Recent Posts

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Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Last post by TimM on Today at 11:37:40 AM »
Quote
Another means of communication might be innocuous-sounding letters. For example, 'Grandma is now recovering,' might mean, 'Everything is ready for the hit.'

Yeah, I've seen a lot of that in spy movies.
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Books about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia / Re: Upcoming Books 2018
« Last post by Kalafrana on Today at 02:55:58 AM »
This looks good!

I would say that the Kaiser did do enough. He offered asylum, but at a time when Russia and Germany at war the Romanovs would not have accepted it.

There were major practical issues for George V, given the difficulty of getting the Romanovs to Britain in time  of war, but Denmark and Norway were both neutral and much closer.

Ann
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Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Last post by Kalafrana on Today at 02:51:32 AM »
According to one of the  books I have read on the killing of Rasputin (currently trying to remember which one), Sergei Sukhotin's role was to lay a false trail by making a telephone call from a telephone box at one of the railway station's to say that Rasputin had left the Moika and was on his way home.

Ultimately, it matters not - just work on the basis that there were no telephone boxes in Perm!

Another means of communication might be innocuous-sounding letters. For example, 'Grandma is now recovering,' might mean, 'Everything is ready for the hit.'

Regards

Ann
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Here is an interesting and charming little excerpt from the memoirs of Nicholas Pavlovich Sablin:

"When we once asked where the grand duchess [Elizaveta] got so many jewels, the grand duchesses told us that her late husband, the Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich, always returned with some gift [for her] after going into the city each day, and now having given up material life, the grand duchess gifted these jewels to her nieces. Olga Nikolaevna once got an especially beautiful piece - a diadem made from the branches of lily of the valley, and each little cup contained a diamond."

Source: Russia's Last Romanovs: In Their Own Words (2013) by Helen Azar and Dan and Eva McDonald. :)
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Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna / Possessions of Elizabeth Fedorovna
« Last post by Ortino on Yesterday at 10:06:52 PM »
Hi everyone,

I couldn't find a thread relating to this topic and would appreciate any insight/thoughts. Does anyone know what happened to Ella and Sergei's possessions (paintings, furniture, objet d'art, etc.) after Ella became a nun? I recall reading that she sold them to fund her new convent, but if this is true, does anyone know where or when these sales took place? Do sales catalogues or related materials exist? Also, did anything go to Maria Pavlovna and Dmitri Pavlovich or other members of the family?

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When one reads how the Orthodox church generally rejoiced in having the Tsarist yoke lifted from itself after the February Revolution and NII's abdication; symbolically by storing the Emperor's cęsaropapal seat in the Holy Synod in a museum and electing a new patriarch for the first time in 300 years, their ambiguous attitude in this matter becomes clearer.
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Books about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia / Re: Upcoming Books 2018
« Last post by Ally Kumari on Yesterday at 03:22:40 PM »
To Free the Romanovs: Royal Kinship and Betrayal
https://www.amazon.com/Free-Romanovs-Royal-Kinship-Betrayal/dp/1445681978/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1516391791&sr=1-1&keywords=to+free+the+romanovs

When Russia erupted into revolution, almost overnight the pampered lifestyle of the Imperial family vanished. Within months many of them were under arrest and they became `enemies of the Revolution and the Russian people'. All showed great fortitude and courage during adversity. None of them wanted to leave Russia; they expected to be back on their estates soon and live as before. When it became obvious that this was not going to happen a few managed to flee, but others became dependent on their foreign relatives for help. For those who failed to escape, the questions remain. Why did they fail? What did their relatives do to help them? Were lives sacrificed to save other European thrones? After 35 years researching and writing about the Romanovs, Coryne Hall considers the end of the 300-year-old dynasty - and the guilt of the royal families in Europe over the Romanovs' bloody end. Did the Kaiser do enough? Did George V? When the Tsar's cousins King Haakon of Norway and King Christian of Denmark heard of Nicholas's abdication, what did they do? Unpublished diaries of the Tsar's cousin Grand Duke Dmitri give a new insight to the Romanovs' feelings about George V's involvement.

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Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Last post by Превед on Yesterday at 01:54:43 PM »
In the Soviet Union and in Russian today the main term seems to have been and be таксофон (taksofon) for the payphone itself - see Wikipedia

Tелефон-автомат (telefon-avtomat) and телефонная будка (telefonnaya budka) seems to have been other terms also in use for the more elaborate booth type.

This Russian site, which looks reliable enough, says, in addition to all the info given above about telephone booths in the US, Germany etc. that:

Первые телефонные будки в России появились в 20-х годах.
=
The first telephone booths in Russia appeared in the 1920s.

A very peculiar-looking one in Moscow in the 1920s: https://nornegest.livejournal.com/362498.html
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Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Last post by Nictionary on January 18, 2018, 12:52:59 PM »
Thanks for the info on the books, James.  And don't worry, there's not much risk of my trying it at home.  Chemistry was never my strongest subject.  It'll probably be a while before I add some more.
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Having Fun! / Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Last post by TimM on January 18, 2018, 11:16:40 AM »
Of course, telephone booths are more or less gone now, thanks to cell phones.
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