Author Topic: Anna Demidova (1878-1918)  (Read 34701 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline JamesAPrattIII

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 826
    • View Profile
Re: Anna Demidova (1878-1918)
« Reply #45 on: September 30, 2013, 04:15:01 PM »
What you all say above is true and it is not soley a Romanov problem. Magazine editors sometimes get the captions of photos mixed up. it happens today. Also even today book publishers do this and will also stick a non period photo on the cover and non period photos in the book without the writers knowledge or permission. you all might want to get together and find some wrongly captioned photos ect and post them some where on this site. There is also a magazine called After the battle which shows then and now locations and points out photos that have been miscaptioned, staged or faked. So you all might do an article for them "Tsar Nicholas II and family then and now"

Offline blessOTMA

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2524
  • Tell me the truth, monsieur
    • View Profile
    • Stay at Home Artist
Re: Anna Demidova (1878-1918)
« Reply #46 on: November 01, 2013, 11:35:09 PM »
Indeed to all the above...the Library of Congress has labeled the 1913 family group photo as 1914... So even places that should know better...don't

"Give my love to all who remember me."

  Olga Nikolaevna

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: Anna Demidova (1878-1918)
« Reply #47 on: November 02, 2013, 11:44:42 AM »
Indeed to all the above...the Library of Congress has labeled the 1913 family group photo as 1914... So even places that should know better...don't

Did you just use the words "congress" and "know better" in the same sentence Anne? :-)

I don't see anyone other than Alexandra standing in that previous photo. Along with Tatiana to the right, Anastasia to the left and I'm guessing Marie with her back turned. I think the hips give Marie away...the girl had hips!

As far as the girls seeming a little distant and not paying much attention to their mother, which I agree is unusual for them. I think beyond the fact that it's hard to ascertain much from a snapshot and random photo such as this, being in captivity probably changed the way they related to one another somewhat. Seeing even more of their mother than before probably made them act in a more casual manner around her. At the same time living in tighter quarters brought them closer both physically and emotionally to their retainers such Anna Demidova. The lines between servants and friends became non-existent and the lines between friends and family members were at the very least blurred.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline blessOTMA

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2524
  • Tell me the truth, monsieur
    • View Profile
    • Stay at Home Artist
Re: Anna Demidova (1878-1918)
« Reply #48 on: November 02, 2013, 01:35:04 PM »
Quote
author=edubs31 link=topic=433.msg529573#msg529573 date=1383410682]

Did you just use the words "congress" and "know better" in the same sentence Anne? :-)
  lol I knew you were going to say that.

I'm now thinking they were absorbed by  looking at something or trying to over the fence . Your point about the heft of the figure next to the older woman is well taken...and Olga was even thinner at this time. I believe that is Marie. If Alix wasn't with Alexi ,then Olga would be as well. Earlier I said I couldn't see Alix standing on that wall...yet she made  it up that ice hill to say goodbye to friendly guards...so it's not out side her ability...what I don't understand is no hat. It looks cold! Very likely also P.  Gilliard would not take a photo of Anna with the girls like this. If that was taken,  it seems it  would be more formally arranged  as we see other earlier ones with servants. I guess I'm coming down on the Alix side :)

 

"Give my love to all who remember me."

  Olga Nikolaevna