Author Topic: Future of the Russian Government  (Read 15463 times)

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Offline Belochka

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Re: Future of the Russian Government
« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2004, 12:54:11 AM »
The original Russian Anthem of 1883 was titled:

Bozhe, tsarya khrani (God Save The Czar) which is hardly appropriate for today.

The terms Anthem and Hymn in this context are the same thing. The correct Russian word is Gimn

Russia has lost both its Imperial and Soviet identity. It will take many years to gain a new democratic identity. For this to happen successfully, Russia must accept not just all symbols from its Imperial past such as the Double-headed Eagle, but it must recognize some of those symbols which followed after that period as well.

Perhaps it can be viewed that not all of Russia's historical past (Soviet) should ever be forgotten, simply because of the 30 million men and women and children who lost their lives during WWII. Their patriotism is honored through the modified text of the post Stalin era in the revized Gimn Sovetskogo Soyuza, the Hymn of the Soviet Union.

Sergei Mikhalkov who wrote the original words for Gimn Sovetskogo Soyuza during Stalin's period (1944) has modified the text in 2001, Gimn Rossiyskaya Federatsiya (Hymn of the Russian Federation) to reflect the new Russian idealism. What he has achieved IMHO is a connection to Russia's soviet past, not to honor the system but to honor the fallen who fell under the red flag - for it must not be forgotten that WWII became Russia's most horrendous historic event.  

 

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


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Offline Olga

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Re: Future of the Russian Government
« Reply #31 on: June 11, 2004, 05:07:09 AM »
I'd say the worst event was the purges/show trials, but they are closely followed by the Great Patrotic War.

lilias

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Re: Future of the Russian Government
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2004, 04:07:32 PM »
good point.

Offline Robert_Hall

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Re: Future of the Russian Government
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2004, 09:29:31 PM »
Certainly no country is blameless in it's history.
Sadly, Russia is still trying to regain some pride [in my opinion], they were proud as an Empire- both Imperial & Soviet, then all that is scrapped for a totally new system they have yet to come to terms with, confusing the generations to no end.
The Russians I know here in SF & London are decidely different in opinion abbout their homeland. The older ones certainly hated Stalin, but not necessarily the system itself. The younger ones do not give a fig for Russia, finding a better chance in the West. The one's in between just seem to have a "what happened" look about them.
Just my observations.
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Robert
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Offline Belochka

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Re: Future of the Russian Government
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2004, 01:06:42 AM »
It is not worthwhile to compare which particular event in Soviet history was the most horrendous. Each carried distinctive modes of terror and destruction.

However what I was trying to highlight was that there was only one specific historical event in the Soviet Union in which not one single family living in the Soviet Union remained untouched (including mine), and that was the Great Patriotic War.

The purges and the show trials were certainly events not to be forgotten either. However the very nature of war elicited a patriotic response - and in this context the Anthem which we are discussing here was one symbol which helped to unite citizens together - it provided the emotional context necessary to achieve hope and victory over the enemy. The other symbol of unity was the red flag under which the military both fought and lost their lives. The color of the flag was irrelevant, what was important was what it represented and that representation was a singular national identity.

It is this historic past which must always be remembered and honored. Every city in Russia has its Eternal Flame which is always guarded everyday by its younger citizens standing in respect some 60 years later. Victory Day on 9 May is one of the most significant days on the Russian calendar. Again this is another important symbol which is commemmorated by Russians today under a new Flag and a new Anthem.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


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