Author Topic: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin  (Read 8865 times)

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Offline primrose

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2012, 11:21:26 PM »
I've just been checking the endnotes referencing Zanotti in Prelude and have discovered something very interesting.... according to Ronald Moe Zanotti did not go with the Imperial Family to Tobolsk and in the author's words,

 "(she) wrote an instant memoir using the nom de plume of Marfa Mouchanow. This memoir of her life with the Empress was written only months after the abdication and while The Imperial Family was still interned at Tobolsk, a period when there was little expectation that the family would be murdered."  (endnote #133, pg 71)

She very well could have slapped together those chapters after leaving AP and had a manuscript in her hand when she fled the country!
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 11:23:24 PM by primrose »
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Offline rudy3

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2012, 03:49:11 AM »
First part is true: she did not travel with the Imperial Family to Tobolsk, she followed them later by train. In a letter, dated January 8th 1918 the Empress writes, that Zanotti had been in Tobolsk already five weeks but had not been allowed to visit her.

However, I believe this discussion should be taken to the "My Empress by Marfa Mouchanow - who actually wrote it and why?" thread, isn't it?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2012, 03:54:48 AM by rudy3 »

Offline historyfan

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2012, 08:26:58 AM »
I've just been checking the endnotes referencing Zanotti in Prelude and have discovered something very interesting.... according to Ronald Moe Zanotti did not go with the Imperial Family to Tobolsk and in the author's words,

 "(she) wrote an instant memoir using the nom de plume of Marfa Mouchanow. This memoir of her life with the Empress was written only months after the abdication and while The Imperial Family was still interned at Tobolsk, a period when there was little expectation that the family would be murdered."  (endnote #133, pg 71)

She very well could have slapped together those chapters after leaving AP and had a manuscript in her hand when she fled the country!

But the question still remains...what was his source?

Offline Richard_Cullen

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2012, 09:00:40 AM »
Well I took possession of my copy of the book and I must admit turned straight to the chapters about the murder and must express my disappointment that Moe chose not to refer in detail to Zharov's work or my forensic analysis.  I can accept that he maybe wrote his text before my book was published but the chapters around the murder are a disappointing mish mash of fiction and half facts.  Disappointing really as my forensic analysis, far more detailed than that which was eventually published in book form was on the AP web-site for many, many months.  But I look forward to reading the rest of the book

Richard
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Who treads alone
Some banquet-hall deserted,
Whose lights are fled,
Whose garlands dead,
And all, but he, departed!
Refrain:
Thus, in the stilly night,
Ere slumberís chain hath bound me,
Sad memíry brings the light
Of other days around me.

Thomas Moore 1815

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2012, 09:11:43 AM »
I've just been checking the endnotes referencing Zanotti in Prelude and have discovered something very interesting.... according to Ronald Moe Zanotti did not go with the Imperial Family to Tobolsk and in the author's words,

 "(she) wrote an instant memoir using the nom de plume of Marfa Mouchanow. This memoir of her life with the Empress was written only months after the abdication and while The Imperial Family was still interned at Tobolsk, a period when there was little expectation that the family would be murdered."  (endnote #133, pg 71)

She very well could have slapped together those chapters after leaving AP and had a manuscript in her hand when she fled the country!

This is the problem regarding Moe's attribution to Zanotti. Zanotti DID go later to Tobolsk and stayed there. The time window for Zanotti to have even written the book was small, and the fact that it almost immediately appeared in England, while Zanotti was in Tobolsk makes it virtually impossible to ascribe Zanotti as "Marfa".

I have sent an inquiry on this issue to one of Dr. Moe's colleagues and close friends, Dr. Idris Traylor, who might know why he made the attribution.

This has become a huge puzzle for me, as Dr. Moe was always considered a scholar of the highest calibre.

Offline historyfan

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2012, 09:26:29 AM »
Is the rest of Mr Moe's book well-sourced?

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2012, 09:51:26 AM »
Yes, the majority of the book is exceptionally well sourced and noted. Which makes the Zanotti unsourced attribution maddening!

Offline historyfan

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2012, 10:53:18 AM »
Yes, the majority of the book is exceptionally well sourced and noted. Which makes the Zanotti unsourced attribution maddening!

That makes me wonder if it was, in fact, Mr Moe himself who made the attribution, or someone else! I suppose I should just read the book, but it seems kind of jarring to talk about Marfa Mouchanow in the first place. It seems that most of his other sources are firsthand accounts from people who were there, definitively, not some obscure "memoir" authored by a pen name. And then the lack of sources attributed to it...it all just seems to go against the grain. But why on Earth would someone else just stick something like that in a book where it would stick out like a sore thumb?

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Re: Prelude To The Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2012, 01:38:07 PM »
Good question.