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Messages - Nikl

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2
Oh my gosh, the family resemblence is amazing.  I can't believe how much she looks like Grand Duchess Olga, later in life when she was living in Canada.
I do not see any resemblance from the picture with Russian language ;)

3
Could somebody please tell me, who is infant sister Natalia?

...when Stana attended exams of Gavriil and Ioann in Livadia and then brought them at first news of their infant sister Natalia's birth and then her death ...

The second daughter of GD Konstantin K., she was born in 1905 and died the same year.
Thank you very much for your quik answer :)

4
Could somebody please tell me, who is infant sister Natalia?

...when Stana attended exams of Gavriil and Ioann in Livadia and then brought them at first news of their infant sister Natalia's birth and then her death ...

5
Many of these desendants do not speak russian ;)

6
Research Russian Roots / Re: My Gt Grandperants
« on: February 19, 2012, 10:07:35 PM »
Prior to 1920, Odessa was part of Kherson Governorate. Carl Urbanek seems to be a German name, which is not unlikely: the region had a sizable ethnic German population.
Carl is maybe German name, but Urbanek is Czech name ;)

7
Research Russian Roots / Re: Born in Russia about 1910
« on: May 14, 2011, 01:53:55 AM »
Two days ago I sent e-mail to this web page http://www.familytreedna.com/Default.aspx with this question:

My grandmother was born in Russia about 1910. Our family have a letter from her step-father, that she descent from Russian family Romanov's. How we can identify her past? She already died in 1985

They answered me this:

Thank you for your email. Can you please confirm if this is your maternal or paternal grand mother? In July 1991, nine bodies were exhumed from a shallow grave just outside Ekaterinburg, Russia. Circumstantial evidence, along with mitochondrial DNA sequencing and matches, gave strong evidence to the remains being those of the Romanovs, the last Russian Royals who were executed on July 18, 1918. The testing may be able to indicate if you are matching these DNA signatures but it could only indicate that you are related (we would not be able to say how close the relationship may be as it could be going back many hundreds of years.)


So they wrote that is only strong not 100% evidence to the remains being those of Romanovs ;)

8
A maybe somewhat better version of the text is available in adress

betweenstpetersburgandeurope.blogspot.com

If there is somebody who could correct my text in English there, I would be very grateful. I would appreciate even other comments about the text as for example if you can understand what I am trying to say or not.

Thanks a lot and greetings

Amely

http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=11015.0
I do not continue on my story, because I got e-mail from Ekaterinburg that they can not find for me any more informations. :(

  
[/quote

9
Research Russian Roots / Re: Born in Russia about 1910
« on: July 01, 2008, 02:16:04 AM »
Midle of this month I came back from Czech Republic, where I was wisiting my family and also I tray to find out more informatoins about my grandmother.

From my family record I recovered, that my grandmother's adoptive parents divided in Vladivostok. My grandmother with her sister and her mother Nadezda Vochminova sailed away July 5, 1919 on ship "SIMBIRSK" and my grandfather left by warship "HUNDSEND".

Also interesting, I find out from copy of my gradmother's birth certificate, that her adopive mother descent from family IOANNOV.



10
Research Russian Roots / Re: Born in Russia about 1910
« on: July 01, 2008, 02:13:57 AM »
Midle of this month I came back from Czech Republic, where I was wisiting my family and also I tray to find out more informatioins about my grandmother.

From my family record I recovered, that my grandmother's adoptive parents divided in Vladivostok. My grandmother with her sister and her mother Nadezda Vochminova sailed away July 5, 1919 on ship "SIMBIRSK" and my grandfather left by warship "HUNDSEND".

Also interesting is, I find out from copy of my gradmother's birth certificate, that her adopive mother descent from family IOANNOV.



11
Research Russian Roots / Re: Born in Russia about 1910
« on: July 01, 2008, 02:11:39 AM »
Midle of this month I came back from Czech Republic, where I was wisiting my family and also I tray to find out more informatoins about my grandmother.

From my family record I recovered, that my grandmother's adoptive parents divided in Vladivostok. My grandmother with her sister and her mother Nadezda Vochminova sailed away July 5, 1919 on ship "SIMBIRSK" and my grandfather left by warship "HUNDSEND".

Also interesting is, I find out from copy of my gradmother's birth certificate, that her adopive mother descent from family IOANNOV.


12
Has anyone ever herd of this story? They are claims that instead of miscarriange Alexander had given birth to a 5th daughter named Susan De Garrieff and gave away because the gender of the child. Anna anderson had met this women claiming her as her sister.
In which year was 5th daughter born?

De Graaff, who later called herself "Princess Alexandra," claimed that she had actually been born in 1903, the year that Tsarina Alexandra experienced either a "hysterical pregnancy" or a miscarriage. According to letters and diary entries by the family that were later published, Alexandra did not give birth to a child in 1903.[3] However, de Graaff claimed that because Nicholas and Alexandra already had four daughters and there was pressure upon them to produce a male heir to the throne, they decided to place their supposed fifth daughter with adoptive parents. Philippe Vachot, a doctor and "holy man" at the Imperial court from Lyon, France, supposedly arranged for the baby to go to Hemmes.[4] De Graaff's claims are seen as plausible by some because Vachot was supposedly hired by the Romanovs at a time when they were desperate for a male heir, pursuant to his claims to be able to influence the sex of children at an early stage of pregnancy. Accordingly, when the fifth girl, later to become de Graaff, was supposedly born on September 1, 1903, Vachot had motive to secret the child away and claim that the Tsarina had not in fact been pregnant. Her pregnancy had been previously reported in the European press.

In 1905, several months after the August 1904 birth of Tsarevich Alexei Nikolaevich of Russia, Vachot returned to France a rich man, having been generously compensated by the Romanovs.

De Graaff told the London Telegraph in October 1968 that Hemmes told her the truth about her origins in 1937. At that time she received her dowry from the Romanovs: five million rubles, a cloth belonging to the crown jewels, china and "trinkets." Hemmes supposedly told her that he had received "hush money" from the Romanovs to stay quiet about his daughter's true origins. An intriguing side note to the story is that Hemmes, who came from a poor family and was himself impoverished, was able in 1919 to build a luxurious home for his family in Rotterdam, which he later lost through incompetent business dealings. Moreover, Suzanna de Graaff left the paper rubles she claimed to have received as a dowry to her three children, one of whom, Anton van Weelden (de Graaff was married twice, producing van Weelden from the first marriage and twin daughters from the second), showed his portion to reporter James Lovell in 1989. Lovell reported in his book "Anastasia: The Lost Princess" (St. Martin's Press, 1991) that the pre-revolutionary rubles shown to him by van Weelden had apparently never been circulated; they were new, still crisp and in numerically sequential order.

Anderson told the London Telegraph that she accepted De Graaff as her sister. The two women first met in Germany in about 1950 and exchanged letters.[5] De Graaff's sister Adriana Hemmes rejected de Graaff's claim to be a fifth daughter of Nicholas and Alexandra as completely false and was estranged from de Graaff in their later years.[6] De Graaff died of a heart attack in November 1968.[7]

It should be noted that de Graaff never tried to capitalize on her claims, and in fact made them public only weeks before her death.

13
The Russian Revolution / Re: Soviet Atrocities
« on: June 06, 2008, 06:01:06 PM »
Quote
Stalin and his cronies (we cannot exempt the cronies from complicity in his crimes) destroyed such a viable agricultural region to the extent that after his Reign of Terror, the Soviet Union needed 10% of the world's total grain to import to feed a starving populace.
Actually, as late as the early 1970s, the Soviet Union was a grain exporter. Russia endured agricultural problems during and after the 1970s due to a large extent to frequent drought. While Russia endured three famines between 1921-1991, Russia had endured dozens of such famines in the 19th century. The Finnish famine of 1866-68 killed a staggering 20 percent of the population.

If it's Stalin's era you want to talk about, the fact that his policies helped to greatly modernize Russian agriculture. Above all, the introduction of the tractor to Russia helped to greatly increase agricultural productivity.
Here is something for you to read:

Around 20 million (citing The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression by Stephane Courtois et al) to 35 million (citing A Century of Violence in Soviet Russia by Alexander Yakovlev) killed in all, from 1917 to 1991

250,000 executed by the Cheka during the "Red Terror" and Russian civil war. (citing The Cheka: Lenin's Political Police by George Leggett) But it could be much higher (see my sig)

Between 300,000 and 500,000 Cossacks killed or deported in 1919 and 1920 (known as "de-Cossackization"; not sure how many of these deaths overlap with the aforementioned Cheka executions - if at all). (citing The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression by Stephane Courtois et al)

Between 7.2 to 10.8 million deaths during dekulakization and collectivization - which caused a famine the regime used as a weapon against supposed "class enemies" (citing Stalin and His Hangmen: the Tyrant and Those Who Killed For Him by Donald Rayfield)

Around 700,000 executed during the Great Terror of 1937-38 (citing Stalin: the Court of the Red Tsar by Simon Sebag Montefiore); this does not include those who were beaten/tortured to death during "interrogation" or deaths in the gulag during this time, which would put it over a million.

Over 1 million Polish citizens deported by November 1940; 30% of whom were dead by 1941 (citing Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar by Simon Sebag Montefiore) and 21,857 executed outright (i.e. Katyn) by the NKVD during the Nazi-Soviet pact (citing Autopsy for an Empire by Dimitri Volkogonov)

A total of 34,250 Latvians and around 60,000 Estonians and 75,000 Lithuanians murdered or deported during Nazi-Soviet pact (citing Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar by Simon Sebag Montefiore)

An estimated 4.5 million (citing Gulag: A History by Anne Applebaum) to 12 million (citing How to Prevent Genocide: A Guide for Policymakers, Scholars, and the Concerned Citizen by John G. Heidenrich) deaths in the Gulag from 1918 to 1956. 

(I'm leaving out Stalin's ethnic cleansing of minorities in the USSR during WWII - Chechens, Crimean Taters, Kalmyks, Volga Germans, etc. - accused of "collaboration" with the Germans. I can't think of a source for that one off the top of my head. I'm sure hundreds of thousands perished though)

Haven't read as much on Mao Tse-tung, but the new biography of him by Jung Chang and Jon Halliday (Mao: The Unknown Story) estimates "well over 70 million" perished as a result of Mao's policies which, if true, makes him the biggest mass killer in history.

Broken down looks like this:
3 million deaths during land reform and the "campaign to suppress counter-revolutionaries"
38 million deaths during "Great Leap Forward"
3 million deaths during the Cultural Revolution

What do you think about that?

15
Niki,  that concept is  Marxist theory. [from the people to the people]  I am not an apologist for the Bolshevik/Soviet state.  But,  the confiscations did, in ways, go back to the people in the form of health care and education amongst other so-called "benefits".  Of course there were/are abuses, as in every system. The disaster of Zimbabwe is a perfect example currently.
 But this id off topic I think.
Communismus was "benefit" of what? :o
If somebody was really sick (cancer and so on) , doctor said he(she) is fine, so he(she) have to go to work.  3 days you did not come to work and you went to  prison for long time. :(
If you never lived in comunist country, you would never know what it is about.  I lived there 34 years and I am glad, that I escaped to Canada. :)

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