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Messages - Inok Nikolai

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1
The Imperial Family / Re: The Imperial children "sad,sheltered" life?
« on: August 03, 2020, 09:01:49 AM »
RE: The incident in the Catherine Palace supply depot:

One doesn’t quite know what to make of this account taken from N. A. Krivosheina’s memoirs.
The Krivosheins are a classic example of the fate of the “Former People”, as described in Douglas Smith’s book.
They escaped across the frozen Gulf of Finland in the 1920s; lived twenty-seven years in France; survived the Gestapo, but believed the post-WW II propaganda; took out Soviet passports and repatriated — only to be arrested and sent to the Gulag. After another twenty-seven years in the Soviet Union, they were allowed to return to Paris in 1974, where they spent their remaining years.
N. A. began writing her fascinating memoirs only in 1977. They contain an epilogue written by her husband after her death in 1981, and a second epilogue written by their son in 1998, when the memoirs were being prepared for publication in Russia itself.

However, her account of the incident in the Catherine Palace supply depot is related third-hand. It comes from an un-named woman (to whom the author assigns a fictitious name) who told the author’s mother that…

But the book “Most-august Sisters of Mercy” — which has been cited elsewhere on this Forum — contains the memoirs (published in 1925) of S. Y. Ofrosimova, who also worked at the supply depot in the Catherine Palace of Tsarskoe Selo. Her account tells quite a different story, and according to her, the Grand Duchesses did indeed interact with their co-workers.
Some excerpts:
************
“…In one of the halls of the Catherine Palace there was established a large supply depot. Every day people worked there packing bandages, preparing wadding, and sewing linen for the soldiers and their families.
The Grand Duchesses came there almost daily. With excitement I awaited the time when the gilded doors of the huge palace hall would open and the Grand Duchesses would appear on the threshold.
…In my imagination I see them once again, sitting opposite me, as in that long-ago time.
Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna is sitting obliquely from me. … I become perplexed and flustered when she cordially strikes up a conversation with me.
…Her manner of laughing… her melodious voice…
Grand Duchess Tatiana Nicholaevna… laughs more rarely than her sisters.
Opposite me sits Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna. … her eyes do not miss a thing of what is happening around her; they notice everything, and her sharp, at times merciless, little tongue, tells of all that she sees. Wherever she appears, irrepressible liveliness breaks out, and merry laughter is heard.
…[During the War] Palace etiquette was gradually simplified, and their [the Imperial family’s] relationships with their subjects became simpler and more intimate.”
(pp. 285-293)
***********

N. A. Krivosheina concludes her narrative concerning the Catherine Palace depot with the dubious remark: “As far as I know [?], the next day the Grand Duchesses stopped coming to the depot to work, and ten days later the depot itself was closed altogether and ceased to exist.”
(No source given, and this was written sixty years after the event.)

It should be noted here that S. Y. Ofrosimova herself does go on to say that the Grand Duchesses did live a rather lonely and sheltered life.

(But from her account above, it does seem that the Grand Duchesses did use those opportunities given them to socialize.)

2
Why not write him directly on his Romanov Facebook page?

4
News Links / Robert Massie has died
« on: December 25, 2019, 10:50:57 AM »

Perhaps I missed it elsewhere, but was it posted anywhere on the AP Forum that Robert Massie passed away?

Just in case it wasn't, here is Paul Gilbert's tribute.

http://tsarnicholas.org/2019/12/04/tribute-to-robert-k-massie-1929-2019/

Of course, a Google search will bring up many more obituaries.
I. N.

5
The Alexander Palace / Re: Alexander Palace Restoration
« on: November 03, 2019, 01:05:35 PM »
Paul Gilbert reports: Summer of 2020.
For a fuller report and more photos, see his posting:
https://tsarnicholas.org/2019/10/31/alexander-palace-to-re-open-in-summer-2020/

6
Nicholas II / Re: Re: Photos of Nicholas II #5
« on: February 21, 2019, 09:33:47 AM »

7
Showing off her wealth ? She did have a bigger collection than her successor "Dick" (Viktoria Adeheld, Duchess of Coburg). 

It was to raise money (and she did, a "remarkable large sum") for a local children's hospital. The exhibition was held in her palace in Coburg. She rented showcases for it and dragooned her daughters and other relations (including her nephew but not yet son-in-law Kyril and Dowager Duchess Alexandrine) into participating as well. All the daughters displayed jewels (with Missy's being particularly remarked on) as well as various objects d'art, furs and laces (some of which had belonged to the late Empress Marie), fans and heirlooms such as the tea service which had been a wedding gift to Marie from her father Alexander II and Duke Alfred's silver model ships. The coronation robes worn by Marie at her brother's coronation and the robes worn by her daughters at the coronation of Edward VII were also on display.
 
Here are some more photos--it was covered in the German amgazines of the time:

http://www.royal-magazin.de/german/sachsen-coburg/sachsen-coburg-schmuck-prinzessinnen.htm

A recent exhibit of part of her church plate, etc.:
https://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwart/article/Lost-Masterpieces-of-Imperial-Romanov-Liturgical-Silver-on-View-at-Museum-of-Russian-Icons-20180918

8
The Alexander Palace / Re: Alexander Palace Restoration
« on: September 08, 2018, 09:52:07 AM »
Paul Kulikovsky's "Romanov News", No. 125, Aug. 2018, has a detailed report on the progress of the restoration.
He visited the palace recently and took photos.
Check out his FaceBook page too.

9


New church to be built in honor of Dr. Eugene Botkin in Ekaterinburg.

http://orthochristian.com/113728.html

10
Alexandra Feodorovna / Re: Who is "red boy"?
« on: June 03, 2018, 01:06:15 PM »
Hi all-

In a letter to Anna Vyrubova dated 11/23/17, Alexandra writes, "How time flies! In two days it will be 9 months since I saw red boy for the last time!! Cannot write upon the subject!"

So she's referring to someone she said goodbye to on  2/25/17 - the tail end of her time at the infirmary? This leads me to believe she might be referring to one of her favorite patients, but since the girls were already sick with measles by then it seems unlikely. I also considered the possibility that she's using some kind of code that Pankratov wouldn't have picked up on. Can anyone help shed some light on this?

"Red Boy" was one of the Empress's nicknames for N. P. Sablin.
In other letters to A. A. Vyrubova, the Empress sometimes refers to him simply as "Boy".
It doesn't seem that it was meant conspiratorially.

And by 2/25/17 O.S., the Empress was no longer at her hospital. The February Revolution had already begun.

11
How about this one from Paul Gilbert's site:

G.D. Xenia and G.D. Olga clasping hands while popping out of the ship's hatches?
https://royalrussia.news/2018/03/24/this-week-in-the-news-the-romanovs-and-imperial-russia-9/

Scroll down.

12
Tsarskoe Selo Palaces / Re: Pavlovsk, the Palaces
« on: January 07, 2018, 10:07:58 AM »
I believe that this fact has already been mentioned elsewhere on this Forum, but some claim that the music hall at the station in Pavlovsk (patterned after the pleasure grounds of Vaux Hall, London) gave rise to the generic Russian word for a railway station: Vokzal Вокзал.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Gardens

https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Вокзал

13


FYI:

The ROC Bishops' Synod is supposed to examine this question at the Synod Meeting, from Nov. 29 to Dec. 2, 2017.

Вопрос "екатеринбургских останков" обсудят на Архиерейском соборе

17.11.2017 12:39
http://www.blagovest-info.ru/index.php?ss=2&s=3&id=75776

14
Maria Nicholaievna / Re: Maria's letters & notes
« on: October 17, 2017, 04:05:20 PM »
Inok Nikolai, I’m so grateful. Thanks for clearing things out. Now it all makes sense! Actually, I was hoping that you would take care of the problem, and I was right. Thanks again!

Well, I think PhotoBucket will still allow me to post links.

1) A table of the letters found in Pr. Eugenie's book:



Princess Eugenie’s father was Tsar Nicholas II’s first-cousin, Prince George of Greece (“Big Georgie”), who had saved the then Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich’s life when he had been attacked in Otsu, Japan, in 1891. According to Princess Eugenie, after the death of her parents, she discovered a biscuit tin in the cellar of her mother’s house containing eighteen letters written by the Imperial family from captivity. Although Princess Eugenie suggested several possible scenarios, she was never able to determine for certain how those letters came into her father’s possession.

The account given here concerning the one letter found at Yale from this period suggests a possible source for those other letters. Perhaps the letters which eventually found their way to Prince George of Greece were originally part of this same cache of letters and photos described by Rodion Bulatsel.

2) Rodion Bulatsel's account:



Whoops!

The destinations for NN. 17 & 18 should read "Tobolsk", not Ekaterinburg. They were written from Ekaterinburg.

15
Maria Nicholaievna / Re: Maria's letters & notes
« on: October 14, 2017, 04:57:44 PM »
Inok Nikolai, I’m so grateful. Thanks for clearing things out. Now it all makes sense! Actually, I was hoping that you would take care of the problem, and I was right. Thanks again!

Well, I think PhotoBucket will still allow me to post links.

1) A table of the letters found in Pr. Eugenie's book:



Princess Eugenie’s father was Tsar Nicholas II’s first-cousin, Prince George of Greece (“Big Georgie”), who had saved the then Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich’s life when he had been attacked in Otsu, Japan, in 1891. According to Princess Eugenie, after the death of her parents, she discovered a biscuit tin in the cellar of her mother’s house containing eighteen letters written by the Imperial family from captivity. Although Princess Eugenie suggested several possible scenarios, she was never able to determine for certain how those letters came into her father’s possession.

The account given here concerning the one letter found at Yale from this period suggests a possible source for those other letters. Perhaps the letters which eventually found their way to Prince George of Greece were originally part of this same cache of letters and photos described by Rodion Bulatsel.

2) Rodion Bulatsel's account:


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