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Messages - Alexa

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1
Forum Announcements / Re: Hurricane Katrina
« on: September 15, 2005, 08:41:41 PM »
I know I haven't posted in ages, but wanted to say, on behalf of all on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, thanks for all your support.  You can't imagine how much support means right now.  Everything from prayers to donations is very much appreciated!

GD Ella, glad to hear you made it through.  I spent the storm up at a friend's house (who was 8 months pregnant) on the Gpt/Lyman boarder.  Her hubby and I kept wondering how the heck to get her to Keesler is she went into pre-term labor.  As is she didn't, thank God!  Hope I never have to go through that again.  And I hope the next time I see Hwy 90 it's in better shape than it is now.  I made the mistake of going down and walking around the day after.  It was so horrible I couldn't even cry, although I wanted to.  But things are getting better -- electricity, water (boil-only), and gas are all back.  And the restaurants are opening back up.  Come back for a vist in a few years, and although it won't be the Coast we once knew, I bet it will be back with a vengence.

Thanks again for the support everyone!

Alexa

2
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i think its possible that he suvived despite his hemophilia, 'cuz he was burnt right? if you cut your self cant u just burn something to stop the bleeding? not a doctor just a kid so dont email me if i'm wrong.
Some one in my class said that if you cut your self badly u have to burn it if you cant stop the bleeding, so since alexei was shot in the ear we would most likely bleed out, but he also was burnt by acid so it would burn the wounds and stop the bleeding.
the only thing that would make this story not plausible is that if he had internal bleeding for like the fall after he was shot or he was shot more then once.
is that true or is it just plausible

P.S. dont mail me if i spelt something wrong.


Yes, certain wounds require cauterization to stop bleeding, but the scenario with Alexis is vastly different than that of a situation that would require cauteriztion (the burning of the skin to prevent bleeding).  A gun shot in the head is a gun shot in the head and cauterizing is not going to help the fact that the poor boys brains were blown out.  If the testimony is accurate, and Alexis was shot in the head, then he didn't leave that room alive (at the very most, he left the room brain dead).  Also, acid is not used for cauterizing and would not have the same effect as the tools used by doctors to cauterize (in layman's terms, a hot poker).  Acid destroys, melts away the skin.  It's not something that would cut off blood vessels the way cauterizing will.

Alexa

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Not necessarily. If she didn't have this child in a hospital which often women didn't at that time, there wouldn't really be any record. Plus we don't know what name she may have used when she gave birth. But it is a fact that AA did give birth, since the physicians could tell during the examination. If the child lived or not, is another story. The child could have also been inofficially adopted, we just don't know... I don't think that records were kept as thoroughly back then, especially post war...


Birth registration all depends on what country you're talking about.  I can't say for certain, but from the research I"ve done it can be assumed that most Western countried required the documentation of a baby's birth by the end of WWI.  Some countries are much earlier (I think in England it goes back to the late 19th century).  In the US it's around WWI (depending on which state you're talking about).  If AA had a baby and it was delivered by a doctor, wether at home or in a hospital, then there is a chance that birth would have been recorded.  Two of my aunts and an uncle were born in Poland in the early to mid-1920's; all were born at home and all have Polish birth certificates.  But without knowing the name AA used, or which country it happened in, then it'd be impossible (or near enough so) to find.

Alexa

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I think it's relatively easy to mistake hazel eyes for brown, but I don't see how anyone could mistake brown eyes for blue.  ???


My dad's eyes are hazle, but can look blue, albeit a light blue, maybe even a gray.  Mistaking brown for blue...yes, that's a trickier.  Then again, eye color is just so tricky, and one of the last traits people tend to remember about a person.

Alexa

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...his eyes changed with the color he was wearing.   Hazel eyes can appear brown to green to blue....



In my case, it's how bad the hangover is. ::) Or how tired I am.  In both of those cases, my eyes are very, very green.

I agree it's very easy to be misled by hazel eyes.  My mom, untill a few years ago, always thought my eyes were brown.  I had to make her look at my eyes up close to convince her they weren't.

Alexa

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Not really, babies are always born with blue eyes but they change for good by at least age 18 months. My little girl had blue until she was about 5 months, then the first brown specks came in, but it took them over a year to turn totally brown. My boy's eyes were dark blue but turned lighter blue. But once they turn they don't ever change again, maybe some elderly folks' eyes fade, but childrens' eyes don't change from say age 5 to 16, what you have at 2 is what you get. (this does not mean that eyes can't look different colors in light or darkness or with different color clothing, just that they don't really change.)


My eyes actually changed from brown to hazel sometime during childhood.  I can't remember exactly when, but I remember looking in the mirror one day and noticing specks of green in the brown.  By the time I was 17, they had finished chaning.  Funny, thouhg, cuz all my official documents have me down as having brown eyes, when in fact they're not.  Anyway, eyes can change color in childhood, but I'm not sure how often this happens.  
Alexa

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The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: "Grabbing at Straws"
« on: December 22, 2004, 08:33:54 AM »
Great analogy Ming.  I think in most cases (if not all) with history, no matter how much information is available, we never get the whole truth.  I think the Romanovs are, and always will be, one of those cases.

Alexa

8
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: AA and FS
« on: December 19, 2004, 07:14:27 PM »
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Hello Alexa

Contact PBS station WGBH in Boston --you can find the site on the internet -- and you can order Anastasia Dead or Alive on VHS for about twenty u.s. dollars. It's quite good, (as you know) but not yet on DVD.
love
rskkiya


Thanks!  I had looked on the pbs site, but hadn't thought of going straight to WGBH.  Looks like I know what I'm getting myself for Christmas.  ;D

Alexa

9
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: AA and FS
« on: December 19, 2004, 04:17:48 PM »
For what it's worth, I remember seeing this episode of Nova years ago when it was first broadcast, and have been looking for a copy to buy ever since.  It was very well done, and a good additition to anyone's video library.

Alexa

10
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: "Grabbing at Straws"
« on: December 19, 2004, 09:05:25 AM »
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I guess you'll have to explain what you mean by 'evidence'. The fact that two bodies have not been found is evidence. Why wouldn't they be with their family? Where are they? That the bolshevik lied in the first place is evidence. Could they not lie again? That the Romanovs were not "buried" in the intented place is evidence. Were the Bolsheviks lax in their attention in getting rid of the bodies? Evidence that there is a flaw in the story, something we have not been told, or evidence to prompt questions as to whether we have been told the truth.


There's speculation, and there's evidence.  The evidence (i.e. the letter written by Yurovsky) points to the fact that the entire family and their entourage were killed that night.  The missing bodies leads to speculation that this might not be accurate.  Wondering if the letter or the other documents that state the events of the night are in fact true is speculation.  

It's good to speculate, and I'm glad you posted this.  Good historians, imho, spculate all the time, and this can help uncover good pieces of information (it can also put one on the wrong track and months or years of researching a theory that's just not right).  At the same time, one needs to look at the evidence and put the pieces together to figure out what the most logical account is.  So far, the evidence points to the IF dying that night, but I love hearing theories of how they could have survived.

Alexa

11
Just an idea for those interested in the Life article.  If you give Time Inc. a call (212-522-1212) they may be able to send you a copy of the article.  I'm not sure if it's still around (when I left, there was talk of shutting it down), but Time Inc. has a library filled with a copy of every issue of every magazine they ever published in the US.  Also try the photo archives.  Although they only keep copies of photos and films (I actually got to see an orginal copy of the Zupruder film, and original color slides of Hitler taken by his private photographer) they may be able to connect you with someone who can provide a copy of the article.  You will need to know the exact issue the article appeared in though.

Alexa

12
The Alexander Palace / Re: The Alexander Palace at the Newark Museum
« on: December 09, 2004, 07:41:08 AM »
I went to the exhibit over Thanksgiving with my mother (who introduced me to the Romanovs as a child) and boyfriend.  Despite the trek in from the city (subway to path to Newark subway to a short walk -- 2 hours all together), it was a wonderful exhibit.  My mom and I gushed over the intimate items of the family, such as the photo albums and toys.  There are just so many touching items on display.  It's hearbreaking to imagine them being used by the IF, and then remember what happened to the them.

Anyway, if you have a chance to go, go.  If you're in NYC, the trek to Neward may be long, but it's well worth it.

Alexa

13
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Investigación Anastasia. Argentina
« on: November 17, 2004, 03:56:21 PM »
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Entertaining, perhaps is more like it.


"Entertaining" is definitly the right word for it.

14
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Investigación Anastasia. Argentina
« on: November 17, 2004, 03:11:04 PM »
I've dogpiled and googled and haven't found anything.  Personally, I think it's a crock (it was in the Globe afterall, and there isn't any mention of another child in N or A's diaries), but for whatever reason I find claimants to be quite interesting.

Alexa

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The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Investigación Anastasia. Argentina
« on: November 17, 2004, 02:51:12 PM »
That was the only picture of her in the article.  Maybe there's a website up about here somewhere.   I'm sitting on conference call right now, and have nothing better to do (other than pay attention) so I'll take a look around.

Alexa

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