Author Topic: Maria Feodorovna after the war  (Read 34874 times)

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Offline kmerov

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #45 on: March 01, 2010, 05:30:49 PM »
You are welcome.

These images are labelled as MF's arrival in Denmark, 1919, but I think they are from a later arrival. I think you can see GDss Olga, Kulikovski and what could be their two sons in the first one, and therefore they are not from the year 1919. What do you think? My guess is that the pictures are from MF's arrival in 1923 after her visit to Queen Alexandra in England from 1922-1923.



Offline kmerov

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #46 on: March 01, 2010, 06:27:07 PM »
And in these pictures she is received by different people, and although they are blurry, you can see that Christian X's uniform jacket is shorter. These are from MF's arrival in 1919.



Offline Nicolá De Valerón

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #47 on: March 01, 2010, 06:41:52 PM »
Kmerov, very interesting last photos!

I hope you don't mind me asking, but haven't you got any more photos from this arrival to Denmark in 1919? If so, could you please post them or send me by PM? The reason is simple - I'm interested and re-exploring all the details of that period of Russian History, and this arrival of Marie Feodorovna from Crimea in 1919, then her life in Denmark is very important for me.
"I think that if Shakespeare lived in our times he would not be able to write. Many of his works are not welcome on stage nowadays: The Merchant of Venice – anti-Semitism, Othello – racism, The Taming of the Shrew – sexism, Romeo and Juliet - hideous heterosexual show..." - Vladimir Bukovsky.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #48 on: March 02, 2010, 03:21:11 AM »
In the first picture Christian X is wearing a greatcoat (unless it's a baggy and rather heavyweight frock coat - it's a bit confusing because Royal Navy greatcoats have rank insignia on the shoulders rather than the sleeves), in the third one posted a uniform jacket. Marie Feodorovna first arrived in Denmark in May 1919, so probably not in greatcoat weather.

Ann

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #49 on: March 02, 2010, 11:00:05 AM »
Thanks. I wonder if Christian X and Dagmar was ever close ? He looks like he is not a very agreeable man. I would have thought Dagmar would have been more welcome to Oslo with Haakon (Karl) & Maud.

Offline PAVLOV

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #50 on: March 02, 2010, 11:49:22 AM »
I dont think he was a very agreeable person. He was also very stingy. Although one must also not forget that she was not the easiest person either. She was a very demanding, and spoilt. She went from everything to nothing. It must have been huge adjustment for her.  Her own sister Alexandra could only take her in small chunks.
The Danish family were obliged to look after her. So between them I think it worked both ways. They had to put up with each other.
I could be wrong.

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #51 on: March 02, 2010, 12:08:42 PM »
I would have thought Dagmar would have been more welcome to Oslo with Haakon (Karl) & Maud.
I don't think the wife and mother of two "tyrants" (i.e. reactionary tsars) would have been very welcome as permanent settlers in the rather fragile new Norwegian monarchy, neither by the quite republican-minded people nor the cautious royal couple themselves.

That being said, MF had been a guest in Norway several times in the period 1905-1914, when her "Polar Star" would anchor next to Alexandra's "Victoria and Albert" in the Fjord of Oslo and they would visit Carl/Haakon and Maud at their summer residence, the seaside Royal Manor of Bygdø, often accompanied by Princess Victoria (Toria) and Grand Duke George.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 12:18:39 PM by Rœrik »

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #52 on: March 02, 2010, 12:58:15 PM »
I think Karl and Maud were closer to Marie (as noted she visited them in Norway before) than Christian X. It is doubly hard for them (Christian X & Marie) to forge arelationship when none was there in the first place. Yes I agree the Dowager Empress was not the easiest person to get along with, but so was Christian X's mother Queen Lovisa...

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #53 on: March 02, 2010, 01:01:18 PM »
I think Karl and Maud were closer to Marie (as noted she visited them in Norway before) than Christian X.
I see your point.

Instead of MF, the most famous Russian exilé in Norway became Trotsky, who lived here 1935-1937!
« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 01:13:35 PM by Rœrik »

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #54 on: March 02, 2010, 01:44:38 PM »
Thanks. I was thinking more along the lines of family affection.

Don't think MF will inviteTrotsky for tea at Havidore... ;)

Offline kmerov

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #55 on: March 02, 2010, 04:38:13 PM »
Kmerov, very interesting last photos!

I hope you don't mind me asking, but haven't you got any more photos from this arrival to Denmark in 1919? If so, could you please post them or send me by PM? The reason is simple - I'm interested and re-exploring all the details of that period of Russian History, and this arrival of Marie Feodorovna from Crimea in 1919, then her life in Denmark is very important for me.

No, I'm afraid that is the only one I have. But if I find some more pictures I will post them.
The ship that brought MF back to Denmark in 1919 was owned by a Danish company, who also supported her financially in her exile.

Offline kmerov

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #56 on: March 02, 2010, 04:54:38 PM »
In the first picture Christian X is wearing a greatcoat (unless it's a baggy and rather heavyweight frock coat - it's a bit confusing because Royal Navy greatcoats have rank insignia on the shoulders rather than the sleeves), in the third one posted a uniform jacket. Marie Feodorovna first arrived in Denmark in May 1919, so probably not in greatcoat weather.

Ann

Thanks for the info on the coat. MF arrived in Denmark in August 1919, but I assume that it wouldn't be greatcoat weather in August either.

« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 04:56:55 PM by kmerov »

Offline kmerov

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #57 on: March 02, 2010, 05:54:04 PM »
By the way, members of Marie Feodorovnas court in Denmark are buried in two sections of the Assistens Cemetery in Copenhagen, and it is worth a visit if you are ever nearby!

The cemeteries homepage. In Danish, but it has a portrait and a picture of MF's two Cossacks.
http://www.assistens.dk/forsk.htm


Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #58 on: March 02, 2010, 07:26:05 PM »
Thanks for the info. I would visit the next time I go to Copenhagen.

Offline Douglas

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Re: Maria Feodorovna after the war
« Reply #59 on: March 02, 2010, 08:04:30 PM »
Every time I read about the British royals trying to get their hands on Marie's  jewels,  I get a sick feeling in my stomach. I presume she realized that since her blood relations were not able or willing to fully fund her retirement, she had to convert her jewels into cash.  Possibly her consolation was the fact that they were retained within royal circles and didn't go to some American millionaire's wife. I guess she was being practical and didn't want her daughters feeling that they had to support their elderly mother.  

  I watched my own mother parcel out her jewelry collection and diamonds to her children before she passed away. It's sad but then one should be realistic.