Author Topic: Fatima prophecies and Russia  (Read 15880 times)

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Offline FrancisMay

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Re: Fatima prophecies and Russia
« Reply #30 on: March 08, 2005, 10:05:49 PM »
have a look at Stealing from Angels on barnesandnoble.com the Vatican is demanding the publisher withdraw this book. It will answer much about the Fatima story

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Re: Fatima prophecies and Russia
« Reply #31 on: March 09, 2005, 09:17:39 AM »
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have a look at Stealing from Angels on barnesandnoble.com the Vatican is demanding the publisher withdraw this book. It will answer much about the Fatima story


Francis, perhaps you could outline it for us?  I know nothing about it but have read so many books which set out to undermine the Catholic faith & are subsequently proved to be little more than a sensationalist way of selling a book that I am often sceptical.

Offline Dolorosa

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Re: Fatima prophecies and Russia
« Reply #32 on: June 14, 2005, 03:52:21 PM »
         For more information about Fatima and Russia see the website below:

       http://fatima.org/

Offline Tania+

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Re: Fatima prophecies and Russia
« Reply #33 on: August 29, 2005, 03:54:18 PM »
As a child, [and I'm not sharing my age, lol], I vividly remember seeing the cinema of the three children of Fatima. Of course, by then, and later, i had experienced a few miracles myself, but did not recognize them as such.

But, almost four years ago I realized that faith, had a hand in my latest miracle as well. My past physicians had not monitored my health, and I lost the use of my kidneys, and was rushed to emergency, [stating later that I had a heart attack], and forced for the next three years to go on dialysis three times weekly. [By the way, I had excellent health to begin with]. I was told, I would stay alive only by dialysis [life-long], or would most certainly have to have a kidney transplant. I told them from the first day on dialysis, I would eventually leave, sans transplant, or dialysis, and prove it to them.

It's been almost a little over three years, and I've not gone back to dialysis; never had the transplant, and take no medications, not even for ms, my chronic 24/7 pain, etc. For me, I chose daily prayer, before and continued in each of the cases of my life miracles. [I'm russian orthodox].  My physicans said it was a miracle. They can find no real explanation of why I walked away w/o further medical need. I had gone in with my creatnine at the count of 19. When I left, I had asked for it to be lowered. I walked away with it being at 4.2.

Who can explain a miracle ?

Tania
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Offline RussMan

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Re: Fatima prophecies and Russia
« Reply #34 on: September 01, 2005, 04:40:33 PM »
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Certainly a great deal about the Fatima prophecies comes down to religious belief, but FWEIW, I, too find this fascinating. I do, however, feel that Orthodox Christians may obejct to the "conversion" of Russia. Many remained faithful to their church in spite of the terrible religious persecution by the Bolsheviks.


I thought the "conversion"of Russia was meant to change their minds away from Leninism. Russia certainly did become one the most Atheistic nations in the world after 1917  Revolutions. :-/

I don't think Mary was refferring to converting Orthodx Russia to Catholicism, because Orthodox Christians are as devoted to her as Catholics. :-/
Cluelessness is a higher state of being. Takes a lot of thought to get here.

Offline Tania+

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Re: Fatima prophecies and Russia
« Reply #35 on: November 26, 2005, 04:07:25 PM »
Thank you RussMan for sharing this importantance of the Russian Orthodox Religion. Indeed, those of us whom are Russian Orthodox, are very devoted to Mary.

But as you state, Russia was forced to turn away after 1917 from Orthodoxy by the Communists, but privately, Russian Orthodoxy stayed alive and well in and with countless families. As you may, or may not know, Commuism was imported to Russia, and many things, and needs, were forced to be erased from Russia forever. Even during WWII, the churches were kept open, so the church never really died, and was one of the many contributions, in using the Orthodox Church to bring the peoples together, that the Nazis were defeated in Russia.

In today's Russia, people are returning in large numbers back to the Church and as a main religion of Russia. Once again, as with her peoples heart, so it is with the hearts of Russia again, to worship openly and with total reverence without personal attacks.

Tatiana


Quote

I thought the "conversion"of Russia was meant to change their minds away from Leninism. Russia certainly did become one the most Atheistic nations in the world after 1917  Revolutions. :-/

I don't think Mary was refferring to converting Orthodx Russia to Catholicism, because Orthodox Christians are as devoted to her as Catholics. :-/

TatianaA


Offline Azarias

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Re: Fatima prophecies and Russia
« Reply #36 on: November 28, 2005, 02:17:42 AM »
"The conversion of Russia...."  an interesting topic to be sure.

I have little doubt that for many of the Roman Catholics this meant literally that the RCC would take hold in the heart of the Russian people, especially during the era of the Cold War.  Various Protestant denominations also took advantage of the easing up of religious persection in Russia and established missions there.

As a result of the Revolution many of the Russian people
had turned away from Orthodoxy. They felt that Orthodxy had been a part of the contributing problems that gave birth to Russia's troubles. Grandparents, parents, and children had been churchless or atheist. True, the Orthodox church had been imbedded in the minds and souls of many and may not have ever completely died out, but the regime had done it's best to do so.

After Patriarch Tikhon's death many believed the Orthodox Church in Russia to have been government run, hardly an ideal situation. This was called the Living Church. Others talk about an underground "catacomb" church which continued (under persecution) in the spirit of the pre revolutionery church.

And needless to say the Revolution had not only created havoc in Russia for Orthodoxy, but also abroad -especially in America. The Russian Orthodox Church held the cannonical rights to establish the American Orthodox movement, but which jurisdiction of the Russian Church was to establish which jurisdiction of the American Church? (not a question but an observation)

Yes, I think many groups were looking to the "conversion of Russia" and from their own angles. And the battle of churches and jurisdictions continues. Pope John Paul II gave back treasures to both the Orthodx in Russia and in Constantinople. He was still not welcomed to visit Russia by the Patrirach. JP II very much wanted to go there, perhaps even believed that he could end the 1000 year schism between the 2 churches single handed.

Interstingly, during the funeral of JPII, they gave at the end "a homage of the Eastern Churches." This was very misleading to many in that "the Eastern Church" in this context was represented by Uniates. By brief definition Uniates are those who appear in dress and ritual to be Orthodox but are subjects of the Roman Church.

Perhaps the blood of the Russian Martyrs has preserved Russia from these various invasions of other churches, especially Rome!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Azarias »
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