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Rasputin's Murder

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Richard_Cullen:
MY COMMENTARY

There are no pictures of the rear of Rasputin’s head, probably because of the massive injuries that were likely to have been caused.  I do believe that photograph 22 shows considerable matting and blood soaked hair.  I have usefully used descriptions from the assassins of the Romanov Royal Family in the basement of the Ipatiev House in Ekaterinburg on 17 July 1918 from King’s and Wilson’s book:

‘When Yurovsky entered the room, he saw Botkin, covered in blood, held his Mauser close to Botkin’s head, and pulled the trigger.  The bullet ripped through the doctor’s head, exiting out the lower right side of his skull, its force slamming his body against the floor in a shower of gore.’

‘Yurovsky, standing behind Tatiana, aimed his Colt and fired.  The bullet tore into the rear of her head; it ripped through her skull instantly, blowing out the right front of her face in “a shower of blood and brains”.

Yurovsky’s Mauser was a .32 calibre (7.63mm) larger than the calibre of Mauser or Browning that Zharov and colleagues say caused the left side body wound to Rasputin.  His Colt was .45 calibre (11.43mm).


Zharov

Conclusion

1.      It is possible that the lethal dose of potassium cyanide didn’t cause Rasputin’s death. The poisoning did not occur, either as a result of cyanide changing its chemical status... (ineligible)  The nature of Rasputin’s complaints about feeling unwell after he took the poisoned cakes and wine, are characteristic of light poisoning.

2.      The autopsy of Rasputin showed three gunshot wounds where the bullets went in the body and one wound where the bullet came out; one cut and many bruises on the head caused by a heavy, blunt object. It is impossible to determine the type or the calibre of the gun from which he was shot (pistol or revolver), but we can assume that it was a 6.35 mm weapon.  

3.      It is also impossible to conclude the sequence, and the distance, from which the shots were fired. We can only suppose that out of three gunshots, the one into the head was the last. This shot shows all the signs of being fired at close range. The shot into the chest and back were probably fired from quite a close distance as well.

4.      The mechanical injuries (the ones not caused by gunshots) in the region of the head were caused by a succession of blows inflicted by heavy, blunt objects. These injuries could not have been caused by the body hitting the pylon of the bridge from which it was thrown off.

5.      The cut on the back was caused by a sharp object, possibly a knife or a razor blade. It is not possible to say whether this injury happened before or after death.

6.      After Rasputin was wounded in his stomach and liver, it is possible that he could walk, run; put up resistance during the next 5-15 minutes.

7.      After he was wounded in the head, it is dubious that he was able of to act with purpose and co-ordination.

8.      The injury most likely to have caused the death is the shot in the head, which caused the damage if the brain matter.

9.      There was no evidence of drowning in the studied materials

Expert of forensic medicine of the highest qualification
PhD in Medicine
Senior Lecturer
                                                       V.V.Zharov


Expert of forensic medicine of the highest qualification
PhD in Medicine
Lecturer
                                                        I.Y.Panov

Expert of forensic medicine of the highest qualification

                                                       V.K.Vasilevskiy


The Zharov Interview

As part of the Time Watch production I had the opportunity to interview Professor Zharov about his findings.  A short piece of the interview is included in the transmitted programme.

Three of the questions I asked Professor Zharov and the answers he gave are I believe of particular importance.


Question:

“I wonder if you could give me your opinion about Professor Kossorotov’s evidence that the three bullet wounds were caused by different calibre weapons.”

Answer:

“Yes I think that is the case, if we accept the wound to the left side was caused by a Browning, the one to the back by a Sauvage, and then the one to the forehead was caused by a larger calibre weapon than both of the other guns.”

Question:

“In your view does the contact wound to the forehead discredit Purishkevich’s evidence?”

Answer:

“Of course it does, Purishkevich said he fired at Rasputin from behind at a distance of twenty paces and hit Rasputin in the back of the head.  The picture of Rasputin’s forehead shows an entry wound, the Standsmark around it means it was fired at close range.”

Question:

“In your view, as the forensic evidence tells us that three weapons of different calibre were used does this mean that there was a third person involved in the shooting?”

Answer:

“As a scientist I cannot say that a third person was involved in Rasputin’s murder.  What I can say is that as an individual I am certain someone else was involved, because neither Purishkevich nor Yusupov mention the close quarter shot to the forehead – if they didn’t do it, who did?”

My Commentary on the Kossorotov Post Mortem and the Zharov, Panov and Vasilevskiy Report

There is no forensic evidence that Rasputin was poisoned by the use of cyanide.

At the time of his demise Rasputin was in a state of drunkenness

Rasputin did not die of drowning

There is evidence that Rasputin was shot three times

All three weapons were fired from a range of no more than 20 centimetres

All three bullets were from different calibre weapons

It is impossible to know the sequence of the shots but the shot to the forehead would have been immediately disabling and was therefore in all likelihood the last.

Both the shot to his left side (stomach/liver) and right side of back (kidney) would individually have been fatal in 10 to 20 minutes.

The head and body had been beaten with a hard but supple weapon consistent with the cosh Yusupov refers to.

The gentiles were crushed with the same weapon.  This is indicative of a sexual/revenge attack.

The face was considerably disfigured

It is impossible to identify whether certain injuries were caused ante or post mortem – for instance hitting the bridge supports.

Richard




Richard_Cullen:
My Commentary on the Kossorotov Post Mortem and the Zharov, Panov and Vasilevskiy Report

There is no forensic evidence that Rasputin was poisoned by the use of cyanide.

At the time of his demise Rasputin was in a state of drunkenness

Rasputin did not die of drowning

There is evidence that Rasputin was shot three times

All three weapons were fired from a range of no more than 20 centimetres

All three bullets were from different calibre weapons

It is impossible to know the sequence of the shots but the shot to the forehead would have been immediately disabling and was therefore in all likelihood the last.

Both the shot to his left side (stomach/liver) and right side of back (kidney) would individually have been fatal in 10 to 20 minutes.

The head and body had been beaten with a hard but supple weapon consistent with the cosh Yusupov refers to.

The gentiles were crushed with the same weapon.  This is indicative of a sexual/revenge attack.

The face was considerably disfigured

It is impossible to identify whether certain injuries were caused ante or post mortem – for instance hitting the bridge supports.

Richard


























Arleen:
You make it clear Richard....

Arleen

leushino:

--- Quote ---You make it clear Richard....

Arleen
--- End quote ---



Well... almost clear. Just one small exception, Richard.

You say his gentiles were crushed with the same instrument. Don't you mean, his genitals? lol

Otherwise, good summary. Carry on.  ;)

Richard_Cullen:
quite right - sorry

Richard

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