Author Topic: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal  (Read 10543 times)

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Offline beladona

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The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« on: March 17, 2008, 05:36:47 PM »
King José I. of Portugal had four daughters. Oldest one, Maria da Gloria, became a queen of Portugal and was married to her uncle Pedro.
What about her sisters?

Maria Ana Francisca (Lisbon 7 Oct 1736-Rio de Janeiro 16 May 1813)
Maria Francisca Dorotea (Lisbon 21 Nov 1739-14 Jan 1771)
Maria Francisca Benedita (Lisbon 25 Jul 1746-Lisbon 10 Aug 1829); married in Lisbon 7 Feb 1777 her nephew (and cousin) José

Queen Maria I. was mentally ill, she suffered from melancholia and religious mania. Were her sisters „normal“? Why Maria Anna and Maria Francisca did not marry? Are there any pictures of them?

Offline Mari

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2008, 04:40:35 AM »
With all this marriage among relatives especially Uncle and niece or Aunt and nephew  no wonder there is mental illness! Do you think perhaps the other Daughters had inherited this strain!

Offline Marc

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2008, 05:37:12 AM »
I would also like to know something more about unmarried sisters...nothing on the web! :-(

Offline Linnea

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2008, 01:18:27 PM »
Oldest one, Maria da Gloria, became a queen of Portugal and was married to her uncle Pedro.

No, she didn't marry her uncle but firstly August of Leuchtenberg (+ 1835) and secondly Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2008, 01:21:04 PM by Linnea »

Offline José

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2008, 03:57:16 PM »
Oldest one, Maria da Gloria, became a queen of Portugal and was married to her uncle Pedro.

No, she didn't marry her uncle but firstly August of Leuchtenberg (+ 1835) and secondly Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

There is a slight confusion.

The one who married August Leuchtenberg and Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg was D.Maria II da Glória.

Beladona was asking for D.Maria I (da Glória).
AFAIK her full name was Maria Francisca Isabel Josefa Antónia Gertrudes Rita Joana.
Her sisters:
D.Maria Ana Francisca Josefa (b. Lisbon 7.10.1736- died Rio de janeiro 16.5.1813)
D.Maria Francisca Doroteia (b. Lisbon 21.9.1739- d. Lisbon 14.1.1771)
D.Maria Francisca Benedita (b.Lisbon 25.7.1746- d. Lisbon 18.8.1829)

The four sisters had a most remarkable education and were devoted to painting and music.

Offline Norbert

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2008, 06:49:47 PM »
Maria Ana was on the list for the Dauphin but Portugal was thought to be " too under the English". Maria Francisca was  seriously considered as a Queen for Poniatowski but the Russians were against the founding of a new dynasty in Poland. Perhaps the Princesses were held back from marriage for the sake of the  1641 Succession Law.

Offline José

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2008, 02:43:00 PM »
Those "grooms" are a novelty for me, and they surely don't appear in any of the Infantas bios I read.

Where did you get that information ?


Offline beladona

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2008, 05:31:17 PM »
Those "grooms" are a novelty for me, and they surely don't appear in any of the Infantas bios I read.
Where did you get that information ?
Did you read any bios about Infantas sisters? Could you tell us more about them? Why Maria Anna and Maria Francesca did not marry? Was it because of Succession Law? This law may explain why the youngest Infanta, Maria Benedita, married her own nephew...

Offline Norbert

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2008, 07:08:06 AM »
The 1641 Succession law .I believe you have to be born a Portuguese to succeed to the throne ...it was to prevent another situation when the Habsburgs took the crown. This is why Maria Francisca Benedita married her nephew at her fathers death bed.The Poniatowski marriage was from an exhibiton of his court at Dulwich Art Gallery. Sadly the French marriage is a note I made researching the court of Louis XV , but if i come across the ref I'll post it. Interestingly Manoel, son of Pedro II was a candidate for the Polish throne in 1733

Offline José

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2008, 04:29:32 PM »
Interestingly Manoel, son of Pedro II was a candidate for the Polish throne in 1733

Indeed he was.
Infante D.Manuel was a very adventurous prince.
When he was 18 he asked his brother king D.João V to let him search fame and glory in Europe, namely in the war against the Ottomans.
The King agreed at first and a party of some 40-50 people prepared to go with the Infante, given his high rank.

Soon after, jealous of his brother, the king postponed the authorization "sine die".

D.Manuel and his good fried Manuel Silva-Tarouca (who would be the anvestor of the austrian-czechs counts of S.Tarouca) decided to flee from the country on an english vessel, sailing to the Netherlands.
From there he presented himself to the Emperor, his brother-in-law, who, by then, had received a letter from D.João V, asking him to convince the Infante to return. The Infante refused and asked for a comission under Pr. Eugene of Savoy and covered himself with glory at several battles, namely at Belgrade.

By that time, the throne of Poland was vacant and the Emperor patronized D.Manuel's candidature.
However, he forgot one tiny little detail. Money was needed to win the throne, so the Emperor wrote to D.João V asking him to support finantially the Prince's campaign.

D.João V, who never forgave his brother to defy his orders, protested he was short of cash and could not pay for D.Manuel's candidature but he might find some "change" if the candidate was Infante D.Francisco, D.Manuel's elder brother and D.João V's favourite one.

The Emperor discarded the "offer" saying that only D.Manuel could be a candidate as his bravure was well known all over Europe and he would have Austria's support, so the polish throne was lost.
The Emperor was so fond of D.Manuel that he thought of creating him a kingdom with the islands of Sardinia and Corsica.
Once again D.João V did not back finantially the idea, this time with some reason as Spain and France objected to the creation of this new kingdom.

The infante remained several years in Austria and travelled all over Europe even to Russia, where he even proposed to the hand of the future Tsarina Elizabeth.

He eventually returned to Portugal where he was effusively greeted by his brother (who would have thought ?) and the whole court .
A man of action, he disliked the court life and intrigues and retired to one of his palaces where he died a couple of years later.

A truly forgotten hero of the 18th century

Offline beladona

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2008, 04:43:43 PM »
What an interesting story!!
Do you have a picture of this adventurous prince?

Offline Norbert

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2008, 04:04:42 PM »
yes many  thanks for that Jose. I never knew that he was to be given Corsica and Sardinia as a kingdom...those were the days eh?. Any thoughts as to why none of the siblings of Joao V married ? I believe Francisco had two natural children. Was this comparitively new dynasty worried at the lack of heirs?

Offline José

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2008, 12:49:09 PM »
A correction.

When D.João V refused to support D.Manuel to the throne of Poland, he said he might do an extra effort if the candidate was Infante D.António, (not D.Francisco) second of the King's three brothers, and his favourite one.

Both of this two Infantes, D.Francisco and D.António, had not very pleasant personalities.

D.Francisco, the elder, emulated his Father and thought of acting as he had done.
When there were talks for D.Manuel leave the country and seek fame and glory in Europe, one of the reasons D.João gave to stop him was the fact that he was intending to go on a pilgrimage to Loretto in Italy.

This woke D.Francisco intention to stay as Regent and try a coup to dethrone his brother.
And he seeked no other ally than the Queen, A-D Maria Anna of Austria, whom he began courting on a more or less open way.
Like his father D.Pedro II, he hoped to get both the throne and his brother's wife.
With great dignity, the Queen repelled her brother-in-law and convinced the King no to leave the country, which he did.

Things were a bit chilly between the two brothers but D.Francisco never left the Court, where his brother could keep an eye on him.

D.António was the "family hooligan".
Although nothing (naturally) was prooved against him, he is supposed to have been the leader of one of the two gangs  that terrorised the night of Lisbon .

Charming brothers.

D.Francisco fathered two natural sons. There are no record that the other Infantes had any children

Look at D.Pedro II descendance

Offline Norbert

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2008, 06:03:26 PM »
oh dear, I have Francisco down as a cruel man who enjoyed shooting sailors as they saluted...however Antonio as a quiet man and great scholar....? I also have a note that Francisco had 2 children by Mariana da Silveira, one of whom , Joao da ben Posta married a niece of 3 Duke of Cadaval

Offline Mari

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Re: The daughters of Joseph I of Portugal
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2008, 02:58:40 AM »
I found some interesting and terrible things about Maria I. Her Madness appears to have been fairly common in this family. If anyone could post any other pictures of this Family I would appreciate it.....and what other sources could you recommend?

Quote
Within a royal family that has been dominated by inbreeding and madness for centuries, Maria I of Portugal (1734-1816) was the first and maddest Queen regnant. When her loved ones died one after the other, she began suffering from delusions. The most agonising shrieks echoed through the palace corridors..

Maria was a daughter of King Joseph I of Portugal (1714-1777) and Mariana of Spain (1718-1781). Many of Maria's relatives suffered from religious mania and melancholia. Maria's maternal grandfather was Philip V of Spain (1683-1746), who was periodically afflicted by fits of manic depression, sometimes lethargic, at others passionate and excitable. Grandfather Joao V In his more lucid periods he was driven by two obsessions: sex and religion, and as a result, torn between desire and guilt. Maria's paternal grandfather, Joao V of Portugal (1689-1750, to the right), was also highly sexed and religious, choosing nuns to be his mistresses. From 1742 onwards, Joao V suffered from a physical illness and gradually he, too, sank into a deep melancholia. Near the end of his life Joao V had left the government in the hands of incompetent advisors, mostly churchmen. After his death Maria's father, Joseph I, busied himself with hunting and playing cards, while Portugal was governed by Sebastiao José de Carvalho e Melo (1699-1782), who received the title of Marquis of Pombal in 1770. Despite his enlightened reform, Pombal's reign was a reign of terror, arousing social discontent. Portugal's prisons were soon crowded with noblemen and priests.

In 1760, Maria was married at the age of 25 to her 42-year-old uncle Pedro (1717-1786). Despite the age difference their marriage was quite happy. The couple was very pious and visited several masses every day. Maria also loved to take part in Church ceremonies to celebrate the salvation of converts. Pedro had inherited the palace of Queluz, but he had it torn down and started constructing a pink miniature Versailles, which wasn't completed until 1794. There, the couple lived and brought up their children. Only three of the seven survived their early years: Joseph (1761-1788), Joao (1767-1826) and Mariana (1768-1788). Pombal arranged that his adherents educated Maria's eldest son, because he knew Maria was opposed to his policy.

An earthquake, followed by a tidal wave, hit Lisbon in 1755 and 30,000 people were killed. Although the Royal family was in Belém at the time of the earthquake, for a long time Joseph I refused to enter any of his surviving palaces, preferring to live in a tent. One evening in September 1758 Joseph returned to Belém and his coachmen, finding a gate jammed, took a side road. Suddenly, three mounted men appeared under the darkness of an arch and fired several shots at the Royal carriage. The King was hit in the arm and ordered the coachman to drive straight to his surgeon at Junqueira, thus avoiding a second ambush. Joseph was treated for bullet-wounds in his arm, shoulder and chest. Rumours circulated that he had been ambushed by the Távora family. The Marquis of Távora was an enemy of Pombal and his daughter-in-law was one of Joseph's mistresses. Nothing more was heard of the affair until December, when the Távoras, the Duke of Aveiro, a few other nobles and a number of jesuits were arrested. Confessions were produced under torture and later retracted, but the Marquis and his second son withstood the torture and revealed nothing. On a public scaffold the elder Marchioness of Távora and her two sons were beheaded. The old Marquis and the Duke of Aveiro had their bones broken and the whole scaffold was set alight. Thus Pombal removed all resistance to his rule, while the King remained passive and idle.
A statue of Joseph mounted on a horse was inaugurated on a great square in rebuilt Lisbon in 1775. The next year, Joseph suffered from a stroke that deprived him of speech and his wife assumed the regency. Before his death in February 1777, he married Maria's eldest son, 16-year-old Joseph, to Maria's younger sister, 30-year-old Benedita (1746-1829). Mercifully, this incestuous marriage remained barren.

Husband-uncle Pedro III At Maria's accession, her husband-uncle Pedro III (to the right) was given the title 'King', coins were struck in their joint names and all acts and deeds mentioned them both, but the Queen was the real sovereign and her uncle-husband only her consort. Maria dismissed Pombal, amnestied his political prisoners, including the surviving Távoras1, and recalled all exiles except the Jesuits. Maria's rule soon calmed the discontent among the nobility, but her conscience was sorely tried. She found it difficult to undo things that were done in her father's name, but she also thought her father's soul might be suffering eternal torment for having permitted Pombal to persecute Christ's representatives on earth. Once, in 1780, Maria scratched out her signature exclaiming that she was "condemned to very hell". She was carried off to her apartments in a state of delirium. By 1786, the Queen's behaviour had become increasingly odd.

Pedro was chiefly concerned with prayers and masses. A contemporary noted that Pedro talked much about goodness and justice, but that he had no knowledge of mankind or business and that he was easily governed by those immediately around him, especially if they belonged to the church. Apparently, he was also unable to read or write. Still, Maria and Pedro were deeply devoted to each other and Maria suffered intense grief at his death in March 1786. Royal festivities were banned, and state receptions resembled religious ceremonies. Two years later, their eldest son, Joseph, died of smallpox2. Maria's only surviving daughter Mariana died two months later. In the same year Maria's confessor and chief minister both died, too.

Maria had always shown a tendency toward religious mania. When her loved ones died one after another, she retreated into uncontrollable grief and melancholia. She was afflicted by stomach pains, depression, fever and insomnia. The melancholy fits and recurring nightmares increased. Reports of the revolution in France further disturbed her. The Queen's courtiers, who had been rotting for years in prison, were vengeance-obsessed and often half-crazed, and their presence did not much to enlighten the atmosphere at court.
Around 1790, Maria sank into a state of permanent melancholia. The English author William Beckford visited the pink palace and reported: "Queen Maria, fancying herself damned for all eternity, therefore on the strength of its being all over her, eats barley and oyster stew Fridays and Saturdays and indulges in conversations of a rather unchaste nature." She fancied she saw her father's image "in colour black and horrible, erected on a pedestal of molten iron, which a crowd of ghastly phantoms were dragging down.".