Author Topic: "House" series  (Read 2949 times)

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Offline clockworkgirl21

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"House" series
« on: February 27, 2011, 09:23:22 PM »
Not really about the Romanovs, but very interesting for a history buff.

The premise of the show is that for several weeks, people volunteer to be told how to dress and act according to a time period. Some drama is invented sometimes for plot. It's really amusing to see people react to how life was, especially when the women have an initial meltdown because they don't have the freedoms the men do. It happens nearly every time.

Here is a list of Houses they've done:
Frontier House
The 1900 House
Manor House
Colonial House
The 1940s House
Regency House Party
Texas Ranch House

I really wish they'd continue the series with more Houses, locations, and time periods.

Offline RHB

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Re: "House" series
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2011, 09:30:49 PM »
I think I remember the 1900 house and maybe a bit of Frontier House... i think they showed it on PBS but not the others! I just found 1900 House on youtube!
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Offline TimM

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Re: "House" series
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2011, 04:37:07 PM »
When I saw this post, I thought was regarding the TV series about Dr. Gregory House, played by Hugh Laurie  ;D
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Offline amartin71718

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Re: "House" series
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2011, 04:48:26 PM »
Me too! I love that show!
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Alixz

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Re: "House" series
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2011, 01:20:42 PM »
Me too and I was wondering what it had to do with films about the Romanovs.

However, I do remember some of the 1900s house and how the women had the worst of it.  No electric appliances and no shampoo or conditioner.  No one had a shower and I think they still had to heat the water on the stove for a bath!

The clothing is also a great problem for everyone especially the women.  Ever tried to dress yourself in late 19th century clothing without help?

Just think about doing laundry without a washing machine!  And of course hanging clothes on the line was the only way to dry - no clothes dryers.

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: "House" series
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2011, 01:26:05 PM »
German TV did a great, more proletarian version some years ago called Schwarzwaldhaus, i.e. Black Forest House: Youtube: Schwarzwaldhaus. A modern family was to run a small Black Forest farm like it was 1902, i.e. back in the days of the Grand Duchy of Baden.

And of course hanging clothes on the line was the only way to dry - no clothes dryers.
I still do it that way, though on a rack.

(BTW one of the funniest things I've read about the US is that in some neighbourhoods there is a ban on hanging clothes out to dry because it gives the neighbourhood a "poor, lower-class image"!)
Makes me smile to think of those people in their Wisteria Lane-perfection watching the old "Lady and the Tramp" cartoon to catch a glimpse of a "slum" with backstreets full of clothes lines!
In my book this "eccentricity" is right up there along with "soccer moms" allegedly invading men's locker rooms to help their school-age sons change and/or fend off pedophiles! Only in America....)
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 01:52:20 PM by Фёдор Петрович »

Alixz

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Re: "House" series
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2011, 01:41:51 PM »
Up until about ten years ago, I still used a clothes line.  But in the Spring and Summer is it fine and leaves a beautiful fresh scent on the clothes.  However frozen towels in winter are not my cup of tea.

I remember my mother saying that she would hang out the clothes early in the morning and they would freeze immediately.  Then as the sun came round the clothes would thaw and hopefully dry enough to bring back indoors to finish up on the clothes rack.  If they didn't, she would have to hang them out again the next morning and hope for the best.

She also tells about hanging my baby clothes on a rack that she would set up over a heat "register" that older heating systems had right in the floor.  That way, because my clothes were smaller, they might actually dry on rainy or snowy days.

I still have that old clothes rack and I won't tell you how old it is.  That would give away my age and as old as I am, I am still not ready to put my age on the Internet for all to see.

Also, my mother used a washer that had separate spin rollers on the top of the machine.  When the clothes were washed, she would have to take them out of the machine and manually put them through the spin cycle by feeding the clothes into those rollers.  When she was a young, newly married girl, she accidentally caught her long hair in the rollers and had to have my father cut her hair because she couldn't reach the off button with her hair and head caught in the rollers.  They were dangerous things, but it was state of the art for their time.