Author Topic: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna  (Read 14206 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« on: July 26, 2009, 04:06:28 PM »


Tsarevna

Length: 57 meters -  or approx. 187 feet

The Imperial Yacht Tsarevna ("daughter to the Tsar") was built 1874 in England for Emperor Alexander II; this smaller, 840 ton, yacht was primarily used by his successor, Emperor Alexander III, for short trips off the coast around St. Petersburg and vacation trips to the Finnish skerries. Emperor Alexander III and his wife, Empress Maria Feodorovna (the Danish born princess Dagmar) frequently visited Finland; their rather basic cottage has survived and can be visited in Langinkoski. The Imperial couple met occassionally with the local fishermen and other local inhabitants - these were not always aware of the fact with whom they were talking. Emperor Alexander III enjoyed fishing and hunting and especially appreciated to escape the formality at the Imperial Court. The elegant yacht was decommissioned in 1917 and finally scrapped.

1899 -  onboard Tsarevna

Here we see the wood decks are overlaid with oriental carpets.


 Very elegant in its naval architecture, «Princess» was excellent in seaworthiness.  At full displacement of 840 tons of speed it was to 13.5 knots, in addition to its three-mast the yacht could carry  slanting sails.

 Artillery armament consisted of four 4-pound guns of the specimen in 1867.  In the stern was a small cabin, which housed the king's room, decorated in valuable wood. Modest imperial apartments were located in a lower deck.  The value of this  yacht was quite high - 290 thousand rubles.

 In the list of Baltic Fleet ships she is listed as «own His Imperial Highness the sovereign heir steam yacht» «Princess».  In September 1874 came from England to Kronstadt.  Soon she was sent to Sevastopol; returned «Princess» Kronshtadt in June 26, 1875.  During this cruise the yacht came to Villa Frankish and lechivshayasya in Nice, France with the Empress Maria Alexandrovna on  December 17,

After assuming the throne Emperor Alexander III in 1883 «Princess»  became a kind of personal yacht Empress Maria Feodorovna, and often went to the Finnish skerries in 1889.

Typically, these two-three-week voyages took place in late June and early July. The yacht came in Kotka, Gelsingfors, Abofiordsky bay and reached the Ekenesas.




« Last Edit: July 26, 2009, 04:34:39 PM by Douglas »

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2009, 03:37:43 PM »

King Christian IX of Denmark - Dowager Empress Maria - GD Olga

Grand Duke Michael - Nicholas's younger brother

Alexandra - Nicholas II wife

Xenia, Nicholas II sister

Nicholas II - 1899

The occasion  for the visit to Denmark was the death of Queen Louise who was Empress Maria's mother.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2009, 03:46:42 PM by Douglas »

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2009, 05:07:38 PM »

This is the Danish Palaces Egg given to Empress Marie in 1890..   The egg is 4 inches tall and 2" 5/8 wide.  So we can see that the panels inside are very small miniatures.

The surprize inside is a folding screen of ten panels.   Two panels are Imperial yachts,  the others are her favorite palaces in Denmark.  The scenes are painted with watercolor on mother of pearl.

This is the screen of the yacht Tsarevna.  Each individual screen is about one and one half inches wide and two inches tall. The other yacht screen is of the Polar Star.

Here is GD Xenia and her husband Sandro on the stern of the yacht Tsarevna.  The object behind them are the davits for the small boat that hung on the stern.

This is a model of the Tsarevna.  The red arrow marks the place where the large family group photo above was taken.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2009, 05:31:31 PM by Douglas »

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2011, 12:47:41 PM »
Here are some additional photos of the yacht "Tsarevna".   She was used by the Dowager Empress for short voyages after the death of Alexander III .


Here is a picture from 1891.  Tsar Alexander III and members of the family.

« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 12:56:39 PM by Douglas »

Offline Robert_Hall

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 6649
  • a site.
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2011, 01:10:40 PM »
Happy NY, Douglas.
 The yachts;  these family sailings were  rather large, what with staff, servants crew and all. And the yachts were hardly  Cunard ocean liners so  where did everyone fit on the the  ships ? Must have been very cramped, even with the size of these vessels.
Life may not be the party we expected, but while we are here, might as well dance..

Do you want the truth, or my side of the story ?- Hank Ketchum.

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2011, 08:57:40 PM »
Happy NY, Douglas.
 The yachts;  these family sailings were  rather large, what with staff, servants crew and all. And the yachts were hardly  Cunard ocean liners so  where did everyone fit on the the  ships ? Must have been very cramped, even with the size of these vessels.

Thanks Robert.  Yachts have always had a way of making all of the interior compartments a wonder of miniaturization.  Twenty inch stairways, narrow passageways and very tiny cabins are an example.  I suppose they had to leave most of the staff at home.   

When they built the larger yachts, of course everything became more spacious and they really had all the comforts of home.  

I sailed on a 1905 steam yacht a few years ago and was so surprised at how small  everything was.   It was all very cozy and intimate to say the least.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 09:00:09 PM by Douglas »

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2012, 06:05:18 PM »
Here is the Tsarevna at anchor in a port.   Alexander III considered this yacht to be too small for his large extended family.   He ordered the construction of the much larger Polar Star. which was much more comfortable.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2012, 06:07:29 PM by Douglas »

Offline Robert_Hall

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 6649
  • a site.
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2012, 06:11:00 PM »
That is why I asked, Douglas, about the capacity issue. Were there other ships/yachts along with this one to house the surplus of availability ?
Life may not be the party we expected, but while we are here, might as well dance..

Do you want the truth, or my side of the story ?- Hank Ketchum.

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2012, 12:30:20 PM »
That is why I asked, Douglas, about the capacity issue. Were there other ships/yachts along with this one to house the surplus of availability ?

Yes there were other yachts available but I have no definite information on their travels during this time period.   All I have read is that the Tsar complained and a new larger yacht was ordered.

Offline Mike

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1324
    • View Profile
    • Erast Fandorin Museum
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2012, 06:38:23 AM »
Imperial yachts never sailed alone: they were escorted by naval ships, which had spare cabins for accomodating low-ranked suite members.

Offline Douglas

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1207
    • View Profile
Re: Imperial Yacht Tsarevna
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2012, 04:09:16 PM »
Imperial yachts never sailed alone: they were escorted by naval ships, which had spare cabins for accomodating low-ranked suite members.

You make a good point Mike.   I didn't mention it because I thought most everyone already knew that.   I believe there were always at least two in attendance.

  These guard ships came in  handy when the Standart went aground in 1907.  They rushed in to rescue the Imperial family and others on board.