Author Topic: Leonid Sednev  (Read 146052 times)

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Offline Elisabeth

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #30 on: December 16, 2008, 10:17:06 AM »
On October 1, 2008, a petition to rehabilitate the Imperial Family, and a large number of servants, was presented to the Presidium of the Russian Supreme Court. Among the list is this excerpt: "In the late 1920’s in the Yaroslav Oblast [Region], E.S. Kobylinski, the former head of the guard of the royal family during their exile in Tobolsk, and L. Sednev, who in childhood was a cook’s helper in the Ipatiev House, were executed for “counter-revolutionary activity”.

Regarding L. Sednev's alleged, untimely death in 1929 (he would have been only what? in his twenties?) it's interesting that in 1926, the Soviet government - please note, this was even before Stalin seized total control - passed Article 58 of the Criminal Code, which particular act characterized crimes against the state in such vague and general terms that even refusing to work in a labor camp, from physical weakness, from starvation, constituted a criminal act against the state (see Solzhenitsyn, Gulag Archigpelago, vol. 1, pp. 60-61). I can't even imagine how dire and therefore "worthy" of capital punishment were the so-called crimes of such former Romanov sympathizers as E.S. Kobylinskii and Leonid Sednev. I'll quote from Solzhenitsyn - Article 58, section 10, was eventually "enlarged to include a face-to-face conversation between friends or even husband and wife, or a private letter... 'subverting and weakening' the government could include any idea which did not coincide with or rise to the level of intensity of the ideas expressed in the newspaper on any particular day. Indeed, anything which does not completely fit in, coincide, subverts [the Soviet government]!" (Solzh., p. 66).

What could be more subversive to the Soviet government than someone who had witnessed the last days and even hours of the Romanovs, and morevoer, undoubtedly sympathized with them and even expressed his pity for them to his friends or relatives - or, er, who might have done so or was at the very least suspected of having done so (well, he wasn't one of the executioners, was he? so he was automatically suspect). Moreover, by 1929 Stalin was fully in control of the Soviet government and "formers" (that was the Soviet term for those who before the October Revolution of 1917 had belonged to the elite classes, sometimes even up to and including their servants) were being arrested and sent to concentration camps or even in some cases shot out of hand.

In short, I think it's extremely likely that our poor Lyonka Sednev met even more than a highly untimely death, he met a highly suspect one as well.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2008, 10:20:27 AM by Elisabeth »
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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #31 on: December 16, 2008, 10:31:43 AM »
In short, I think it's extremely likely that our poor Lyonka Sednev met even more than a highly untimely death, he met a highly suspect one as well.

Surely seems possible. I thought I'd read somewhere (to my frustration, I can't find the source just now) that he'd died of influenza or some such disease, but that could easily be a cover for a politically motivated death.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
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aleksandr pavlovich

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #32 on: December 16, 2008, 10:42:43 AM »
Thank you, Sarushka and Elizabeth, for your interesting and timely replies.  I've no doubt that his closeness to the IF could, and would, bring dire consequences.......and possibly ultimately did.   STILL apparently no one has been able to conclusivly produce even a quote or a fragment of the alleged memoirs. Thus their once-purported existence at this moment is simply heresay.  I truly hope that someone would attempt to find and authenticate such.....though many things of this kind (when found) often prove to be inconsequential in expected content.   AP
« Last Edit: December 16, 2008, 11:05:48 AM by aleksandr pavlovich »

Offline Ausmanov

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #33 on: June 27, 2009, 05:50:53 PM »
If the rumour of his memoirs existing is true, i truly hope they surface even if they are inconsequential.
Does anyone know how old Leonid was when he entered into service at the palace or what year he started working there?
Also, I understand that he and Alexei were quite good freinds when they were imprisoned but does anyone have any information on how they got along before the revolution?
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aleksandr pavlovich

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #34 on: June 27, 2009, 06:08:59 PM »
Also (needless to say), they would require the unmost authentication possible.  Often when such a "find" is made, even the best experts seemingly " throw caution to the wind."  The forged "Hitler Diaries" come to mind........... AP
« Last Edit: June 27, 2009, 06:11:19 PM by aleksandr pavlovich »

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #35 on: June 27, 2009, 09:16:15 PM »
Does anyone know how old Leonid was when he entered into service at the palace or what year he started working there?
Also, I understand that he and Alexei were quite good freinds when they were imprisoned but does anyone have any information on how they got along before the revolution?

Many of the servants brought their families to Tobolsk when they followed the Romanovs into exile, so it's possible that Leonid never worked for the imperial family prior to the revolution.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
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Offline nena

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #36 on: June 28, 2009, 06:06:27 AM »
I agree with you. Most likely he joined the IF during Tobolsk exile.
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Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #37 on: June 29, 2009, 11:26:15 AM »
I agree with you. Most likely he joined the IF during Tobolsk exile.

Most likely, the uncle, Ivan, worked for the Imperial Family before the Revolution and went with them to Tobolsk as the Grand Duchess' footman. There is no mention of the younger man until their imprisonment, so likely Leonid joined his uncle and started working for them there. What is certain is that Alexei would not have befriended Leonid prior to the Revolution - they would not have had the close proximity to develop a friendship.

Offline Ausmanov

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #38 on: June 29, 2009, 04:48:22 PM »
Thankyou for your insights, opinions and information. I was unaware that his uncle Ivan went with the family to Tobolsk. Thankyou for enlightening me. I always thought Leonid worked at the palace before but that was just an uneducated theory. Has anyone ever been found list of the palace staff?
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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #39 on: November 30, 2009, 05:15:16 PM »
A brief physical description of Leonid Sednev from page 475 of Ispoved' Tsareubiits, as part of Anatoly Yakimov's May 1919 statement:

"Еще жил при царской семье мальчик, лет 14. Имени и фамилии его не знаю. Он был по своему росту высокий, худой, из себя лицом беловатый, нос прямой, длинный, рот большой, губы тонкие, глаза не особенно большое, но глубокие, а цвета их не помню. Носил он темносерую тужурку со стоячим воротником, такой же материи брюки и ботинки, но видел я его и в сапогах."

Google translation with my corrections:
A 14-year-old boy also lived with the imperial family. I don't know his first and last name. He was tall, thin, with a whitish face, a long straight nose, wide mouth, thin lips, not particularly large eyes, but deep, though I don't remember what color. He wore a dark grey jacket with a standup collar, trousers of the same material, and shoes, but I saw him in boots.

(Further corrections welcome!)
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
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Offline Nicolá De Valerón

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2009, 06:44:53 PM »
Further corrections welcome!


Sarushka, your Russian is excellent.
Here is some minor corrections.
More accurate translation. Maybe it's too British, but anyway.

"Еще жил при царской семье мальчик, лет 14. Имени и фамилии его не знаю. Он был по своему росту высокий, худой, из себя лицом беловатый, нос прямой, длинный, рот большой, губы тонкие, глаза не особенно большое, но глубокие, а цвета их не помню. Носил он темносерую тужурку со стоячим воротником, такой же материи брюки и ботинки, но видел я его и в сапогах."

There was a 14-year-old boy, who also lived with the imperial family. I don't know his name and surname. He was tall, thin, with a paled face, with a long straight nose, with a big mouth, with thin lips, with deep, but not a particularly large eyes, the colour of which I don't remember. He wore a dark grey double-breasted jacket with a stand-up collar, trousers and shoes of the same material, but I also saw him in a boots.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2009, 06:46:52 PM by Nicola De Valeron »
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Offline EmmyLee

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #41 on: December 01, 2009, 11:48:20 AM »
Thank you for the description. It would have been nice to see a picture of the boy; it's only another reason to mourn the family being unable to develop their photos there.

Offline Nicolá De Valerón

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #42 on: December 02, 2009, 08:10:10 PM »
Correct information about Leonid Sednev and his uncle sailor Ivan Sednev.

 Sednev Leonid Ivanovich, (near 1909 - 1942). Kitchen boy, a nephew of Ivan Dmitrievich Sednev. Followed with the Imperial family to Tobolsk and Yekaterinburg. Taken away before their execution in the house of Ipatiev. Was sent to Yaroslavl Province. Killed by the NKVD during the war.

*Info taken from Popov's archive.

 Sednev Ivan Dimitrievich, (1886 - 1918). A peasant from Yaroslavl Province. Sailor from the imperial yacht Standart. Footman of the grand duchesses. Followed with the Imperial family to Tobolsk, then arrived with them in Yekaterinburg, where in 27 of May 1918, was arrested and sent to the prison along with K. Nagorny. They both were shot at the end of the May, 1918 or in the beginning of the June, 1918. After the Siberian White Army took the Yekaterinburg their bodies were buried in the cemetery of Ivanovo, Yaroslavl Province.

*Info are taken from "Abbot Seraphim (Kuznetsov). Orthodox Tsar-Martyr. M. 1997. S. 635."  
« Last Edit: December 02, 2009, 08:14:46 PM by Nicola De Valeron »
"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #43 on: December 02, 2009, 08:18:43 PM »
Has anyone ever seen a photo of Ivan Sednev?
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
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Offline Nicolá De Valerón

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Re: Leonid Sednev
« Reply #44 on: December 02, 2009, 08:23:20 PM »
It's the same difficult work, as to find a Leonid photo. Maybe just impossible.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2009, 08:28:06 PM by Nicola De Valeron »
"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.