Author Topic: Are that a old russian jar?  (Read 13501 times)

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2010, 10:37:55 AM »
The piece can not be from an Imperial Yacht. Each Imperial Yacht had its own "cypher" and this piece has none. Also, it does not match the know glassware from these yachts. Please see "An Imperial Fascination," which has photos of these yacht's glass and porcelain services. 

I am 99% certain this piece is NOT Imperial and the mark on the bottom was added later as a fake.

Constantinople

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2010, 11:47:03 PM »
I said that because the anchor on the base was put there after
Which glass manufacturers used an anchor in their work
How do explain the A lll?

aleksandr pavlovich

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2010, 06:02:02 AM »
Attention  "Constantinople"  :  The "anchor" is a simplistic hand-painted rendition of the Imperial Crown, and of course, "AIII"  represents the Emperor Alexander III, uniting to create the Imperial cypher/monogram.     Regards,  AP.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2010, 06:31:15 AM by aleksandr pavlovich »

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2010, 09:29:28 AM »
I said that because the anchor on the base was put there after
Which glass manufacturers used an anchor in their work
How do explain the A lll?

I explain the "A III" easily:  that someone deliberately PAINTED IT there later to fool people. It is a fake.

Constantinople

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2010, 10:16:39 AM »
You could be right
I would suggest contacting that woman who is an expert on glass ware and perhaps inviting her to contribute to Alexander Palace as a resident expert.  I am sure she would appreciiate the interest in  her field of expertise.

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2010, 10:25:33 AM »
The market is now flooded with fake and spurious "Imperial" pieces. Many are genuine 19th century pieces, of inferior quality, that have been later marked in some way as to imply "Imperial" provenance. For example, ebay has dozens of perfectly good 19th century cigarette cases from decent makers, that have had a cheap silver "Imperial" Eagle slapped on and a "faberge" stamp stamped over the REAL maker's mark, and many pieces of inferior porcelain that were unmarked German or French pieces, where an "Imperial" cypher is underglaze painted to suggest coming from the IPF...

99% of what is purporting to be "Imperial" in the market today is FAKE. Buyers MUST be careful.

Constantinople

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2010, 11:11:41 AM »
What is really alarming is going into a reputable antiques dealer and seeing fake Faberge (probably from Bulgaria or Roumania).  I have seen a lot of match boxes and small pieces where  you could tell that the metal work was inferior and the enamel work was third rate.  Ii have also seen and felt genuine Faberge and when you see the real thing, the difference becomes very apparent.
  I still suggest contacting that woman and some of her Russian colleagues to be able to add expert input.

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2012, 10:42:11 PM »
Attention Replies # 2 and 3:  There were TWO better-known "Coronation Cups."  The common one (sometimes called "The Cup of Sorrows"), to which I am sure you are referring, Fyodor Petrovich, is flat-enameled over METAL (NOT earthenware).  This is the one with the geometric "strap-work" in the style of this jug.  The EARTHENWARE variety was in monochrome colors over raised and molded bodies.  I believe that there are seven different (separate colors) of manufacture that have been identified for this earthenware cup. A lesser number of this kind of cup survived, and is not seen as frequently, because of breakage. I have examples of both kinds in my collection.  Best regards to you both.  AP

Speaking of those cups, have you seen one of these commemorative cloths printed for distribution to the crowds?

It's 28 inches x 25 inches, and it displays Tsar Nicholas II's initials, the year 1896, with the text "God Save the Tsar".

I think that they may have been used to wrap up the treats given to the common folk.

We acquired ours many years ago when we purchased a chalice from a Russian monastery. It came wrapped in this cloth, which they kindly gave to us too.

I believe that such cloths are rare. A photograph of ours was once used as an illustration in a book on the coronation.

(I'm trying to post this as a thumbnail. Hope it works!)

инок Николай

aleksandr pavlovich

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Re: Are that a old russian jar?
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2012, 06:20:47 AM »
Attention Replies # 2 and 3:  There were TWO better-known "Coronation Cups."  The common one (sometimes called "The Cup of Sorrows"), to which I am sure you are referring, Fyodor Petrovich, is flat-enameled over METAL (NOT earthenware).  This is the one with the geometric "strap-work" in the style of this jug.  The EARTHENWARE variety was in monochrome colors over raised and molded bodies.  I believe that there are seven different (separate colors) of manufacture that have been identified for this earthenware cup. A lesser number of this kind of cup survived, and is not seen as frequently, because of breakage. I have examples of both kinds in my collection.  Best regards to you both.  AP

Speaking of those cups, have you seen one of these commemorative cloths printed for distribution to the crowds?

It's 28 inches x 25 inches, and it displays Tsar Nicholas II's initials, the year 1896, with the text "God Save the Tsar".

I think that they may have been used to wrap up the treats given to the common folk.

We acquired ours many years ago when we purchased a chalice from a Russian monastery. It came wrapped in this cloth, which they kindly gave to us too.

I believe that such cloths are rare. A photograph of ours was once used as an illustration in a book on the coronation.

(I'm trying to post this as a thumbnail. Hope it works!)



   Yes, thank you, Father Nikolai, I have seen a few of these cloths.  They were used to wrap the contents/treats of the cups that were distributed. They are indeed more rare than the cups due to the nature of their comparative fragility of material.  If memory serves me correctly, there were a few different designs, but all (and I stand to be corrected) within the color scheme of red/white.  One was displayed in the great "Nicholas and Alexandra Exhibition" that toured in only four cities of the USA some years ago. I viewed the Exhibition twice in Wilmington, Delaware, USA. Though I do not have my copy of their rather heavy hardbound catalogue in front of me at this instant, I feel certain that it is shown in there.    Happy New Year, and thank you for the posting!   Kind Regards,  Aleksandr Pavlovich.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 06:37:03 AM by aleksandr pavlovich »