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Messages - Alexa

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31
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Anna Anderson and Anastasia
« on: October 15, 2004, 09:10:08 AM »
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If anything, Anna Anderson seems to have gone out of her way to lose friends and alienate people. Her behavior was often not only damaging to other people, but also intensely self-destructive. In addition, we have the testimony of so many people that she never seemed to be acting a role. All of this makes me think that Anna Anderson, whether she was Franziska Schanzkowska or someone else, was not completely insincere in her insistence that she was Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna... on some level, she must have believed it herself, or come to believe it.  I know that some chronic PTSD sufferers do have major problems with identity (dissociation or loss of self), but I've never read about such a complex case before. Whoever Anna Anderson was, she was a genuine mystery.
 


Just a idea that popped into my head while reading this.  Is is possible that AA, due to PTSD, suffered amnesia of some sort (tyring to forget everything related to her trauma) so she really didn't know who she was.  Susequently, when people said she looked like a GD, she subconsiously decided she was becuase being a GD would be better than facing whatever nightmare she had been through?

Alexa

32
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Anna Anderson and Anastasia
« on: October 12, 2004, 06:43:40 PM »
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Is this what you're looking for?

http://www.geocities.com/kransnoeselo/Front.html


No.  I mean to take a picture of AN and age her the way the authorities age missing children to see what they would like at a certain age.  I'm interested to see what AN would have looked like at, say, age 30.

On the other side, I'd like to take a pic of AA and de-age her to see what she would have looked like at, oh I don't know, maybe 10.  I'm curious to see AA would have looked like AN as a child, and to see if AN would have looked like AA as an adult.  Any comparison would of course be purely one's own opinion, but my curiosity is peeked.

Alexa

33
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Anna Anderson and Anastasia
« on: October 11, 2004, 04:18:36 PM »
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To all.

Hey, I suggested earlier for someone to make a detailed mathematical study of both Anna A. and Anastasia N.s' faces. Something on the lines of the study done on the Egyptian Sphinx by that NYC detective forensic artist. I saw it on National Geographic a while ago....

...Now we have so many artists on this web site I'm sure someone could take on the study. Best regards. JonC.


Heck, I still want to see computer aging of AN to middle-age and de-aging of AA to childhood.

Alexa

34
Tatiana Nicholaievna / Re: The Enigmatic Tatiana
« on: October 07, 2004, 08:33:08 AM »
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Why a counselor? Reading the letter I hear a kid who seems almost overly afraid of her parents' unhappiness and/or anger. There's a difference between "I'm sorry" and "I'll never do anything to make you unhappy ever again or do anything you don't want me to do ever again." That's an impossible promise. Even in 1910 I would think most parents would have understood that. Hopefully Alexandra reassured Tatiana verbally on that point after getting that letter. The letter writer also seems to be assuming the caregiver role for her sick mother.  Then there's whatever the conflict was with her regular caregiver, the nurse, and with Rasputin. If I were a teacher, for instance, and saw that letter, I'd suggest a school counselor talk to her.

You don't like Radzinsky's book or believe the nurses' testimony. I'm inclined to believe it. Everyone has a different opinion, I guess.


If the letter were written in 2004, I might agree.  But the letter was written in a day and age when people wrote in a much more "flowery" (for lack of a better word) way than they do today.  Nicky and Alix wrote to each other, and to their children with this style (the "how do I love thee, let me count the ways" style) and the children, imho, picked up that style of writing.  I mean, how many kids today start a letter off to their moms with "My dearest, darling Mamma?"  I may not be  kid anymore, but when I drop my mom a line it starts with "Hey Mom."  All the letters between the family were overly dramtic imo, and this letter reflects that.

Anyway, just in my 2 cents, for what it's worth.

Alexa

35
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She married in 1939 Dmitri, Prince Dzhordzhadze at Maidestone, England. One notation said he was 'crated' Prince Dzhordzhadze so I don't know if he was 'real' nobility or not.
 
I thought that photo looked very British, but that's who it was ID'd as.  ???



Maidstone, huh?  That's just down the road, so to speak, from my mom's hometown, and I've spent many a day there since childhood.  Intersting to see a Romanov connection so close to "home." (Yeah, there are a lot of Romanov connections in my home town of NYC, but somehow it seems more intersting when it's rinky-dink Maistone.)

Alexa

36
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Anna Anderson and Anastasia
« on: October 06, 2004, 08:24:16 AM »
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I suppose at this point in the discussion, I would like to know what the sources are for the repeated claim that AA spoke Polish?  I know of only one such assertion, and it comes from a period when AA was living in Virginia after her marriage to John Manahan.  Any number of people asserted she spoke a number of languages or understood them, but Polish was never among them.  And, in any case, (since presumably this goes to the theory that AA was Franziska Schanzkowska), FS who grew up in western Poland, in the Pomerania region, spoke Katchoubian dialect, as her siblings all testified, and as the police reports on her assert.  She picked up some Polish, but it was not enough to even speak in complete sentences, and her German, learned after she came to Berlin, was in fact her best language after Katchoubian.

So again, I wonder who heard her speak Polish, because if it's in line with the theory that she was FS, it contradicts the evidence of her family and the existing reports in FS's police files.

Greg King



Hey Greg,
Could you let us know which languages AA spoke, other than German and English?  It's been ages since I read your book, and with all the information about her floating around, both true and false, my brain confuses much of the clutter.

Also, who in Virginia asserted that she spoke Polish?  Just curious as to how this rumor got started.

Thanks!
Alexa

37
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Anna Anderson and Anastasia
« on: October 04, 2004, 04:22:18 PM »
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Now, that is an interesting story because my Polish grandmother said most emphatically that she could not understand Russian as it was too different.  I think my analogy about French and Italian is probably a good one. A Frenchman might understand some Italian words and vice versa...but they are not that close...
Perhaps Mike can shed some light for us.


See. now my dad says the same thing, but when I ask him to explain how he understood what the cab driver was saying (not just the curse words) he just blows it off.  He's very aloof when it comes to stuff like that.  All I know is what I saw.  Maybe it's more like English and Swedish.  Before I went to Sweden, I couldn't speak or understand a word of it (except what I picked up from language tapes), but now I can at least understand some of it.  The languages seem very different at first, but once you hear Swedish enough, the differences fade quite a bit.  That's not to say I can understand everything I hear in Swedish, but I have an easier time understanding Swedish than I do German, a language I studied for 3 years.

Alexa

38
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Anna Anderson and Anastasia
« on: October 04, 2004, 04:14:14 PM »
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What a great story Alexa!  I have on several occasions seen my native speaker Russian spouse carry on conversations with Poles; they in Polish, he in Russian and both understanding one another completely.

I'm told the languages are different but easily understood by both.


Glad you enjoyed the story.  I have to admitt, I laughed my butt off when the cab driver realized my dad knew exactly what names he was being called.  We still laugh about it.

I've heard the same thing about Russian and Polish, and after witnessing the conversatino my dad had, it clicked in my head on why AA could understand Russian, but would never speak it.  

Alexa

39
The Myth and Legends of Survivors / Re: Anna Anderson and Anastasia
« on: October 04, 2004, 03:55:08 PM »
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a Question.

   Anna Anderson spoke Polish and Anastastia of course spoke Russian. But as I don't know Polish---please- is it similar to Russian? A romance language, or Finno Ugric or a more slavic tongue? A dialect of russian? please do clarify

R.



I'm no expert on either language and can only give an opinion from my own experience.  My father's family is Polish, and I grew up hearing the language quite a lot (as a young child, I could understand it, but no longer).  There are words that are the same in both languages (nastrovya (ignore the spelling please) comes to mind), but I'm not sure to what extent the similarities are.  All I know is that 10 years ago, my dad picked me up from the airport and told the Russian cab driver which way to go from JFK.  The cab driver and my dad argued over it in English.  We ended up going the way my dad wanted to, but the cab driver was saying stuff the whole way in Russian.  When we got out of the cab, my dad told him off in Polish.  The cab driver's eyes popped out of his head and asked my dad in Russian if he understood everything that he had said.  My dad told him in not so nice Polish that he did.  My dad chalks it up to knowing Russian curse words from his father, who picked them up while serving in the Russian army during WWI, but to me it looked like more than just that.  Maybe if you're Polish, you don't need to know a whole lot of Russian to be able to understand it?  Who knows?  Like I said, I'm just going by what I've seen within my own family.

Alexa

40
The Final Chapter / Re: Imperial skulls
« on: September 27, 2004, 09:19:05 AM »
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According to the translation of the webpage via http://www.worldlingo.com/products_services/worldlingo_translator.html it says:
Fig. 11. Plastic reconstructions on the skulls of Olga, Tatiana, Anastasiy.

Personally I still think the missing skull is Anastasia's and the one they are calling Anastasia is really Marie's.



Thanks Jackie3.  It's been driving me up a wall to know what it said.

Personally, I think the missing GD is Marie, but I'm open to hearing about why it could be one of the girls over another.

Alexa

41
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Even though Kurth is an avid AA supporter, he was at least more objective in his writings and let you draw your own conclusions, or lack thereof.


You hit the nail on the head.  That's one of the reasons why I enjoyed this book so much.

Alexa

42
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Hi Alexa

Thank you very much for recommending the forum's book section!
I'll certainly read Peter Kurth's book then, because I would like to learn more about the whole Anna Anderson mystery.

Take care

Karentje


My pleasure.  Any other questions, just feel free to ask.

Alexa

43
Hi Karentje,

For recommendations on Romanov books, go to the Books section of the forums <http://hydrogen.pallasweb.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=Books>.  Not only does it have a ton of books, but also feed back (both good and not so good) from people on the forum who have read them.

As for Lovell's book, well, I took it with a grain of salt.  The whole 5th daughter thing was just too much for me to believe.  For a great book on Anna Anderson, I'd recommend The Riddle of Anna Anderson by Peter Kurth.  Although I'm not a believer in Anna Anderson, his book is not only well written but is compelling and convincing.  It's the only book that really had me re-think my beliefs in her, and made me open my mind to the possibility.  Since then, I've gone back to being a non-believer, but that doesn't diminish the quality of Mr. Kurth's work in my opinion.

Alexa

44
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When one remembers that the stories were read and enjoyed by the Tsar's children, it's so overwhelming. The book is so unique in this way.


That's exactly why I bought it when it first came out.  I remember going into the book store and vowing I wouldn't buy anything (yeah, right).  I came out with Lost Tales, and have never regretted going back on my vow.

Alexa

45
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You are all -- I say this as humbly as I know how, which isn't much, but is still *something* -- much too nice!  My "Anastasia" is now 21 years old.  I do indeed want to update it, and also to give it a less partisan tone, but in order to do this I first have to win the rights back from its publisher -- believe me, I'm working on it -- "a small, still voice crying in the wilderness" against the TimeWarner behemoth -- but, in the end, I think, I'll win.  Thank you all for your kind words.  PK





Good luck with winning the rights back.  I just had my first articl published, and had to give up rights for only a year, and even that felt like I was selling my soul.  Once you do get the rights back, I'd be more than interested to see an updated version.  I first read your book back in 1991, and have to concur with Robert and Elizabeth, and look forward to seeing more.

Alexa

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