Author Topic: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?  (Read 19391 times)

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Offline blessOTMA

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2011, 10:14:28 AM »
Thank you Sarah...you are vastly more organized than myself. That has a nice portrait of Olga and "Dear Well"  ( Dr.Botkin) sitting together along with Trina ...and I wonder if the farther most officer on the right is Paul? At least one person is moving to help AN...but the rest of her victems seem to be enjoying the moment when the joke is squarely on the tiny terror lol !

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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2011, 10:23:59 AM »
...and I wonder if the farther most officer on the right is Paul?

Yes, that's Voronov.
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Offline Sunny

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2011, 12:05:18 PM »
If i were AN, once on my fett again i'd punch those silly sister who didn't help me... LOL
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Offline blessOTMA

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2011, 12:17:53 PM »
If i were AN, once on my fett again i'd punch those silly sister who didn't help me... LOL
She's at TN's feet and TN isn't moving a muscle LOL ! Anastasia being so little , they could always best her physically. But she found  another way to compete ..... her humor and her fearlessness.

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Offline Olga Bernice

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2011, 06:59:59 PM »
If i were AN, once on my fett again i'd punch those silly sister who didn't help me... LOL

I don't know . . . perhaps play a prank on Tatiana. Hmm - anybody see a snake around?  ;)
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Offline historyfan

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2011, 08:36:23 PM »
If i were AN, once on my fett again i'd punch those silly sister who didn't help me... LOL

I don't know . . . perhaps play a prank on Tatiana. Hmm - anybody see a snake around?  ;)

Didn't TN take a snowball in the face courtesy of AN at some point?  "Revenge is a dish best served cold" - in more ways than one - perhaps?  ; )  Pure speculation on my part!  LOL

That photo is adorable.  : )

Offline Olga Bernice

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2011, 09:23:10 PM »
Oh yeah, historyfan, I ahd forgotton that! Hmm . . . maybe I don't blame Tatiana for not helping her!  ;)
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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #22 on: September 04, 2011, 09:17:26 AM »
According to pg 121 of Resurrection of the Romanovs, "...that summer of 1925, the claimant [Anna Anderson] casually mentioned the word 'Schwibes,' a variant of 'Schwibzik,' the nickname bestowed on Anastasia by her aunt Olga Alexandrovna."

King and Wilson list their source for this information as Anastasia: The Survivor of Ekaterinburg, by Harriet von Rathlef-Keilmann.

I don't own a copy of Rathlef-Keilmann's book, so I can't cross-check the reference.
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Offline Lady Macduff

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2013, 10:53:42 PM »
I'm not so sure about the "tipsy" reference being born when that photo was taken. If Sarushka's right (and I think she is) "shvybzik" originated with Olga A, and she isn't there. I suppose she could have heard about it, or been outside the frame of the picture. More likely, I think, in reference to another char falling incident.

Slightly off topic, but I always thought the nickname came from Nicholas. Interesting there are no written instances of his using it.
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Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2015, 12:16:39 PM »
FYI:

Paul Gilbert’s Royal Russia, Vol. 8, p. 130, has the following footnote to the article by Irene Galaktionova on the Imperial family’s pets:

“Shvybzik (also shvybzdik, shibzdik) — a colloquial Russian word used to humorously describe a puny man or a small child. First recorded in the 19th century in some of the North Western Russian peasant dialects, the word became very popular in the urban Russian culture of the early 20th century.”

***********

I am not contradicting the above information or questioning the fact, but I would like to hear from other native Russians on this etymology.

Dahl's four-volume dictionary does not have such an entry, nor could I find a cross-reference on line.

Anyone?
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Offline Превед

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2015, 03:30:39 PM »
I would also be interested in hearing an (unlikely) North Russian dialect etymology. I think the following is more likely, etymology-wise:

- From German beschwipst, tipsy.
- From Danish vips or German Wips, exclamation in connection with a swift movement. (Same etymology as English wipe, swipe and sweep, I suppose.)
- From Danish svippe, to stretch out, scuttle back or forth or take a short trip.
- From Danish (get) svip, get mad (in both senses of the word), loose one's mind / temper.

See http://ordnet.dk/ddo_en?set_language=en

Danish and Norwegian are very close and most of these words and meanings also exist in Norwegian, although not in all Norwegian dialects. There was some contact between Norwegian and North Russian dialects in the Arctic. (Resulting in the pidgin Russenorsk.)

« Last Edit: November 02, 2015, 03:32:14 PM by Превед »
Берёзы севера мне милы,—
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: «Ивы и берёзы», 1843 / 1856)

Offline Превед

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Re: Shvybzik: Where did it come from?
« Reply #26 on: November 03, 2015, 08:10:40 AM »
Or what about an etymology from the brand name Schweppes and their carbonated, sparkling (tonic) water, to denote Anastasia's bubbly, sparkling personality? The company is old (founded by a Hessian in the 18th century) and was purveyor to the British court as early as the 1830s and might therefore have been well-known to Queen Victoria's large kin.

That would explain the /sh/ sound, though not the /i/ instead of /e/, based on the common English pronunciation.
Берёзы севера мне милы,—
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: «Ивы и берёзы», 1843 / 1856)