Author Topic: Pronounciation  (Read 221661 times)

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Offline Maria the Beautiful

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #300 on: September 30, 2012, 11:15:55 PM »
RomaFan96- For pronunciation of Tsarskoe Selo, see FA's post #143 for detailed explanation.   It would probably be very helpful for you to read through this entire thread.  We all have trouble pronouncing a lot of the Russian words and most of them have already been discussed here.    
« Last Edit: September 30, 2012, 11:18:25 PM by Maria the Beautiful »

Alixz

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #301 on: October 01, 2012, 01:32:12 PM »
When I first learned the Romanov was pronounced Ro MAN ov. I thought it sounded Italian. I don't know why but a lot of Italian names are pronounced with the accent on the second syllable like Bal DUC ci (Bal DUT chi)

However since then I have found that most three syllable Russian surnames are accented on the second syllable. It is especially annoying during the Olympic Games to hear the announcers pronouncing the names of the Russian athletes incorrectly. It has gotten better in recent years. But the ones that defeat most announcers are the female version of the male surname.

Romanova is still Ro MAN ova not Ro man OVA. It takes a while for the English speaking brain to adjust to that kind of speech, but now I find myself doing it even to names that aren't Russian. Then I have to shake my clouded head and get it right.

Offline historyfan

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #302 on: October 01, 2012, 09:21:38 PM »
I still mispronounce Maria Sharapova's name. : P

Alixz

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #303 on: October 02, 2012, 08:25:22 AM »
I have noticed that some Russian athletes have either changed the pronunciation or just stopped trying to get the announcers to get it right.

I think I have heard Sharapova pronounced Shar a POVA.  I would have gone with Shar AP ova.

When I  have trouble, I think of the male version - in this instance it would Shar AP ov and then just add the "a".

I remember one time (in that other thread) asking about Alexandrovich, the patronomic.  We usually hear it as Alex AN drovich. I remember FA saying it should be Alexan DRO vich.  Roll the "r" and it sounds very very Russian.

The other interesting one is Anastasia. It should be Anasta SI a.

But that other thread does have a lot of very good information. Someone just recently asked about Xenia. It should be Ks EN ia. (There might be an apostrophe in there somewhere). I think that English authors had trouble with transliteration in some cases. That is why her monogram features a K and not an X.

Another famous one is Anna Vyr U bova  not Vyru BOVA.

But you get the point.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2012, 08:29:15 AM by Alixz »

Offline rudy3

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #304 on: October 02, 2012, 08:38:33 AM »
I think it should be VY rubova.
The Russian Wikipedia usually has the stress marked: А́нна Алекса́ндровна Вы́рубова
 

Alixz

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #305 on: October 02, 2012, 10:23:17 AM »
Rudy - Thanks.

The fact that it is a three syllable name made me think that it should be accented on the second syllable.  I know that you speak Russian and I don't and so I thank you.

I always thought that her husband would be Vy RU bov. Is this name an exception to the general rule?

Even Medvedev. Wasn't that Med VE dev. I know that it was always pronounced differently by just about every newscaster.

Thanks

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #306 on: October 02, 2012, 11:25:06 AM »
Med vy'ed ev

Alixz

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #307 on: October 03, 2012, 07:27:31 PM »
FA - Interesting.  Thanks.

Offline TimM

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #308 on: October 07, 2012, 10:55:20 AM »
The Russian language can be hard for those not born into it.   I look at some of these words and names and say "huh?" a lot.  LOL!
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Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #309 on: October 08, 2012, 02:36:43 AM »
russian names are easier than Polish ones, however. We may not get the precise nuances, but it's not like all the strings of consonants in Polish.

Ann

Alixz

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #310 on: October 08, 2012, 10:19:16 AM »
I have a friend who speaks Polish from childhood. He cannot make me understand the sounds that certain combinations of letters make. They are very different from English to Polish.

For example Lech Walesa is  ,lɛk vəˈwɛnsə  in English.

I asked where the "n" came from but he told me "its too hard to explain".  I don't understand the upside down small "e" or the small curvy   ɛ.

He may have just been tired of trying.  :-)

His English is perfect (with an American accent) and yet when he started school, he spoke only Polish.




Offline TimM

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #311 on: October 08, 2012, 04:13:14 PM »
There is this girl who works in a bookstore a frequent.  She's from Poland, and her name is Gosia.  She tried to teach me some Polish words.  Of course, when I tried to say them, I totally butchered them!
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Offline Maria the Beautiful

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #312 on: October 08, 2012, 04:20:49 PM »
Many years ago I worked with a guy who had a Polish last name - lots of c's, z's, y's, w's with a slight sprinkling of vowels.  No one could pronounce his name so we affectionately called him "John Alphabet".

Alixz

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #313 on: October 08, 2012, 05:29:29 PM »
Growing up in the town that I did, there were many Polish as well as many Portuguese.

One Polish name is Woczyk. It is pronounced Wojack.

One year when I was working in a tax preparation office, we had a computer problem which allowed each preparer to enter the names of the clients that they had seen. However, the names could also be entered more than once (that was the glitch) and so people were being counted as being more than one client. Some were entered as many as six times depending on who did the return, who took the payment and/or who might have updated the return if more information was needed.

I was office supervisor and on April 16 my assistant and I sat with lists and lists of names and tried to sort out who had been entered more than once and why.  She asked me at one point, how I could pronounce some of the Polish names we came across. The only explanation I had was that I had gone to school in the town and I had known many of the families. I could pronounce the names only because I had grown up saying them in school.

The other language that can be difficult is French. There are many letters that are simply silent or groups of letters that make up a single sound.

My father's aunt married a man with a French last name. It was spelled Thibault. It was pronounced Teebow.

Sort of like the football quarterback Tim Tebow.

I took French in High School and I still can't get the accent marks right.  accent aigu   accent grave   accent circonflexe  accent tréma  cédille.

It must be a lot like "ph" in English which is always "f" and "gh" which is sometimes "f" and sometimes not. (ghastly) (laugh)

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Pronounciation
« Reply #314 on: October 09, 2012, 01:16:48 AM »
One of the horrors at both the grammar schools I went to was dictation in French! All those endings that sounded the same but were spelt differently!

Ann