Author Topic: Kerensky's Intentions on Moving the IF to Tobolsk  (Read 7746 times)

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Alixz

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Re: Kerensky's Intentions on Moving the IF to Tobolsk
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2011, 08:57:30 AM »
As much as I like to read about information from those who were actually there as Kerensky was, I have heard in the past that he was not adverse to making himself look good in retrospect.

I wonder if his "new" information in 1960 was an "adjusted" memory which made him look good to the new generations who were now more interested in the Romanovs.  Also remember that in 1960, Anna Anderson was in court and there were many who wanted to believe that she was actually Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna.

Perhaps it would have suited Kerensky to have any prospective "claimant" think that he truly tried to rescue her and her family is she was proven to be the "real thing"?

I am always so suspicious of things said or discovered "after the fact".  Its just me.

Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Kerensky's Intentions on Moving the IF to Tobolsk
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2011, 02:52:22 PM »
As much as I like to read about information from those who were actually there as Kerensky was, I have heard in the past that he was not adverse to making himself look good in retrospect.

I wonder if his "new" information in 1960 was an "adjusted" memory which made him look good to the new generations who were now more interested in the Romanovs.  Also remember that in 1960, Anna Anderson was in court and there were many who wanted to believe that she was actually Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna.

I am always so suspicious of things said or discovered "after the fact".  Its just me.

I would say 'suspicious' should be an understatement. It defies credulity that Kerensky would 'discover' or 'recover'  in the early 1960's a memory or understanding of an intended removal of the Romanovs to a Pacific port for a departure to Japan. You don't just forget or overlook something like that, especially if it's a scenario that would make you look more competent and politically aware than the one that  you chose that ended in tragedy for the Romanovs.

And think of the  above from a man who spent more than 40 years, the rest of his life after 1918, vainly and lamely trying to justify his failures of both will , and maybe even more so, political judgment. I don't think it's an overstatement to say that Kerensky made a decent career for himself, in the west and US particularly , selling himself as a stalwart,if ultimately unsuccessful , opponent of those mean Bolsheviks. Well, they were what they were fully known to be , and he was still clueless as to how much of a threat they were and how to defeat them.

I and others elsewhere have been sceptical of the removal of the Romanovs via Japan scenario, but to limit this post a little, I just want to repeat that Kerensky was the  chief architect of the Romanovs' removal, and therefore  could have explained or justified his rationale  at any time thereafter, and in a second career based on self-justification, apparently never did until the 1960's.
Rodney G.

Offline billmcl2

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Re: Kerensky's Intentions on Moving the IF to Tobolsk
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2011, 07:50:05 PM »
The K&W article is a fascinating and EXTREMELY detailed discussion of possible motives behind the removal of the IF to Tobolsk and makes clear that Kerensky DID have plans AT THAT TIME to help the Romanovs leave Russia. I chose 2 quotes from the article that particularly related to Holly's question. Here are a few more:

From the very beginning of his (Kerensky's) tenure in the Provisional Government, he had made it quite clear that he intended to send the Romanovs out of Russia, if not to England, then perhaps to another friendly country where they might live comfortably and securely.

We know, from Kerensky’s public statements, the written records of Government meetings, the memoirs of those imprisoned with the Imperial family at Tsarskoye Selo, and from Kerensky’s own books, that his main goal was to get the Romanovs safely out of the country. He had announced as much within the first week of the Revolution, and pressed hard to win them asylum in England.

When the Imperial Family left Tsarskoye Selo for Siberia, their train carried a placard reading “Japanese Red Cross Mission” and bore two Japanese flags. Such a train could pass through Siberia and on into Manchuria without any great risk.58 It is entirely possible that Kerensky intended to move the Imperial Family out of the country on this train, but that circumstances forced an end to the plan.

Cables flew back and forth between railway stations and local Soviets spread along the length of the Trans-Siberian, warning that while papers were reporting the transfer to Tobolsk, “rumor is rampant that the train is actually on its way to Novo-Nikolaievsk and to Harbin,” where the prisoners could presumably flee the country. These rumors, the Ekaterinburg Soviet noted in a cable of 5/18 August, 1917, were “provoking ferment” among the population in Siberia; they advised that cables had been sent to railway stations and Soviets further East, ordering that the train be stopped until the situation was clarified.64

Thus, before the train reached Tyumen -- the river port that served as a staging post for boat journeys to Tobolsk -- all of Russia knew of both Kerensky’s announced decision to send the prisoners to the latter town, and of the rumors that they were actually being sent out of the country. Soviets along the length of the Trans-Siberian had been warned to halt the train, and numerous local Bolshevik organizations sent angry cables demanding explanations and calling for action. Stopped twice by hostile railway workers, the train continued into the Urals with its precious cargo made known to all.

Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Kerensky's Intentions on Moving the IF to Tobolsk
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2011, 07:08:30 PM »
According to the book "The Russian revolution" Kerensky was paranoid that some generals/right-wingers were going to launch a coup and reenstate the monarchy. This may be the main reason he wanted the IF out of the way. this also led to the Kornilov affair later on that year. Kerensky also didn't do very much against Lenin and the Bolos who staged a revolt against him in July and ousted him in November. He thought "The revolution has no enemies on the left". According to the book "Young Stalin" Kerensky was using Cocaine and Morphia which probably affected his judgement which does not come out as very good to begin with.