in her pictures.

TampaBay

Queen Alexandra and her dear sister, Empress Dagmar (as I like to call her) both had very youthful looks :) .. but of course, age eventually caught up with them  * Sad *
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Martyn on May 16, 2008, 10:45:31 AM
The portraits of Alix give a stronger sense of her loveliness as they give us an idea of her colouring, which even allowing for artistic license, must have been exquisite.

Both the Winterhalter portrait and that one by Richmond suggest a very fair complexion and hair that is tinged with red - a winning combination.  Black and white photographs can never convey this adequately.

Of course, although Alix did age well, we must remember that she did resort to cosmetic enhancements and that most of her photos were retouched to perpetuate the youthfull allure.  The very few unretouched photos of her in later life, most notably at her Coronation, show a woman whose face shows natural ageing and a fair amount of make-up.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Yseult on May 16, 2008, 11:19:25 AM
One more...

(http://i298.photobucket.com/albums/mm243/Gallaeciafulget/Alixminiature.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: TampaBay on May 16, 2008, 12:55:17 PM
Is the bottom necklace still in existence?  There is a costume necklace in June 2008 American Haper's Bazaar this month that is almost identical.

TampaBay.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: gogm on May 16, 2008, 07:23:37 PM
The floral work at the bottom of the necklaces is reminiscent of currant motif diamonds worn by the Empress Eugenie and sold at auction in 1887. Maybe Alexandra was able to pick up some of Eugenie's diamonds among the spoils?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on May 17, 2008, 10:58:37 PM
A Gracious Queen - warm image of dear Alix
(http://img362.imageshack.us/img362/8461/salixnh1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: ArchDss Louise-Henriette on May 17, 2008, 11:02:49 PM
Queen Alexandra's 'message to the nation' ...  her dress has been re-touched
http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/3408/sr3956if6.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on May 25, 2008, 11:00:52 PM
Thanks for the info G D Ella. Just as an update if anyone is interested, I am gradually tracking down more of Alexandra's clothes worldwide in various museums for my PhD.  Trying to locate the forty or so lots that were not bought by the Met in NYC from the 1937 auction is a challenge, but is proving fascinating.  Although the jewellery aspect is not my priority as I am a dress historian, it is still naturally such a part of the whole look that any info is great!  Actually, I am currently working on two of Alexandra's fancy dress costumes that are here in the UK.  If anyone knows of any references to either the Waverley Ball in 1871, the Marlborough House Ball of 1874 and the most famous Devonshire House Ball of 1897, I would be really grateful.

I already know about some of the texts such as Sophia Murphy's book on the DHB but any other suggestions would be very welcome.  Thanks!

I don't know if any of this will help bu I stumbled across some info and photos--though since they're from newspaper scans, the images aren't very good, sorry.

When the auction occured, it aised $2667.50. Some of the items sold:

black tulle gown, specially embroidered in silver and gold by the wives of India's ruling princes brought $50
driving coat of white Danish lamb (part of her trousseau) $60

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/LastScanQAauctiongown.jpg)

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/LastScanQAauctiongowns.jpg)

The text says the dresses are a gold & white gown QA wore to Xenia's wedding, yellow & heliotrope sain gown worn in 1900, black & silver gown wih gold & white beads worn during visit to Portugal in 1904, mauve sequin gown worn in 1900, navy & mauve sequin gown also worn during 1900
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on June 09, 2008, 12:58:51 PM
Wonder if that gown still exists...?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kate_S on July 03, 2008, 08:10:58 AM
Thanks GDElla for the newspaper articles.  I have only just seen them, having been out of the loop for a while!  Fantastic to see those images.  A couple of those featured are part of the Metropolitan collection and the heliotrope gown is in Toronto.  As for the others.....Still searching.  Several more items have turned up in Liverpool where a Sandringham housekeeper retired and so objects surface all over the place.  Just as an aside, I recently visited the National Archive at Kew, London to study Queen Victoria's office of robes volumes which were so interesting and shed a great deal of light onto the whol set up of the royal wardrobe and how it operated, and I am returning to Windsor next month to have another look at Alexandra's wardrobe accounts, including her privy purse records since I ran out of time on my last visit.  The project is progressing really well, and I am so grateful for input from others, so thanks again.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on July 06, 2008, 10:51:59 AM
Looking forward to you're future posts Kate! I just had to share this picture with you all. It doesnt contain Queen Alexandra herself but a piece of furniture owned by her. The picture was taken in Hvidore (the castle that belonged to Queen Alexandra and her sister Dagmar in Denmark) and shows use the wrinting table of Alexandra agian filled with pictures. I just love Royalty putting out their family pictures on desks, writing tables and so on. It shows how much the care fore eatchother by putting them in those lovly frames out in the open instead of in just a family album. And I toke over this way of exposing my (old family) pictures to myself. I think the generations before me diserve to be honoured. Maybe I will post a picture of my 'royal mob' standing at my desk later. But back to real royalty now!

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/951968208_ba758aef30_o.jpg)

The writing table later was in possesion of Alexandra's sister the Dowager Empress Marie. The picture was taken in 1928 at Hvidore (I read). And if that is true I can really imangine that 'Minnie' kept the writing table of her sister exactly the same after her sisters death as during Alexandra's life.
As you see closely to the pictures you can see from left to right on the desk: Both sisters (Minnie & Alix) at the Victoria & Albert (?), King Christian IX (just a wild guess), Alexandra's (favorit) grandchild little Olav of Norway, their brother and sister-inlaw King Frederick VIII and Queen Louise of Denmark behind them Alexandra's lovly daughter Maud nee Queen of Norway next to her two pictures of Olav agian followed by Edward VII (?) in the frame with the crown on top and at the end the thirth sister Thyra. The ones in the middle I can't identify and the one standing on top of the writing table (exacpt fore the one second behind the candle, it could be the picture of Dagmar,Alexandra and Edward VII at Buckingham Palace), could that be their brother the King of Greece or their father King Christian IX of Denmark? On the left you can see another picture frame, but I can't see who are in it. Beneath the frame you can see probaly a picture of a gathering of the family in Denmark (at a wedding?). And you see a tip of a horse statue. Thats the statue of Alexandra's grandchild Olav ridding a horse. ( I have some where a picture of the complete statue of Olav, but can't finfd it at the moment.) I just love seeing pictures like this! Just like the one of the desk of King Christian IX at Amalienborg Palace stuffed with pictures of relatives. I gladly follow their example..... :)

Royal Netherlands

PS: 'Whe could start a new thread and call it ''Identify the pictures in the pictures'', I really enjoy doing that!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on July 06, 2008, 11:16:01 AM
Wonderful picture thank you RN! I think the double frame in the centre holds a picture of Alexei in his sailor suit? But it could well be Olav like you say.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on July 06, 2008, 03:56:20 PM
Lovely and interesting picture of Alix's desk. Thank you!

Perhaps the boy is Alastair! Just a thought! I do wish there were piccies out there of Alix with her first great grand child! I often muse that there maybe a Four Generations one of Alix, Louise, Alix C and Alastair, after all Alastair was eleven when his great granny died and Alix was photographed with Georgie, Mary and the present Earl of Harewood as a baby.

Considering how much she loved her children and seems to have been quite a hands on grand mother, Alix was still quite active and sprightly when Alastair was small so maybe piccies of them together will emerge in due course. I love the one of Alix with Olav. I know it was probably retouched, but Alix has such a gentleness and sensitivity in that particular photograph.

 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 06, 2008, 08:04:32 PM
The picture was really lovely. Thanks. Is the table still in the Royal Collections ?  ???
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Michael HR on July 19, 2008, 11:49:02 AM
I wish I could keep my study that tidy!

:)


Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 22, 2008, 08:14:11 PM
Yours is actually less chaotic than "Motherdear"'s clutter. I wonder howshe can operate in that "blessed" mess... ;D
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Svetabel on July 23, 2008, 12:59:19 AM
Yours is actually less chaotic than "Motherdear"'s clutter. I wonder howshe can operate in that "blessed" mess... ;D

I'd better feel sorry for poor servants who must have been acrobats to dust all these tables and shelves every day and not to break any piece of this mess...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 23, 2008, 09:51:27 AM
Yes...especially with the Faberge frames...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on July 26, 2008, 04:58:25 AM
I found this yesterday:
http://museum.odense.dk/billedfiler/HCA/person/115x2s.jpg

from left to right: sitting at the left: Dagmar, Valdemar, Queen Louise (sitting), Thyra and at the far right Alix.
Standing: Frederik, King Christian and Vilhelm.

The whole family is together on this (Bertie isn't on it), so I suppose it's dated around 1861/62
I hope you haven't seen it before  ;)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Aliss_Kande on July 26, 2008, 08:07:12 AM
I haven't seen that pic, so thank you Luc for posting it.  However, I have seen Thyra in the same position by herself.  Do you think it could be a montage?  It doesn't look like it, but you never know.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Svetabel on July 26, 2008, 10:03:44 AM
I found this yesterday:
http://museum.odense.dk/billedfiler/HCA/person/115x2s.jpg

from left to right: sitting at the left: Dagmar, Valdemar, Queen Louise (sitting), Thyra and at the far right Alix.
Standing: Frederik, King Christian and Vilhelm.

The whole family is together on this (Bertie isn't on it), so I suppose it's dated around 1861/62
I hope you haven't seen it before  ;)

That's 1862, the time of Alexandra's engagement to Prince of Wales.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on July 26, 2008, 12:56:41 PM
It is a well known picture and published as a postcard too. It is also in the Van Der Kiste book on the Scandavian Royal Families...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alix of Wales had Panache on August 16, 2008, 12:29:55 PM
Back again after computer problems which have been rectified

Saw this painting on Ebay.  Have put this in photostop.  Here is a direct link: 

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q276/coker10/160888376_o.jpg
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 16, 2008, 10:21:28 PM
Think it came from the same sitting with Queen Amelie of Portugal...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on August 17, 2008, 12:09:02 AM
It does. With the black background it seems that the rest were photoshopped out.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on August 17, 2008, 01:04:46 AM
Had Diana behaved and got on with it, and therefore not divorced but instead toed the line with Charles, how many of us genuinely feel and believe that she could and would have ended up like Alix.....loved and revered instead of made into into an icon? What I am trying to say is that Alix was the real first when it comes to 'feelings'...and she did it all with dignity and left a legacy that still resonates without all ghastly dolls and and other 'tat' that the 'Diana' inc feels necessary to churn out!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on August 17, 2008, 08:29:38 AM
I hope there are any photos of Queen Alexandra at the funeral of her husband in 1910. Does anyone have them ?? :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 17, 2008, 01:50:28 PM
The famous one of her and Dagmar in the coach...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on August 17, 2008, 06:00:27 PM
There have been a couple posted over the years--probably on some of the older Alexandra threads. Here is one I found, courtesy of Royal Netherlands:

(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/64.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on August 18, 2008, 10:43:48 AM
Thank you so much, GDella !! I suppose she's in the Irish State Coach ? Any more photos ??
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on August 18, 2008, 01:07:00 PM
Any photos of Alexandra at the Golden Jubilee in 1887 ? I read somewhat in Grandmama of Europe, she wore a dress of cream and pink brocade.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 19, 2008, 07:04:35 PM
The official jubliee postcard was one with QV, Bertie and Alix in a dazzliging dress with diamond stars.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: tom_romanov on August 20, 2008, 11:14:19 AM
The official jubliee postcard was one with QV, Bertie and Alix in a dazzliging dress with diamond stars.


oh i have that photo somewhere!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 20, 2008, 01:39:41 PM
Yes...It was also in Theo Aronson's "Grandmama of Europe".
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: tom_romanov on August 20, 2008, 02:03:26 PM
Yes...It was also in Theo Aronson's "Grandmama of Europe".

thats where i saw it!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on August 20, 2008, 04:15:49 PM
Yes...It was also in Theo Aronson's "Grandmama of Europe".

Therefore I asked if there were more :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 22, 2008, 10:45:41 AM
Saw it before in postcard shops, but since it was an old image I did not get it. The photos of the jublilee were all long shots, hard to see dress details. The commemoritive portraits are better.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on August 26, 2008, 08:26:44 AM
Thank you Eric. Was Alexandra also at the coronation of her son George V in 1911 ?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on August 26, 2008, 08:42:31 AM
No, she wasn't. Until Queen Mary attended the coronation in 1937 of her son George VI, the Dowager Queens stayed away. I think QA might have been travelling even when the Coronation happened.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on August 26, 2008, 02:31:12 PM
Yes she wasn't. According to one author QA still cannot believe Georgie as King. She was quoted "It should be Eddy not Georgie !"....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on October 08, 2008, 06:16:46 AM
I am curious to know if any photographs of Alix from 1924/25 have been posted here. I have seen a picture in Frances Diamond's wonderful book of Alix with Dighton Probyn that was dated 1924 and am curious to know if any other are out there (here on her thread hopefully!!!) of Alix from this period. I do appreciate that she rarely ventured to London after 1923 but even in the earlier half of 1925 she was still going out and about in Norfolk so I guess there must be other photos of her that I may have missed.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: gogm on October 08, 2008, 11:21:14 AM
No, she wasn't. Until Queen Mary attended the coronation in 1937 of her son George VI, the Dowager Queens stayed away. I think QA might have been travelling even when the Coronation happened.

George VI's coronation was special due to circumstances so the show of maternal support was very special.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on October 08, 2008, 12:43:27 PM
Indeed. I still remember seeing the reels. Queen Mary teaching her granddaughters Lilibet and Margo how to wave to the people.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on October 08, 2008, 02:31:07 PM
I am curious to know if any photographs of Alix from 1924/25 have been posted here. I have seen a picture in Frances Diamond's wonderful book of Alix with Dighton Probyn that was dated 1924 and am curious to know if any other are out there (here on her thread hopefully!!!) of Alix from this period. I do appreciate that she rarely ventured to London after 1923 but even in the earlier half of 1925 she was still going out and about in Norfolk so I guess there must be other photos of her that I may have missed.


[/quote
Alixann I think another late shot of Alix was the one of her with Dagmar andToria at an air show probably from the early to mid twenties. It was published in the Battiscombe book, not sure if she gives it a date...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on October 08, 2008, 07:26:54 PM
Did you get Frances Dimond's book ? She had excess to a lot of Alexandra photos not seen before.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on October 10, 2008, 03:41:23 PM
Frances Dimond's book about Alix and the camera is wonderful! I have it. I was really only wondering about the period 1924 - 25. I understand that at some stage during the last two years of her life a blood vessel broke in Alix's eye and she complained in letters that she was increasingly frail and in collapse. I understand that Alexander Rose day in 1923 was the last attended by Alix and along with Bertie and Elizabeth's, and Maud and Charles Southesk's weddings must have been the last 'major' public events which she attended before withdrawing to Sandringham. Can anypne clarify this for me?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royalboy202 on November 08, 2008, 02:36:46 PM
Was Queen Alexandra named after her aunt Grand Dss Alexandra of Russia who had married her mothers brother Fredrick Landgrave of Hesse-Kessel?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on December 04, 2008, 08:31:31 AM
I haven't seen before this portrait: Queen Alexandra with her grandchildren and dogs by Frederick Morgan and Thomas Blinks.
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?collector=12781&display=acquired&object=402302&row=76
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: OctoberLily on December 11, 2008, 12:23:24 PM
Hello everyone!  First let me congratulate all of you on this wonderful forum!  I've been a member for about a year and a half and have delighted in reading the various discussions about my favorite royals.

I've come to admire Alix for many reasons, and like you all, have pondered many things about her life.  My first post is a simple question:  what color are Alix's eyes?  In all the color portraits I've seen of her it's hard to tell, but the black and white photographs seem to indicate her eyes are light colored.  Blue perhaps?

Thank you all in advance,

Lily
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on December 11, 2008, 01:47:03 PM
Welcome, October Lily. Yes, they were blue. As an incidental, many portraits showed her with reddish-brown hair.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on December 31, 2008, 12:44:13 PM
Some of Queen Alexandra's fans from the Royal Collection:

Faberge fan purchased by her sister Marie Feodorovna, 1904:
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?searchText=fan+queen+victoria&pagesize=20&object=25219&row=46

Photographic fan with photographs of the five children of Alexandra:
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?searchText=fan+queen+victoria&pagesize=20&object=25193&row=32

Fan with a picture of Sandringham House:
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?searchText=fan+queen+victoria&pagesize=20&object=25048&row=34

Ostrich feather fan, 1901:
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?searchText=fan&pagesize=20&object=25279&row=80

Fan from Denmark:
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?searchText=fan&pagesize=20&object=25033&row=99

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: tom_romanov on December 31, 2008, 12:49:34 PM
wow what lovely fans, the ostrich fan is my favorite. Is there a picture of Alexandra with it?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 16, 2009, 10:07:30 AM
Victoia, Mary and Alexandra:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/VictoriawithMayandAlexandraholdingD.jpg)

Prince and Princess of Wales:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/Walescouple1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: tom_romanov on January 16, 2009, 02:57:24 PM
Victoia, Mary and Alexandra:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/VictoriawithMayandAlexandraholdingD.jpg)



what a great photo Alexandre, QV looks so small compared to Alix and Mary.
in the photo whos the baby?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 16, 2009, 03:08:12 PM
His is the first child of Mary and George
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 16, 2009, 03:09:58 PM
Alix and Bertie:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/2891648441_ea847e7eea_o1.jpg)

Alix and Maria:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/2699278820094285158S600x600Q851.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: tom_romanov on January 16, 2009, 03:18:41 PM
oh its David! thank-you
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 16, 2009, 03:41:11 PM
There's another taken at the same time of QV with David, Bertie and George. The reigning and future monarchs in 4 generations. I believe QV noted that was the first time in history that had happened.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 17, 2009, 03:39:30 PM
Alix and dog:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/alixbi51.gif)
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/Alexandra_of_Denmark1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 18, 2009, 04:44:39 PM
She look really aged in the second photo...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on January 18, 2009, 07:04:45 PM
She was in her 70's when it was taken, so understandable...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 18, 2009, 08:23:50 PM
Yes, it was in 1921.

From the NPG

(http://images.npg.org.uk:8080/OCimg/790_500/1/8/mw59418.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 19, 2009, 02:30:22 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/Alex2-21.jpg)
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/Alex2-11.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on January 19, 2009, 06:48:37 AM
Yes, it was in 1921.

From the NPG

(http://images.npg.org.uk:8080/OCimg/790_500/1/8/mw59418.jpg)

Thank fore this wonderfull picture of Alix in older age gdella! I only say it very small at the NPG archive.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on January 19, 2009, 10:27:04 AM
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/952029188_222d17167c_o.jpg)
Queen Alexandra in front of the royal mob with a smile on her face, followed by King Edward VII (taking his hat off), the Prince of Wales and his sister Princess Victoria (Toria).
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/951203291_70fb829d36_o.jpg)
Queen Alexandra smiling, her husband Edward VII is walking in front of her.
(http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f78/opzich/430952534_fc3a3e5374_o.jpg)
The Dowager Queen Alexandra at a wedding in the ninetine-twinties.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 19, 2009, 12:59:24 PM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/Alixaprettygirl1.jpg)
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/1844-1925AlexandraPrssofDenmarkxGre.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 20, 2009, 09:30:29 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/2892802524_1702e40ecd_o1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 20, 2009, 09:31:16 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/Alex1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: LadyTudorRose on January 22, 2009, 11:32:22 AM
Here's one of QA wearing the necklace at the wedding of her granddaughter Alexandra Fife in 1913:

(http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f282/vickyandfritz/jewels/10.jpg)

Are you sure that was taken in 1913? She looks really young. In 1913 Alexandra would've been sixty-eight. I suppose some of it could be editing, but they can't make sixty-eight-year-old women look that young with all the technology they have today, so I don't see how they could've done it back then.

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eddie_uk on January 22, 2009, 12:49:50 PM
It's certainly been touched up jeniann, you can see the one with Olaf has been too!

She did keep her looks though, one of the Russian grand dukes ?KR saw her, I think at a wedding, and wrote she looked 30 when in fact she was in her 50s!!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 22, 2009, 03:58:58 PM
As good can be expected.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on January 22, 2009, 04:16:59 PM
As good can be expected.

What do you mean?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 23, 2009, 08:33:49 AM
Her age I mean. Alexandra was an old woman but even without the retouches has flashes of the girl within her. That made her beautiful still.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 23, 2009, 10:29:33 AM
Jeniann--Yes, the photo was taken in 1913 at the time of her granddaughter's wedding.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 23, 2009, 12:01:00 PM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/alex40zk11.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Carolath Habsburg on January 23, 2009, 03:50:42 PM
(http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/8953/alix31vi4.jpg) (http://imageshack.us)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: CountessKate on January 24, 2009, 08:17:06 AM
This is a lovely photo - but has it been touched up a bit?  Her left thigh has a suspicious white 'shadow' alongside it.  The gatepost is rather crude looking and appears to have been superimposed to her right side, making her umbrella look awkward.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 24, 2009, 08:10:34 PM
It's from a visit to England by her parents and sister Thyra. They are seen in the entire group photos.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Carolath Habsburg on January 25, 2009, 09:13:50 PM
Here another picture of that session. There is Thyra, Alix`s parents and Bertie

(http://i41.tinypic.com/2rh06x3.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Grace on January 26, 2009, 04:17:39 AM
Bertie's looking thrilled to be with Alix's family as always, isn't he?!!!  They must have had a big photo session this day - I've seen at least four or five others on the same occasion.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 26, 2009, 11:06:57 AM
Indeed they need it for the newspapers for the empire from Bombay to Hong Kong....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 29, 2009, 02:39:34 AM
Alexandra and Maria F.:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alix%20et%20Berti/alixdenmark184419yc51.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 30, 2009, 07:16:44 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/Photo/AlixasMaryStuart1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on January 31, 2009, 08:23:38 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alexandraatball1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on January 31, 2009, 04:21:32 PM
A great Cabinet card. She was laden with jewels...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on January 31, 2009, 05:45:41 PM
It's from the Devonshire House ball in 1897.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 02, 2009, 10:11:28 AM
Yes...As the scandalous Queen of Navarre...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 06, 2009, 02:28:04 AM
Queen Alexadra  and Queen Mary:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/AlexandraandMaywiththeirhats1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 06, 2009, 10:02:13 AM
Two Queens with different styles.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: RoyalWatcher on February 06, 2009, 10:30:04 AM
And I love how they infused jewels into their style. Those two women knew how to adorn themselves so beautifully. I love looking at photos of each where they seem to be wearing their entire collection!
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 06, 2009, 11:12:00 AM
Yes...But Alix remained many aspects like a girl, while Mary was more mature...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 08, 2009, 03:31:38 PM
Alexandra coronation:
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alixcoronation1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 08, 2009, 04:04:25 PM
I wonder who painted this ?
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 17, 2009, 03:13:36 PM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/AlixandGeorgie1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Carolath Habsburg on February 17, 2009, 05:59:13 PM
Here s another one of the coronation

(http://img3.imageshack.us/img3/5632/94182975tj1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 19, 2009, 01:34:16 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/Alixpostcard1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: CountessKate on February 19, 2009, 06:37:50 AM
I have to say that is the first picture I've seen of Alexandra where her hat seems to be overwhelming her !
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 19, 2009, 09:21:21 AM
It's part of a larger sitting, the other people have been photoshopped out. I forget who all was there but Edward VII was sitting in the chair next to her.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 19, 2009, 11:41:30 AM
She seemed to be dressed in a tent...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Kevin From Australia on February 23, 2009, 04:50:35 AM
Was Queen Alexandra named after her aunt Grand Dss Alexandra of Russia who had married her mothers brother Fredrick Landgrave of Hesse-Kessel?

She was actually named for the Grand Duchess's mother, the Empress Alexandra (princess Charlotte of Prussia), who was one of her godmothers
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Luc on February 24, 2009, 03:57:15 AM
And my favourite - as Mary Stuart


Alexandra is dressed as Mary Stuart at a fancy-dress ball given in 1871 in London. She holds this fan in her hand, presumably a gift from the Brzailian Emperor:
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eGallery/object.asp?searchText=fan&pagesize=20&object=25415&row=58
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 24, 2009, 09:20:13 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/374413095_923a033985_o1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 24, 2009, 03:54:07 PM
This is one of those 'rub out everyone from the background' shots. The occasion was the marriage of Princess Margaret of Connaught to Prince Gustav Adolf of Sweden in 1905.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: PrinceEddy1864 on February 25, 2009, 01:16:41 AM
yeah, im pretty sure that is from the National Portrait Gallery and it is miss-id'd on their website.

It is a rather common image though.

All four...
(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y28/loali2/walesfamjuly1865.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 25, 2009, 01:55:25 AM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/princesswales21.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Carolath Habsburg on February 25, 2009, 10:39:28 AM
Ok...we all know that Alix was a beauty, but the "artist" who made this portrait thought different...

(http://i43.tinypic.com/2i1gn6d.jpg)

This has to be one of the worst portraits of Alix i ve ever seen....

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Alexandre64 on February 25, 2009, 12:17:28 PM
(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj213/Alexandre64_2007/England/AlixWales1.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Ally Kumari on February 26, 2009, 05:38:57 AM
One of her most stunning pïctures
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/th_186207georgehansen3bmmz9.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/186207georgehansen3bmmz9.jpg)

Love the hair!
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/th_2628352790094285158S600x600Q85.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/2628352790094285158S600x600Q85.jpg)

With Eddy
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/th_alixeddy1xr2.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/alixeddy1xr2.jpg)

Beautiful painting
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/th_Alixx.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/Alixx.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: B5218 on February 26, 2009, 03:20:09 PM
In the third picture in the posting 2/25 at 11:13 by Grand Duchess Ally, what is in Alexandra's hair?  Is it a tiara or flowers?

Thanks
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: grandduchessella on February 26, 2009, 03:21:50 PM
I think it's a large bow.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Tina Laroche on February 26, 2009, 03:51:16 PM
I think it's a large bow.

Yes, I does look like a bow to me too. Btw, Ally, what kind of letter is this?! -->
One of her most stunning pïctures.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 26, 2009, 05:19:49 PM
The first one was actually taken in Denmark before her marriage. The cdv was from Denmark.
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Ally Kumari on February 27, 2009, 02:42:26 AM
I think it's a large bow.

Yes, I does look like a bow to me too. Btw, Ally, what kind of letter is this?! -->
One of her most stunning pïctures.

That is some silly mistake. I must have press some key I don´t even know :)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: royal_netherlands on February 28, 2009, 09:54:34 AM
It was a gift from either Dagmar or Alexandra towards her sister Thyra Duchess of Cumberland. I posted a sort alike picture of the miniature of Alexandra in the Thyra and her daughters thread. Many imperial and royal gifts that have belonged to the Hannover family have been auctioned during a recent auction at I believe Sotheby's or Christie's. Main (Faberge) items came from Dagmar the empress (dowager) of Russia an her family, as gifts fore her sister's family. It really makes me sad to see al this royal historical items disappear around the world!

RN
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on February 28, 2009, 02:29:24 PM
I think there was a lot of selling of Thyra's belongings in the last few years. I did not see jewels though...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Eric_Lowe on March 01, 2009, 04:36:53 PM
I wonder where the portrait of the photo is now located...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Charity on March 01, 2009, 09:16:40 PM
Alexandra looks rather cranky in this photo, perhaps she'd had enough of the photo session?!

Perhaps its just me, but there is a strong facial resemblance showing in the photo between the then Princess Alexandra and the current Queen Margarethe of Denmark .



Love the hair!
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/th_2628352790094285158S600x600Q85.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/2628352790094285158S600x600Q85.jpg)

Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: alixaannencova on March 01, 2009, 09:31:38 PM
I believe that when this photograph was taken, she was still very much recovering from the trauma she endured during her bout of Rheumatic fever earlier in the year! I believe this photograph dates from sometime in mid 1867.
 
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 02, 2009, 06:08:55 AM
Alexandra
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/th_3423918.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/3423918.jpg)
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/th_3433525.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/3433525.jpg)

If this one has been coloured, I do not know the artist...
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/th_396513808_5130d73431.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/396513808_5130d73431.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 02, 2009, 06:13:39 AM
Does anyone have this one bigger?
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/alex1.jpg)

(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/th_CT68633Queen-Alexandra-of-England-P.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/CT68633Queen-Alexandra-of-England-P.jpg)
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/th_alex2.jpg) (http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/alex2.jpg)
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Carolath Habsburg on March 02, 2009, 11:56:42 AM
Ally, that colored picture was handtinted for someone like this lovely lady (a victorian  colorizer)

(http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/3584/colorl.jpg) (http://img14.imageshack.us/my.php?image=colorl.jpg)


And now back to Alix...
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 02, 2009, 12:01:33 PM
Thank you Katenka! I know pictures used to be tinted, but I didn´t want to "steal" anything so I wrote those things....
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Veronica on March 02, 2009, 12:03:50 PM
Ally, that colored picture was handtinted for someone like this lovely lady (a victorian  colorizer)

(http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/3584/colorl.jpg) (http://img14.imageshack.us/my.php?image=colorl.jpg)

Wow, thank you for this picture!
Some colorizer were real artists, while others... were amateurs, judging the outcome
Title: Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
Post by: Svetabel on March 02, 2009, 12:16:27 PM
Does anyone have this one bigger?
(http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff287/VelkokneznaMaria/various/alex1.jpg)



(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/feomarie/1912037.jpg)

The same session

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v433/feomarie/PrincessAlexandra_1862.jpg)