Author Topic: Other Romanov Crimean estates  (Read 96578 times)

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Offline Sarai

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Other Romanov Crimean estates
« on: March 23, 2004, 02:05:19 PM »
I would like to know if other Romanov Crimean estates survive to this day, such as G.D. Alexander Mikhailovich's Ai-Todor and G.D. Constantine Constantinovich's Oreanda. It would be great to have a list of all the Romanov Crimean estates, whom they belonged to, and which of those have survived.

In Prince Michael of Greece's book Nicholas and Alexandra: The Family Albums, there are also several photographs of a Crimean zoological park of sorts called Kozmodemiansk showing the Tsar and his children having fun there, hiding amongst the tall grasses, playing in the fountains and streams, etc. Makes me wonder whether this survives as well.

Offline Jane

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2004, 03:56:45 PM »
Hello Sarai,

Greg King and Penny Wilson devoted an issue of Atlantis Magazine to the Romanovs in the Crimea, including historical backgrounds of the palaces, and Perry and Pleshakov's "The Flight of the Romanovs" (briefly) refers to the fate of a number of the palaces.

From what I understand, GD Alexander Mikhailovich's palace at Ai Todor was destroyed during WWII.  GD Dmitri's "Kichkine" is used as a travel and conference center by the Ukrainian government (MOD).  GD Peter N.'s "Djulber" is still extant, and is currenly used as a sanitorium.  "Massandra" and "Livadia" are museums now, open to the public.  The Yusupovs' villa still stands (possibly a sanitorium? unsure).  As to the fate of villas like Chaeer and Harax, I am not sure.  Can anyone expand/clarify/correct or otherwise add to the list?  Is the Crimea still a strong resort destination?  By all accounts I have seen, it looks to be an incredibly beautiful region, although I am ashamed to admit I still often (erroneously) think of it being a place in Russia, rather than the Ukraine.

Regards,

Jane  

Offline BobAtchison

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2004, 04:13:15 PM »
Harax is still there, the seacliff-perched pavillion of Ai-Todor was still there (although in great danger of falling)...

Bob

Offline Jane

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2004, 05:28:30 PM »
Bob, can you refresh my memory--who built Harax?  Was it one of the "Nikolaivichi" grand dukes? Can you describe it for us?

I've seen photos of the little pavilion perched on the cliffs of Cape Ai-Todor.  I've read that it was used as a restaurant?  Can that possibly be true?  Also, surely that wasn't Sandro and Xenia's palace?  I thought that the main villa had been destroyed by the Nazis, but I might be wrong...

Jane

Offline BobAtchison

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2004, 06:24:17 PM »
Harax was built in 1907 for Grand Duke George and his wife Marie - it was designed by the architect Kranov - who later built the new Livadia palace for Nicholas and Alexandra.

Yes the pavillion at Ai Todor was a restaurant in Soviet times - I don't know what they are doing with it these days.

Bob

Mary Breheny

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2004, 08:41:30 PM »
When I visited the Crimea in 1976 I saw a charming little "castle" hovering on the side of a hill above the sea not too far from Livadia.  We were told that it was a restaurant, and that it was called "The Swallow's Nest."  Could this have been the Pavilion at Ai-Todor that you mention?  

M. Breheny

Janet Whitcomb

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2004, 09:13:31 PM »
Hi Mary--

No, I don't believe so. During my 1991 tour group visit, we also visited Swallow's Nest. It is charming, but as I understand it was built by a German industrialist around 1912.  Lots of legends around it . . . of course, the locale and design invites legends!  We just climbed up to Swallow's Nest, walked around it--don't do so if you have vertigo, the walled walkway is narrow!--but didn't go inside because it was filled with customers, and of course it was also very expensive. But that was the sum of the experience. If I return to Yalta I'll skip Swallow's Nest and spend more time at Livadia, Chekhov's home, and also Yalta itself. (I am sure OTMAA must have marveled at it, perched so high and so precariously, just as we continue to marvel at it today!)

By the way, I just received a letter from our tour guide, Vladimir, with whom I continue to correspond, and he told me university students have been setting up road blocks on the way to places like Swallow's Nest, then  charge a fee to unsuspecting tourists before they are allowed to pass.  Not to commend Communism, but I doubt this type of dubious entrepreneurship would have been allowed in Soviet Russia!

Offline Greg_King

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2004, 09:49:20 PM »
Details from memory-

The Crimean estates (Imperial):

1.  Livadia:
 A) The Old Palace (built by Ippolit Monighetti in 1862-66 for Alexander II, pulled down in 1909 to build Krasnov's White Palace for Nicholas and Alexandra)
 B)  The Maly Palace (built in 1866-68 by Monighetti for Tsesarevich Alexander Alexandrovich and his family, burned in WWII-the site is now a tennis court)
 C) The White Palace, built by Nicholas Krasnov for Nicholas and Alexandra 1910-1911, now a museum.

2.  Massandra, purchased by Alexander III, still standing-the Palace is now a museum.

3.  Orienda, built by Nicholas I as a gift for his wife Alexandra (designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel, adapted by Andrei Stackenschneider in 1852, burnt 1881.  The small wooden dacha used by the Konstantinovichii family is still there as are the ruins of the old palace)  Purchased for the Crown in 1894.

4.  Dulber (designed by Nicholas Krasnov for Grand Duke Peter Nikolaievich, now a resort)

5.  Tchair (designed by Krasnov for Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaievich), now a museum

6.  Kichkine (designed by Krasnov for Grand Duke Dimitri Konstantinovich, now a resort)

7.  Ai-Todor (built for Grand Duke Michael Nikolaievich, burned in WWII)

8.  Harax (built by Krasnov for Grand Duke George Mikhailovich, now a hospital)

The Yusupov Estates:

1.  Koreiz (now a resort)
2.  Kokoz (under restoration)
3.  Estate at Balaklava (don't recall name or fate)

Also, aside from a number of other estates like Alupka, don't forget the Emir of Bokhara's Palace in Yalta, by Krasnov, which is still standing and now a museum.

Greg King

Offline Janet_Ashton

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2004, 07:17:35 AM »
Quote
Bob, can you refresh my memory--who built Harax?  Was it one of the "Nikolaivichi" grand dukes? Can you describe it for us?

Jane


It looks like an English suburban villa of that era - rather arts-and-craftsy in design, and a bit out of place - but I like that style :-)

Janet

Offline BobAtchison

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2004, 10:27:41 AM »
More on Livadia:

At the end of the 18th century the estate was owned by Commander Colonel Reveliotti.  In 1834 it was sold to a Polish Magnate, Leo Potolsky who had the Architect Eshliman construct large buildings on the state and later a huge park including vineyards was put in by Delinger.  In 1861 the estate was bought by Alexander II and presented to his wife Maria Alexandrovna.  Livadia was a personal estate of the Empress and was passed down from her in the family.

Alexander II sent Monigetti to build a new big palace and a small palace which were under construction from 1862 to 1866.  At this time there were altogether 70 buildings on the estate.

In 1891 the estate was enlarged by Alexander II through the purchase of Oreanda.

On December 12, 1909 it was decided to demolish the old big palace. The cornerstone of the new building by Krasnov was laid on Alexandra's namesday - April 23, 1910.  The new palace was 'consecrated' on September 20, 1911.

Nicholas Petrovich Krasnov was born into a peasant family.  He became town architect of Yalta.  Besides Livadia he built Koriez, Dulber, Harax, Ai-Todor and Chaeer for thr Yussopovs and Romanovs.  He was born in 1864, emigrated from Livadia and the Crimea in May 1919 and died in Yugoslavia in 1939.  Here he is....


Bob

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by BobAtchison »

Janet Whitcomb

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2004, 12:10:40 PM »
Thank you for the wonderful photos, both of Harax and the architect of Livadia, as well as the information!  I have a book of memoirs--the author's name I do not presently remember--which makes frequent mention of Harax.  When I have the chance I will return to this section with the exact title and author.  The author socialized with the Romanovs, staying at Harax while in the Crimea. (She was not terribly fond of Alexandra but liked Nicholas very much.) At any rate, for anyone wanting to know more about Harax, this book might be of interest.

Offline Antonio_P.Caballer

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2004, 12:28:38 PM »
Hello Sarai,
That book could be "Not all vanity"?
The writer is Baroness Agnes de Stoeckle.

Offline Antonio_P.Caballer

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2004, 12:33:37 PM »
She was with the Grand Duchess George and met the Tsar in the Crimea many times.
I really like this book and her recollections and would recommend it to anyone. She fairly  described Grand Duchess Olga 16 birthday ball in Livadia...

Janet Whitcomb

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2004, 12:53:51 PM »
That's the one! It's sentimental and at times gossipy, and definitely has its own charm . . . certainly not academic, but of interest for anyone wanting to temporarily immerse themselves in those times.  The Baroness' voice comes through very well . . . very much like taking tea with the lady herself and listening to her many life experiences.

Offline Jane

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Re: Other Romanov Crimean estates
« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2004, 01:42:50 PM »
Thanks to all for the fascinating information reagrding the Crimean palaces!  :)  And special thanks to the FA for posting the picture of Harax--like Janet, I like the style, but Harax does look rather unusual (architecturally speaking) for nineteenth-century Russia.  From the picture, it could be Sussex, England.  I will try to track down the memoirs of the baroness; sounds like very interesting reading.  I simply love this site, I have learned so much here.

Jane