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1
Russian Noble Families / Re: von Nybeck
« on: October 24, 2018, 05:44:11 PM »
It is not in the "Annualaire" or Annual Book of the Nobility of the Russian Empire for 1889.

2
Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« on: October 08, 2018, 06:31:41 PM »
From a Model T enthusiast site:
The pedals aren't in the standard placement that we've grown accustomed to over the last 100 years or so, and in fact, only one of the three pedals does what we might expect from a floor pedal these days. I'm talking about the brake pedal. Yes, the brake pedal stops the car -- but even then, it's in the far-right position (where you would normally find the accelerator pedal). So what are the other two pedals for, you ask? Well, in addition to the brake pedal, you'll find a gear selector pedal that provides first gear (all the way to the floor), neutral (half-way out and used for stopping) and second gear (all the way out). Next to that pedal, you'll find a separate reverse gear pedal. In other words, if you're driving a Model T, you'd better be up for some pretty fancy footwork.

But it's not just your feet that will stay busy in a Model T, your hands will get a pretty good workout, too. Aside from steering the car where you want it to go, with your left hand, you'll be adjusting the firing of the spark plugs (down to advance and up to retard), and with your right hand you'll control the throttle (down to open and up to close).

According to the Car and Driver article, "The odd position of the throttle, brake, and shifter make driving a Model T an archaic and dangerous experience. It's like trying to do the Charleston while loading a musket after a big night at the speak-easy."

But the full Model T experience isn't just about sitting in the driver's seat and, well, driving. Before you can drive it, you have to start it. And, if you ever find yourself behind the wheel of a pre-1919 Model T (prior to being equipped with an electric starter), that can be another challenge. In fact, there's even the very-real risk of breaking an arm each time you start it up -- that is, if the engine backfires.

3
Russian Noble Families / Re: Biron descendants
« on: October 06, 2018, 03:10:44 PM »
I've never heard of nor seen "Nobility Books". We have a copy of the 1880 edition of the Annual of the Russian Noble Families, listing them.  There is no "von Biron" listed. The only thing I found in it was a mention of a lesser noble family "Biren", but the family was not of high enough nobility to list the family lineage.
Here is the lineage of the family:
The family rose to prominence when the last member of the House of Kettler was left without any male heirs. As a result, Ernst Johann von Biron, a lover of Empress Anna of Russia, succeeded Ferdinand Kettler as Duke of Courland and Semigallia.

After that, the family ruled the Duchy of Courland and Semigallia for periods of time between 1737 and 1795. However, the dynasty was short lived and ended with Peter von Biron, who died in 1800 with no male heirs.[1]
Rodokmen

    Karl von Bühren
         Ernst Johann von Biron (1690–1772), duke of Courland and Semigallia, lord of Sycow
             Peter von Biron (1724–1800), duke of Courland and Semigallia, duke of Sagan, lord of Sycow
                Wilhelmine von Biron (1781–1839), princess of Courland, duchess of Sagan
                Marie Luisa Paulina von Biron (1782–1845), princess of Courland, duchess of Sagan
                Johanna Katharina von Biron (1783–1876), princess of Courland
            Karl Ernst von Biron (1728–1801), prince of Courland
                Gustav Kalixt von Biron (1780–1821)
                    Karl Prinz Biron von Curland (1811–1848)
                    Kalixt von Biron (1817–1882)
                        Gustav von Biron (1859–1941)
                            Karl von Biron (1907–1982) ∞ Herzeleide of Prussia (1918–1989)
                                Benigna von Biron (*1939)
                                Ernst-Johann Biron, Prince of Courland (*1940), current head
                                Michael von Biron (*1944)
                                    Veronika von Biron (*1970)
                                    Alexander von Biron (*1972)
                                    Stefanie von Biron (*1975)
                            Friedrich Franz von Biron (1910–1997)
                                Franz Kalixt von Biron (*1934)
                                    Marcus von Biron (*1967)
                                    Kalixta (*1975)
                                Gustav von Biron (*1941)
                                    Alexandra (*1970)
                                    Franziska (*1975)


4
Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« on: August 13, 2018, 05:56:41 PM »
Don't forget Armand Hammer, who met with the Soviets and was given contracts and who served as the conduit to raise Western cash for the USSR by importing and selling off Romanov memorabilia and Imperial Russian antiques from the Soviet Antikvariat. "The Hammer Galleries" toured department stores all across the US in the 1920s and '30's.

5
Some guy posted to the Facebook Romanov News group just recently that he was STILL pursuing Eugenia Smith's claim despite the DNA, and he refers to her as "Evgenia Smetisko"!

6
My Russian is not good enough to translate. I do however know that the "accent" is not at all all "foreign". It is aristocratic Russian of the Imperial Era. I had a "Tante" born to a noble family in Moscow in about 1905 or so. Her Russian had the very same accent. Paul Kulikovsky is on Facebook, and you might want to message him and ask him for details.

7
Q&A and Interviews / Re: . How do I change my email address?
« on: July 28, 2018, 10:30:51 AM »
Yes, in your profile.

8
The Imperial Family / Re: The Romanovs as artists
« on: July 21, 2018, 06:30:15 PM »
Be aware that the link goes to an article that is available only to paying subscribers. I have a close friend of many years who is part of the Romanov family and contributed to the piece, and put other member in contact as well.

9
Having Fun! / Re: I got a new cat: Tatiana!
« on: July 21, 2018, 04:45:38 PM »
We got a puppy and about two months later adopted 2 kittens. A second puppy came a year later. Because they grew  up together they adored each other. One or both cats was often snoozing happily curled up next to one of  the dogs. Never had a problem between them for 13 years.

10
I translated Volkov and published it here on the AP site back in 2004. http://www.alexanderpalace.org/volkov/

11
The Imperial Family / Re: Tatiana Konstantinovna Escaping Russia
« on: May 05, 2018, 05:37:36 PM »
According to a Russian Orthodox site devoted to members of the Imperial Family and their relationships to the Church:
Aide-de-camp Alexander Korochenzov serving to the Grand Duke Dmitri Konstantinovich, helped Tatiana and her young children to escape from Russia. They were fortunate enough to flee to Switzerland. Tatiana decided to marry Alexander Korochenzov, who saved her and her children’s life in fact.

   In October 1921, they married in Geneva. Not quite three months later, however, Tatiana became a widow for the second time when Alexander died in Lausanne… Tatiana raised her children alone, and tried hard to give them good education granting independence.

12
"not easy to find the directions" to post photos? HUH??? The SECOND PINNED POST in "New Users Read First Please" is "POSTING PHOTOGRAPHS". "Not easy to find"??  Seriously??   http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=771.0

13
Imperial Transportation / Re: Cars
« on: April 17, 2018, 01:15:26 PM »
Impossible. There were no self propelled vehicles that early. A cabriolet is a type of horse drawn carriage.

14
Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« on: March 13, 2018, 03:42:47 PM »
The first telephone installations in Russia were made by the American Bell System in the early 1890s, which charged an incredible $2,500 for each new installation.  The Bell company's contract expired in 1901, and the Russian telephone system was taken over by the Swedish Ericsson Company.  By the beginning of World War I most Russian cities had some kind of telephone service, and it was possible to telephone from St. Petersburg to Moscow, with long distance service to most major cities.  By 1911 there was a total of 181,000 telephones in all of Russia.

15
Nicholas II / Re: Infant Brother Alexander
« on: March 09, 2018, 11:12:44 AM »
Google is a great tool. He wasn't an infant, George Alexandrovich was 18 when he died.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Duke_George_Alexandrovich_of_Russia

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