Author Topic: Fashions of the British Royals  (Read 10715 times)

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Offline grandduchessella

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Fashions of the British Royals
« on: December 07, 2012, 10:23:36 PM »
We had gotten off on a discussion on the Worth thread but it would probably be better discussed here. I'm going to start off with Elizabeth II but we can have any British royals from any time period. :)

Dress of Elizabeth II by Norman Hartnell C.1959



Sketch by Hardy Amies: Pink dress with fine blue and yellow stripes and matching neckerchief; pink coat with orange lining and matching hat.



From Pinterest: Orange silk chiffon evening gown worn by Queen Elizabeth II, designed by Norman Hartnell, English, 1970. In 1970 The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh undertook a five week tour to Australia. The Queen wore this evening gown of orange silk chiffon with bead and sequin embroidery by Norman Hartnell for a dinner at Government House in Sydney.



From Pinterest: Norman Hartnell, 1967



"This ensemble was worn during the tour of Canada for a State dinner at Rideau Hall, Ottawa, 30 June 1967.  Norman Hartnell designed the white silk crêpe bodice and bright blue silk skirt for the 1967 tour of Canada.  Once more paying homage to her host country, the bodice is edged with maple leaves and berries created from crystal beads, silver bugle beads, sequins, diamanté and blue beads. By the 1970s a Hartnell trained designer called Ian Thomas began to encourage a more youthful less formal more modern approach into styles offered to the Queen.  It was Ian Thomas who encouraged her to choose less structured styles and move forward in fashion whilst retaining her sense of the clothes fulfilling a function of helping her be seen, whilst also complimenting the event." (fashion-era.com)
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 11:32:01 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2012, 10:27:31 PM »
The coronation gown with  tudor rose, thistle, leek, shamrock, protea, maple leaf, wattle flower, fern & the Lotus flower of India-all deeply embroidered on the gown-symbols of Elizabeth's empire.

 

"The first coronation dress design was for a very simply styled gown similar to that worn by Queen Victoria at her Coronation.  The only decoration on the white satin was a Greek key design which formed an embroidered border on the hem and bodice. The second design was a modern slim-fitting sheath gown, embroidered in gold and trimmed with black and white ermine tails at the hemline.  The Queen rejected this as too form fitting. The third was a crinoline style coronation dress of white satin, silver tissue and crusty silver lace, the whole shimmering with crystals and diamante. The fourth was white satin embroidered with Madonna and arum lilies and encrusted with pendant pearls. The fifth introduced colour and although the Queen was dubious about the design of violets, roses and wheat, she liked the departure from the traditional all white gown with just the addition of gold or silver. The Queen very much approved of the sixth design which was the first of the emblematic Ideas. Spreading branches of oak leaves with acorns, were embroidered in gold, silver and copper bullion thread on a white satin background. The seventh introduced the Tudor Rose of England, appliquéd in gold tissue and softly padded amidst looped fringes of golden crystals against white satin.

Finally, the eighth design was a variation of the seventh, but incorporating all the floral emblems of Great Britain.  It pleased the Queen, but the fact that it was embroidered in silver and crystal caused her to remark that it closely resembled her wedding dress.  Queen Victoria wore all white at her Coronation, but she was only eighteen and unmarried, whereas the Queen would be a twenty seven year old mother of two at her Coronation.  The Queen thought the latter design would be ideal if Hartnell could introduce some colour.  In a short time the necessary tints were applied and the coronation dress design was approved.

Then Prince Philip made the observation that his wife was Queen of the Commonwealth as well as Great Britain, so Hartnell was asked to draw up a ninth design which included the Dominion emblems. Hartnell juggled with the eleven emblems until he arrived at a satisfactory arrangement within the design. Hartnell also checked them with the Garter King of Anno and was horrified to discover that the emblem for Wales was not a daffodil, but a dull vegetable, the leek. The Garter flatly refused to allow the use of the daffodil.  Hartnell finally 'borrowed' the leek on the cap of the Welsh Guards and his embroideresses interpreted it into an attractive motif using fine silks and diamante.  The leek became a source of inspiration and most of the other emblems were interpreted in the same way.  With the completed emblem samples, Hartnell travelled to Sandringham where he showed the Queen his ninth design.

For England there was a Tudor Rose, embroidered in palest pink silk, pearls, gold and silver bullion and rose diamante.

The Wales the Welsh Leek, embroidered in white silk with leaves of palest green silk, was enhanced with diamante.

For Scotland the Thistle was worked in pale mauve silk and amethysts. The calyx was embroidered in reseda green silk, silver thread and diamante dewdrops.

The Irish emblem, the Shamrock, was embroidered in soft green silk, silver thread, bullion and diamante.

For Canada, the Maple Leaf was worked in green silk embroideries, veined in crystal and bordered with gold bullion.

The Australian Wattle flower, was, after countless attempts, successfully achieved with fuzzy mimosa yellow wool and green and gold foliage.

The Fern of New Zealand was embroidered in straight stitches using soft green silk and veined in silver and crystal.

The South African Protea was embroidered in shaded pink silk, each petal bordered with silver thread. The leaves of shaded green silk were embellished with rose diamante.

The Lotus flower of India was worked in seed pearls and diamante, and mother of pearl embroidered petals, whilst the Lotus flower of Ceylon was of opals, mother of pearl, diamante and soft green silk.

Pakistan's three emblems are Wheat, Cotton and Jute. The Wheat was in oat-shaped diamante and fronds of golden crystal. The Jute was embroidered as a spray of leaves in green silk and golden thread. Finally, the Cotton blossom was worked in silver with leaves of green silk.

The Queen liked the interpretation of each emblem and asked only that the green of the Shamrock be subdued.

Once Hartnell had the Queen's approval, work commenced on the white satin which had been obtained from Lady Hart Dyke's silk farm at Lullington Castle. Six embroideresses worked in utmost secrecy and all involved on the project were closely surveilled until Coronation day.

By Christmas the Coronation dress, constructed by three girls, was ready for its first fitting. Madame Isabelle, who was in charge of the construction of the dress, had experienced some difficulties in getting the weighty bejewelled skirt to fall correctly. On its wooden model the skirt of the dress swung to one side. She solved the problem by backing the silk fabric with cream taffeta throughout and reinforced it with three layers of horsehair. The additional support not only solved the problem, but also gave the skirt a certain stability which dispersed the weight of -the beading over the whole of the bell-shape, making it as light as air to wear.

[dress information courtesy of fashion-era.com]

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2012, 10:31:08 PM »
Her dress for Margaret's wedding

They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2012, 10:41:00 PM »


From Pinterest:



Satin evening gown worn by Queen Elizabeth II, designed by Norman Hartnell, English, 1956. In January and February 1956 The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh paid a three-week visit to Nigeria. On 2 February The Queen addressed the House of Representatives in Lagos. Norman Hartnell designed this magnificent duchesse satin gown with a full crinoline skirt for the occasion. The sleeveless bodice is heavily encrusted with embroidery of pearls, sequins and looped bugle beads

 

Evening gown worn by Queen Elizabeth II, designed by Norman Hartnell, English, 1953-54. The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh paid their first visit to New Zealand in 1953-4, during the first Commonwealth tour. This elegant evening dress of gold lamé is overlaid with cream-coloured lace, re-embroidered in gold thread. It was worn by The Queen for an investiture in Wellington. It was designed by Norman Hartnell, who prepared the majority of the dresses for this first Commonwealth tour.

Not for the Queen but designed by Norman Hartnell--I would've loved to see EII wear this. :)

« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 10:50:48 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2012, 11:17:09 PM »


This beautiful dress was designed by British couturier Norman Hartnell for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Her Majesty wore the gown on October 14, 1957 to a state banquet and reception at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, the official residence of the Governor General. Known as the “Maple Leaf of Canada dress,” it features a garland of green velvet maple leaves and white roses. The Canadian symbol of the maple leaf emphasizes Her Majesty’s role as Queen of Canada.



Evening dress worn during the visit to Barbados, 1985. Bright yellow organza, embroidered with iridescent white and yellow sequins in imitation of rain drops. Designed by Ian Thomas.



by Norman Hartnell



Gown Worn by Queen Elizabeth II Visiting Ethiopia Norman Hartnell, 1965
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 11:29:41 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2012, 11:25:04 PM »






'The Flowers of the Fields of France' closeup: "Lavish gold and white beadwork encrusts this ivory evening dress worn by Queen Elizabeth II on a state visit to Paris in 1957. The dazzling, jewel-like details of the embroidered design include miniature bees, grasses, wheat and wild flowers. These motifs are worked in relief in faceted glass, gold beads, brilliants and variously shaped pearls, mother-of-pearl and gold petals. It also features an extravagant back bow. The design of this single-occasion gown diplomatically refers to French motifs, including the flowers of France and large gold bees, the emblem of Napoleon. It was intended to both compliment the French nation and draw attention to the Queen." (from Victoria and Albert Museum description)
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Offline RoyalWatcher

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2012, 11:29:01 AM »
Her gowns were to die for. They were so beautiful and looked stunning on her. The detail and bead work were amazing. And, to think, she probably only wore each one just once.

Offline historylover

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2012, 02:23:27 AM »
I agree with you, Graf.  I especially like the white and blue gown that she wore in Canada.

Thank you to Prince Phillip for including the emblems of the Dominions on the Coronation Gown!

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2012, 02:27:51 AM »
Her gowns were to die for. They were so beautiful and looked stunning on her. The detail and bead work were amazing. And, to think, she probably only wore each one just once.

I agree that some of the dresses were beautiful.  I cannot agree that the Queen always looked beautiful in them - the designs were often overloaded and fussy, given that she always has been a small woman, and did not make the most of her good points (slim waist and good figure, up to her 50s at least), while frequently emphasising her bad points (heavy bust).  (I've ranted about this elsewhere - so apologies to those who have read my views and are probably rolling their eyes).


Offline Lindelle

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Re: Fashions of the British Royals
« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2014, 09:59:41 PM »
Where have all the beautiful pictures gone?