Author Topic: Rasputin's "Powers" and His Family Name.  (Read 45214 times)

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Offline Todd

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #45 on: April 18, 2004, 10:54:56 PM »
Sensationalism in the case of Rasputin


I thought some of you might be interested in the following:

Some of the earliest sensationalism concerning Rasputin came from one of his earliest supporters, later to become a bitter enemy, a charismatic monk named Father Iliodor (Sergei Mikhailovich) Trufanov, who was born in 1881 in the village of Bolshaya Marinskaya in the Don region in southern Russia. Have any of you ever heard of him?

Father Iliodor was a graduate of the St. Petersburg Theological Academy and became a priest in the city of Tsaritsyn (later called Stalingrad, and today called Volgograd), where he earned a reputation for his fiery sermons.  

Iliodor and Rasputin became friends and were often seen in each otherís company. Over the years, Iliodorís vitriolic zeal became too much for him to handle. Unable to control the vehemence of his tongue, he moved frequently to stay one step ahead of the police.

Things ended sadly for Iliodor. Extremely unbalanced, he eventually renounced his priestly and monastic calling. On November 20, 1912, he slashed his arm with a razor and sent a message, signed in his own blood, to the Holy Synod, stating:  

I renounce your God. I renounce your faith. I renounce your Church. I renounce you as hierarchs....

Former Hiermonk Iliodor (Sergei Trufanov), Holy Devil, Moscow, 1917, p. 175 (My translation, TRB)

Iliodor wrote his book on Rasputin in 1914, entitling it The Holy Devil, an appalling and libelous account alleging amorous ties between Gregory Rasputin and the Empress.

The idea for such a book was supported enthusiastically by author Maxim Gorky (20th century Soviet writer and close friend of Lenin) in a letter to a journalist friend, S.S. Kondurushkin, in March 1912:

It seems to me, - more than that, I am convinced, that a book by Iliodor on Rasputin would be extremely opportune and essential and could be of undoubted benefit to many people. If I were in your place, I would insist that Iliodor write this book. I will see that it makes it abroad.

Literary Inheritance, Gorky and Russian journalism at the beginning of the 20th century, Moscow, 1988, Vol. 95, p. 985 (My translation, TRB)

Iliodor, dressed as a woman, fled to Norway at the beginning of 1916 to avoid being imprisoned on libel charges for his slanderous writings. His flight was assisted by Maxim Gorky, the Soviet writer, who had promised to help get his slanderous book published abroad. Iliodorís book was finally published in Moscow in 1917 and in New York by Century Company in 1918. Most of what the world knows today about Rasputin comes from Iliodorís distorted and sensational writings. Most of the same stories are rehashed over and over again in various books.

Trufanov became a Baptist and in his last years worked as a janitor for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in New York. He died of a heart attack in 1952 at the age of 71, leaving behind a wife and 7 children.

He was really something. I just came across the manuscript of a work by Iliodor called Stalingrad Martha. Iíve never heard of it, so it should be interesting.

Todd

J.R

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #46 on: May 04, 2004, 11:35:56 PM »
H---I don't want to say hi...I just want to know why
did I knew his name, before that I discover him on a
E---book... well I don't know if you understand, but.. it  
take me so long to know that he was existing before
L----you know..
i was so young and i was thinking that i created that
P---name.. .BUT  He Is TRUE... Does someone can explain that to me....  
thx    

J.R

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #47 on: May 04, 2004, 11:56:13 PM »
Well I'm sorry,  
Anyway... I know it may sound crazy, but
If you can answer plz
reply (better on that web site)

rskkiya

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #48 on: July 11, 2004, 11:18:30 AM »
About Rasputin...

I found out something recently (a few days ago) that †explained some of Rasputin's "magical power" over Alexie's hemophilia -- †although the good folk here probably knew it all along! †:)
† † The doctors were supposedly prescribing Aspirin for Alexie's condition --not knowing that this would in fact make his bleeding much worse! Rasputin, distrusting of such witchcraft as medication, would inevitably throw the tablets away whenever he came to heal the child. †
† † The tendence of aspirin to affect blood clotting was not understood until 1971, so I don't think that the doctors were trying to hurt Alexie. Rasputin didn't so much heal the boy - as just keep his blood from getting even thinner!

strange but true
R.

sorry about my poor spelling
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by rskkiya »

Offline AGRBear

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #49 on: July 12, 2004, 08:17:50 PM »
Where in the world did you find information on the fact that the doctors were giving Alexis aspirn? :o

AGRBear
"What is true by lamplight is not always true by sunlight."

Joubert, Pensees, No. 152

rskkiya

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #50 on: July 12, 2004, 08:32:39 PM »
AGRBear

It was in "Nicholas II: the Interupted Transition" by Hellene Carrere Decausse...

page 147 (middle of the page)

† "....the doctors administered the analgesic that was†then in vogue - aspirin, discovered in 1899 - which far from halting the bleeding only aggravated it. Rasputin, a man of nature hostile to all drugs, urged the monarchs not to give aspirin to the child, and on several occations threw the pills that had been prepared onto his bedside table.' †

shocking

R.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by rskkiya »

Offline AGRBear

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #51 on: July 12, 2004, 08:47:59 PM »
Learn something new everyday. ;D

Also, you've mentioned another book I haven't read.

Go over to the book threads and tell us more about it, please.

AGRBear
"What is true by lamplight is not always true by sunlight."

Joubert, Pensees, No. 152

rskkiya

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #52 on: July 12, 2004, 08:49:43 PM »
AGRBear

Its under recomended books

Offline AGRBear

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #53 on: July 12, 2004, 09:17:32 PM »
I wonder how many of you are old enough to know what it was like to live in time when people all around you believed in people who held powers of healing or who could conjure up evil spells or who could give you the evil eye?

Today, it is easy to scoff at Alexandra and others of her generation who believed in magical powers.  But in those days there were  so many unexplained occurances which no one understood.  And to fill that void of  which became known quite quickly as "mysterious occurances" were answers connected to the world of supersition.

Today,  we can just turn on our computer, go to goggle,  go to some medicine site, type in "aspirn" and in a blink of an eye all the information you want to know and then some pop up on the screen.

In Alexandra's time,  there was no one to explain the effects of "aspirn".  And,  when Rasputin took it away and her son was better than she, being a God fearing woman,  gave credit to God who had sent her Rasputin.  

It wasn't just Alexandra.  In the small distant villages there were events which were just as mysterious.  And,  like in the far away Palace in St. Petersburg, there were words to utter to warn off the evil spirits and to bless the bride and groom and when a child was born or someone died....

A minor event such as a bird pecking on a window meant death had come knocking for someone within the hut.

A black cat cross someone's path meant mad luck.

A broken mirror meant bad luck for seven years.

People truly believed and many ruled their lives because of supersitions.

Since I'm older and remember "knocking on wood for good luck",  I can understand the reason Alexandra could believe in Rasputin's healing powers just because of some aspirn.

AGRBear
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by AGRBear »
"What is true by lamplight is not always true by sunlight."

Joubert, Pensees, No. 152

Offline Belochka

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #54 on: July 20, 2004, 12:01:25 AM »
Rasputin actually did Alexei a huge medical favor, which was described in d'Encausse's book at p 147.

The new medication - Aspirin was given by Alexei's doctors in good faith, to relieve joint pain due to inflammation caused by his repeated bleeding episodes. Unwittingly the doctors were severely compromising Alexei's health status, by extending the period of internal bleeding.

Today we are advised that Aspirin should not be administered generally to children because of the associated risk of Reye's Syndrome - a rare condition which causes the brain to swell and also can disturb liver function.

Both these contraindications have horrendous ramifications, yet Rasputin's repeated actions helped relieve Alexei's misery and guard against further potential medical problems. The absence of this medication in his body was no doubt the reason for his fairly rapid relief and improvement.

The simple act of deprivation of the medication was not appreciated at the time, but the resulting relief in Alexei's condition was clearly observable. IMHO this observation provided a desperate connection for Alexandra as a mother to believe in Rasputin's alleged divine powers.

Today our modern understanding of the pharmacologic effects of Asprin, provide a clearer explanation as to what was really happening.  



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rskkiya

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #55 on: July 20, 2004, 08:31:10 AM »
Belochka
Thanks for the confirmation of my previous post...

Its rather too bad that Aliksandra was unable to see a connection between these to events ( no aspirin - Alexie gets better)... She might not have been so fixated with Rasputin. Thus his seemy side might not have put her under such general contempt.

R.

Offline Belochka

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #56 on: July 20, 2004, 10:52:31 PM »
Quote
Its rather too bad that Aliksandra was unable to see a connection between these to events ( no aspirin - Alexie gets better)... She might not have been so fixated with Rasputin.
R.


Yes indeed how different everything would have been had Alexandra understood that connection! †:-/
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


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Offline Natalie

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #57 on: July 29, 2004, 09:52:47 PM »
I was trying to find information on where Rasputin was barried, and found some info that he was cremated.  If he was cremated then why is his body part ( more specifically his penis) is preserved and on display at a Russian museum?  Did they just cut off some body parts and burned the rest? What are the actual facts?  ???

Offline Belochka

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #58 on: July 30, 2004, 12:10:22 AM »
Although the remains of Rasputin were exhumed and cremated for political reasons, such a practice is contrary to the Orthodox religion.


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rskkiya

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Re: Rasputin
« Reply #59 on: July 30, 2004, 05:37:09 PM »
OHHH HOOOO! ;D

† † The old Rasputin phalus myth once again rears its ummm... head? (lol)
† †Anyway thats just a jolly unban legend and the last 'item" claiming to be this venerated object turned out to be a pickled sea cucumber!

R.

Belochka is right about the Orthodox Church and cremation.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by rskkiya »