Author Topic: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson  (Read 146229 times)

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Alixz

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Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson, and the World's Greatest Royal Mystery," to be published January 2011
By Greg King and Penney Wilson

A lot of information about this book has been posted under the Anna Anderson threads in "Myths and Legends of Survivors"

I wanted to bring it here because it is going to be a very good book.

It is written by Greg King And Penney Wilson and has been well researched from original sources.

FA has read the manuscript and is recommending it.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2010, 07:52:15 AM by Alixz »

Alixz

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Quote from Greg King about the manuscript


But again...I'd just add that a lot of people still have questions, and I hope that we are able to address. I think (I could be wrong, but this is my perception) that those who still believe that AA was Anastasia are troubled by trying to reconcile the DNA evidence with what we all-everyone-has been led to believe is a mountain of positive evidence on the other side favoring her claim. That's why I can't be too hard on people-because they are assuming in good faith that the AA story passed down to history is so convincing. The most important thing I hope our book will do is to show that almost nothing was convincing and most of what has been said to be evidence in her favor crumbles on close examination. This is the difference between saying, "The DNA says she was FS" and "The DNA says she was FS, now how do you explain everything else in her favor?" The point is, there just isn't much to constitute "evidence" when one gets back to the original documentation and sources. But I understand some people being skeptical because, no matter what they have read on the case, most haven't had the benefit of starting at the beginning of the tale and seeing how thin the evidence in her favor was. I was shocked to find that almost everything I had believed to be true about the case-and evidence in her favor-was actually not correct or plagued with problems. Those discoveries then gave us a sound basis for answering our own outstanding questions-and I hope those of everyone else-so that in the end people can know that AA was Franziska not merely because the DNA says so, but also because of new information and details that help fill in how she managed to seem so convincing.

Offline Joyann1

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I really enjoyed: ''The Fate of the Romanovs '' and ''Gilded Prism''(both were written by the same authors).

When I heard about this book a few month's ago i got really excited, can't wait for it to hit the shelves.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2010, 07:52:44 AM by Alixz »

Offline Greg_King

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While we can't discuss too many specifics yet, we are happy to answer any questions that we can with this proviso

Offline stepan

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I wonder Greg if you had any interview with any member of the Schanzkowski family?   I have always wondered what they knew and what they believed. They have been very silent through the years. I think only Felix daughter has said something. And that was a long time ago now.

Offline Greg_King

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I think we can probably answer this. And the answer is that while we were in contact with members of the family about a decade ago there is nothing worthwhile they could add to the book-and because they are very reluctant to talk we did not pursue this angle. On the plus side, though, you will find in this book about 400 percent more about Franziska than has ever been known before-and a lot of this from her family and friends-siblings and her school chums-whose words and accounts have never appeared in print. In addition there are accounts by her family and many family letters that have not been published before. So hopefully that balances out the lack of any present day collateral relative-in fact none of the relatives have done any interviews with anyone except for Waltraut (Felix's daughter, and thus Franziska's niece, who uses the spelling Waltraut von Czenstkowski), and that only in 1994 for German film producer Maurice Philip Remy. All subsequent accounts that quote Waltraut-in Massie and in Klier and Mingay-derive from this single interview having been translated partially into English and printed in The Times in London in October 1994 in connection with the AA DNA test results.

Alixz

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Waltraut von Czenstkowski

The addition of 'von' to a name has, in the past, denoted royal heritage.  Is Waltraut claiming to be of royal descent?

I know that this is true in Germany and Austria, but I have not been able to find any information about Polish surnames that would show this to be true in the early 20th century.  Is this something that she has added herself or did you find any information that would show that this particular spelling of the last name was in use by the family when Franziska lived with them?

I have also read that the family did not live in Poland when Franziska was born, but in another part of Eastern Europe (which I can't remember now).

The spelling using the "Cz" is definitely Polish.  Czar being the Polish spelling of Tsar.  Just an interesting note, there is a family near where I live whose last name is Czarczasty.  I have always wanted to know what that translates to and if it is a claim to being a descendant of Russian Royalty, such as Alexander I's brother Grand Duke Constantine, who was governor general of Poland in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Similar to FitzRoy in England which would denote being the illegitimate son of a King of England in the 16th century.  Henry the 8th had at least one such son and named him Henry FitzRoy.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2010, 09:58:27 AM by Alixz »

Offline Greg_King

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With apologies for not getting too specific at this stage: the family, up to 1914 and onward, used Czenstkowski as the spelling of their name. Franziska changed this, attempting in 1915 to leave behind her eastern origins when living in Germany, and adopted Schanzkowsky. The family had been granted use of the honorific "von" a few hundred years earlier, but it was Franziska's father who finally abandoned it-clearly Waltraut wants it back.

FS was born in West Prussia, and raised in Pomerania. The places are now in modern Poland but at the time of her birth-and for hundreds of years before-had been entirely in German hands.

Offline Ilana

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Dear Greg,
I read few books about these things now... just can't anymore, but I really am looking forward to your book.  I am mostly looking forward to knowing WHY she got away with it as long as she did... why so many people were convinced...why she did it...and how, I think finally in the end, she believed it herself...!????

Anyhow, I'm sure we'll find out answers...

Ilana
So long and thanks for all the fish

Offline Greg_King

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Hi Ilana-hopefully it succeeds on these levels! It really is an attempt to address what we always believed to be true and found was not and at the same time answer any outstanding questions related to the claim

Constantinople

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I thought that von is an aristocratic but not a royal designation.  it is like the French de and means from, in Franz from Munich.  Cz a Polish combination as in Czartoryski.  I am not sure if Czar is originally a Polish form of Tsar but it is closer to the origin of the title, which was Cesar, as in the Roman title.

Constantinople

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Cesar=Caesar

Constantinople

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At what point did Gleb Botkin come iinto contact with Anna Anderson?  OPbviously someone who had intimate knowledge of GD Anastasia coached Anna Anderson well.  Was it Gleb?
  No matter how she was discredited and called a fraud,  Anna Anderson's life improved well beyond what a factory worker could hope for.

Constantinople

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The word Czar, which English speakers use to refer to the Russian emperors, entered the Russian language as Tsar, the Old Slavic version of Caesar: tsesari. The spelling Czar is a respelling of the Russian word with the letters of the Latin alphabet. The spelling with cz was common in European languages because that was how it was spelled the first time it appeared in a European book in 1549, but the French adopted the spelling tsar in the 19th century and the London Times prefers it. In German it is spelled Zar.

by the way, the German title Kaiser comes from the same and is actually the closest to latin pronounciation as there was no soft c in Latin pronunciation.

Offline Janet Ashton

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Cz a Polish combination as in Czartoryski.  I am not sure if Czar is originally a Polish form of Tsar

The Polish "Cz" is pronounced "Ch", and used to be more widely used in west Slavic countries - others, though, long ago replaced it with a C with hacek over it (e.g. the spelling Czech persists in English but looks like C<hacek>ech in Czech itself....). "Tsar" in Polish is "Car", with the C being pronounced as "ts". The "Czar" spelling is probably archaic German, inasmuch as the first written source which used it seems to have been by a German[Austrian]/Slovene writer in around the sixteenth century.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2010, 07:08:35 AM by Janet Ashton »
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you -
Ye are many; they are few.