Author Topic: Princes Baryatinsky  (Read 54995 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Valmont

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 379
  • I love History  !!
    • View Profile
Princes Baryatinsky
« on: March 19, 2004, 01:00:45 PM »
 I read P Bariatinskaia  went back to St. petersburg on 1901 when the Empress called her.  She is last mentioned in  June, 1914, when A writes to N about P Bariatinskaia spending her last afternoon with Alix.
Does anyone know what happened to her? Did sho go back to Rome?. Alix considered her if not the closest, one of her closest friends, and yet, she vanished after the revolution.
Arturo Vega-Llausás

Offline Nick_Nicholson

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 199
  • www.objectofvirtue.com
    • View Profile
    • Nicholas B. A. Nicholson
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2004, 09:29:43 AM »
Valmont,

This is a question for Tim Boettger, who has dones extesive research on the Baryiatinskys.

Nick
Nick Nicholson
New York City

Offline Valmont

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 379
  • I love History  !!
    • View Profile
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2004, 09:32:54 AM »
Nick,

How do I get in touch with Tim Boettger?

Arturo Vega Llausás
Arturo Vega-Llausás

Offline Nick_Nicholson

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 199
  • www.objectofvirtue.com
    • View Profile
    • Nicholas B. A. Nicholson
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2004, 12:50:02 PM »
Arturo,

Tim's wonderful website (he has a whole site on the Baryatinskys) is:

http://www.geocities.com/tfboettger/

Best,

Nick
Nick Nicholson
New York City

Offline Thierry

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 49
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2004, 03:36:30 PM »
Arturo, Nick,

This is the notice in Boettger's book (volume 1, p. 78) :

"Kniajna Maria Victorovna Bariatinskaďa, née ŕ ... le 28 décembre 1858, + ... ; demoiselle d'honneur de LL.MM. les Impératrices."

It is not very much, unfortunately.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Thierry »

Offline Joanna

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1305
  • Winter Palace Research
    • View Profile
    • Winter Palace Research
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2004, 09:34:52 PM »
Hello Arturo !

There are two more references in Alexandra's letters of Marie Baryatinskaya:

May 6, 1915: "...At the stores Marie Bariatinsky & Olga [her sister-in-law] were making stockings, the same as they had been doing at Moscou so far..."

June 12, 1915: "... Marie Bariatinsky dines with us & leaves to-morrow with Olga [her sister-in-law] for Kiev I think ..."

Joanna

Dr Michael Foster

  • Guest
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2004, 02:17:33 PM »
I am seeking to find the missing dates of birth and death for the son of Ivan Ivanovitch Bariatinsky 1772-1825; Anatole Ivanovitch Bariatinsky ?-?

In advance of anyone who is able to help; thanks!


Offline Mike

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1326
    • View Profile
    • Erast Fandorin Museum
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2004, 01:47:45 AM »
1820 - 1881. See his detailed bio here (a plug-in viewer required).

Offline npkyalta

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2004, 09:24:01 PM »
My name is Sam Small and I am the great grandson of N.P. Krasnov.



Recently, I visited Yalta and was taken on a tour by Lyudmila, a Krasnov expert


We visited, ‘Selbillyan’, the former villa of Princess N.A. Baryatinskaya. We were told that her relatives that now reside in France had also recently visited and were impressed by Krasnov’s work.



I would like to contact those relatives, could you please assist in any way?



« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by npkyalta »

elisa_1872

  • Guest
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2004, 01:56:49 PM »
I had always wondered whether Pcss Bariatinsky ever wrote any reminscences or told any acquaintances reminiscences that were noted down.
I discovered recently that at least two of the letters to the Pcss by Empress Alexandra are kept at Broadlands. Does anyone know what became of the rest of her papers?

Offline Belochka

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4447
  • City of Peter stand in all your splendor - Pushkin
    • View Profile
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2004, 10:55:59 PM »
Quote
I had always wondered whether Pcss Bariatinsky ever wrote any reminscences or told any acquaintances reminiscences that were noted down.


Hi elisa_1872,

You are in luck! There is a splendid read which Princess Marie Bariatinsky wrote during the 1920's in English.

The book opens with her life as a young girl, with descriptions of her own family members. She details
her personal contacts with the I.F. and includes her travels abroad.  There are chapters which deal with Stolypin's assassination and Russia's entry into the war including the events which followed leading to her exile. Her memoirs conclude with her initial impressions of England.

Her memoirs contain numerous photographs, and her own self painted portrait.

The book is: My Russian Life by Princess Anatole Marie Bariatinsky, Publ. Hutchison $& Co 1923.

:D

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


Faces of Russia is now on Facebook!


http://www.searchfoundationinc.org/

Offline veu

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 31
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2005, 10:58:21 AM »
Lina Cavalieri (December 25, 1874 - February 7, 1944) was an Italian operatic soprano known for her great beauty.


Born Natalina Cavalieri in Viterbo, Latium, Italy, she lost her parents at the age of fifteen and became a ward of the state, sent to live in a Roman Catholic orphanage. The vivacious young girl was extremely unhappy under the strict raising of the nuns and at the first opportunity she ran away with a touring theatrical group.

Blessed with a good singing voice, a young Lina Cavalieri made her way to Paris, France where her stunning good looks opened doors and she obtained work as a singer at one of the city's café-concerts. From there she performed at a variety of music halls and other such venues around Europe while still working to develop her voice for the opera. A soprano, Cavalieri took voice lessons and made her opera debut in Lisbon, Portugal in 1900, the same year she married her first husband, the Russian "Prince" Bariatonsky. Eventually she followed in the footsteps of Ericlea Darclée as one of the first stars of Puccini's Tosca. In 1904 she sang at the Opera de Monte Carlo then in 1905, at the Sarah Bernhardt Theatre in Paris, Cavalieri starred opposite Enrico Caruso in the Umberto Giordano opera, Fedora. From there, she and Caruso took the show to New York City, debuting with it at the Metropolitan Opera on December 5, 1906.


Cavalieri's "hourglass" figureLina Cavalieri remained with the Metropolitan Opera for the next two seasons performing again with Caruso in 1907 in Puccini's Manon Lescaut. Renowned as much for her great beauty as for her singing voice, she became one of the most photographed stars of her time. Frequently referred to as the "world's most beautiful woman," she was part of the tightlacing tradition that saw women use corsetry to create an "hourglass" figure. During the 1909-1910 season she sang with Oscar Hammerstein's Manhattan Opera Company. Her first marriage long over, she had a whirlwind romance and marriage with Winthrop Astor Chandler (1863-1926), a member of New York's prominent Astor family. However, this marriage lasted only a very short time and Cavalieri returned to Europe where she became a much-loved star in pre-Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Russia and in the Ukraine.

During her successful career, Lina Cavalieri sang with other opera greats such as the Italian baritone Titta Ruffo and the French tenor Lucien Muratore, whom she married in 1913. After retiring from the stage, Cavalieri ran a cosmetic salon in Paris. In 1914, on the eve of her fortieth birthday, and still a very youthful looking and beautiful woman, she wrote an advice column on make up for women in Femina magazine and published a book, "My Secrets of Beauty." In 1915 she returned to her native Italy to make motion pictures. When that country became involved in World War I she went to the United States where she made four more silent films. The last three of her films were the product of her friend, the Belgian film director Edward José.

Married for the fourth time to Paolo d’Arvanni, Cavalieri returned to live with her husband in Italy. Well into her sixties when World War II broke out, she nevertheless worked as a volunteer nurse. Lina Cavalieri was killed in 1944 during an Allied bombing raid that destroyed her home in the outskirts of Florence, Italy.

In 1955, Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida portrayed Cavalieri in the film The World's Most Beautiful Woman. In 2004, a book was published authored by Paul Fryer and Olga Usova titled Lina Cavalieri -The Life of Opera’s Greatest Beauty, 1874-1944.

Filmography:

The Two Brides (1919)
A Woman of Impulse (1918)
Love's Conquest (1918)
The Eternal Temptress (1917)
La Rosa di Granada (1916)
La Sposa della morte (1915)
Manon Lescaut (1914)



Offline veu

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 31
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2005, 11:03:31 AM »
She was the morganatic wife of Prince Alexander Bariatinski!
She was a legendary and very very very beautiful woman like Countess of Castiglione and Countess Christine Nilsson di Casa Miranda!

Photo:






Offline Margarita Markovna

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 3809
  • Call me Ritka :)
    • View Profile
    • My Yahoo Group for OTMA! Join!
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2005, 11:33:38 AM »
The second one is amazing!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by magpie »

Offline veu

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 31
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Princes Baryatinsky
« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2005, 02:26:54 PM »