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Messages - ordino

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46
The Final Chapter / Pandemia  of Influenza in 1918
« on: April 06, 2006, 02:16:09 PM »
 Was it the called "gripe espaņola" in Siberia. Are there any information about the situation of the pandemia in Siberia?. Thanks in advance for the information. Ordino :)

47
Nicholas II / Re: portraits (paintings) of Nikolai II Aleksandrovich
« on: April 04, 2006, 05:24:14 PM »
I like also very much this one. I think-maybe Iīm wrong -this and the another one above are by Serov


48
Nicholas II / Re: portraits (paintings) of Nikolai II Aleksandrovich
« on: April 04, 2006, 05:14:22 PM »
This is maybe my favourite portrait of Nicholas II.


49
The Final Chapter / Re: If someone DID escape that night...
« on: April 04, 2006, 03:10:47 PM »
Well Ra-Ra-Rasputin is a pity that you do not have  a chance to read the book "The file...."  edition 2002. I refer to what you wrote in your previous post when I said that you can read the chapter in question. Forgive me if I disturbed you, it was not my intention, I just have read a book that maked me to think, thatīs all.
Ordino :)

PS: I did not know that only historian writers can write about history

50
Poor man. He did what he believed correct.  At the end, he did not try to go out of Russia, he was an autocrat, but no for himshelf election but for education. Maybe the fatal error was the absence of a good adviser near him. For instance, the brothers of Alexander III, maybe they did must help him much, much more. Really no guilty.
Ordino :)

51
The Final Chapter / Re: If someone DID escape that night...
« on: April 04, 2006, 08:41:44 AM »
Hello Ra-Ra-Rasputin.
Summers and Mangold have their book revised and update 2002 edition, may be you can go to your library and take a look this is the isbn 0752849379.
Iīm so sorry but, yes I can doubt of the execution, the bodies and de adn, why?, becouse I have read the opinions of several experts and the Doubt exists. For Instance about the bodies. This is from "The file on Tsar" edition 2002
Page 355 "If some believed all along that these remains were authentic, others were doubtful. As Sir Thomas Preston, the former British consul, reminded us years ago, there was nothing remarkable about finding bodies in the Koptiaki woods. The area had been a killing field, where "counter-revolutinaries"had been shot and buried in the hundreds, perhaps thousands"
In the same page"Another problem, still apparently unresolved, involves a well-known distinguishing mark on the Tsarīs forehead-the legacy of a sword-blow by a  would-be assassin when he was a young man. The blow has chipped the bone, and one early report said the skull attributed to the Tsar did bear such a mark. Yet Professor Viacheslav Popov, a forensic specialist who examined it, found no such mark"
About the dna please read this book (edition 2002) the pages numbers 357-358
Of course I can not deny the official story, but a I can compare, think and get an opinion, so If you don,t mine I will. I will be glad if you like to read the pages of the book to know your opinion about them. Thanks. Ordino :)

52
The Final Chapter / Re: If someone DID escape that night...
« on: April 03, 2006, 02:30:27 PM »
I had been re-read a chapter of the "The File on the Tsar", and again I feel sock to know the way the famous imperial bodies- and servants- were found. I put a couple of pages of this chapter in the topic "survivors....." the subject is "Why we must believe the official story?, please, read it and say your opinion. Thanks very much in advance :)
PS: I really think that the authors, Summers and Mangold are serious  and their work is truly

53
From "The File on the Tsar" 2002 edition, chapter  26 "A solution at last"
 "It was to be with his personal approval(Boris Yelstein), the very day after his inaguration as President in 1991, that a search party would set out into Koptiaki Woods-and in short order recover hundreds of bones and a box containing three skulls.  Two years later, the world would be told that these were almost certaninly the remains of the murdered Romanov family." page351
"the credit for solving the mystery of the century has been claimed by a colourful character called Ghely Ryabov. He first became interested, he has said, as long ago as 1952 when he was a Moscow law student. While visiting a friend, he claimed, he just happened upon Judge Sokolovīs book-a three-decades-old monarchist publication distributed only in the west.
According to Ryabov, he soon became a Romanov aficionado and collector of imperial memorabilia, a perilus hobby in Soviet times. He served, meanwhile, as a detective for Moscowīs Criminal Investigation Departament before becoming an author-of whodunnits and film scripts. The year our book was published (1976?), he has asserted, his work took him to Ekaterimburg. "I still donīt know," Ryabov recalled of his arrival there, "what inspired mi to ask the people meeting me at the station to take me to the Ipatiev House". His Communist hosts readily obliged, he said, and he spent an entire night walking around the mansion. The sometime investigator was consumed by "strange, astonishing thoughts", and resolved then and there that "it was my duty to discover the truth about the execution and burial of the Romanovs"
"Ryabov made contact on that first trip with a local geologist who shared his curiosity about the Romanovs fate. This was Alexander Avdonin, who has been using his professional expertise to hunt for a gravesite in the nearby Koptiaki woods. He had also traked down the son of Yankel Yurovsky, the man who allegedly directed the massacre in the cellar. Contacted in turn by Ryabov, the son produced his fatherīs journal-which turned out to contain a detailed account of the murders, the disposal of the bodies, and even clues as to where the remains were buried. In May 1979, Ryabov and Avdonin made a spectacular breakthrough. Working covertly, they claim, they unearthed a mass grace in the woods. "We made the first (bones) find" Ryabov said of their dig, after unearthing some old railway sleepers at a spot throught likely to yield results. "The very first one was blackgreen....It was the pelvic bone of Nicholas II." Ryabov has variously been quoted as saying that  they "touched at least eight or nine skeletons" or, on another occasion, that he would stake his life on having found eleven, the full number required to account for the Tsarīs family and their servants. Ryabov and his companion decided to call themselves the First Finders, got out the vodka and drank a toast to Tsar Nicholas. They then removed three skulls from the site, one of them replete with "gold-capped dentures", and Ryabov took them back to Moscow. He reportedly kept one of them under his bed. The following year, the two men returned the skulls to the grave-enclosed now in a box along with a crucifix inscribed with a verse from the Gospel of St Matthew:"He that endureth to the end shall be saved". The remains would not be disturbed again for twelve years"
"While Ryabov was at work, a Moscow history student called Edvard Radzinsky had apparently also been pursuing the truth about the Romanovs. He was inspired to do so, he has said, after hearing old Bolshevikīs stories of how the Romanovs died passed on by his aged landlady. Later, as an archivist, Radzinsky heard rumours of a Yurovsky note said to exist somewhere in official records, a supposedly authoritative account on the killings by the commander of the death squad. Only in 1989, though, was he allowed to see a file held at the Central State Archive of the October Revolution. And there was the Note itself-supposedly Yurovskyīs own lurid account of the whole bloody episode" pages 352-353

54
Hello AGRBear, I think the two bodies have not been found because they are not there. I donīt believe the official story because since the beginning there are several versions and differents ends and ups. I ask, why the nine bodies were found first in 1970 and then in 1991, who many people where involved in these  works. Yakov Y. did not say the thrue, the investigation of Sokolov was a neutra one, was he objetive in his opinions- I have read The File on the Tsart , Summers and Mangold they said  a very interenting thinks, No I can not believe the official story because there are a lot of differents versions and several questions without answers.
By the way, AGRBear your point of view in general is very interensting.
Ordino :)

55
The Final Chapter / Re: If someone DID escape that night...
« on: April 02, 2006, 02:38:29 PM »
Hello LisaDavidson, and sorry for my stubbord personality, I have read Penny an King,s and also Summers and Mangoldīs, and I like both but I īm a fan of the last one and may be Alexei did not die before the 16-17 July 1918 and may be all the Imperial Family died that horrible night but I don,t believe the official story and I for this I like so very very much this forum. I have discovered that there are people that think like me.  :)

56
why do you say there is not Alexei in the first photo,  and the second one  is or not is?
Thanks, Ordino :)

57
The Final Chapter / Re: If someone DID escape that night...
« on: April 01, 2006, 04:28:37 AM »
Well I disagree with the official story because the offcial story is based on the words of a liar Yakov. Y. The principal point is that Yurosky said that the bodies were there and  the bodies were there o.k, but I said again, why we must believe this person. Really Why?.

58
The Final Chapter / Re: If someone DID escape that night...
« on: April 01, 2006, 04:18:47 AM »
Well I disagree with the official story because the offcial story is based on the words of a liar Yakov. Y. The principal point is that Yurosky said that the bodies were there and  the bodies were there o.k, but I said again, why we must believe this person. Really Why?.

59
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Anna = Anastasia
« on: March 31, 2006, 08:38:26 AM »
I believe that Anna was Anastasia

60
Really I feel that Nicholas, Alexsandra en their children were abandoned for all their family, from England, Denmark, German. And I beg your pardon, the king George did not act correctly. I can understand that it would be difficult for him to convice the ministers and so on, political reasons, well, but George did must  help them, not offered to live in England, ok, but to try in another country. If you want to do somthing, you will do it. I have read the book " The File on the Tsar" by Summers and Mangold- I like very much- and in this book edition 1976 there is a chapter titled " The Spanish friend", the authors said here that the King Alfonso XIII reallly tried to help Imperial Family but he did not enough capacity alone, so he asked for help to another countries and anybody answered, I am talking about spanish edition. So I say again, King George , Kaiser Willian rest of the royal families around de world did no move a finger for their russian relatives and again if you want you do.
Ordino

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