Author Topic: Romanov Byzantine Ancestry  (Read 66130 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Kalafrana

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2932
    • View Profile
Re: Romanov Byzantine Ancestry
« Reply #30 on: March 20, 2010, 05:09:26 AM »
'But they were not necessarily ancestors of the Romanovs.'

Indeed not. Until Anastasia Romanova married Ivan the Terrible they were a fairly modest family.

For all the complexities of Byzantine history, and the multitudinous dynasties, can I recommend John Julius Norwich's three volumes on Byzantiim.

Ann

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

  • Guest
Re: Romanov Byzantine Ancestry
« Reply #31 on: March 21, 2010, 06:00:00 PM »
By redirecting Ex-Princess Lisa from the Celtic mists of Ireland to not so romantic Finland I just realized: Ex-Princess Lisa's dubious linking of Byzantine dynasties to the Purcell family in Ireland really is similar to Holy Blood, Holy Grail's and the DavInci Code's ending up with the Scottish Sinclairs and the Rosslyn chapel. No doubt this endearing, but also annoying compulsion to connect anything mythical to the Celtic Fringe really is a sales trick geared towards American sensibilities.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2010, 06:12:24 PM by Fyodor Petrovich »

Offline richard_1990

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 111
    • View Profile
Re: Romanov Byzantine Ancestry
« Reply #32 on: June 20, 2010, 04:15:18 AM »
Could anyone enlighten me as to what the full title of the Byzantine sovereigns was?

Offline Kalafrana

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2932
    • View Profile
Re: Romanov Byzantine Ancestry
« Reply #33 on: June 21, 2010, 03:34:18 AM »
One of the Byzantine titles was 'Equal of the Apostles'.

Ann

Constantinople

  • Guest
Re: Romanov Byzantine Ancestry
« Reply #34 on: June 22, 2010, 01:00:12 AM »
The title of all Emperors listed preceding Heraclius was officially Augustus, although various other titles such as Dominus were used as well. For official purposes, their names were preceded by Imperator Caesar and followed by Augustus. Following Heraclius, the title commonly became the Greek Basileus (Gr. Βασιλεύς), which had formerly meant generally "king", "sovereign" but now was used in place of Imperator. Following the establishment of a rival Empire in Western Europe (the Holy Roman Empire), the title Autokrator (Gr. Αυτοκράτωρ) was also increasingly used. Foreign kings were now titled by the neologism Regas (Gr. Ρήγας, from the Lat. "Rex") or by another generic term Archon (Gr. Άρχων, "ruler"). In the later centuries of the Empire, the emperor could be often referred to by Western Christians as the "Emperor of the Greeks," though they still considered themselves "Roman" Emperors. Towards the end of the Empire, they referred to themselves as "[Emperor's name] in Christ, true Emperor and Autocrat of the Romans."