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Messages - Inok Nikolai

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496
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga's Letters
« on: January 17, 2012, 10:06:18 AM »

Ha! You post-Soviet Union, Internet-using researchers have it easy!

Sorry, Nikolai, what do you mean? Is it a praise or a blame?))
Thank you very much for you work!
unfortunately I can't find Dzhurkovich's full name, and I don't know anything about  Eugene Apollonovich. In one Olga's letter there was mentioned ''Lubom. Andr.", and I thought it could mean Lubomir - a Yugoslavian name, probably his,  but I have not got any confirmation.

Dear Antonina,

Forgive me. The comment was neither praise nor blame. I was just reflecting aloud on how much faster and easier some aspects of research have become in the Internet age, as opposed to how much sifting and searching it used to take us in the "old days" to discover even small nuggets of information.

And thank you for the tip. "Lubom. Andr." is a good lead. That reference occurs in Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna's letter of November 29, 1917, to M. S. Khitrovo.
Usually, however, G. D. Olga would simply refer to him directly as "Little Montenegrin".
But it is definitely worthwhile keeping in mind. Thank you again. Let's see what more might come up.

497
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga's Letters
« on: January 16, 2012, 11:02:19 PM »
Newbie's error!

In my last posting I accidentally included the new portion of text inside the quote box.

Please do take the time to read about the letter in Steinberg's book which is *not* from Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna.

Sorry to cause confusion.


498
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga's Letters
« on: January 16, 2012, 10:41:16 PM »
Another letter mistakenly attributed to Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna:

In Steinberg's "Fall of the Romanovs", p. 154, is a letter purportedly from Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna to her aunt, Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna.

However, an examination of the original manuscript in GARF shows that it is actually in Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna's handwriting, and it was written to her aunt and godmother, the Dowager Queen of the Hellenes, Olga Constantinovna.

Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna's godmother was Dowager Empress Marie Feodorovna, whom she would never have address as "Godmother", but rather, as "Grandmother".

Once the true author of this letter has been established, the contents make much more sense.

"Mama" = Dowager Empress Marie Feodorovna, with whom Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna was planning to flee to the Crimea soon.

"Nieces and their parents" = NAOTMAA

And Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna had written "matrosiki" (sailors), *not* "matroshki" (dollies)!

It was a cry from her heart over the role that their beloved sailors were playing in the revolutionary events. Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna knew that Queen Olga would share her intense grief, since they both were patrons of the Russian navy and very fond of its sailors.

For the record, the archivists at GARF agreed with the above analysis. They have now moved this letter from Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna's file to that of Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna.

499
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga's Letters
« on: January 16, 2012, 10:23:52 PM »
Yes, it’s my mistake, based on “Sisters of mercy”, sorry.  It was the 57th Modlinsky (модлинский) infantry regiment. First Olga wrote in her diary(20/091916): “3 wounds came to us. Warrant officer Dzhurkovitch from the 57th Liublinskiy (I by mistake translated it like Lubljana’s) regiment …(Montenegrin).”
Then Tatiana wrote in her letter(23/09/1916): “One wounded officer – Montenegrin was brought to us. He has been in the military school (or: corpus) of Kiev during 7 years, and now he is in 57th Madlinsky regiment. <…>
(More full quotes in Russian:
О: К нам прибыло 3 раненых. Прапорщик Джуркович 57-го Люблинского полка, ранен в грудь, руку и ногу (Черногорец).
Т: Привезли к нам одного раненого офицера черногорца. Он был 7 лет в Киевском корпусе, а теперь в 57-м Мадлинском полку. Не знает, конечно, где его родные. Спрашивает нас, где Король Николай и Король Петр, а где он, мы не знаем, а он беспокоится, так как его брат адъютант Петра. Тяжело он ранен, бедняжка. В спине большая рана, левая рука не движется, правая ранена и правое бедро. Маленький, худенький).


Ha! You post-Soviet Union, Internet-using researchers have it easy!

For years (decades?) no one could determine who this was: "Mal. Cher." Was it a surname, or a nickname, etc.?
I had a hunch that it meant "Little Montenegrin", but we had no way to confirm it.
Then in Stanford's Hoover Institution's archives we found letters from M. S. Khitrovo in which she called him just that.

Further question: Does anyone happen to know his full name?
Guessing from the text and context of many other letters, we thought that he might be the same as Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna's friend, Eugene Apollonovich.
Anybody know anything definite?

500
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga's Letters
« on: January 16, 2012, 10:03:43 PM »
Olga letter from April 1918

From the Southey auction catalog.







For the record, this letter is, in fact, from Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna (to Z. S. Tolstaya's daughter), and *not* from Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna. We alerted Sotheby's to that fact, but the catalogue had already been printed and distributed.

The handwriting is definitely Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna's, and the contents reflect the mind of a younger girl, not of someone G. D. Olga's age.

Sotheby's made that mistake because Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna, in signing this note, did not bring the "tail" of the capital initial "A." all the way down to the line, so it appears at first glance to be a loop, making the letter look more like an "O.".

501
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga's Letters
« on: January 16, 2012, 09:19:44 PM »
As far as I've been able to determine, the first publication of Olga's quote was in the July 1968 issue of Православная Жизнь (Orthodox Life). Unfortunately the article does not state who the letter was written to, when it was written, nor does it quote any other portion of the letter for context.


This is one of many questions which I wish that I had asked dear Mr. Alferieff while he was still alive!

In his book Mr. Alferieff featured this excerpt, supposedly taken from a longer letter from Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna:

Фрагменты письма:
(Тобольск)

Отец просит передать всем тем, кто Ему остался предан, и тем, на кого они могут иметь влияние, чтобы они не мстили за Него, так как Он всех простил и за всех молится, и чтобы не мстили за себя, и чтобы помнили, что то зло, которое сейчас в мире, будет еще сильнее, но что не зло победит, а только любовь...

As you know, this excerpt has become famous and has been cited many times, both in print and on the Internet.

Since Mr. Alferieff gave Правосланая Жизнь as his source for the quote, I had always assumed that the original printed source would contain an explanation of the primary source for this letter. Thus, I never asked him about this matter at the time.

But years later, when I finally checked that issue of П. Ж. (July 1968, No. 7, pp. 3-4), I saw that no further source is listed. I am not doubting the authenticity of the extract at this point, but I had always expected that the full letter, from which it was taken, would one day surface. In the course of our many years of research, this has, alas, not happened. I did look at all the issues for П. Ж. for 1968, in case a source was mentioned elsewhere, but none was.

Do bear in mind that in issue No. 7 that excerpt is followed by two authentic letters from captivity: one from Grand Duchess Olga Nicholaevna to her aunt, Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna; and the other one from Grand Duchess Maria Nicholaevna to Z. S. Tolstaya. (If that means anything.)

As I said, I wish that I had addressed this question to Mr. Alferieff and the editors of П. Ж. at that time! Recently I did write to the fathers at Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville, New York, to ask them to look into this matter. They said that they would, but, of course, most of the fathers involved with that publication have passed away already years ago.

To avoid any possible confusion, let me point out that Holy Trinity Monastery publishes *two* magazines called "Orthodox Life" — one in Russian, and one in English. But they are totally separate journals, with differing content.

(BTW: The quote itself is a paraphrase of a passage from St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans 12:17-20.)

502
Sarushka, you are absolutely right.

By the way, Tatiana and Olga made their choice in favor of Caucasian men with a black eyes and dark features. Kiknadze (Georgian), Shah-Bagov (Azerbaijanian or Georgian).
Not a bad choice;)

And Grand Duchess Maria Nicholaevna too.

On October 3, 1915, she wrote to her father at GHQ:

My Golden Papa!
...They transferred one officer from the Red Cross to our hospital. His surname is Shah-Nazarov. He is very attractive, dark, with a mustache. In general, I quite approve of him...

(From "Most-august Sisters of Mercy, p. 139.)

503
Sorry,this is kind of off topic...but in Olga's 1913 diary,what does she mean by ''mama's heart is #1(#2)''?

I've never seen that explained anywhere, either. My best guess is it's some sort of family code related to Alexandra's heart trouble. Perhaps it indicates the level of her discomfort? Alexandra believed she suffered from an enlarged heart, so maybe it was an informal measure of how enlarged her heart felt on any given day.

This comment is a bit tardy, but yes, such references occur often in the Imperial family's letters. Even Dr. E. Botkin used it at times too. The archivists at GARF told me that so far no one has determined the scale represented by these numbers. So we don't know what level of illness is represented by these references.

504
Maria Nicholaievna / Re: Maria and Nicholas Demenkov
« on: January 16, 2012, 05:38:40 PM »
Naval Magazine, wardroom in Prague. July, 1938.

A small article (memoirs, including Maria's letter in 1917) of Nikolay Dmitrievich Demenkov.
My translation and two print screened images are below.             

Dear Nicola De Valeron,

We were very happy to come upon this letter and the accompanying account. Thank you very much!
We will add it to our collection:
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=16969.0

What is the Russian name of the journal it appeared in?
We would like to look for it in the libraries here.

Inok Nikolai

505
And a special word of thanks from us goes to Sarushka for the detailed index which she drew up, indicating the date, author, recipient, source, and available English translation for every letter that has already appeared on this forum. It saved us a lot of work! We had been wondering how to locate all the letters posted on various parts of this forum — and then, voila!
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=12527.msg366574#msg366574


506
Greetings all!

As I mentioned in my posting under “Upcoming books in 2012”, for many years now our monastery ( http://www.thehtm.org ) has been preparing to publish the collected letters of the Imperial family from captivity in an English translation.

When I say “for many years”, I mean precisely that. It's hard to believe now, but we actually began this project in 1981, thinking that it would take us just a few years to gather all the materials! Because of the many demands of our monastic life and our primary duties here at the monastery, this project has always been an “extracurricular activity” which we pursue in our “spare time”. More than once we have been forced to set this project aside for months, even years, but we have never given up on it.

And actually, the long delay has proven to be quite providential. In the intervening years so many more letters have come to light, and so many controversies and riddles concerning the Imperial Family’s death and burial have been resolved.

Several times we thought that we could wind up the project and go to print, only to have new archives open up and additional letters become available. And who would have believed back in 1981 that in ten years the USSR would be no more?!

The book which formed the original core of our project was Mr. E. E. Alferief’s Russian edition: “The Letters of the Tsar’s Family From Captivity, a review of which appears on the Alexander Palace Time Machine site. http://www.alexanderpalace.org/palace/books.html?sku=95

A fuller description of our projected publication (accenting the spiritual aspects of these letters) appeared in our diocesan journal in 1992. But regardless of how one views the Imperial family, these letters, as primary documents, will be of interest to a wide range of readers.
http://www.saintannas.com/Archived_Docs_HTM/TV14OnImperialLetters.pdf

(Note: If the above link does not work on Safari, try using another browser, such as Firefox.)

As a postscript to the above article, I would like to add that we now have over 450 letters written by the Imperial family during the time of their captivity. Included in that number are some of those which earlier we had requested our readers to help us find. Most of these letters were written in Russian, ten or twelve in German, several in French, and a few in English.

I see that various posters on this forum have already furnished translations of many of these letters. Sarushka, Nena, Shandroise, Lanie and others have done an admirable job. In addition to more letters, we also have been able to find the longer, unedited originals of many of the letters which already appear here on the forum.

And as I stated earlier, this new thread is meant not so much to “plug” a proposed book, as it is to request your collaboration and assistance. I am not sure how that aspect will evolve, but certainly some of you could be a great help to us in deciphering the full names of those mentioned only by their initials in countless letters. Many we have already discovered, while others still remain an enigma to us.

While working on the letters, we would also like to post some short comments throughout the forum on various topics, concerning which we may have pertinent information, based on our thirty years of research. However, we cannot permit ourselves (much as we would like) to get involved in lengthy discussions on any one topic, since that would deflect us from our primary goal of preparing the Imperial letters for publication.

In advance: thank you for your interest and assistance!

507
Books about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia / Re: Upcoming Books in 2012
« on: January 15, 2012, 08:52:09 PM »
Greetings all!

While we would certainly love to have our proposed book to be in print by the end of 2012, we can't promise it. Nevertheless, this did seem like a good time and the appropriate place to bring our project to your attention.

I have been reading the Alexander Palace Forum off and on for many years, but only recently have I begun to post on it.

For many years now our monastery has been preparing to publish the collected letters of the Imperial family from captivity in an English translation. Rather than discuss all the details of our project in this post, I have opened a new thread below. Please understand that the new thread is meant not so much to “plug” a proposed book, as it is to request your collaboration and assistance.

508
Forum Announcements / Re: New Users say Hello Here and ONLY HERE!
« on: January 09, 2012, 10:15:06 PM »
Well, here goes! I hope that I am doing this right.

I have been reading the AP Time Machine and the Forum off and on for many years.

I actually registered last March, but this is my first posting.

Question: With so many topics and threads spanning so many years, how can anyone know if someone else posts new information on a topic that perhaps has not been active for some time?

One could spend a lifetime tracking everything down — even with the search option.

Any comments or advice?

Thanks!

Welcome Inok Nikolai!
I'm afraid it's the only way. Like you i had been reading the forum for ages before registring and still, i did not know everything there was on it.
Often newbies (i was the first do to it!) start a lot of new threads to makle question, but my advice is: wait for a queation to pop up in your mind. When it happens, first check in the search engine, and take some time to browse in the forum to see if you can find a thread where the topic is discussed. Then, if you don't, wonder if there's  already a thread where your question would be in the right place but hadn't been asked yet. If not again... well, you really should start a new topic ^^
Art least, this is the way I use, you could try to see if it's ok for you.
With the search engine, for exapmple, i was able not only to find a lot of infos i was searching for, but also so many others i hadn't asked yet!

Welcome again!

Thank you for the advice.
Inok Nikolai

509
Forum Announcements / Re: New Users say Hello Here and ONLY HERE!
« on: January 08, 2012, 09:15:44 PM »
Well, here goes! I hope that I am doing this right.

I have been reading the AP Time Machine and the Forum off and on for many years.

I actually registered last March, but this is my first posting.

Question: With so many topics and threads spanning so many years, how can anyone know if someone else posts new information on a topic that perhaps has not been active for some time?

One could spend a lifetime tracking everything down — even with the search option.

Any comments or advice?

Thanks!

510
Books about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia / Re: Upcoming Books in 2012
« on: January 08, 2012, 09:02:02 PM »
When will the new edition of "A Romanov Diary: The Autobiography of H.I.& R.H. Grand Duchess George" be released?
It should have been published in September 2011, but it was not..


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