Author Topic: Stupel  (Read 6475 times)

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Offline Lady Macduff

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Stupel
« on: July 20, 2013, 07:43:53 PM »
I've just come across a letter from Maria to Anastasia in Steinberg and Khrustalev's The Fall of the Romanovs. It's from when OTAA were getting ready to leave Tobolsk. Maria mentions that she hopes Stupel will help them pack. The footnote indicates that he worked in a court cloakroom and was with the family in Tobolsk. This is the first I've heard of him, and no first name is given. Can anyone shed some light on this?
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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2013, 10:04:30 PM »
I don't think any more is known about Stupel. He does not appear in Vernye, a book about the IF's servants in captivity, nor in the index of my Russian edition of N&A's 1917-18 diaries. The only mention I've been able to find is in Kobylinsky's 1919 deposition, but again only his surname is given -- no further information.
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Offline Tsarfan

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2013, 12:30:38 PM »
Stupel, a valet, was one of the 45 retainers who accompanied the Romanovs into exile in Tobolsk.

Stupel is listed in the 2009 petition to the Procurator General of the Russian Federation for rehabilitation of all 45 retainers.  However, the deposition given by Colonel Kobylinski listed Stupel as one of the nine servants the family had to discharge in Tobolsk after state funding of the prisoners was reduced.  Consequently, he would not still have been employed at the time the remainder of the family would have been packing to leave Tobolsk.

Perhaps Marie either was not aware that Stupel had been let go, or she had forgotten.  With 45 servants on hand and a valet typically serving only male members of the entourage, perhaps Marie did not have much contact with Stupel and had known his name and role but not much else about his comings and goings.


Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2013, 09:39:35 AM »
Stupel, a valet, was one of the 45 retainers who accompanied the Romanovs into exile in Tobolsk.

Stupel is listed in the 2009 petition to the Procurator General of the Russian Federation for rehabilitation of all 45 retainers.  However, the deposition given by Colonel Kobylinski listed Stupel as one of the nine servants the family had to discharge in Tobolsk after state funding of the prisoners was reduced.  Consequently, he would not still have been employed at the time the remainder of the family would have been packing to leave Tobolsk.

Perhaps Marie either was not aware that Stupel had been let go, or she had forgotten.  With 45 servants on hand and a valet typically serving only male members of the entourage, perhaps Marie did not have much contact with Stupel and had known his name and role but not much else about his comings and goings.

It's true that not much more is known about him than what you people have all noted above.

In her letters to M. F. Zanotti, Empress Alexandra does mention having to let him go, due to lack of funds.
However, the Imperial Family did give those servants a couple of months severance pay (from the Family's own funds) to support them until the ice broke and river navigation opened in the spring -- thus allowing them to leave town and return to Petrograd, etc.

So Stupel and the others were still in Tobolsk.

As for the letter from Steinberg's book (p. 300), we have a photocopy of it from GARF, and the attributions in the book are wrong. It was Empress Alexandra who wrote "I hope that Stupel will help with the packing" -- so maybe he was still around in some capacity, or could still be called upon to come assist the Children to leave. Obviously the Empress would know that he had been let go, since she herself had written about it earlier.

Princess Eugenie's book has a letter from Tobolsk to Ekaterinburg (May 1/14, 1918), in which G. D. Tatiana writes: "We haven't heard anything about Stup., and probably won't". That would seem to be in response to the Empress' earlier comment to them.

Pr. Eugenie's translator and she did not see the initial letter as a capital "S", so she put "stoup" in the French edition.

Of course, we have not seen the original Russian of that letter to be certain, but most likely it was Stupel whom G. D. Tatiana was referring to.

For some reason, in our records we have him listed as "Y. Stupel" (as in "Yakov" or "Yuri"), but I have no recollection why or where we would have found that initial. It may be simply a typo.

So, stay tuned...
I. N.
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Offline Tsarfan

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2013, 12:53:21 PM »
So Stupel and the others were still in Tobolsk . . . .   G. D. Tatiana writes: "We haven't heard anything about Stup., and probably won't".

You seem to have access to some very comprehensive sources.  Thanks for enlightening us further on this.

It does seem, however, that Stupel might have been gone from Tobolsk by the time the children were packing to leave, based on Tatiana's response to her mother.


Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2013, 04:15:05 PM »
So Stupel and the others were still in Tobolsk . . . .   G. D. Tatiana writes: "We haven't heard anything about Stup., and probably won't".

You seem to have access to some very comprehensive sources.  Thanks for enlightening us further on this.

It does seem, however, that Stupel might have been gone from Tobolsk by the time the children were packing to leave, based on Tatiana's response to her mother.

Yes, he may have been gone by then. The Tsar, Empress and G. D. Maria had been hurried away by horse over horrible roads and thawing ice, etc. By the time the others were preparing to leave, river navigation had already opened up, so, in the interim, Stupel might have already left town.
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Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2013, 11:01:23 AM »
Another piece to the puzzle:

While looking for something else, I happened upon this passage in Tsar Nicholas II's diary entry for March 21, 1918:

"In the evening, three of our people whom we had dismissed a month ago came to bid us farewell before leaving for home."
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Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2013, 04:35:18 PM »
Another piece to the puzzle:

While looking for something else, I happened upon this passage in Tsar Nicholas II's diary entry for March 21, 1918:

"In the evening, three of our people whom we had dismissed a month ago came to bid us farewell before leaving for home."


Well, that's intriguing. It means that at least some of those dismissed were  able to leave Tobolsk well before Nicholas , Alexandra and Marie were taken away, in spite of river navigation being a hindrance. But the diary entry really doesn't help one way or the other regarding Stupel's presence or absence. It's  also disappointing that he doesn't seem to have established much of an  identity at the Governor's House, or at least not enough to be remembered and mentioned by name.
Rodney G.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2013, 07:36:14 AM »
Rodney

I think in March, with everything still frozen hard, transport by sledge would not be difficult, provided the necessary sledges were available (perhaps this took a month to organise). Mid-April, when Nicholas, Alexandra and Marie left Tobolsk, was the worst possible time for travelling, because the thaw was in progress (making land travel horrible), but the river was not yet open.

Ann

Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2013, 03:05:47 PM »
Good points, Ann. If he could manage a horse, we also know that men in large numbers were coming and going in and out of Tobolsk during this period. Most were soldiers but travel by horse would at least be a possibility .
Rodney G.

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2013, 12:08:56 PM »
Just a few more minor details on this man:

1) I found a note in my files from an archivist at GARF, in which she gave his first-name initial as "Я." = "Y" as in Yakov or Yuri, so that is where that clue came from.

2) Both times when the Empress wrote his surname, in German to M. F. Zanotti, and in Russian to the Grand Duchesses, she spelled it with two "p"s = Stuppel.

3) A parishioner of ours in Germany checked the German phone directories, and in all of Germany she found only 8 listings:

Three "Stuppel"s (i.e., double pp) -- all in the Rhein-Neckar region

Five "Stupel"s (i.e., one p) -- three in Berlin, one in Munich, and one in Leipzig

I realize that it's not much, but at least a few more pieces to the puzzle...
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Offline Antonina

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2013, 11:26:05 PM »
1) I found a note in my files from an archivist at GARF, in which she gave his first-name initial as "Я." = "Y" as in Yakov or Yuri, so that is where that clue came from.

Not Yuri - it begins with Ю. Yakov, Yan, Yaroslav or something rare. "Memorial" knows two men (or is it the same person?) named Yakov Stupel. Unlikely it is him, but... http://lists.memo.ru/d31/f330.htm
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Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2013, 10:57:30 AM »
1) I found a note in my files from an archivist at GARF, in which she gave his first-name initial as "Я." = "Y" as in Yakov or Yuri, so that is where that clue came from.

Not Yuri - it begins with Ю. Yakov, Yan, Yaroslav or something rare. "Memorial" knows two men (or is it the same person?) named Yakov Stupel. Unlikely it is him, but... http://lists.memo.ru/d31/f330.htm

Yes, of course, not Yuri, my mistake.

Thanks for the link, but doesn't seem to be our man.

We'll have to keep looking...
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Offline Lady Macduff

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2013, 10:02:16 PM »
As of now it's as if Stupel materialized in Tobolsk, like Leonka Sednev. Has anyone ever come across any record of him before the family was exiled?
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Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Stupel
« Reply #14 on: August 10, 2013, 10:37:59 AM »
As of now it's as if Stupel materialized in Tobolsk, like Leonka Sednev. Has anyone ever come across any record of him before the family was exiled?

Well, a little earlier than that.

He appears as No. 35 on the official list of the 45 people who chose to accompany the Imperial family from Tsarkoe Selo to Tobolsk.
So, apparently, he was already a wardrobe attendant at the Alexander Palace before that time.
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