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Messages - Penny_Wilson

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16
Imperial Russian History / Re: Who Betrayed Nicholas II?
« on: March 17, 2007, 11:07:43 AM »


Tsaria, do you know if the current Queen of England affixes the stamps to her own personal correspondence?


I don't know about the Queen and her personal correspondence, but I have a few pieces of correspondence from Prince Philip, and he uses a machine, not stamps.  They must take it with them when they travel, too, because the frank is the same whether the letter has been mailed from Windsor Castle or Buckingham Palace.  It says "Royal Mail 1." 

I think a postage meter machine must be a lot more fun than licking stamps -- no dry tongue!   ;D

Edited to add: If the Queen prefers stamps, do you think it's a surreal experience for her to lick the back of her own head before sticking it on the envelope?



17
The Final Chapter / Re: Floor Plan of the Tobolsk Governor's Mansion
« on: February 22, 2007, 10:02:32 AM »
You are so very right, Pers!  Now that I look closely -- at the lower floor especially -- I think this is an old version.  I'll ask G for the most recent one when I speak to him next.

~Penny

18
The Final Chapter / Re: Floor Plan of the Tobolsk Governor's Mansion
« on: February 20, 2007, 09:46:19 PM »
Yup -- that's Greg's handwriting, and his drawing -- made to the best of his knowledge.  ;D  If anyone has corrections, please let us know!



19
I have it, Sarushka.  It's always hard to predict what people will find familiar or unfamiliar in Romanov photographs, but I must say that there were quite a large number of photos that were new to me in this book.  It's 508 pages long, with most pages showing one or more photographs, all of which are black and white reproductions on matte paper -- this is not a glossy coffee table book, though it is quite thick.  Captions are in Russian and English, which is nice, and there is some Russian language text, but the vocabulary is pretty basic to the Romanovs, and I would hazard a guess that anyone reasonably used to picking through Russian with a dictionary will find this easy enough to follow.

Ask me whatever else you need to know that I haven't covered -- and I can scan and send a jpeg of the cover, if you like.

~Penny

20
Fingers crossed that everyone gets one!  :)

Do you know of any other rarities or must-haves they have in stock? It looks like their catalog is pretty vast, and my knowledge of Russian publications is limited -- relatively speaking.  ;)

I'll look through their catalog this weekend and let you know.  Is there anything in particular that you yearn for?  8)

21
It took me about 24 hours to hear back from them via email.  I have ordered from them several times in the fairly recent past, and sometimes have had experiences like yours, where I've had to wait.  That's usually when I've telephoned them -- just for peace of mind.  Their number is: 1-847-491-9851.

22
In the final, spirited wrestling over this book's auction on eBay, I recognized a few names from this board -- so I thought I would post a quick notice that The Russian Press Service of Evanston, Illinois has copies of this book for US$38, and, as of yesterday when I bought mine, they had them in stock:

http://www.russianpress.com/Books/BookViewer.asp?catNumb=117-053

If you're interested, you'll want to email Elizabeth Sheynzon at rps@russianpress.com

~Penny

23
Penny has the right to post links to information on the King and Wilson site. If anyone has problems with the information presented THERE, they are welcome, I'm sure, to bring those concerns ON THAT FORUM. Information presented here is free to be discussed here, information on links is best criticised on the home turf.

Thanks, Rob.  Everyone is always welcome on kingandwilson to hang out, discuss, ask questions, etc.  In this particular instance, though, all the sources in the essay are public domain and available to anyone, anywhere -- we just compiled them so that everyone could read them all together in one place.  We make no claim on the sources or their veracity.  As the cool kids say:  It is what it is.

~Penny

24
My original question still stands.

We are discussing "sources" not links.


Good Lord, Belochka!  Your question does not stand.  The sources are given in the link.  If you cannot understand this, then I can help you no further.

Here's the link again, if it helps:

http://www.kingandwilson.com/ErnstLudwig1916/


25
Does this mean that while we are able to discuss this hypothetical idea that interests you and generously offer our ideas and references - you have chosen to decline to offer sources in fair return on this forum?  ???

...  I have offered plenty of other sources through the months and years that I have been here, including, but not limited to, the sources in Fate of the Romanovs and those listed on my own website: http://www.kingandwilson.com

As far as this particular "hypothetical idea" goes, I refer you back to my post on this thread where I give the URL for King and Wilson's summary of the usual evidence given for the alleged 1916 visit; there are sources listed there also.

If you note my words carefully I stated that the concern was about this hypothetical idea "on this forum".

Yes, and I said that in respect to this "hypothetical idea" on "this forum," there is a link to a short essay on the kingandwilson site that gives sources for and against this "hypothetical idea."  The sources exist on the kingandwilson site, and they are given and referenced here.

So what's the problem?  Can it actually be that you have a problem with the sources being "linked" rather than being made in a post right here on this forum?  I think that's sort of reaching to find a problem, don't you?

Perhaps Rob or GDssElla can give us a ruling on the legality of links to articles on other sites?


26
Does this mean that while we are able to discuss this hypothetical idea that interests you and generously offer our ideas and references - you have chosen to decline to offer sources in fair return on this forum?  ???

Nope, it doesn't.  It means exactly what it says:  I will offer no living sources on this board because of the unfortunate behavior of one of your fellows.  I have offered plenty of other sources through the months and years that I have been here, including, but not limited to, the sources in Fate of the Romanovs and those listed on my own website: http://www.kingandwilson.com

As far as this particular "hypothetical idea" goes, I refer you back to my post on this thread where I give the URL for King and Wilson's summary of the usual evidence given for the alleged 1916 visit; there are sources listed there also.

Thus, you have failed in your attempt to make me look like an ass.

27
...of course none of them had the access you have to a pamphlet in the Soviet archives...

If you're referring to Monarkhia Pered Krusheniem, that's a 300 page pamphlet... also known as a "book," Bev.  You could try getting yourself through Interlibrary loan.

28
I asked a question, Bev.  It may have been a book of which I was unaware.  Sorry if I hit a raw nerve and made you defensive.

As for research into this issue -- thanks for the suggestions.  I am -- as you know -- a working my way steadily through a number of sources that are not included in your list, but I will keep your list under advisement as a back up.

And you might try being a bit nicer; you don't have to be a bitc.h every time you post.

~Penny


Gosh, Penny, did I make a glaring error? That completely changes the entire premise of my argument.  Perhaps you could research it -  start at the National Security Archives and then proceed to the Hoover Institute archives, and then the Wilson Center.  When you've come up with 18 sources, come back and post them, I'll be happy to vett each one.  So far, you haven't listed one.  It seems that all your sources are "packed away" or in transit or between libraries or not available, or you haven't finished reading them as yet or you're afraid to post them. 

You might want to consult Yale University's library and archives of Wiseman, House and Wilson's papers and documents, and maybe glance at Doerries' "Imperial Challenge" or "German Diplomacy" by Gerard.  Perhaps you might want to peruse Tuchman and Katz's books and papers on the Zimmerman telegraph incident.  Every single one of them discusses the machinations and intrigue in consulates and embassies and yet not one mentions any visit by Ernst to Petrograd - of course none of them had the access you have to a pamphlet in the Soviet archives not to mention what you have packed away and not one of them would have had the wit to consult the primary sources of Imperial German archives housed in England that Bernadotte Schmidt mentioned as something he took a gander at once in awhile.  (I won't even mention the United States Senatorial document dump known to have a fact or two packed away in the garbage bags they euphimistically call an archive.  You might want to  peruse such Swedish documents and publications such as "Invalidtranposterna" which examines the transport of POWS and invalided soldiers between Russia and Germany via Sweden or "Svenskt Militarhistoriskt Bibliotethek" which gives quite a rundown on various sources pertaining to Swedish diplomacy during WW I - I might have missed a phrase or two that could be construed as "evidence" of a visit to Petrograd by EL.  But then, what do I "know" - I only worked for the U.S. Consular Services for a few years and I didn't hang out at the British Archives on Saturday afternoons the way Phil has, and acquired his commanding knowledge of consulate services.)

29
"German Diplomacy" Bethmann and Hollweg

Is this Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg (1856-1921) who served as Chancellor of Germany from 1909- July 1917?  I have his two-volume Betrachtungen zum Weltkriege (1920), but not this book.  Where and when was it published?  My Betrachtungen is packed away somewhere at the moment, so I can't double-check and see if this is the name of one of the volumes.

~Penny

30
If you are reading this, Ms. Wilson, I would like a little homage.

Ahem. My sig line, sir....  8)


Quote
And Tsarfan raises an interesting point about Nicholas being caught by surprise by the alleged visit.

I've been reading Monarkhia Pered Krusheniem (MPK) off and on over the last couple of days in between doing this and that for my site -- and although the book mentions Ernst-Ludwig only once, it does cover a lot of ground on the peace initiatives started by the Kings of Sweden and Denmark.  What Semennikov lays out (so far) is this:  The Danish King sent out feelers to the Kaiser asking if a general peace would be possible; the Kaiser agreed to receive the Danish King's proposals through an envoy named (funnily enough) Anderson; Anderson went to Berlin in March 1915 to see Wilhelm and Bethmann-Hollweg; Anderson made a transcript of their meetings, from which Semennikov quotes.  The King of Denmark wanted a general peace between all combatants, and although Wilhelm expressed himself open to being approached, he made it plain that he thought that the best avenue to peace lay through "the good heart of the Tsar" -- thus the Danish King's hand was rather forced into trying to arrange a separate peace, which was not his first idea.

The decision was taken to approach Nicholas through the offices of Princess Vassiltchikov -- yet it seems also that Alexandra received a letter from Ernst-Ludwig outlining a plan to arrange in a private way a meeting between Russian and German representatives.  This letter was plainly received by AF sometime before 17 April 1915, because this was the day on which she wrote to Nicholas about this letter.

A footnote at this point claims that Ernst Ludwig was already in Stockholm on 15 April (OS), but as he could "only be there a week" and as Nicholas was at the Stavka at this time, the initiative was chronologically challenged, and did not take place.  Alexandra wrote to Margaret of Sweden that: "it would be best if 'this gentleman' did not wait, as 'it is evident that all thirst for peace, but the time is not yet come.'"

This is as far as I have read -- glancing ahead, it seems that the peace initiative continued to be an  issue well into 1916 -- but when I've completed the chapters related to this issue, I'll be posting a full translation on kingandwilson, if anyone is interested.

~Penny
 

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