Author Topic: The Kremlin - general information  (Read 159640 times)

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Offline ilias

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The Kremlin - general information
« on: June 24, 2004, 05:28:24 PM »
I know that kremlin was not used by the romanovs but does anyone know a good site with nice pictures?  i'VE SEEN SOME IN A MAGAZINE when a greek singer was in moscow for a concert and they gave her a special tour even in rooms not open to the public and they were impressive!

Thanks!

Offline Joanna

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2004, 11:42:47 AM »
Hi ilias !

The Imperial Family lived within the Kremlin when they were in Moscow. There residence was the Grand Palace.

The President of Russia uses this palace today for ceremonial occasions.

Joanna

« Last Edit: May 08, 2009, 12:07:00 PM by Svetabel »

Offline ilias

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2004, 03:11:05 PM »
Oh my God! It is in such great shape!

So I'm guessing it was never destroyed by the germans in WWII?

Offline Greg_King

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2004, 06:07:04 PM »
The Grand Kremlin Palace was featured in an issue of Architectural Digest in the early 1990s-I don' have the exact reference at hand.

Two other books with a lot of interior photos:

Markova, G.  The Great Palace of the Moscow Kremlin.  Leningrad: Aurora Art Publishers, 1981.

Rodimzeva, Irina and Nikolai Rachmanov and Alfons Raimann.  The Kremlin and Its Treasures.  New York: Rizzoli, 1987.

You can also buy a video called "Behind Kremlin Walls" that tours these rooms.

Note, though, that all of these appeared before the destruction of the Hall of Congresses and restoration of the two original parade halls-the Hall of the Order of St. Alexander Nevsky, and the Hall of the Order of St. Andrei.

Greg King

Offline Joanna

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2004, 10:09:46 PM »
Here is a view of the Grand Palace from the side with Nicholas II riding and the various cathedrals that I have never seen before:

http://www.ipmce.su/~cyril/orthodox/tzar/images/kremlin.jpg

Joanna

Offline gleb

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2004, 10:30:46 AM »
if anyone is intersted in seeing a plan of the Great Palace and a section of it, can contact me at my  personal email.

Offline Arleen

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2004, 01:04:36 PM »
Does anyone know the name of the horse Nicholas is riding in the picture Joanna posted?  I am interested in the different horses that he owned after the wonderful article on the Pensioners Grave Yard in King/Wilson's Atlantis Magazine this time.
How many different horses did Nicholas have and what were their names.       Many thanks, Arleen

Offline Joanna

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2004, 09:10:49 PM »
Quote
How many different horses did Nicholas have and what were their names.


Hi Arleen,

On Nikolai's site of the Anniversary Exhibition of Tsarskoe Selo of 1911, there are photographs of various horses one of which belonged to GD Nicholas Nicholaevich that are interesting to see. Of my translations I have not been able to identify any that belonged to Nicholas but I too would be fascinated to find out more not only of N's but of Alexandra's and the GD's. Of the Kremlin, where were the Tsar's stables located or were they kept within one of the regiments' stables? Did Nicholas transport his horses from St. Petersburg to Moscow for these revues or were familiar horse(s) maintained there for his infrequent visits?

http://geglov2.narod.ru/Foto/Raznoe/Ubileyn_vist_012.htm

http://geglov2.narod.ru/Foto/Raznoe/Ubileyn_vist_013.htm

Joanna





Offline Dominic_Albanese

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Discoveries in the Kremlin
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2005, 07:15:32 AM »
http://english.pravda.ru/science/19/94/377/15934_Kremlin.html

Archeologists discover secret passages and rooms in Putin's Kremlin residence

08/06/2005 17:35

There has always been a bunch of legends about secret staircases and passages in the Kremlin

The Moscow Kremlin revealed another of its mysterious. A sudden discovery was made in the place where everything seems to have been discovered. Restorers found secret corridors and staircases in the walls of the Patriarchal Kremlin.

There has always been a bunch of legends about secret staircases and passages in the Kremlin. There was a strong belief in their existence but nobody knew where exactly to look for them. Their discovery can be considered a major archeological finding of recent years. It is possible that some of them may lead to a famous library of Tsar Ivan the Terrible.  

Palace's One-Pillar Chamber was under restoration. During the Soviet period there were public lavatories here. The voids were found when builders took the tile off the walls and sank a boring.

"As a rule, during the restoration unexpected discoveries are made which surprise specialists as well as restorers and architectural historians. In this building amazing in-stairs spaces and rooms were discovered", Alexey Levykin, director of the Kremlin Museum scientific department says.

Historians think that these walled up stairs connected Patriarch Nikon's Chambers with the backyard. They made it possible to hide from the danger or to leave the palace quickly. In the time of peace they could serve practical purposes.
 
"Meals which were cooked here were then brought to gala chambers through these stairs. Two of them were found during the restoration. They had not been used for a long time", the head of the Kremlin's department of architectural monument's restoration Tatiana Krasheninnikova explains.

Tiny rooms located in the walls could be used for storage. Archeologists scrutinized every brick and sifted the dust in discovered bays.

The rooms discovered are rather small but they will definitely serve as an extra space for the Kremlin's museums. The restoration actually was started in hopes to solve the problem of space. A new exhibition hall is to be opened in One-Pillar Chamber with some new objects on display. A researcher Marina Golovanova who holds a unique collection of banners says that some of them never left the repository. A banner, which was used during the coronation of Nicholas II, is worth exposing to the public other then being tucked away. Some of the banners are kept in such places you can hardly access them. "The exhibits are not always kept as they should be. It is better to keep staffs in a horizontal position", Marina Golovanova says.

The Moscow Kremlin Museum will celebrate its 200th anniversary next year. By this time the problem of space is going to be solved as they say. All the restoration workshops and storerooms are going to be removed from the territory of Kremlin. Rooms that they occupy at the moment are to be restored and then will be used as exhibition halls for more then 100,000 objects.

Alexander Rogatkin


Read the original in Russian: (Translated by: Anastasia Pulich)

Offline Dominic_Albanese

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2006, 07:06:39 PM »
A recent article on (in?) the Spasskaya Tower in the Kremlin

http://english.pravda.ru/main/18/90/363/16730_Kremlin.html

World's most unique Kremlin tower clock celebrates 600 years
01/12/2006 14:57
Today, the Kremlin chimes are the only ancient mechanical tower clock in Russia and worldwide

In Russia, a new year begins after the old Kremlin tower chimes strike twelve on December 31. The clock is situated in the very heart of Moscow, the Red Square, that is known as the favorite place of interest among foreign and Russian guests of the capital. In 2005, the old clock turned 600.

The old clock is situated in the Spasskaya Tower of the Kremlin at the height of about 60 meters. One has to climb a cast-iron tracery staircase with cast footsteps to get to the clock. People who maintain technical support and secure the clock have to climb the long staircase several times a day.

Head of the group for the Kremlin chimes restoration, Alexander Starodubov, is an accurate Time Keeper. This is the name under which the man is known in the Kremlin. He has to examine parts of the chimes regularly and lubricate them with machine oil. The Time Keeper says that he adjusts the clock twice a day because the chimes go five-six seconds fast every 24 hours.

One who manages to climb the staircase and reach the rarity clock mechanism on the eighth circle of the Spasskaya Tower risks to remain thunderstruck when the chimes begin to sound. Everyone who wants to have an excursion about the Kremlin clock needs to have earplugs. The very heart of the Kremlin clock consists of perpetually moving pinions, levers and other clock mechanisms. Today, the Kremlin chimes are the only ancient mechanical tower clock in Russia and worldwide.

In previous centuries only emperors and their confidants were allowed to come inside the Kremlin clock. Sometimes, foreign ambassadors were permitted to come and see the wonderful clock from the inside. Today, the main clock of the country is guarded as a strategic object. It is not open for public excursions.  

Nobody knows how much exactly the mechanical wonder weighs. It is not easy to know absolutely everything about the huge construction. The Kremlin chimes are the national standard time for the whole of Russia.

The musical chime is what makes common tower clock particular. Some time ago, there were over 30 of working bells while there are just 14 bells there today. It was just once over the modern history of Russia that the bells kept silent. In 1974, the bells did not ring for 100 days, two hours and 58 minutes because of complex restoration of the clock.

The belfry is situated some circles above the heart of the clock. Some unique bells even have the brands of makers who moulded them. One bell weighing 21 poods (one old Russian pood equals 16.3 kg) has an engraving saying it was made in 1769 and mentions the name of the maker. Best bell ringers of the Moscow Patriarchy put the Kremlin bells' ringing right. These bells have small hammers instead of tongues to make the sound short and resonant. It slightly resembles the organ sound with its polyphony. People must not stay for too long under the hipped roof of the tower otherwise they may have headache. There is a legend saying that some members of the imperator family even lost conscience staying there. Probably it happened because of fear caused by another legend saying that ghosts haunted the Spasskaya Tower. Today, guards of the chimes say they from time to time feel uncomfortable staying in the tower as if someone is watching them.

In 2004, the Kremlin chimes turned 600. Monk Lazar Serbin from Afon made the first clock mechanism and mounted it in the Moscow Kremlin in December 1404. Today's chimes were made under Peter the Great. But the original sight of the chimes was transformed several times within the centuries. Parts of the clock were changed three times within the 20th century.

Igor Ganswindr from the Russian Academy of Sciences Center for Geoinformation says the tower clock made by Monk Lazar survived many fires and restorations. It was mysteriously discovered a year ago. In 1624, some merchants from Yaroslavl bought a clock that served its time on the Spasskaya Tower and restored it. It became a real scientific sensation when researchers supposed that the chimes of the Spassky monastery in Yaroslavl were probably the rarity clock made in the epoch when Monk Lazar lived. However, this fact is not yet determined for certain.

The first bells were made for the chimes in 1624. The face of the clock was divided into twelve hours under Peter the Great. Earlier, it was divided into 24 hours.

In 1917, Bolsheviks changed the czar melody of the chimes for The Internationale and a revolutionary song popular at that time. In 15 years, the chimes sounded only The Internationale. In 1938, the Kremlin clock sounded no music at all and only rang chimes to mark every hour.

In 1995, the authorities charged experts with reviving the melodious sound of the main clock of Russia and making it sound two melodies as it had been in previous years. So, experts of the clock industry research institute performed a unique job. At first, they recorded the chimes of the bells remaining on the Spasskaya Tower to determine the musical tone of each bell. Then they made the frequency analysis of the bell sound. The sound of the chimes was restored in 1996. Today, the Kremlin bells sound two melodies; Russia's national anthem composed by Alexandrov is one of the two.

During the last restoration of the clock the face and the hands were covered with special protective substance to resist the soot and gases of the megapolis.  

Offline xirbis

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2006, 03:51:19 PM »
TO ILIAS:
Ilias, Germans never took Moscow. This is why the Palace could not be destroyed by them. The Kremlin was protected against German air raids quite well.

Offline Dominic_Albanese

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Burials in the Archangel Michael Cathederal
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2006, 10:55:32 AM »
Hi - not sure if this will be of interest to others or not, but I've been looking for a long time for a list of burials (in english) in the Archangel Cathederal in the Kremlin.

Here it is...

http://www.kreml.ru/en/main/museums/archangel/burial-vault/scheme/

dca

David_Pritchard

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Re: Burials in the Archangel Michael Cathederal
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2006, 01:25:46 PM »
Nice site Dominic!

In case anyone is interested in the historic churches that contain the burials of other early Russian rulers, I found some old research stored in my computer regarding the burial places of a few of the Rurikid grand princes:

The tombs of Yaroslav I Mudriy (the Wise), born 1017 and died 1054; Vladimir II Monomakh, born 1053 and died 19 May 1125; Izyaslav I, born 1024 and died 3 October 1078 are at the Cathedral of Saint Sophia in Kiev.

The tombs of Vsevolod III, born 1154 and died 15 April 1212; Yaroslav II Feodor, born 8 February 1191 and died 30 September 1246 are at the Uspensky (Assumption) Cathedral in Vladimir.

Svyatoslav I Igorovich, born 930 and died 972, has no grave at all as the Turkic Pechenegs killed him near the cataracts of the Dnieper River and converted his skull into a drinking vessel.

Mstislav I Vladimirovich, born 1 June 1076 and died 15 April 1132, was buried in the Church of Saint Feodor.

Rostislav II Mstislavich, born 1100 and died 14 March 1167, was buried at the Theodosiev Monastery in Kiev.

Yaropolk II Vladimirovich, born 1082 and died 18 February 1139, was buried in the Church of Saint Andrei in Kiev.

Yurii I Dolgoruky Vladimirovich, born between 1096 to 1100 and died 15 May 1157, was buried in the Church of the Holy Saviour in Berestovo, Ukraine.

Tsar Boris is buried at the Trinity-Sergiev Lavra outside of Moscow. See a picture of grave at the link below. http://www.artandarchitecture.org.uk/images/conway/4689d813.html

David

Offline Nadezhda Edvardovna

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2006, 09:46:00 AM »
In Greg King's book The Court of the Last Tsar, I saw photographs of the Grand Kremlin Palace.  Does it have another name? I didn't find any threads on it here.  Does anyone have photographs of it  that they will share?  What is the palace used for now?  Pax, Nadezhda

Offline pers

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Re: The Kremlin - general information
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2006, 02:56:36 PM »
A number of years ago, there was a whole section on the Imperial Private Apartments in the Architectural Digest . 

It would be interesting to see whether someone actually has the plans of the apartments.  I recall that they were located on the ground floor instead of the "bel etage".  I believe that it is strictly a museum.  The rooms were decorated for Nicholas I and his wife Alexandra Feodorovna and all the subsequent Emperors left the decoration just as it was, instead of changing it according to the latest fashions.