Author Topic: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III  (Read 104771 times)

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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2010, 05:00:34 PM »
I think Alice was more close to Bertie because he was suffering more under their parents rule. Vicky was the favouite child and Bertie was the problem child. It is easy to see why Alice bonded with Bertie as she felt he needed more of her support. Vicky in the nursery days was quite the know-it-all. Later Alice was able to bond with Vicky on another level when both sisters married into German States. It was a credit to Alice that she was not able to inspire love & respect from even Willy (who adored the relaxed household in Darmastdt) but also from her German hating sister-in-law Alexandra who when heard about Alice's demise cried "I wish I had died instead of her."

Offline violetta

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2010, 05:10:10 PM »
this is exactly what i said in my yesterday post on alice-vicky-bertie relationship,eric !

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2010, 05:12:53 PM »
Yes. But Alice was his favourite sister and the only one who (with Alexandra) nursed him back to health through his near death sickness. The same cannot be said of Vicky.

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2010, 07:32:01 PM »
Wasn't Vicky prohibited from going to England by Wilhelm I? Her movements were much more circumscribed than Alice's. Wilhelm frequently prohobited travels to England or forbade her to take the children if she did go. It was published in letters between Victoria/Vicky in the books by Roger Fulford.
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Offline violetta

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2010, 07:39:33 PM »
Wasn't Vicky prohibited from going to England by Wilhelm I? Her movements were much more circumscribed than Alice's. Wilhelm frequently prohobited travels to England or forbade her to take the children if she did go. It was published in letters between Victoria/Vicky in the books by Roger Fulford.


I read about that in Uncommon Woman. Sometimes she was denied a possibility to go to her mother for 2 or even three years.

Offline wildone

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2010, 11:19:10 PM »
It was a credit to Alice that she was not able to inspire love & respect from even Willy (who adored the relaxed household in Darmastdt)

Where did you read that?

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2010, 11:14:38 AM »
I read it in John Rohl's biography of Wilhelm. He adored his aunt's more relaxed household.

Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2010, 03:10:15 PM »
Lovely illustration of Alice's family
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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2010, 10:19:20 AM »
This was of course based on a photo. The interesting thing is that it includes Alicky & May.  :)

Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2010, 03:03:29 PM »
Sure! It is a composited family portrait
Alice's deathbed :-(
Russia cannot be grasped with the mind, or measured in feet and inches, for she has a special character: In Russia one can only believe. ~Fyodor Tyutchev.

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #25 on: November 10, 2010, 10:58:22 AM »
Another illustration. I don't think there was a dead photo of Alice.

Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2010, 02:52:57 PM »
Of course, it's an illustration. I never said that it was a photo.
Baby Alice
Russia cannot be grasped with the mind, or measured in feet and inches, for she has a special character: In Russia one can only believe. ~Fyodor Tyutchev.

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2010, 03:58:18 PM »
I don't think she had one done (photo or drawing) more imaginary...

Offline violetta

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #28 on: November 12, 2010, 04:58:39 PM »
What I admire about Princess Alice was the fact that she was a patroness of numerous societies. In some cases she was far ahead of her time having taken care of the causes that few people even dared to speak of publicly. I`m sure her mother didn`t approve some of her activities because they were connected with human phisiology that the Queen detested so much. BUt Alice gently pursued her way disregarding (very probable? protests from QV.

1. She was a patroness of the asylum for blind people.

2. 21.11.1863 she wrote to QV
   
To-day I am going to visit the hospital in the
   town, which is said not to be good or well looked
   after. I want to be able to do something for it, and
   hope to succeed, for the people have plenty of
   money, only not the will. The Burgomaster and
   Gemeinderath [the Town Councillors] will meet me
   there.
   
   I have just called into life what did not exist
   that is, linen to be lent for the poor women in their
   confinements, and which I hope will be of use to
   those classes.
   


I can just imagine how detested QV must have been if one remembers how repulsed she was about pregnancies. And her own daughter was to go the dirty disgusting hospital where poor women were to give birth to their children.



Offline violetta

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Re: Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, Part III
« Reply #29 on: November 12, 2010, 05:17:35 PM »
Princess Christian i.e. Helena of Schleswig-Holstein about Alice`s activities:

But in spite of the many social duties and distractions in which the Princess took an active part, she never lost sight of more serious duties and pursuits. She became the " Pro-
tectress " of the " Heidenreich Institution for Lying- in Women," which was the beginning of the active interest afterward taken by her in all sanitary im-provements. This interest was heightened by the birth of her second daughter, who was born on the 1st of November, 1864, and christened on the 28th of that month, receiving the names of Elizabeth
Alexandra Louise Alice. The Princess was very proud of being able to nurse her child herself, and from this time she took up with the keenest interest
all questions relating to the physical, mental, and moral training of children. She found an able sup- porter and independent adviser in Dr. Weber, a very eminent medical man, resident at Darmstadt.
   


Princess Alice to QV, 05.03.1864 (


I will tell you of something I did the other day ; but please tell no one, because not a soul but Louis and my ladies know of it here. I am the patroness of the " Heidcnreich Stiftung," to which you also gave a handsome present in the beginning. The ladies who belong to it go to bring linen to poor respectable women in child-bed, who claim
their assistance. They bring them food, and, in short, help them. All cases are reported to me. The other day I went to one incognito, with Christa, in the old part of the town and the trouble we had to find the house ! At length, through a dirty court- yard, up a dark ladder into one little room, where lay in one bed the poor woman and her baby ; in the room four other children, the husband, two other beds, and a stove. But it did not smell bad. nor was it dirty. I sent Christa down with the children, then with the husband cooked something" for the woman ; arranged her bed a little, took her baby for her, bathed its eyes for they were so bad, poor little thing ! and did odds and ends for her. I went twice. The people did not know me, and were so nice, so good and touchingly attached to each other ; it did one's heart good to see such good feelings in poverty. The husband was out of work, the chil-
dren too young to go to school, and they had only four kreuzers in the house when she was confined. Think of that misery and discomfort !
If one never sees any poverty, arid always lives in that cold circle of Court people, one's good feel- ings dry up, and I felt the want of going about and doing the little good that is in my power. I am sure you will understand this.



Alice to QV 06.03.1865

I have read and studied a great deal about the human body ; about children their treatment, etc. It interests me immensely. Besides, it is always useful to know such things, so that one is not perfectly ignorant of the reasons why doctors wish one to do certain things, and why not. In any moment of illness, before there is time for a doctor to come, one can be able to help one's self a little. I know you don't like these things, and where one is surrounded
by such as dear Sir James [Clark] and Dr. Jenner, it is perfectly unnecessary and pleasanter not to know a good deal. Instead of findino- it disirustinor. it only fills me with admiration to see how wonderlully we are made.