Author Topic: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev  (Read 22713 times)

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Offline Nicolá De Valerón

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2009, 01:26:08 PM »
Here is another interesting excerpt from Yakovlev's memoirs.
Sorry, that I publish excerpts from his interesting memoirs in a very inconsistent key.
The problem is, that this is very difficult to find them. As far as I know, even in Russia.
Memoirs had been published, again as I know of course, only once - in 1988, in the Ural state magazine during Perestroika times and never again. Some excerpts were published by Richard Pipes, some excerpts were published by other historians, but the whole memoirs, unfortunately, were never been published. Of course I mean in English.
All the information, which I publish here are from open and available sources, not from the various archives, etc.

This is an interesting excerpt, or to be more correct, telephonic (or telegraphic, I don't know exactly) message from Yakovlev to his Boss Sverdlov. It took place when Yakovlev had just visited Imperial family at a first time and found Alexei being very sick. Yakovlev immediately telegraphed to Sverdlov and told him about the new unexpected problems and as well as about his upcoming mission.
(Sorry in advance for a very "specific" Bolshevik's language).

  "To People's Commissar Sverdlov. To Moscow.
   Sverdlov on the line?
   Tell him on my behalf the following. "My son" is dangerously ill. (dot)
   Muddle hinders to take "all the luggage". (dot.) Are you understand me? (dot)
   If you understand, then answer.
   Am I doing right, if, without waiting for a good road,
   I will go only with a "part of the luggage"? (dot)
   Let the Nevsky to give a telegram to the Tyumen railway station, in order to my train,
   will not be arrested immediately as an emergency train without parking, and they gave us
   in addition to our train one railcar of a first or second class.
                                                                        Yakovlev."



Also here is a very interesting, and maybe even rare terse excerpt from report of Yakovlev's personal secretary Galkin. Galkin made a report of the meeting in Romanov's house in Tobolsk between Yakovlev and Nicholas II. As I know the whole Galkin report was once published in Russian sometime ago.

  "Commission consisted from the Executive Commissar from the Council of People's Commissars of RSFSR, Yakovlev, his secretary, Galkin, commandant of the house Kobylinsky, chairman of the house security committee Matveev, representative from the Yekaterinburg City Commission Avdeev and the duty officer of an outer entrance.
We met Nicholas, along with his three daughters in the hall. Comrade Yakovlev greeted all and asked the Romanov:
- Are you satisfied with the house security? Have you got any claims?
At that Nicholas, rubbing his hands and smiling, answered:
- I'm very pleased, very pleased.
Commissar expressed the desire to see Alexei. Nicholas hesitated.
- Alexei very ill.
- I want to see him - Commissar continued to insist.
- OK, But only you alone, - agreed Romanov.
Comrade Yakovlev and Comrade Avdeev went to the Alexei room. Daughters with curiosity looked during a conversation, on the representatives from the Communist government. Alexei was indeed very sick from the bruise hereditary disease. Yellow emaciated boy seemed to be a deadly ill. The former Empress at that time was not ready for a visit. Comrade Yakovlev visited her after, alone. Alexandra with greatness met him, was speaking regally and graciously answering to all the questions and often smiling. Then we again visited Alexei."
« Last Edit: December 21, 2009, 01:35:47 PM by Nicolá De Valerón »
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Offline blessOTMA

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2009, 02:10:41 PM »
Thank you Nicolá ! Each line adds to our knowledge

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Offline Nicolá De Valerón

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #17 on: October 11, 2010, 02:51:07 PM »
Better quality photo of Vasiliy Vassilievich Yakovlev (Myachin, Stoyanovich). I don't know exact date, but think that it was taken during Yakovlev's Chinese work after Revolution (twenties). Rather mysterious and imperturbable look...



« Last Edit: October 11, 2010, 02:54:05 PM by Nicolá De Valerón »
"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.

Offline scarlett_riviera

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #18 on: October 11, 2010, 10:22:33 PM »
Thank you for that pic of Yakovlev. He really is a mysterious figure. I've only read about him from Massie's book and Radzinsky's. In The Last Tsar it was stated that he died in one of Stalin's camps- is that true? I would like to think that he was sympathetic to the tsar but seeing that he returned to the Bolsheviks I now highly doubt it.

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Offline Nicolá De Valerón

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2010, 10:21:57 AM »
Thank you for that pic of Yakovlev. He really is a mysterious figure. I've only read about him from Massie's book and Radzinsky's. In The Last Tsar it was stated that he died in one of Stalin's camps- is that true?

You are welcome.

Yes, that's true. He was first repressed and then after and an endless painful experiences, killed. This is understandable, because he was too important figure during October Revolution and Civil War (close with Yurovsky, Sverdlov and other big Bolsheviks) and his actions, like the Romanov's transportation and defection to the White side were rather strange. These things Stalin would have never forgave.

I would like to think that he was sympathetic to the tsar but seeing that he returned to the Bolsheviks I now highly doubt it.

I also think so. It seems to me that he was more like a big player or adventurer, than a Bolshevik or Monarchist;). Just a man in the heat of those difficult times.
"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.

Offline Richard P

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2010, 06:29:37 AM »
I have meant to reply before but I would like to thank all the members who contributed for improving our knowledge of the man Vasily Yakolev and his political affiliation.

I suppose I was of the opinion that he was a political adventurer the like of which arises in times of great upheval, but it seems he might have had a past history in the bolshevik party, which makes sense given the task he was entrusted with. From the books I have read he always seems to have treated the family well and I had hoped tried to save them from the fate that awaited them at Ekaterinburg. I think he had the last real chance to save the family for  and appears to have dallied before handing them over.whether out of loyalty to the Tsar, promise of reward or knowledge of what fate awaited them.

I await with interest any new information that emerges

Many thanks

Richard

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #21 on: September 04, 2011, 12:18:45 PM »
We know thjat Yakovlev was arrested once in Ekaterinburg; does we know wether he was arrested immediately - on the platform of the secondary station, in front of Nicholas, Alexandra and Maria - or only afterwards? To be short: did Nicholas, Alexandra and Maria SEE him being pushed away in handcuffs?
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Offline AGRBear

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #22 on: April 26, 2014, 11:14:56 AM »
The book THE ROMANOVS, LOVE, POWER & TRAGEDY on p. 306 hold the various photo of Vasily Yakolev, who had a variety of names which depended upon what he was doing at the time, but knows best for this particular name due to his role in taking Nicholas II and Alexandra to  from Tobolsk to Ekaterinburg (Yekaterinburg).  The Bolsheviks claim him as their own and is known best as  Konstantin Myachin, a member of the CHEKA.  

Speaking of the CHEKA,  they were far better than most of you realize, they infiltrated their "moles" into very high places, so, who knows if Myachin died or was just sent into another secret mission.    

His main role was to raise money for farther communist activities....

Here is a photograph of him:


« Last Edit: April 26, 2014, 11:26:09 AM by AGRBear »
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Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: The Role Of Vasily Yakolev
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2014, 04:45:15 PM »
Thanks for posting the pictures of him. For awhile the only known likeness of him was from the Soviet painting of Him with NAM arriving in Ekaterineburg. On his defection to the Whites this is what may have happened: Defections were quite commen in the Russian Civil war. The Reds were losing when he defected in late 1918. Yakolev was put in command of the Red 2nd Army after his mission with NAM so I guess at this time he was still trusted by the Bolshevik leadership. It could be he wasn't a very good general since he had no previous military experience and being a bad commander that loses battles could get you shot in the Red army. Also note the Red Commisar for war was Trotsky who didn't like his friend and superior Sverdov. Note no one in the Bolshevik leadership except Lenin liked Trotsky. So things may have been going badly and he decided to desert. It should also be pointed out he was observed to be acting in a deferentional manner towards Nicholas, then there was his attempted Omsk detour. Then there is the article he wrote and the messages he sent before he handed NAM over at Ekaterinburg. Which if found out by others in the Bolshevik leadership could have made him suspect which could also get you jailed, tortured and shot. So he decided to defect.