Author Topic: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos  (Read 129050 times)

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Offline AlexM.

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #105 on: September 28, 2005, 08:23:56 AM »
Please, anyone know more details about relations between crown prince Alexander and his mother queen Alexandra or his grandmother princess Aspasia Manos?
specialy for the years 1960-1970......

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #106 on: September 28, 2005, 07:22:51 PM »
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Please, anyone know more details about relations between crown prince Alexander and his mother queen Alexandra or his grandmother princess Aspasia Manos?
specialy for the years 1960-1970......


What kind of information are you seeking? If you have some specific questions, Crown Prince Alexander is reachable. However, I wouldn't want to ask him such a general question. He would have been 15 years old in 1960 and 25 in 1970 - and was mostly in the UK during this period.

Offline TampaBay

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #107 on: September 29, 2005, 10:15:18 AM »
Lisa,

Was CP Alexander estranged from his mother or just seperated due to her illness?

YampaBay
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Offline AlexM.

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #108 on: September 29, 2005, 11:18:16 AM »
From the book
FOR THE KING’S LOVE
The intimate Recollections of Queen Alexandra of Yugoslavia

A short part from the Chapter 1 (Mougey and Pougey):


Nannie Jackson, a comfortable jolly Yorkshire woman who had come to Italy to look after me, gave my curly brown hair a final brushing. “The princess can go in to see Her Royal Highness now” she told the maid waiting to take me to my mother.
It was a lovely, pearl-tinted morning in Florence, and the new day’s sunshine was streaming blithely into bedrooms of our small villa. I scampered off, calling “Mougey! Mougey!” my pet name for my mother – and hearing her answering call “Pougey! Pougey!”- her pet name for me- as I rushed towards her room.
As always, a funny delicious little feeling squiggled through me, the feeling of pure happiness that a small girl of five can get from knowing she is loved and secure, that in a moment she is going to be kissed and cuddled by her mummie who is, surely, the most wonderful person in the world.
I rushed into charming bedroom. My mother was sitting at her dressing table before open windows. Her back hair, falling to her waist, gleamed sometimes dark gold and sometimes raven blue as the sun glanced on its silkiness, while she brushed it with a gold and silver brush. I flung myself at her and she gathered me up. I thought she was the most beautiful lady I had never seen, and I wanted to be with her for always.
Presently she set me down in order to continue her toilette. One of the earliest lessons I had to learn was that I could not be with Mougey and sit on her lap all day. I was an over emotional and highly strung little girl, an I had  to realize  that I must be  a good child and  stay with Nannie, because Mougey was often very busy. But this morning I had a  big question to ask. “Why have I got a new Nannie?” “Because Nannie Foster  became homesick for Greece and wanted  to go back there” said Mougey.
I sensed the longing in her voice. “But she’s English and that’s our home” I cried. “Why don’t we go back with her?” “ Because Pougey, we  are exiles” said my mother slowly. I pondered the word “exile”. What did that mean? That was English  word too? I should have understood  it, for  all the five years of my life I had  spoken in English  to my Nannie, to Mougey, and Amama  my German grandmother, Queen Sophia of Greece, who was a sister of Kaiser.
“What’s an exile Mougey?” I persisted. “And why are we exiles?” I hesitated over this new, strange word. My mother put down her hair brush, and turned to look at me. She had big shining brown eyes which could flash anger, even fury when her tempestuous nature was roused, but now, this lovely morning, they were soft and nearly tear-misted.
“Exile Pougey, is a very difficult word for a little girl to understand” she told me gently. “It means we can’t go back to Greece for a little while because they would rather not have a King there now, and while  the King is away from home, so is the family”.
“Well, I’ m going  to tell Amama that I want Uncle Georgie (King George II of the Hellenes) to go back so that we can all  go with him” I said  triumphantly. “ Amama always makes everything  right”.
Me mother, who  had a great affection  for her mother-in-low Queen Sophie, smiled then. “Yes, Pougey,  you tell Amama” she agreed. “Amama will explain.” But neither  my grandmother  nor my mother  attempted  to explain, then,  the intricacies and tragic  uncertainties which governed both their exile and their loved homeland.
Only in fragments  gleaned from listening to the grown-ups’ conversation, and later, when I had to study the history of my country, did I begin  to know, and to realize in part, why we could not  go home and why I had always  been regarded, and accepted  with much  understanding, as a “highly-strung” little girl.  It was  because my father’s  tragic death, which shocked the world,  occurred when  my mother  was only in  the beginning of her  pregnancy. Alone, she  did not care to live, or to see the child  she had borne.
“ I wanted us both to die, Pougey” she told me once  “for without  your father it seemed the world  held no home for either of us”.
So my birth, which should  have marked the start of the “living happily-ever-after” to my mother and father’s story, instead began  for my mother a lonely and unceasing struggle to bring up the daughter of a dead King. The romance of my parents is, to me,  a profoundly moving love story. And because  it has  made mother a woman of infinite wisdom and  understanding towards me, in all my sorrows  and all my happiness, I would like  to tell it to you now .........…………………".

For the members of Alexander's Palace

Offline Marc

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #109 on: September 29, 2005, 06:32:59 PM »
Thank you very much for this!Could you tell me more about her book ''For a King's love''?I can't find it anywhere...P.S.Alex,where are you from?

Offline Iskenderbey

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #110 on: September 30, 2005, 11:23:54 AM »
I don't know if I've mentioned this before, but about two years ago, a Mr. Alexandros Zaoussis wrote an excellent book, published in Greece, on the love affair and subsequent marriage between King Alexander and Aspasia Manos, from their courtship, marriage, to the death of the King, all within the context of the political situation in Greece at the time.
It was fairly done and not biased at all, and was very historically accurate (at least in my opinion).

Regards

Offline Marc

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #111 on: September 30, 2005, 02:23:22 PM »
Can you tell us also the name of the book?And how can we purshase it?Thanks

Offline Marc

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #112 on: September 30, 2005, 02:24:06 PM »
Correctin:purchase it?Thanks

Offline Marlene

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #113 on: October 05, 2005, 02:13:47 PM »
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Thank you very much for this!Could you tell me more about her book ''For a King's love''?I can't find it anywhere...P.S.Alex,where are you from?



You might try out of print book sites such as www.addall.com as the book was published in the 50s -- rather embellished - and ghost written.
Author of Queen Victoria's Descendants,
& publisher of Royal Book News.
Visit my blog, Royal Musings  http://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/

Offline Marlene

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #114 on: October 06, 2005, 09:19:51 AM »
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Lisa,

Was CP Alexander estranged from his mother or just seperated due to her illness?

YampaBay


The Crown Prince was largely raised by his maternal grandmother ...
Author of Queen Victoria's Descendants,
& publisher of Royal Book News.
Visit my blog, Royal Musings  http://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/

Offline Marc

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #115 on: October 06, 2005, 01:52:20 PM »
What impresions he has about his grandmother Aspasia?

Offline Marc

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #116 on: October 07, 2005, 01:30:39 PM »

Offline Marc

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #117 on: October 07, 2005, 01:32:26 PM »
Princess Alexandra with her husban King Peter II and son Crown Prince Alexander...

Offline AlexM.

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #118 on: October 16, 2005, 05:19:12 PM »
From the book FOR THE KING’S LOVE
The intimate Recollections of Queen Alexandra of Yugoslavia
A short part from the Chapter 1 (Mougey and Pougey):

…… I suppose one could say it really began in the early nineteenth century, in the great war of Greek Independence, a famous and powerful family, the Phanariotes, settled in Athens. They could trace their direct descent from the Greek Byzantine Emperors, and were linked with the noblest family of Venetia and Greece. Those were my mother ancestors, always tremendous and true patriots of Greece, and staunch supporters of the monarchy wish was established in 1863, when Prince William George of Schleswing-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksburg-Beck, the younger son of King Christian of Denmark, became King George I of the Hellenes. His sister was Queen Alexandra of England.  Half a century later, in 1913, on the eve of the First World War, this King George I was assassinated at Salonika and was succeeded by his son, King Constantine, whose wife, Queen Sophie, was the sister of the German Kaiser.
A favourite equerry to King Constantine was Colonel Manos, my mother’s father. He had sent my mother Aspasia, to France and Switzerland to be educated. Now, with all Europe seething towards war, he brought her home to Athens. The attractive fifteen- years old Aspasia Manos, already showing signs of the lovely, vivid beauty and vital character which was to win her the heart of a King soon became a favourite at the Greek Court.
The two younger sons of the King, Prince Alexander, nineteen, and Prince Paul, fifteen, were her constant companions. Two years later Alexander and Aspasia knew themselves to be in love. Joyfully they sought King Constantine’s permission for their marriage. He and Queen Sophie were not opposed to it. My mother, thought a commoner, came from one of the noblest of the Greek aristocratic families, and King Constantine approved his second son’s engagement to her. But he would not fix a date
For their wedding, for in 1915, he was a sorely troubled man.
With Britain and Germany at war Greece was in a position of great strategic importance. The Western Allies, knowing Constantine was married to the Kaiser’s sister, held that both he, and his eldest son Crown Prince George, would incline to German, rather than French and British sympathies. So, in June, 1917, they demanded his abdication, and that of the Crown Prince.
My mother has so often told me of that ill-fated June morning. At dawn she had been out riding in the forests with her fiancé and his sister, Princess Helen of Greece, who later married King Carol of Rumania. Gaily the three young people cantered back to the Palace and ran indoors, ready for their breakfast. They had been out since 6 a.m. and now it was nine.
In the square hall of Palace they met King Constantine. Prince Alexander made his father a slight bow, and smiling asked: “How are the things to-day, Papa?” Constantine looked gravely at his son. “They are as bad as they can be” he answered. “YOU are King”
The Western Allies had demanded that Alexander, the second son, should succeed his father, who, with the Crown Prince, was banished. My mother now was engaged to the King: and she, Princess Helen, and the new King all ran upstairs to Helen’s sitting room and wept. They were young for such responsibility, young and a little afraid.
That day all Alexander’s family left. Before they went exiled king Constantine summoned him and Aspasia. “Alexander is King only in my place” he told them. “the war cannot last long and I shall return. Until that day I wish both to give me your word that you will not marry. Any issue of such marriage would complicate and endanger the line of succession in these distressing circumstances” Solemnly the young people pledged themselves to wait until the King’s return.
Then the new king Alexander was left alone. His entire family went to Switzerland. He was bereft of friends, family and counsellors; left to occupy a throne which seemed already to be tottering, and to “rule” beside the all-powerful Prime Minister, Eleftherios Venizelos, whose dominant personality and great experience would have dwarfed, if not extinguished a man much older and more tried than he.
My mother too was almost alone; with the exception of her mother all her family left with the exiled King. Together the young engaged couple turned to each other for solace, and for each other guidance. And often it was my mother who had to be stronger and more resolute of the two.
How their love, their faith and their loyalty captured the true friendship of that turbulent statesman, Venizelos, is now part of my country history: but the ordeal of that love and loyalty was only completely known to two people, my mother ad father. So much in love, so far from everyone they knew, isolated in their own land, they clung to each other, and longed to marry.
Now that Alexander was the lawful King, there was nothing, except their promise to the exiled King Constantine, to prevent marriage. Yet through all the weary months of war they kept that promise. “Perhaps it is a good thing that we cannot know the future, Sandra” my mother said to me wistfully. We always believed we would have a good and full life together for so many years after the war, your father and I. He used to tell me again and again, “I shall spend all my life looking after you, but it will take longer than life can give me to thank you for all you mean to me. I could not have managed this alone, and I could not live without you.’ Life did not give him very long, and I have had to try to live without him”
At last came the Armistice. But still King Constantine did not return. Greece was now in a state of unrest. Some wanted the exiled King to return, some wanted his son Alexander, the new King, to remain on throne, while others wanted no monarchy, but a republic. In 1919, Prime Minister Venizelos announced that the nation would go to the poll. The people would now decide in any event, which King, and which form of government they would have, and his released King Alexander and Aspasia Manos from their promise. After three and a half years engagement, they married, on 4 November, 1919.
It was a very simple ceremony, purposely quiet so that the marriage could not be said to influence the forthcoming elections.
But my Father still was King. Now he and Aspasia saw even less of each other, for, as the King’s wife, she must go to various parts of her husband’s land, visiting the hospitals still full of war-wounded men, the rest shelters and the voluntary organizations; and meanwhile my Father toured the stricken areas of his country.
In the summer of 1920, happier than they had ever been, they went together to their summer Palace of Tatoi, my Father trying practically to wrap my mother in cotton-wool. She was going to have a baby……
Continue

For the members of Alexander’s Palace


Offline Grand Duke

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Re: King Alexander I & Aspasia Manos
« Reply #119 on: October 23, 2005, 06:06:45 PM »

King Alexander I

I'm THE GRAND DUKE of LIPTON-upon-AVON ! Please to meet you. I'm glad you know my name!