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Topic: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev  (Read 12083 times)
« on: August 13, 2009, 05:38:46 AM »
Richard P Offline
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I have been enjoying reading the forum of late and have found it very informative but I would be grateful if anyone could inform a new member further about Vasily Yakolevthe Extraordinary Commisar sent from Moscow to Tobolsk.

I would like to know what if any official position he held other than the title 'Extraordinary Commisar'?  What was his history in the Bolshevik party? As he failed in his mission to return the family to Moscow how was he viewed by the central authorities? Lastly I seem to remember reading that he later joined or was captured by the Whites but died shortly thereafter but could someone update my faulty memory?

Many thanks

Richard
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« on: August 20, 2009, 12:51:11 PM »
Clemence Offline
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From what I read in a book on Nicholas II and AF, it seems that Jakovlev's mission was intented to make it seem like the bolscevicks tried to get the IF back to Moschow, while the only think they really wanted was the family to remain in siberia. It seems there was considerable pressure by count Wilhelm von Mirbach, the german ambassador and a true desire of the Kaizer to try and save the family. Jacovlev didn't have any problems in explaining why he failed in his mission, six months later he joined the whites, but there's no evidence that he was somehow in contact with anyone of the whites before that.
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« on: November 02, 2009, 02:47:55 PM »
Nicolá De Valerón Offline
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  Myachin Konstantin Alekseevich(real name), Man who played big role in Romanovs destiny.
Born 17(29).08.1885(6), s.Mihaylovka(Sharlyk) St. Michael's parish Orenburg district of Orenburg Province - died 16.09.1938, Moscow (repressed and killed by Military Collegium of the Supreme Court of the USSR).
  Party and Military leader, terorrist, adventurer, big Party player, bolshevik, fought for Bolshevicks, then moved to the side of White Army.
Had Party pseudonym "Finn","Nicholas", for his life had three names, first his own name Myachin Konstantin Alekseevich, then in 1909-1919 lived under the name of Vasyl Vasylievich YAKOVLEV, from 1921 till the end lived under the name of Konstantin Alekseevich Stoyanovich.
  From the peasants. Studied at the parochial school. Member of RSDLP(1905-1917). One of the leaders of Ufa provincial militia organizations, members of terrorist acts and expropriations on Ural. In 1909-1917 due to the threat of arrest and death was in exile (Italy, Finland, Belgium). Studied there Electrical Engineering and foreign languages(Later Pierre Gillard and others remembered as a how gracious was Commisar Yakovlev!, and that he knew several languages!!) Met on Capri with Maxim Gorky, involved him in a campaign to protect the militants on trial in Chelyabinsk.
  After the February Revolution(1917) returned to Russia and worked in Ufa. Participated in Ural Congress of the Soviets in Ufa Province. Actively participated in the seizure of power by the Bolsheviks. Commissar of telegraph and telephone station. From the end of 1917 to the early 1918 - assistant chairman of the Cheka (later knowm as KGB).
In April 1918 completed order of Sverdlov carried the former Imperor's family members from Tobolsk to Yekaterinburg (originally planned to Moscow?  foreign country ? We don't know his big play to this day). He turned the direction of the train from Yekaterinburg to Omsk (White Government). Not bad for a Bolshevik! Yakovlev became immediately blamed by local Bolsheviks in Ekaterinburg as a traitor. But he immideatly managed to get out of this difficult situation (due to friendship with Sverdlov), but, unfortunately, he had to deliver Nicholas II to the Red Ekaterinburg.  But saved him at the station from the furious crowd
  Later in 1918 he moved to  the Constituent Assembly(Whites).
Agreed to the statement in the press with an appeal to the Red Army, called on them to move to the side of Constituent Assembly(Komuch) army.
Unfortunately was unable to infiltrate with White Army and in November of 1918, when Kolchak rased power he was arrested. In the beginning. 1919, possibly for a bribe, he was released with travel restrictions. Soon he disappeared and exiled to China. In Harbin, he joined the revolutionary.
From 1921 till the 1928 by the name name of Konstantin Alekseevich Stoyanovich worked in the apparatus of Office of the Adviser to the Government. Arrived in 1928 in the USSR, Moscow and immideatly became arrested, convicted by committed treason, until 1933 was in custody, and in 1938 again arrested and shot.
  Executed (16.09.1938)The prosecution: the TRANSITION to White Army, TIES with foreign intelligence and anti-Soviet activities.
  
*photos are taken from http://www.dostoinstvo.zolt.ru/
« Last Edit: November 02, 2009, 02:56:20 PM by Nicola De Valeron » Logged

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« on: November 03, 2009, 01:25:41 PM »
Nicolá De Valerón Offline
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Here is the receipt that was given to Yakovlev(Myachin) when he arrived at Yekaterinburg with Nicholas II, Alexandra Fedorovna and Maria Nikolaevna. He gave them to the Commissar Beloborodov.
Photo(from Sokolov investigation)



And translation.
           
          "Yekaterinburg     30 of April     1918.

               Receipt

          1918 of April twentieth day, I,
          Chairman of the Urals Regional Council,
          Alexander G. Beloborodov, received from the Commissar
          of All-Russia Central Executive Committee
          Vasil Vasilievich Yakovlev, delivered them from the
          city of Tobolsk: 1) the former Tsar Nikolai Alexandrovich               
          Romanov 2) the former Empress Alexandra Feodorovna Romanov,
          3) the former Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna Romanov, for
          their custody(custody underlined) in the city of  Yekaterinburg.

          A. Beloborodov.


              Head of the Regional Executive Committee
              B. Didkovskii."
       
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« on: November 04, 2009, 09:38:34 AM »
AGRBear Offline
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Ahhh  yes,   the mysterious Yakolev.

Tinker, tailor, soldier, spy?Huh?  

Was he whom the Reds/ communists claimed?

Interesting subject.  Yes,  'indeedy'.

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« Last Edit: November 04, 2009, 09:42:08 AM by AGRBear » Logged

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Reply #5
« on: November 04, 2009, 01:04:29 PM »
Nicolá De Valerón Offline
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Yes, he remains a very mysterious figure. The problem is that he was killed more than 70 years ago. Disappeared forever, and left many things unsaid. I think that he was neither a Bolshevik, nor a communist (too smart for a Communist), nor intelligence agent. Rather, he was just a very big player and adventurer. A man of his time, caught in a heart of the Revolution, and lived under the laws of that time. As a result, by the way, he didn't recognized neither the Whites nor Red Army. I also know, that he had a wife, Olga, she left, as far as I know, her memories. He, incidentally, when he returned to the Soviet Union, also wrote about how he was carrying the Emperor, of course in justificatory key, excused for his transition to the the Whites. But it seems that he was not forgiven. He was too outstanding figure. The most important question that remains open, is that in what place he wanted to bring the Emperor, and why he wanted to take with him Alexei Nikolaevich? Unfortunaly Alexei was sick, and could not withstand the road.



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"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.
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« on: November 10, 2009, 10:40:18 AM »
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From the moment    Vasily Vaslevich Yakovlev and his men rode into Tobolsk, there has been questions asked about what his intent was in regards to Nicholas II and his family.

In Alexandra "last letter to Anna Vyrubova" (pps. 492-3  Nicholas and Alexandra by Massie) >> Alexandra wrote: ...A great number of new troops have come from everywhere.  A new commissar has arrived from Moscow, a man named Yakovlev and today we shall have to make his acquaintance.... They are always hinting to us that we shall have to travel either very far away or to the center of Siberia... The atmosphere around us is ...electrified.  We feel that a storm is approaching, but we know that God is merciful... our souls are at peace.  Whatever happens will be through God's will."<<

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« on: November 12, 2009, 10:58:58 AM »
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p. 265 THE FILE ON THE TSAR by Summers and Mangold [First Edition]:

>>Yakovlev certainly did all he could to deceive the men from Ekaterinburg.  When th train pulled out, at five o'clock in the morning, it actually started out in the direction of Ekaterinburg, only to reverse back through Tyumen again, all all lights extinguished on the way to Omsk.  But news of Yakovlev's plan had already reached Ekaterinburg by telegraph.  As the train moved eastwards, the Ekaterinburg Soviet declared (p. 266) Yakovlev an outlaw and traitor to the revolution, and asked the Omsk comrades to turn the train back to Tyumen.<<

Farther down the page.

>>The only Soviet account tries to explain the whole thing by saying that Yakovlev indeed arrived as Moscow's trusted envoy, sent to trandsfer the tsar to Ekaterinburg.  But he betrayed his orders in mid-operation and "know tha execution awaited the Romanovs, decided to save them, and to alight with them on the way to Samara and to hide them for a time in the hills..."<<

All of this is interesting to me for several reasons.  Not only does it appear that Yakovlev seem to have taken it upon himself to rescue the Tsar, the Soviets admited he knew that Moscow had already given the orders that the Tsar was to be executed in Ekaterinburg.

Over on p.  269-270 the authors continue to tell us the last word known about him up to the time when the book was published in 1976.

>>Clearly Yakovlev, whoever he was, would have been a key witness for the invesigation into the fate of the Romanovs.<<
>>...White investigators knew exactly where Yakovlev was with the White armies.  Two formal requests were made to Kolchak's minister of war to have him made available for questioning.  The requests went unheeded and only in June 1919, after a six-month delay, did the Military Counter-Intelligence admit that they had traced Yakovlve--and lost him again.  Their reported stated lamely:
Yakovlev was arrested on the instructions of General Shenikh, and escorted to Western army headquarts and from there  to the town of Omsk, in accordance with instructions from the 1st Quartermast General of the Supreme Command Staff [Whites].  But because of a mistake by escort Yakovlev was transferred to the command of Colonel Zaicek on 2 Jan 1919, all further trace of him was lost after this.  Acording to the same report, Yakovlev offered 500,000 roubles in return for his freedom.<<

>>....Some accounts say he was killed fighting for the Whites, another says he was "shot by mistake".  The mistakes, the fatal accidents and illnesses, multiply.  Yakovlev vanishes with trace another silent witness<<

Summers and Mangold follow with speculations.  And, they were not the only ones speculating.

It wasn't until I read THE ROMANOVS, LOVE, POWER AND TRAGEDY tranlsated by L. Xenofantova  on pps. 302-306 that I read that he was a "true Bolshevik" and the authors go on to say: >>In fact, he was one of Lenin's lieutenants, his read name being Konstantine Myachin. Before the revolution he had been a participant and organizer of the so-called "expropriation", burglaries and plunder to raise money for Bolshevik activities.  Suspect by his fellow Bolsheviks of treason, he defected to the White Guard in autumn of 1918. But as the accusations were discredited, he returned to the side of the Bolsheviks. There is some evidence he worked for the Cheka.  He died in Russia in 1938.<<  They have a copy of his identity card and a photo which was signed by the Cheka chief Fleix Dzerzhinskiy.  There is another document which has him as a metal worker by the name of Ivan Klokov.

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« on: December 01, 2009, 01:25:24 PM »
Nicolá De Valerón Offline
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As I know Yakovlev memoirs have not been published in English. Here are some excerpts from Yakovlev's memoirs. Unfortunately his language is very terse. Largely because that Yakovlev wrote his memoirs, when he had just returned in Soviet Union. So, he wrote them in justificatory key.
Detailed translation.

Some words about the preparations for the road of Imperial family. And these are in fact the only emotional words about them in throughout his memoirs.

  "All the inhabitants of the house were in a hurry and were running around the house. In all corners of the house I heard the sighs and sobs. Daughters of the Romanovs and all of their entire court staff went out onto the porch. Nicholas Romanov being a little bit confused passed from one to another, and with some spasmodic movements baptized his daughters. His haughty wife held back her tears. Each of her gesture, every of the word she spoken, testified that she didn't want to show their weakness to the "Red enemy." She tried once again to show her character, stated, that the she will choose the crew at her own discretion."

About their arrival in Yekaterinburg, when Yakovlev protected Imperial family from the crowd.

  "On April 30, in the morning, we arrived in the city of Yekaterinburg without any accidents. Despite our early arrival, all the Yekaterinburg platforms were fully crowded. How all these people have learned about our upcoming arrival, we didn't know. Largest crowds were concentrated on commodity platforms, to one of which they then moved our train. Our train was standing on the fifth line from the platform. When we became visible, crowd began demand to bring out Nicholas and show him to them. The air was filled with noise and threatening cries: "They should be stifled!" Finally they are in our hands!" The platform's security had a poorly control of the crowd and disorderly crowds began a dangerous movement to my train. I quickly set up my squad around the train and prepared guns. To my surprise, I saw in the led of the crowd a railway station commissar himself. He had shouted to me from a big distance:
 -"Yakovlev, Bring here the Romanov, I spit in his face."
The situation became extremely dangerous. The crowd pressed forward and was more and more closer to the train. It was necessary to take an a decisive action. I sent Kasyan to the head of the station with order to immediately place between the platform and out train something like a freight train, and then sent our train to the station of Yekaterinburg-2. The cries became more and more threatening. In order to pacify the crowd, I shouted as loud as possible to my detachment:
- "Prepare machine guns!." This word had an effect. The crowd fell back. Then I also heard threatening cries in my address. The station commissar yelled with frantic voice:
- "We don't fear your machineguns! We prepared our machineguns against you! Here they are - on the platform!"
I looked in this direction and indeed, a plenty of guns were already ready for the fire and someone was rummaging around them. While I was trying to win some time and exchanging courtesies with the crowd, Kasian, meanwhile managed to obtain from the head of the station to execute all our orders.
Soon we saw the train moving in our direction. Just a few minutes later we were already separated from the crowd with a long freight train. We immediately heard shouting and swearing to the driver of that train, and while the crowd was getting to our side through the buffer of the freight, we have already hitched a locomotive, withdrew from the place and disappeared in a countless ways of the Yekaterinburg station and just after a 15 minutes we were completely safe in the station of Yekaterinburg - 2.
  The courier, that was sent by my to Beloborodov returned and said that now we must wait for the cars and representatives from the Council. Beloborodov, Goloshchekin and Didkovskii came 20 minutes later. Beloborodov entered in my railcar. Our meeting was very short and laconic. Evidently, Moscow has given them all a good threshing - it was felt on every their step. All the transfer of the Romanovs to chairman of the Ural Council had been silent. Beloborodov, as a chairman of the Ural Council, wrote a receipt that I gave him Romanovs. Receiving a receipt from Beloborodov, I gave them the Romanovs, and after it, gave them the rest. Romanovs were sent to Ipatyevsky house, their courtiers - in the Yekaterinburg Prison."
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 01:27:52 PM by Nicola De Valeron » Logged

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« on: December 01, 2009, 05:45:17 PM »
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wow Thank you for posting
even in this  terse account, he describes an  atmosphere  that is emotional and electric.

It seems they had no idea what would happen to them from one moment to the next.
When he says Nicholas Romanov... with some spasmodic movements baptized his daughters.
I'm guessing he means Nicholas was blessing them .
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« on: December 02, 2009, 01:49:08 PM »
Nicolá De Valerón Offline
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Agree with you, blessOTMA. Each following step of Yakovlev could easily be the last for him and for the Romanovs. But in the end, he finished his mission and kept them alive, although only for three months. So, his soul is unguilty. I also think that all of them (Yurovsky, Ermakov, M. Medvedev-Kudrin, Yakovlev, etc) although wrote their memoirs in a very terse language (we know the reason why), but were surprisingly intelligent and had also some certain literary talent. In all of their memoirs we hear incredible and dark atmosphere in the air. As I remember, Radzinsky even said, I don't remember his quote exactly, but something like, that it's a pity that Yurovsky wrote just small note, cause he could easily write a novels.

Here is a little part of a conversation between Yakovlev and Ural Council members (Beloborodov, Golovoshcekin, Didkovskii). It's interesting, that here he slightly denies his previous words about the calm meeting between them. Yakovlev gave them the Romanovs and demanded the removing of a telegram declaring him as a traitor. Long discussion started between them. As I know, this part was already published by historian Richard Pipes. This is my translation of this part of his memoirs.
 
 "Socialist-Revolutionaries and Beloborodov with Didkovskii tried to turn the situation as if I was guilty, while I came to demand the removing of the telegram. Passions flared up, but the usual sense of a tone or the comrade Golovochekin won, and it was decided to return me a document. (Receipt that Golovoschekin, has received the Romanovs and has no any claims to Yakovlev). Sitting in the railcar, we were talking peacefully with Goloshchekin and discussing all the details. Finally, he interrupted the conversation and said:
     - "Your happiness, Yakovlev, that Lenin is on your side. He considers all of your actions as an absolutely right." Then he thought for a moment, paused, and with a friendly tone added:
     - "Oh, Yakovlev, but you have already lost your revolutionism."
 Our following meeting with Sverdlov was very friendly. Sovnarkom acknowledged my actions as a right and I was immediately appointed as a commander of the Orenburg - Samara front."
« Last Edit: December 02, 2009, 01:55:32 PM by Nicola De Valeron » Logged

"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.
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« on: December 05, 2009, 06:16:35 PM »
Nicolá De Valerón Offline
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 View about those meeting and transferring of the Romanovs from Avdeev.
Little excerpt from the memoirs of the first of Ipatiev's house commandants about their, with Yakovlev meeting with the representatives from Ural Regional Council in the city of Yekaterinburg. Again very terse language. But this is Adeev's view of that situation. It's interesting, that for him is not characteristic such an a colorful description of an events, as for Yakovlev. Just terse enumeration of the facts. But this is understandable, because Avdeev was not from Yakovlev's detachment, and was appointed simply as a controller of the Romanov's transportation. Furthermore, relations between them were very strained. He also didn't said anything about a serious conversation between Yakovlev and Goloshchekin.

 "Our train was stopped nearly freight station of the Yekaterinburg-3, just a few miles away from the main Yekaterinburg passanger terminal. Comrads from Ural Regional Council Beloborodov, Goloschekin and Didkovskii were already waiting for us there. Whole territory of the station was cordoned off with the Red Guards. Comrade Beloborodov told us, that Nicholas, his wife and daughter will got out of the train here and will go by car, as well as the luggage will follow up to the main station, where all of the rest must also get out and luggage would be unloaded. This was done in order to distract the audience's attention, which was waiting in the main terminal. All of the arrested were already dressed and ready to get out of the railcar.
    After Yakovlev was given a receipt of the acceptance of the former tsar, Beloborodov invited Nicolas to sit in one of the cars, in which he sat next to him. I also sat next to them. Alexandra, their daughter Maria, comrades Goloshchekin and Didkovskii sat on the second car. On the way, Comrade Beloborodov told me that by the decision of the Regional Executive Committee I was appointed as an a commandant of the "house of special purpose", or simply the house, where Imperial family would be imprisoned."          

« Last Edit: December 05, 2009, 06:21:40 PM by Nicola De Valeron » Logged

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« on: December 05, 2009, 11:22:44 PM »
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Nicola, as you say the language is terse ...but that just adds to the chill these statements give one
That you for posting this gold nuggets of infomation! 
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« on: December 06, 2009, 03:43:32 PM »
Nicolá De Valerón Offline
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Excerpts from Yakovlev memoirs about important meetings with Sverdlov
(Head of All-Russia Central Executive Committee) who gave him an
order for the transportation of the Romanovs. Yakovlev didn't said
exact date of the meetings, but of course they were definitely on
April, 1918. And not in the first time Yakovlev shows a certain literary talent.
Very picturesquely description of the events.

 "After a few friendly words Sverdlov got down to our business.
Sverdlov began:
- Well, Anton, how much people did you shot?
I immediately realized that all details of our wild gallop with forty railcars filled with grain to Moscow a week ago was well known for him, he also knew all about our troubles with the attackers on the train units.
- Well, this is not our case. - as usual, firmly and definitely spoke comrade Sverdlov. - I've been waiting for you for a long time. I have a secret conversation to you. You will get a very important job of a state significance.
 Obviously, my face was expressed with a mixture of a different feelings. Comrade Sverdlov couldn't resist a smile:
- Ah, what an impatient you are. By the way, haven't you forgot all the covenants of Ural militants yet? You can say not what you can, you can say only what is need. I hope that you didn't forgot it in the foreign countries. I tell it you because this conversation would be only between me and you. Do you understand me?
- Yes! - I answered, being almost touched by the great confidence.
- Well, that's all for the present time. Come straight to my office, after our All-Russia Central Executive Committee session will be finished.  - and he went out. Only after all, I learned that at that time he held a consultation with Lenin about my forthcoming mission.
 
  I have come too early. He came in an hour later:
- Well, here is your mission - Council of People's Commissars of the RSFSR decided to remove the Romanovs from Tobolsk, till only on the Ural.
  My emotions erupted - my old Ural sourdough remembered about itself.
- I will do everything exactly. What are my credentials?
- All power is in your hand. All people for your detachment you will recruit by yourself. You will have a special train. You will have a mandate signed by Lenin and by me. And you have the right to shoot an anyone who does not comply with your orders. But only...
 I was silent and waited tensely.
- ...Only the Urals defeated. As soon as the information about Romanovs transportation was obtained, Ural Regional Council sent a detachment and wanted to took away the Romanovs. But it didn't work, guard didn't let them to do it. Omsk and it's detachment also could do nothing.
- Guard has refused to extradite the Romanovs?
- Well, and yes and no, - answered Sverdlov. - There, in any case, the situation is very serious. We cannot trust their guard. All of the Urals and Omsk detachments, Tobolsk garrison - at your own personal disposal. But you must pay the money to the guard's soldiers. How much money do you have?
- Five million.
- Take as needed. In all actions - the strictest secrecy. On the all issues about transportation contact exclusively with me. Direct line: Kremlin, Moscow, Sverdlov.

 After I prepared a special train, I came to the boss for the mandate:
- OK! - exclaimed Sverdlov and picked up the phone. - Comrade Yenukidze? how is a mandate to Yakovlev? Done? OK. Lenin signed it? I will come by myself.
 
 In my mandate, because of an absolute secrecy, Emperor and Tobolsk haven't been mentioned. In order to recheck all the instructions, I finally asked:
- The "cargo" must be delivered alive?
Comrade Sverdlov shook my hand and rapped out sharply:
- Alive; I hope, that you will follow all the instructions exactly."
« Last Edit: December 06, 2009, 03:50:23 PM by Nicola De Valeron » Logged

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« on: December 07, 2009, 04:51:15 PM »
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Urgent telegraphic message from Sverdlov to Yakovlev, in the response for his request on April 29, 1918.
Sverdlov telegraphed Yakovlev immediately after Yakovlev turned his train to Omsk and was immediately declared as a traitor both by Ural Regional Council and Omsk Regional Council. Realizing the hopelessness of the situation and that he had fallen into the trap, not reaching Omsk, Yakovlev stops the train, and through his acquaintance Comrade Kosarev (head of the Omsk Regional Council) sends a telegram to Sverdlov, and expects from him a pacifying of a both of the councils. Sverdlov however ordered him go back to Yekaterinburg.

  
  Sverdlov to Yakovlev by telegraph,
  (Moscow to Omsk) April 29, 1918.
    
  "Immediately moves back to Tyumen.
   Agreed with the Urals. Measures are
   taken - they gave personal guarantees by
   the Ural Representatives.
   Pass the entire "cargo" to Tyumen to the
   Representative of the Ural Regional council.
   This is necessary...
   You have executed most importantly.
   I am confident in the precise execution
   of all instructions.
  
                             Regards, Sverdlov. "




*telegram is in the open archives.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2009, 04:55:43 PM by Nicola De Valeron » Logged

"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.
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