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Messages - feodorovna

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Besides being found inexcavations at troy and Rome. As well as in Inca graves. The Swastika is a buddist religous symbol that is still used today in Asia. It is also a Navaho religous symbol which was quite commonly used by them pre-WW II. In fact someone acctually published a book about the US west in the late 1930s that had on the cover a number of Navaho Swastikas. During WW I i have seen photos of German, French and even one british aircraft with Swastikas painted on them. i think there is at least one British warship that had this on there ships crest. During WW I i believe the US 45th infantry division had a Swastika as its division insignia. They changed it when the division was reactivated during WW II. the Finnish air force had the sawastika as its insignia until 1945. The Latvian or Lithuianian air force also used it as a national insignia until 1940 when they were overrun by the USSR. I hope this is of some help.


I can't say how true it is, but I was once told that the original swastilka was a religious symbol of love, peace and harmony. Hitler, when he took the symbol for his own purposes not only reversed the meaning of its symbolism, he also reversed the way it faced.

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Alexandra Feodorovna / Re: Alexandra's Clothing; Formal and Informal
« on: January 30, 2013, 02:59:43 AM »
It's always a joy to see pictures of Alexandra's exquisite clothes, but whilst I was feasting my eyes on a glorious gold creation, shown earlier, I occured to me how difficult a colour to wear is that colour for ANY woman, let alone one who blushes deeply. I speak from personal experience as all my life I've been plagued by rosacea and until I found cosmetics which disguised it, certain colours were a complete no no, as too, were most shades of lipstick. I imagine that Alexandra would have frowned on the use of cosmetics, appearing, as she did, to be "strait laced" but I also imagine that having given birth, in quite rapid succession, five times, her figure benefitted from being corseted.

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The Windsors / Re: Princess Royal, Princess Anne
« on: January 22, 2013, 03:07:20 AM »
Absolutely NOTHING wrong with colour enhanced hair providing that, once a woman has passed the age of colouring for fun, it's done subtley. It always looks to me as if HRH does it herself and whilst it's always difficult to tell from photos, it seems to fall in a colour range between far too dark and far too dark with purple/red undertones revealing varying amounts of regrowth. The only female who comes to mind immediately as being able to get away with such dark looks is Joan Collins. Whilst it's not a look I care for, she does it to perfection

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The Imperial Family / Re: Very good people
« on: September 25, 2012, 02:39:29 AM »
I rather think that how much you wanted to save them would have depended largely on where in the social strata you were. To my certain knowledge Tsars didn't allow their daughters to marry members of the proletariat!!!!

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The Yussupovs / Re: Felix Yusupov and Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch
« on: September 10, 2012, 03:19:08 AM »
I do not know, but I still call my closest male friends "dear, dearest, loving,  etc. It may be old fashioned but it makes them happy. It shows true affection and such. They return in kind. Which makes me happy. In my case, it is a term of sincere affection, not politie 19 cenrury etttitique.
 I  reecntyly wrote an obit  about a friend and used all the flowering words I could think ,  a lot of which were not quiet really true,  but,  I do not spael ill of the dead, with few exceptions  So,  the old tradiition  has not gone. Especially in Asia.

I have to agree with this and especially in a letter. "Intimate Friend" is also another term I've heard used. I can't speak for Felix and Dmitri but I always think of Jonathan and David in the Bible. David said something along the lines that Jonathan's companionship was dearer to him than that of any woman's. 


In those times, I imagine that most women were still regarded as appendages to men. They were on show when occasion demanded it, displaying evidence of their husbands wealth. They were readily available, whenever the need arose, to sate certain appetites and most importantly, provided children...........but they weren't their husbands' best friends, possibly had no desire to be, but weren't given the opportunity. It was to another man that husbands were likely to turn to discuss those things that only men can talk about. I have my doubts about how much of their converserations involved "deep and meaningful", but certainly I think the men believed then necessary.

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I set out to try to find out if the accusations that AF was guilty of political machinations that helped bring down the dynasty, specifically that she was entirely responsible for Nicholas II assuming personal command of the army and the entire ministerial 'merry go round' that occurred during the war, were justified or not.

In my analysis I have clearly shown that this was not the case and that when she did have a hand (which was not very often -only 7 out of 26 appointments and then only 3 directly herself) the outcome was actually positive............

I did not analyse if AF was a good mother or a nice person. I'm not demeaning those as topics, they are valid and very interesting and I'm sure if someone started the thread ' Was AF a good mother?' it would prove to be a very 'hot' topic. Its just my analysis did not deal with that.................


Feodorovna, I agree with many of your points but I tried to show that the burden of Alexei did not send AF mad as has been asserted.

Ann, I agree that Victoria and Irene were eminently sensible and balanced individuals but Ella after GD Serge's death was in my opinion (very justifiably) unhinged. As I have stated before, what can one say about a 'Nun' who encourages and condones murder?

Vanya Ivanova, I concur with all you say and I'm delighted that your excellent research and analysis shows her as being innocent of what history would label her as guilty of.

I would like to clarify that whilst I was in no way suggesting that "the burden of Alexei" sent her mad, I DO feel that the possible burden of guilt and sense of responsibility which, I believe had been with her from childhood, MAY have been the cause of psychological breakdown. It is not impossible that she was a functioning depressive for most of her life.

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I don't buy the "little Alix" theory. Alix was 6 when her mother and May died, but it was Ernie who gave his worn out mother the disease that killed her not Alix. Yes Alix had large losses, but as I said before, some people deal with hardship better than others and Alix appears to have wallowed in any sadness that she could find.

Remember that a cousin of Alix's told her that she liked to play at being sorrowful far too much and there is a line of thought today in psychiatry which says that the brain gets used to being sad (for what ever reason - either real or imagined) and even likes it and it is very hard to go back to being happy if one "plays at being sorrowful far too much".

Nicholas was sent on his world cruise for many reasons but one was to remove him from Russia while Alix visited Ella at Ilinskoe in 1890. He even mentions this in his diary and says that he would rather be heading for Ilinskoe but he had to go on the cruise.

If Alix learned to be an Empress through watching Queen Victoria, then she saw all the wrong things. Victoria did withdraw from the public after Albert's death (that was long before Alix was even thought of let alone born) but when her children and her Prime Minister reminded her that she had a job to do, she came back and did it.

No matter how many people told Alexandra this, she never listened.

And, of course, I always go back to Queen Mary and King George V who also had a sickly child. Mary did her job. This was the same time period so the judgement can be equal. Both were loved by their husbands both were empresses. May lost her first fiance which Alix never did if you want to talk about loss and sadness. May never interfered with Queen Alexandra's position while Edward VII was dying, but Alix thought she was entitled to walk all over Empress Marie and tell Nicholas that he should be the first one consulted, not the wife of the dying man.

I think you may have missed my point, Alixz. There will be a huge difference between what ACTUALLY happened and little Alix's RECALL of what happened. How can a 6 year old be held culpable for the deaths of her siblings and her mother? It's really only a matter of her brain telling her that if she hadn't snatched Fritti's toy from him, he wouldn't have gone running to Mama and fallen from the window, and if she was powerful enough to cause the death of her brother, then clearly she must have done something wrong, like refusing to eat her food, soiling her clean dress, stamping her feet, or dropping her prayerbook in church, which caused the death of her sister and mother. She must have felt herself to be a very wicked child, so she could never tell anybody what she'd done, she just had to live with it.

I agree entirely with your psychiatrist friend, that the brain becomes used to feeling a certain way. I have some personal experience of it. After her lifechanging experiences, I very much doubt that Alix's 6 year old brain had any recall of happy times.

With regard to her picking up wrong methods from QV, I entirely agree, but how could she know it was wrong? She had no other role model and children rarely criticize the person responsible for their care when they are fully aware that there is no one else to care for them, and she would have to be extra good for Grandma so she wouldn't suspect how wicked she'd been.

I'm not sure we can compare Alix with Mary. They were entirely different personalities, experienced different familial dynamics and thus had different coping mechanisms. Mary's self sufficiency was admirable and her sense of duty unimpeachable. I also have the feeling that gruff and uncultured as he was, George was reliable and I don't imagine Mary ever felt anything other than safe. She produced an heir and requisite spares and was so emotionally removed from them that she said she always had to remember that their father was first their King, whereas Alix, who openly adored Nicky, and probably had higher expectations of him than he was capable of delivering, produced girl after girl and a very sickly heir.

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I feel that it is being overlooked that Alexandra was the summation of Alix, therefore to exlain Alexandra, it is to Alix we must turn.

I have said before that I believe Alix was a lonely child after the death of her siblings and her mother. How great a part might the small Alix have believed she played in their loss? A dear friend never lost the guilt she had for causing her mother's death because her 10 year old self had found the sensation of speed exhilerating as she galloped to get help when her mother fell from her horse. She was in her 80s when she revealed this long held guilt to me. Little Alix experienced three huge losses which could have added up to huge feelings of guilt and feelings of responsibility for the life, and death of those closest to her for the rest of her life, small wonder then that she tended to smother her well children, let alone the precious heir to whom she had passed a potentially fatal affliction. Personally, I believe she ran herself ragged in an attempt to control the lives of her family, possibly even her country, in order to prevent their deaths and to keep them with her to prevent the overwhelming isolation and loneliness she experienced as a child. Small wonder also that she became so devotedly attached to religion, a well known guilt absolver. These days we would turn to a psychologist. This is my view of Alexandra as a mother.

For an insight to Alexandra as Empress, I think we must look at how she saw her role model in the person of Grandma Victoria, she who had learned the art of Empressing over many years, something denied to Alexandra, who almost had to learn it overnight. Victoria had dual personality, by this I mean that Queen and woman were seperate people. The Queen was imperious, brooked no arguments, got her own way at what ever cost, and many times extricated herself from "society" simply because she wanted to. The woman was quite humble, frequently enjoying the company of servants over family or aristocracy. Alix was bought up largely under Victoria's auspices, so is more than likely to have been the female Alix emulated. This is not necessarily how Victoria was, but how Alix experienced her as being.

IMO Alix became isolated as a child and Alexandra was isolated as an Empress, and without guidance, one was as likely to follow the other as night follows day. Her husband might have helped had he been less deferential to his mother's needs, and his mother seemed more interested in holding onto her own position than helping her daughter in law achieve hers. I don't accept that her stress levels are over emphasized. I feel that for most of the time Alexandra probably carried with her a huge weight of guilt and sorrow, a legacy of her little self, Alix.

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The Windsors / Re: Henry & Alice, Duke & Duchess of Gloucester
« on: July 18, 2012, 02:05:52 AM »
I still wonder at how these 2 are consistenly singled out. I don't think their children ended up much worse than many other royal children--or children of the nobility--of their time and they certainly, for the most part, had a stronger sense of duty then most.  Were they great parents? Not really, by modern interpretations. Were they probably average or even above so for their time and station, I believe yes. Queen Alexandra, for all she is lionized in her parenting, did her children a great disservice in treating them like infants until she died. The Wales girls, especially, had some serious issues and far less a sense of duty (I speaking specifically of Louise, the Princess Royal here) than the Wales children--even David.

That's an interesting point. IMO, the lives of historical "celebs" from A list to Z list, are at the mercy of the pens, or keyboards, of those who record them. As royal "celebs" go, I imagine the Gloucesters were small fry, which probably meant that their children enjoyed a freedom not granted to their more elevated cousins.

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The Windsors / Re: Henry & Alice, Duke & Duchess of Gloucester
« on: July 17, 2012, 01:32:54 AM »
I can't help but feel that the biggest problem which befell George and Mary's children was being born to George and Mary.

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The Windsors / Re: Windsor Jewels Pt 7
« on: June 30, 2012, 02:41:36 AM »
I was amazed at how genuinely tiny Queen Victoria's small diamond crown is - how she kept it on her head I don't know, she must have had an incredibly upright posture.  Queen Alexandra had a fairly high hairdo, so could have secured it more easily and unobtrusively with pins, but that would have been difficult for Victoria whose hair was flat to her head, at least in her later years when the crown was made for her.

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The Windsors / Re: Windsor Jewels Pt 7
« on: June 30, 2012, 02:41:09 AM »
I was amazed at how genuinely tiny Queen Victoria's small diamond crown is - how she kept it on her head I don't know, she must have had an incredibly upright posture.  Queen Alexandra had a fairly high hairdo, so could have secured it more easily and unobtrusively with pins, but that would have been difficult for Victoria whose hair was flat to her head, at least in her later years when the crown was made for her.

All of her life, QV wore her hair in a chignon. In her younger days she had enough hair to adorn it with looped braids. As all women learn, hair becomes thinner with age, creating difficulties in keeping attached to it anything with weight, but it would have been possible to add artificial padding, such as frizzeur force, to Victoria's meagre chignon, in order to create bulk and enough density to hold pins and combs.

I imagine that, by now, Her Majesty has a wardrobe of handmade "pieces" which can be attached to her jewelled headwear to create more fullness than could be provided by her own hair. Her grandmother, Queen Mary had false frizzy fringes (bangs) attached to the front of her crowns and tiaras.

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The Yussupovs / Re: Was Prince Felix a closeted gay man?
« on: June 26, 2012, 02:20:11 AM »
I hate to be rude. But I feel that in Irina case she married him and it was her duty to stay with her husband. She simply could not and would not divorce him, this meant she must stay with him and learn to deal with his behavior. I personal do not feel that he was gay but if he was it is not my place to judge him on it. He lived in a time were that was looked down upon so if he was homosexual then he delt with it. I personal do not feel he was, due to the fact that once the problems of his past were dead and gone why would he stay with his wife? If you would gay and your family and surroundings where changed in that way wouldn't you then divorce her and move on with life? I know that I would. I come from an old russian family and I am homosexual and I know my family does not approve of it but as long as I am respectful they just simply dismiss it. I know that if I were to marry a woman then my family was killed off and the society that I live in was no longer running my life I would look to my lover for comfort and leave my wife so that I might be with my lover full time. So in my mind I do not feel he was gay. I just keep thinking why stay with Irina all that time if he was?





If I have offended anyone with this post, I ask your forgiveness please.

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The Yussupovs / Re: Was Prince Felix a closeted gay man?
« on: June 26, 2012, 02:19:56 AM »
I hate to be rude. But I feel that in Irina case she married him and it was her duty to stay with her husband. She simply could not and would not divorce him, this meant she must stay with him and learn to deal with his behavior. I personal do not feel that he was gay but if he was it is not my place to judge him on it. He lived in a time were that was looked down upon so if he was homosexual then he delt with it. I personal do not feel he was, due to the fact that once the problems of his past were dead and gone why would he stay with his wife? If you would gay and your family and surroundings where changed in that way wouldn't you then divorce her and move on with life? I know that I would. I come from an old russian family and I am homosexual and I know my family does not approve of it but as long as I am respectful they just simply dismiss it. I know that if I were to marry a woman then my family was killed off and the society that I live in was no longer running my life I would look to my lover for comfort and leave my wife so that I might be with my lover full time. So in my mind I do not feel he was gay. I just keep thinking why stay with Irina all that time if he was?


LeslieR, you sound as if you come from a position where you care, something I don't feel able to say of Felix. I believe he stayed married to Irina because it suited them both for him to do so. They made an exquisitely beautifuland probably superficial, couple and I have no doubt that each revelled in being admired by both sexes. I don't imagine it to have been a conventional marriage. Importantly, there was enough money to support and sustain whatever they chose to do. I sense yearning behind the desire to  "look to my lover for comfort and leave my wife so that I might be with my lover full time". I can't credit Felix with having that depth of emotion, I think, for him, it was more about "I want it and I will have it," and I imagine that when things on an emotional level, became to hot for him to handle, it was to Irina that he turned. I believe she placed few, if any, emotional demands on him and he was happy with things as they were. Marriages are based on so much more than sex-they had a child, it happened once-and I think they were each others best friend.





If I have offended anyone with this post, I ask your forgiveness please.

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Nicholas II / Re: Nicholas's Height
« on: June 23, 2012, 05:41:06 AM »
I'll bet that tiny 1/2 inch made all the difference in the world to Nicholass self esteem.

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